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Showing 51 through 75 of 41,841 results

Youth, Sexuality and Sexual Citizenship (Sexuality, Culture and Health)

by Peter Aggleton Mary Lou Rasmussen Daniel Marshall Rob Cover Deana Leahy

Sexual citizenship is a powerful concept associated with debates about recognition and exclusion, agency, respect and accountability. For young people in general and for gender and sexually diverse youth in particular, these debates are entangled with broader imaginings of social transitions: from ‘child’ to ‘adult’and from ‘unreasonable subject’ to one ‘who can consent’. This international and interdisciplinary collection identifies and locates struggles for recognition and inclusion in particular contexts and at particular moments in time, recognising that sexual and gender diverse young people are neither entirely vulnerable nor self-reliant. Focusing on the numerous domains in which debates about youth, sexuality and citizenship are enacted and contested, Youth, Sexuality and Sexual Citizenship explores young people’s experiences in diverse but linked settings: in the family, at school and in college, in employment, in social media and through engagement with health services. Bookended by reflections from Jeffrey Weeks and and Susan Talburt, the book’s empirically grounded chapters also engage with the key debates outlined in it's scholarly introduction. This innovative book is of interest to students and scholars of gender and sexuality, health and sex education, and youth studies, from a range of disciplinary and professional backgrounds, including sociology, education, nursing, social work and youth work.

Youth Rising?: The Politics of Youth in the Global Economy (Critical Youth Studies)

by Stuart Tannock Mayssoun Sukarieh

Over the last decade, "youth" has become increasingly central to policy, development, media and public debates and conflicts across the world – whether as an ideological symbol, social category or political actor. Set against a backdrop of contemporary political economy, Youth Rising? seeks to understand exactly how and why youth has become such a popular and productive social category and concept. The book provocatively argues that the rise and spread of global neoliberalism has not only led youth to become more politically and symbolically salient, but also to expand to encompass a growing range of ages and individuals of different class, race, ethnic, national and religious backgrounds. Employing both theoretical and historical analysis, authors Mayssoun Sukarieh and Stuart Tannock trace the development of youth within the context of capitalism, where it has long functioned as a category for social control. The book’s chapters critically analyze the growing fears of mass youth unemployment and a "lost generation" that spread around the world in the wake of the global financial crisis. They question as well the relentless focus on youth in the reporting and discussion of recent global protests and uprisings. By helping develop a better understanding of such phenomena and critically and reflexively investigating the very category and identity of youth, Youth Rising? offers a fresh and sobering challenge to the field of youth studies and to widespread claims about the relationship between youth and social change.

Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change: Youth Resistance Research And Theories Of Change (Critical Youth Studies)

by Eve Tuck K. Wayne Yang

Youth resistance has become a pressing global phenomenon, to which many educators and researchers have looked for inspiration and/or with chagrin. Although the topic of much discussion and debate, it remains dramatically under-theorized, particularly in terms of theories of change. Resistance has been a prominent concern of educational research for several decades, yet understandings of youth resistance frequently lack complexity, often seize upon convenient examples to confirm entrenched ideas about social change, and overly regulate what "counts" as progress. As this comprehensive volume illustrates, understanding and researching youth resistance requires much more than a one-dimensional theory. Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change provides readers with new ways to see and engage youth resistance to educational injustices. This volume features interviews with prominent theorists, including Signithia Fordham, James C. Scott, Michelle Fine, Robin D.G. Kelley, Gerald Vizenor, and Pedro Noguera, reflecting on their own work in light of contemporary uprisings, neoliberal crises, and the impact of new technologies globally. Chapters presenting new studies in youth resistance exemplify approaches which move beyond calcified theories of resistance. Essays on needed interventions to youth resistance research provide guidance for further study. As a whole, this rich volume challenges current thinking on resistance, and extends new trajectories for research, collaboration, and justice.

Youth Practices in Digital Arts and New Media: Learning in Formal and Informal Settings

by Joanna Black Juan Carlos Castro Ching-Chiu Lin

The authors examine youths' practices in digital culture affecting social change, pedagogy, and creative learning practices. Knowledge about these practices is discussed, in which learning, knowledge sharing, distinct social contexts, pedagogical relationships, and artistic creative inquiry are examined in diverse formal and informal environments.

