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Accelerating The Learning Of All Students: Cultivating Culture Change In Schools, Classrooms And Individuals (Renewing American Schools Ser.)

by Christine Finnan

Isn't acceleration just for gifted kids? This is a common assumption when we think about who benefits from efforts to accelerate student learning. For generations, students identified as gifted have been separated from other students and provided enriched learning opportunities many adults believe would be wasted on other students. More recently, in response to failed efforts to remediate low-achieving students, the term has been extended to efforts to reverse the negative effects of grade retention for many low-achieving students. The most promising application of the term involves efforts to extend the curriculum and instruction usually reserved for gifted students to all students.Accelerating the Learning of All Students: Cultivating Culture Change in Schools, Classrooms, and Individuals explores the multiple applications of the term "acceleration" and the assumptions that shape schools, classrooms, and individuals that encourage and discourage efforts to accelerate the learning of all students. This book begins with an exploration of the multiple definitions of acceleration, examining the social and historical context that led to an emphasis on labeling and sorting students. Descriptions of exemplary programs geared to each group of students provide useful ideas for addressing special needs of students. These descriptions also illustrate the wisdom of providing a rich, challenging learning experience to all students rather than focussing on separating them for special instruction. The book proceeds to explore the conditions in schools and classrooms that facilitate or hinder efforts to accelerate learning of all students. Focusing on the importance of changing individuals' assumptions about students, adult roles in schools, acceptable educational practices, appropriate communication patterns and the value of change, the book ends with a challenge to all of us to assume responsibility for making schools a better place for all students. Written by authors who bring a wealth of experiences to this topic, Christine Finnan and Julie D. Swanson draw on their own research and experience and on current research to provide a much-needed exploration of issues surrounding efforts to effectively educate all students. Accelerating the Learning of All Students provides hope to all citizens and educators that the dismal history of educating low-income students can be turned around, and that all students can be provided the rich, engaging educational experience that has historically been reserved only for those identified as gifted.

Accelerating Academia: The Changing Structure Of Academic Time (Palgrave Studies In Science, Knowledge And Policy Ser.)

by Filip Vostal

Filip Vostal examines the changing nature of academic time, and analyzes the 'will to accelerate' that has emerged as a significant cultural and structural force in knowledge production.

Accelerated Learning for the 21st Century

by Colin Rose

We live in an era when the unprecedented speed of change means: The only certainty is uncertainty; you can't predict what skills will be useful in ten years time; in most professions knowledge is doubling every two or three years; and no job is forever--so being employable means being flexible and retraining regularly.Accelerated Learning into the 21st Century contains a simple but proven plan that delivers the one key skill that every working person, every parent and student must master, and every teacher should teach: it's learning how to learn. The theory of eight multiple intelligences (linguistic, logical-mathematical, visual-spatial, kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalist) developed by Howard Gardner at Harvard University provides a foundation for the six-step MASTER-Mind system to facilitate learning (an acronym for Mind, Acquire, Search, Trigger, Exhibit, and Review), and is enhanced by the latest findings on the value of emotion and memory on the process of learning.Combined with motivational stories of success applying these principles, and putting forth a clear vision of how the United States can dramatically improve the education system to remain competitive in the next century, Accelerated Learning into the 21st Century is a dynamic tool for self-improvement by individuals as diverse as schoolchildren and corporate executives.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Accelerated Leadership Development: How to Turn Your Top Talent into Leaders

by Ines Wichert

As organizations adapt to an increasingly volatile and complex world, it is crucial that HR and Learning and Development (L&D) professionals ensure that leadership development keeps pace and employees have the right skills and capabilities to operate successfully in leadership positions. Accelerated Leadership Development shows how organisations can accelerate the career progression of their top talent and reduce the journey time from entry level to senior executive roles. It covers the entire acceleration process from how to identify which individuals are right for accelerated leadership development, to what roles are best suited for stretch assignments, and how to avoid burnout. Packed with insights from HR experts and business leaders from across the globe, Accelerated Leadership Development shows how this type of development works in practice, what makes it successful and highlights the potential pitfalls to look out for. Debunking the myth that one size of leadership development fits all, this book includes specific guidance on how to tailor leadership development to women and millennials. Full of practical advice, tips and techniques, this is an essential book for anyone looking to develop their very best employees.