Youth Media Matters: Participatory Cultures and Literacies in Education

by Korina M. Jocson

In an information age of youth social movements, Youth Media Matters examines how young people are using new media technologies to tell stories about themselves and their social worlds. They do so through joint efforts in a range of educational settings and media environments, including high school classrooms, youth media organizations, and social media sites. Korina M. Jocson draws on various theories to show how educators can harness the power of youth media to provide new opportunities for meaningful learning and “do-it-together production.” Describing the impact that youth media can have on the broader culture, Jocson demonstrates how it supports expansive literacy practices and promotes civic engagement, particularly among historically marginalized youth.In Youth Media Matters, Jocson offers a connective analysis of content area classrooms, career and technical education, literary and media arts organizations, community television stations, and colleges and universities. She provides examples of youth media work—including videos, television broadcasts, websites, and blogs—produced in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, New York, and St. Louis. At a time when educators are increasingly attentive to participatory cultures yet constrained by top-down pedagogical requirements, Jocson highlights the knowledge production and transformative potential of youth media with import both in and out of the classroom.

Youth Literature for Peace Education

by Candice C. Carter Linda Pickett

Carter and Pickett explore how educators and families can teach peace education through youth literature and literacy development. Showing how to assess, choose, and make use of literature that can be used to teach both literacy and peace education, they walk through individual methods: recognizing and teaching different portrayals of conflict in youth literature, analyzing characterization, and examining the role of illustrations. Educators who want to incorporate peace education within a broader, literacy-focused curriculum, and peace educators looking for age-appropriate materials and methodologies will find Youth Literature for Peace Education a rich and interdisciplinary resource.

Youth Learning On Their Own Terms: Creative Practices and Classroom Teaching

by Leif Gustavson

Youth Learning On Their Own Terms convincingly shows how developing a respect and understanding of the youth-initiated creative practices that occur outside schools can offer educators the opportunity to directly influence their teaching in schools by making classroom spaces personally meaningful and rigorous for both students and teachers.

Youth, Inequality and Social Change in the Global South (Perspectives on Children and Young People #6)

by Hernan Cuervo Ana Miranda

This book gathers international and interdisciplinary work on youth studies from the Global South, exploring issues such as continuity and change in youth transitions from education to work; contemporary debates on the impact of mobility, marginalization and violence on young lives; how digital technologies shape youth experiences; and how different institutions, cultures and structures generate a diversity of experiences of what it means to be young. The book is divided into four broad thematic sections: (a) Education, work and social structure; (b) Identity and belonging; (c) Place, mobilities and marginalization; and (d) Power, social conflict and new forms of political participation of youth.

Youth in Education: The necessity of valuing ethnocultural diversity (Routledge Research in Educational Equality and Diversity)

by Christiane Timmerman Sara Mels Luc Braeckmans Noel Clycq Marie Mc Andrew Alhassane Balde

Youth in Education explores the multiple, interrelated social contexts that young people inhabit and navigate, and how educational institutions cope with increasing ethnic, cultural and ideological diversity. Schools, families and communities represent important settings in which young people must make successful transitions to adulthood, and the classroom often becomes a battleground in which these contexts and values interact. With contributions from the UK, Belgium, Germany and Canada, the chapters in this book explore rich examples from Europe and North America to suggest strategies that can help to counter negative perceptions, processes of stigmatization and disengagement, instead prioritising peer support and cooperative learning to give pupils a renewed sense of worth. This book takes the growing ethno-cultural diversity in education systems to heart and studies the various related educational processes from a multidisciplinary and multi-method approach. It aims to offer more insight into underlying mechanisms that are often implicit, but can be important factors that positively or negatively influence educational trajectories and outcomes. It is essential reading for researchers, academics and postgraduate students in the fields of education, sociology, higher education, policy and politics, and social and cultural geography.

Youth in Contemporary India

by Parul Bansal

This book endeavors to be a study of identity in Indian urban youth. It is concerned with understanding the psychological themes of conformity, rebellion, individuation, relatedness, initiative and ideological values which pervade youths' search for identity within the Indian cultural milieu, specifically the Indian family. In its essence, the book attempts to explore how in contemporary India the emerging sense of individuality in youth is seeking its own balance of relationality with parental figures and cohesion with social order. The research questions are addressed to two groups of young men and women in the age group of 20-29 years-Youth in Corporate sector and Youth in Non Profit sector. Methodologically, the study is a psychoanalytically informed, process oriented, context sensitive work that proceeds via narrations, conversations and in-depth life stories of young men and women. Overall, the text reflects on the nature of inter-generational continuity and shifts in India.