Accelerated Expertise: Training for High Proficiency in a Complex World (Expertise: Research and Applications)

by Paul Ward Robert R. Hoffman Paul J. Feltovich Lia DiBello Stephen M. Fiore Dee H. Andrews

Speed in acquiring the knowledge and skills to perform tasks is crucial. Yet, it still ordinarily takes many years to achieve high proficiency in countless jobs and professions, in government, business, industry, and throughout the private sector. There would be great advantages if regimens of training could be established that could accelerate the achievement of high levels of proficiency. This book discusses the construct of ‘accelerated learning.’ It includes a review of the research literature on learning acquisition and retention, focus on establishing what works, and why. This includes several demonstrations of accelerated learning, with specific ideas, plans and roadmaps for doing so. The impetus for the book was a tasking from the Defense Science and Technology Advisory Group, which is the top level Science and Technology policy-making panel in the Department of Defense. However, the book uses both military and non-military exemplar case studies.

Academy Seven

by Anne Osterlund

Aerin Renning and Dane Madousin struggle as incoming students at the most exclusive academy in the Universe, both hiding secrets that are too painful to reveal, not realizing that those very secrets link them together.

The Academy in Crisis: Political Economy of Higher Education

by John W. Sommer

The Academy in Crisis is a provocative contribution to an important debate....The costs of goverment support for American universities are not negligible. They include stress on some of the core values of universities and of science-vaules like openness, collaboration, and collegiality-and pressure, too, on other central institutional responsibilities, such as the education of undergradutes. Robert M. Rosenzweig, former president, Association of American Universities.

Academy Dictionaries 1600-1800

by John Considine

This is the first unified history of the large, prestigious dictionaries of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, compiled in academies, which set out to glorify living European languages. The tradition began with the Vocabolario degli Accademici della Crusca (1612) in Florence and the Dictionnaire de l'Académie françoise (1694) in Paris, and spread across Europe - to Germany, Spain, England, Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Russia - in the eighteenth century, engaging students of language as diverse as Leibniz, Samuel Johnson, and Catherine the Great. All the major academy and academy-style dictionaries of the period up to 1800, published and unpublished, are discussed in a single narrative, bridging national and linguistic boundaries, to offer a history of lexicography on a European scale. Like John Considine's Dictionaries in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2008), this study treats dictionaries both as physical books and as ambitious works of the human imagination.

An Academy at the Court of the Tsars: Greek Scholars and Jesuit Education in Early Modern Russia (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

by Nikolaos Chrissidis

The first formally organized educational institution in Russia was established in 1685 by two Greek hieromonks, Ioannikios and Sophronios Leichoudes. Like many of their Greek contemporaries in the seventeenth century, the brothers acquired part of their schooling in colleges of post-Renaissance Italy under a precise copy of the Jesuit curriculum. When they created a school in Moscow, known as the Slavo-Greco-Latin Academy, they emulated the structural characteristics, pedagogical methods, and program of studies of Jesuit prototypes. In this original work, Nikolaos A. Chrissidis analyzes the academy's impact on Russian educational practice and situates it in the contexts of Russian-Greek cultural relations and increased contact between Russia and Western Europe in the seventeenth century. Chrissidis demonstrates that Greek academic and cultural influences on Russia in the second half of the seventeenth century were Western in character, though Orthodox in doctrinal terms. He also shows that Russian and Greek educational enterprises were part of the larger European pattern of Jesuit academic activities that impacted Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox educational establishments and curricular choices. An Academy at the Court of the Tsars is the first study of the Slavo-Greco-Latin Academy in English and the only one based on primary sources in Russian, Church Slavonic, Greek, and Latin. It will interest scholars and students of early modern Russian and Greek history, of early modern European intellectual history and the history of science, of Jesuit education, and of Eastern Orthodox history and culture.

Academy 7

by Anne Osterlund

With a past too terrible to speak of, and a bleak, lonely future ahead of her, Aerin Renning is shocked to find she has earned a place at the most exclusive school in the universe. Aerin excels at Academy 7 in all but debate, where Dane Madousin?son of one of the most powerful men in the Alliance? consistently outtalks her. Fortunately Aerin consistently outwits him at sparring. They are at the top of their class until Dane jeopardizes everything and Aerin is unintentionally dragged down with him. When the pair is given a joint punishment, an unexpected friendship?and romance?begins to form. But Dane and Aerin both harbor dangerous secrets, and the two are linked in ways neither of them could ever have imagined. . . . .

Academies and Free Schools in England: A History and Philosophy of The Gove Act (Routledge Research in Education Policy and Politics)

by Adrian Hilton

Academies and Free Schools in England argues that there is a high degree of philosophical consensus and historical continuity on the policy of ‘academisation’ across the main political parties in England. It attempts to make sense of what are all essentially free schools by interviewing the architects of policy and their closest advisors, analysing the extent to which they invoke historical expressions of conservatism and/or liberalism in their articulation of that convergence. The book offers a unique insight into educational policy-making during the Conservative/Liberal-Democrat coalition era (2010-2015), and an in-depth analysis of the nature of liberty as it relates to state education in England. Providing original interview transcripts of the key reformers, and new accounts of a sometimes contentious history, Hilton identifies an elite ‘policy community’, connected by educational background, moral-religious frameworks, life experiences and shared networks of common ideology. Academies and Free Schools in England will be vital reading to academics and researchers in the field of education and education policy. It will also be of great interest to school governors, business leaders, political philosophers and those involved and interested in free schools.

Academics in Action!: A Model for Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service

by Sandra L. Barnes Allison Mcguire Bernadette Doykos Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein Nina C. Martin

The academy is often described as an ivory tower, isolated from the community surrounding it. Presenting the theory, vision, and implementation of a socially engaged program for the Department of Human and Organizational Development (HOD) in Peabody’s College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University, Academics in Action! describes a more integrated model wherein students and faculty work with communities, learn from them, and bring to bear findings from theory and research to generate solutions to community problems. Offering examples of community-engaged theory, scholarship, teaching, and action, Academics in Action! describes the nuanced structures that foster and support their development within a research university. Theory and action span multiple ecological levels from individuals and small groups to organizations and social structures. The communities of engagement range from local neighborhoods and schools to arenas of national policy and international development. Reflecting the unique perspectives of research faculty, practitioners, and graduate students, Academics in Action! documents a specific philosophy of education that fosters and supports engagement; the potentially transformative nature of academic work for students, faculty, and the broader society; and some of the implications and challenges of action-oriented efforts in light of dynamics such as income inequality, racism, and global capitalism. This edited volume chronicles teaching, research, and community action that influences both inside and outside the classroom as well as presents dimensions of a participatory model that set such efforts into action.

The Academic's Handbook, Fourth Edition: Revised and Expanded

by Lori A. Flores and Jocelyn H. Olcott

In recent years, the academy has undergone significant changes: a more competitive and volatile job market has led to widespread precarity, teaching and service loads have become more burdensome, and higher education is becoming increasingly corporatized. In this revised and expanded edition of The Academic's Handbook, more than fifty contributors from a wide range of disciplines and backgrounds offer practical advice for academics at every career stage, whether they are first entering the job market or negotiating the post-tenure challenges of leadership and administrative roles. Contributors affirm what is exciting and fulfilling about academic work while advising readers about how to set and protect boundaries around their energy and labor. In addition, the contributors tackle topics such as debates regarding technology, social media, and free speech on campus; publishing and grant writing; attending to the many kinds of diversity among students, staff, and faculty; and how to balance work and personal responsibilities. A passionate and compassionate volume, The Academic's Handbook is an essential guide to navigating life in the academy.Contributors. Luis Alvarez, Steven Alvarez, Eladio Bobadilla, Genevieve Carpio, Marcia Chatelain, Ernesto Chávez, Miroslava Chávez-García, Nathan D. B. Connolly, Jeremy V. Cruz, Cathy N. Davidson, Sarah Deutsch, Brenda Elsey, Sylvanna M. Falcón, Michelle Falkoff, Kelly Fayard, Matthew W. Finkin, Lori A. Flores, Kathryn J. Fox, Frederico Freitas, Neil Garg, Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Joy Gaston Gayles, Tiffany Jasmin González, Cynthia R. Greenlee, Romeo Guzmán, Lauren Hall-Lew, David Hansen, Heidi Harley, Laura M. Harrison, Sonia Hernández, Sharon P. Holland, Elizabeth Q. Hutchison, Deborah Jakubs, Bridget Turner Kelly, Karen Kelsky, Stephen Kuusisto, Magdalena Maczynska, Sheila McManus, Cary Nelson, Jocelyn H. Olcott, Rosanna Olsen, Natalia Mehlman Petrzela, Charles Piot, Bryan Pitts, Sarah Portnoy, Laura Portwood-Stacer, Yuridia Ramirez, Meghan K. Roberts, John Elder Robison, David Schultz, Lynn Stephen, James E. Sutton, Antar A. Tichavakunda, Keri Watson, Ken Wissoker, Karin Wulf