Youth Identities, Localities, and Visual Material Culture

by Kristen Ali Eglinton

This invaluable addition to Springer's Explorations of Educational Purpose series is a revelatory ethnographic account of the visual material culture of contemporary youths in North America. The author's detailed study follows apparently dissimilar groups (black and Latino/a in a New York City after-school club, and white and Indigenous in a small Canadian community) as they inflect their nascent identities with a sophisticated sense of visual material culture in today's globalized world. It provides detailed proof of how much ethnography can add to what we know about young people's development, in addition to its potential as a model to explore new and significant avenues in pedagogy. Supported by a wealth of ethnographic evidence, the analysis tracks its subjects' responses to strikingly diverse material ranging from autobiographical accounts by rap artists to the built environment. It shows how young people from the world's cultural epicenter, just like their counterparts in the sub-Arctic, construct racial, geographic and gender identities in ways that are subtly responsive to what they see around them, blending localized characteristics with more widely shared visual references that are now universally accessible through the Web. The work makes a persuasive case that youthful engagement with visual material culture is a relational and productive activity that is simultaneously local and global, at once constrained and enhanced by geography, and possesses a potent and life-affirming authenticity. Densely interwoven with young people's perspectives, the author's account sets out an innovative and interdisciplinary conceptual framework affording fresh insights into how today's youth assimilate what they perceive to be significant. Supported by a wealth of ethnographic evidence, the analysis tracks its subjects' responses to strikingly diverse material ranging from autobiographical accounts by rap artists to the built environment. It shows how young people from the world's cultural epicenter, just like their counterparts in the sub-Arctic, construct racial, geographic and gender identities in ways that are subtly responsive to what they see around them, blending localized characteristics with more widely shared visual references that are now universally accessible through the Web. The work makes a persuasive case that youthful engagement with visual material culture is a relational and productive activity that is simultaneously local and global, at once constrained and enhanced by geography, and possesses a potent and life-affirming authenticity. Densely interwoven with young people's perspectives, the author's account sets out an innovative and interdisciplinary conceptual framework affording fresh insights into how today's youth assimilate what they perceive to be significant. Supported by a wealth of ethnographic evidence, the analysis tracks its subjects' responses to strikingly diverse material ranging from autobiographical accounts by rap artists to the built environment. It shows how young people from the world's cultural epicenter, just like their counterparts in the sub-Arctic, construct racial, geographic and gender identities in ways that are subtly responsive to what they see around them, blending localized characteristics with more widely shared visual references that are now universally accessible through the Web. The work makes a persuasive case that youthful engagement with visual material culture is a relational and productive activity that is simultaneously local and global, at once constrained and enhanced by geography, and possesses a potent and life-affirming authenticity. Densely interwoven with young people's perspectives, the author's account sets out an innovative and interdisciplinary conceptual framework affording fresh insights into how today's youth assimilate what they perceive to be significant.

Youth Identities, Education and Employment

by Kate Hoskins

This book investigates how policy, family background, social class, gender and ethnicity influence young people's post-16 and post-18 employment and education access. It draws on existing literature, alongside new data gathered from a case study in a UK state secondary school, to examine how policy changes to the financial arrangements for further and higher education and the changing youth employment landscape have had an impact on young people's choices and pathways. Hoskins explores a number of topics, including the role of identity in young people's decision-making; the impact of changes to young people's financial arrangements, such as cuts to the Education Maintenance Allowance and increased university fees; and the influence of support from parents and teachers. The book will be of interest to students and researchers of Education and Sociology.

Youth Guidance Technician: Passbooks Study Guide (Career Examination Series #C-920)

by National Learning Corporation

The Youth Guidance Technician Passbook® prepares you for your test by allowing you to take practice exams in the subjects you need to study. It provides hundreds of questions and answers in the areas that will likely be covered on your upcoming exam.

Youth Group Worker Aide: Passbooks Study Guide (Career Examination Series)

by National Learning Corporation

The Youth Group Worker Aide Passbook® prepares you for your test by allowing you to take practice exams in the subjects you need to study. It provides hundreds of questions and answers in the areas that will likely be covered on your upcoming exam.

The Youth Experience Gap

by Francesco Pastore

"The education to work transition of young people is key to a successful work-life and to fight youth unemployment. The book provides an impressive outline of the facts and convincing insights of the potential causes. This offers a large and broader audience help to adjust properly to achieve a better life. " Klaus F. Zimmermann, IZA, Bonn, Germany This work points to the youth experience gap as a key concept to explain the meager employment opportunities and earnings many young people face. The transition from education to work remains a long dark tunnel around the world. However, this book shows that there are striking differences between countries: in Germany, the young people of today are no worse off than their adult counterparts, while in Southern European and Eastern European countries they fare 3 through 4 times worse. The current economic and financial crisis has further exacerbated the situation for young people in many advanced economies. Observers are divided as to the optimal design of youth employment policy. Liberalists believe that the market itself should address youth disadvantages. More flexible labor markets should also guarantee greater labor turnover, including temporary work, so as to allow young people to move from one job to the next until they accumulate the work experience they need to become more employable and find the right career. In contrast, other economists oppose approaches focusing on entry flexibility and temporary work, claiming that the former type helps only the most skilled and motivated target groups, while the latter only allows young people to gather generic, not job-specific work experience.

Youth Culture, Language Endangerment and Linguistic Survivance

by Leisy Thornton Wyman

Detailing a decade of life and language use in a remote Alaskan Yup'ik community, Youth Culture, Language Endangerment and Linguistic Survivance provides rare insight into young people's language brokering and Indigenous people's contemporary linguistic ecologies. This book examines how two consecutive groups of youth in a Yup'ik village negotiated eroding heritage language learning resources, changing language ideologies, and gendered subsistence practices while transforming community language use over time. Wyman shows how villagers used specific Yup'ik forms, genres, and discourse practices to foster learning in and out of school, underscoring the stakes of language endangerment. At the same time, by demonstrating how the youth and adults in the study used multiple languages, literacies and translanguaging to sustain a unique subarctic way of life, Wyman illuminates Indigenous peoples' wide-ranging forms of linguistic survivance in an interconnected world.

Youth, Critical Literacies, and Civic Engagement: Arts, Media, and Literacy in the Lives of Adolescents

by Theresa Rogers Mia Perry Kari-Lynn Winters Anne-Marie LaMonde

Through stories of youth using their many voices in and out of school to explore and express their ideas about the world, this book brings to the forefront the reality of lived literacy experiences of adolescents in today’s culture in which literacy practices reflect important cultural messages about the interplay of local and global civic engagement. The focus is on three areas of youth civic engagement and cultural critique: homelessness, violence, and performing adolescence. The authors explore how youth appropriate the arts, media, and literacy as resources and how this enables them to express their identities and engage in social and cultural engagement and critique. The book describes how the youth in the various projects represented entered the public sphere; the claims they made; the ways readers might think about pedagogical engagements, practice, and goals as forms of civic engagement; and implications for critical and arts and media-based literacy pedagogies in schools that forward democratic citizenship in a time when we are losing sight of issues of equity and social justice in our communities and nations.

Youth Corps Recruiter: Passbooks Study Guide (Career Examination Series)

by National Learning Corporation

The Youth Corps Recruiter Passbook® prepares you for your test by allowing you to take practice exams in the subjects you need to study. It provides hundreds of questions and answers in the areas that will likely be covered on your upcoming exam.

Youth Corps Project Director: Passbooks Study Guide (Career Examination Series)

by National Learning Corporation

The Youth Corps Project Director Passbook® prepares you for your test by allowing you to take practice exams in the subjects you need to study. It provides hundreds of questions and answers in the areas that will likely be covered on your upcoming exam.

Youth at Risk: A Prevention Resource for Counselors, Teachers, and Parents

by David Capuzzi Douglas R. Gross

This comprehensive text, written by experts in each topical area, provides research-based approaches designed for work with youth in the difficult transition from adolescence to adulthood. Developmental in its orientation, the text moves from population definition and identification, to causal factors and issues most often identified with placing youth at risk, to a prevention-intervention paradigm specifically created for teens. Illustrative case studies and enlightening sidebars enhance reader self-awareness, promote self-study and skill development, and aid in the comprehension of the concepts and applications of chapter material.

Youth, Arts, and Education: Reassembling Subjectivity through Affect (Routledge Advances in Sociology)

by Anna Hickey-Moody

How are the arts important in young people’s lives? Youth, Arts and Education offers a groundbreaking theory of arts education. Anna Hickey-Moody explores how the arts are ways of belonging, resisting, being governed and being heard. Through examples from the United Kingdom and Australia, Anna Hickey-Moody shows the cultural significance of the kinds of learning that occur in and through arts. Drawing on the thought of Gilles Deleuze, she develops the theory of affective pedagogy, which explains the process of learning that happens through aesthetics. Bridging divides between critical pedagogical theory, youth studies and arts education scholarship, this book: Explains the cultural significance of the kinds of learning that occur in and through arts Advances a theory of aesthetic citizenship created by youth arts Demonstrates ways in which arts practices are forms popular and public pedagogy Critiques popular ideas that art can be used to fix problems in the lives of youth at risk Youth, Arts and Education is the first post-critical theory of arts education. It will be of interest to students and scholars across the social sciences and humanities, in particular in the sociology of education, arts education, youth studies, sociology of the arts and cultural studies.

Youth and Inequality in Education: Global Actions in Youth Work (Routledge Research in Educational Equality and Diversity)

by Dana Fusco Michael Heathfield

The transition to adulthood for many is mediated by class, culture, and local/global influences on identity. This volume analyzes the global injustices that create inequities and restrict future opportunities for young people during this transitional time, including poverty, unemployment, human rights, race, ethnicity and location. It critically examines global instances of youth discrimination, offering positive strategies and practices such as youth work that successfully remediate these injustices. With international contributions from Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia, England, Malaysia, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Morocco, Jordan and the U.S., this volume is particularly important to researchers and scholars in the fields of youth studies, education, and social work.

Youth Activism in an Era of Education Inequality

by Ben Kirshner

Winner, 2016 Best Authored Book presented by the Society for Research on Adolescence<P><P> This is what democracy looks like: Youth organizers in Colorado negotiate new school discipline policies to end the school to jail track. Latino and African American students march to district headquarters to protest high school closure. Young immigration rights activists persuade state legislators to pass a bill to make in-state tuition available to undocumented state residents. Students in an ESL class collect survey data revealing the prevalence of racism and xenophobia. <P> These examples, based on ten years of research by youth development scholar Ben Kirshner, show young people building political power during an era of racial inequality, diminished educational opportunity, and an atrophied public square. The book’s case studies analyze what these experiences mean for young people and why they are good for democracy. What is youth activism and how does it contribute to youth development? How might collective movements of young people expand educational opportunity and participatory democracy? The interdependent relationship between youths’ political engagement, their personal development, and democratic renewal is the central focus of this book. Kirshner argues that youth and societal institutions are strengthened when young people, particularly those most disadvantaged by educational inequity, turn their critical gaze to education systems and participate in efforts to improve them.

Youth Activism in an Era of Education Inequality

by Ben Kirshner

Winner, 2016 Best Authored Book presented by the Society for Research on AdolescenceThis is what democracy looks like: Youth organizers in Colorado negotiate new school discipline policies to end the school to jail track. Latino and African American students march to district headquarters to protest high school closure. Young immigration rights activists persuade state legislators to pass a bill to make in-state tuition available to undocumented state residents. Students in an ESL class collect survey data revealing the prevalence of racism and xenophobia. These examples, based on ten years of research by youth development scholar Ben Kirshner, show young people building political power during an era of racial inequality, diminished educational opportunity, and an atrophied public square. The book's case studies analyze what these experiences mean for young people and why they are good for democracy. What is youth activism and how does it contribute to youth development? How might collective movements of young people expand educational opportunity and participatory democracy? The interdependent relationship between youths' political engagement, their personal development, and democratic renewal is the central focus of this book. Kirshner argues that youth and societal institutions are strengthened when young people, particularly those most disadvantaged by educational inequity, turn their critical gaze to education systems and participate in efforts to improve them. Instructor's Guide

Yours Turly, Shirley

by Ann M. Martin

Surviving fourth grade isn't going to be easy for Shirley--but the thought of repeating it with her younger sister is too much to bearShirley Basini is dreading fourth grade--if she doesn't do well this year, she'll be held back. Having dyslexia is tough, but having a brilliant older brother makes it even worse. When Shirley's parents adopt a young girl from Vietnam, she's excited to have someone whom, for once, she can teach some things.But her new sister is actually quite adept at English and winds up in the advanced third-grade class. Shirley can't face the prospect of repeating fourth grade--this time with her adopted sister, who might even perform better than she does. Shirley has only one talent that might prove she's not dumb--but does she have the will to let it shine?This ebook features an illustrated personal history of Ann M. Martin, including rare images from the author's collection.

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