The Academic's Handbook

by Craufurd D. Goodwin A. Leigh Deneef

This new, revised, and expanded edition of the popularAcademic’s Handbookis an essential guide for those planning or beginning an academic career. Faculty members, administrators, and professionals with experience at all levels of higher education offer candid, practical advice to help beginning academics understand matters including: The different kinds of institutions of higher learning and expectations of faculty at each. The advantages and disadvantages of teaching at four-year colleges instead of research universities. The ins and outs of the job market. Alternatives to tenure-track, research-oriented positions. Salary and benefits. The tenure system. Pedagogy in both large lecture courses and small, discussion-based seminars. The difficulties facing women and minorities within academia. Corporations, foundations, and the federal government as potential sources of research funds. The challenges of faculty mentoring. The impact of technology on contemporary teaching and learning. Different types of publishers and the publishing process at university presses. The modern research library. The structure of university governance. The role of departments within the university. With the inclusion of eight new chapters, this edition ofThe Academic’s Handbookis designed to ease the transition from graduate school to a well-rounded and rewarding career. Contributors. Judith K. Argon, Louis J. Budd, Ronald R. Butters, Norman L. Christensen, Joel Colton, Paul L. Conway, John G. Cross, Fred E. Crossland, Cathy N. Davidson, A. Leigh DeNeef, Beth A. Eastlick, Matthew W. Finkin, Jerry G. Gaff, Edie N. Goldenberg, Craufurd D. Goodwin, Stanley M. Hauerwas, Deborah L. Jakubs, L. Gregory Jones, Nellie Y. McKay, Patrick M. Murphy, Elizabeth Studley Nathans, A. Kenneth Pye, Zachary B. Robbins, Anne Firor Scott, Sudhir Shetty, Samuel Schuman, Philip Stewart, Boyd R. Strain, Emily Toth, P. Aarne Vesilind, Judith S. White, Henry M. Wilbur, Ken Wissoker

Academics Going Public: How to Write and Speak Beyond Academe

by Marybeth Gasman

Academics Going Public makes the case for academics to enter the public sphere and simultaneously gives them the tools to do so. This important book helps faculty members who want to become more active on a national scale and would like to move beyond publication in scholarly journals and books. Expert contributors explore how to have a voice about salient higher education issues and engage traditional media, new medias, policymakers, funders, and the general public. Chapters offer best approaches and concrete strategies for diverse audiences, helping faculty have an impact on society by becoming more publicly engaged and writing for broader audiences in more inclusive ways. This critical guide also covers strategies for confronting obstacles academics might encounter along the way and presents tactics for responding to controversy and backlash.

Academics Engaging with Student Writing: Working at the Higher Education Textface (Routledge Research in Higher Education)

by Jackie Tuck

Student writing has long been viewed as a problem in higher education in the UK. Moreover, the sector has consistently performed poorly in the National Student Survey with regard to assessment and feedback. Academics Engaging with Student Writing tackles these major issues from a new and unique angle, exploring the real-life experiences of academic teachers from different institutions as they set, support, read, respond to and assess assignments undertaken by undergraduate students. Incorporating evidence from post-1992 universities, Oxbridge, members of the Russell Group and others, this book examines working practices around student writing within the context of an increasingly market-oriented mass higher education system. Presenting a wealth of relevant examples from disciplines as diverse as History and Sports Science, Tuck makes extensive use of interviews, observations, texts and audio recordings in order to explore the perspectives of academic teachers who work with student writers and their texts. This book will be of interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students in the fields of academic literacies, higher education, language and literacy, language in higher education, English for academic purposes and assessment. Furthermore, academic teachers with experience of this crucial aspect of academic labour will welcome Tuck’s pioneering work as an indispensable tool for making sense of their own engagement with student writers.

Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses

by Richard Arum Josipa Roksa

In spite of soaring tuition costs, more and more students go to college every year. A bachelor's degree is now required for entry into a growing number of professions. And some parents begin planning for the expense of sending their kids to college when they're born. Almost everyone strives to go, but almost no one asks the fundamental question posed by Academically Adrift: are undergraduates really learning anything once they get there? For a large proportion of students, Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa's answer to that question is a definitive no. Their extensive research draws on survey responses, transcript data, and, for the first time, the state-of-the-art Collegiate Learning Assessment, a standardized test administered to students in their first semester and then again at the end of their second year. According to their analysis of more than 2,300 undergraduates at twenty-four institutions, 45 percent of these students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills--including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing--during their first two years of college. As troubling as their findings are, Arum and Roksa argue that for many faculty and administrators they will come as no surprise--instead, they are the expected result of a student body distracted by socializing or working and an institutional culture that puts undergraduate learning close to the bottom of the priority list. Academically Adrift holds sobering lessons for students, faculty, administrators, policy makers, and parents--all of whom are implicated in promoting or at least ignoring contemporary campus culture. Higher education faces crises on a number of fronts, but Arum and Roksa's report that colleges are failing at their most basic mission will demand the attention of us all.

Academic Writing for Military Personnel

by Adam Chapnick Craig Stone

Academic Writing for Military Personnel is written for members of the military who are either new to or re-entering the academic community and who need to familiarize themselves with academic writing. The authors, an experienced writing instructor and a retired military officer, show how persuasive academic writing enhances officers' effectiveness in their regular duties, especially as they reach more senior levels of service. They explain the differences between staff writing and academic writing, and outline some of the common errors military personnel make when transitioning from one to the other. The book's chapters outline the value of strong written communication skills, the research process, the writing process, academic referencing, and frequent grammatical and syntactical errors. Specific examples chosen with a military audience in mind are integrated throughout the book to provide the reader with relevant and practical guidance. The book concludes with a discussion on how officers can use the knowledge they have acquired through their professional experiences in their academic work. As the only comprehensive guide to effective academic writing designed specifically for military personnel, this book will be a crucial addition to the libraries of junior and senior officers in militaries worldwide.

Academic Writing for International Students of Science

by Jane Bottomley

Academic Writing for International Students of Science will help international students to develop their command of academic scientific writing in English. It guides students through the writing process itself, and will help them to produce clear, well-written and well-organised essays and reports. The book covers a range of issues such as how to explain complex ideas clearly and concisely, how to develop a coherent argument, and how to avoid plagiarism by making effective reference to sources. Through detailed analysis of authentic scientific texts, the book will enhance students’ understanding of the nature of academic scientific writing. This will enable them to understand how language and discourse function in a real scientific context. The texts serve as models of good writing and are followed by practice activities which will help students to develop their own writing skills. Key topics include: the writing process; academic scientific style; sentence structure; paragraph development; referring to sources; coherence, argument and critical thinking; academic and scientific conventions. This book will be an invaluable companion to those studying for a science or technology degree in an English-speaking institution. Informative study boxes, model answers and a clear, comprehensive answer key mean that the book can be used for self-study or with guidance in the classroom.

Academic Writing for International Students of Business and Economics

by Stephen Bailey

The third edition of Academic Writing for International Students of Business and Economics is written to help international students succeed in writing essays, reports and other papers for their English-language academic courses. Thoroughly revised and updated to reflect issues such as diversity and sustainability, this book is designed to let students and teachers easily find the help they need, both in the classroom and for self-study. The book is divided into five parts, comprising a total of 42 units: The Writing Process Elements of Writing Language Issues Vocabulary for Writing Writing Models New topics in this edition include Writing in Groups, Written British and American English and Reflective Writing. In addition, the new interactive website has a full set of teaching notes as well as more challenging exercises, revision material and links to other sources. Additional features of the book include: Models provided for writing tasks such as case studies and literature reviews Use of authentic academic texts from a range of sources Designed for self-study as well as classroom use Useful at both undergraduate and postgraduate level A complete set of answers to the practice exercises Cross-references across all units Providing a glossary to explain technical terms and written to deal with the specific language issues faced by international students of Business and Economics, this practical, user-friendly book is an invaluable guide to academic writing in English.

Academic Writing for International Students of Business

by Stephen Bailey

International students of Business or Economics often need to write essays and reports for exams and coursework, and this new, second edition of Academic Writing for International Students of Business has been completely revised and updated to help them succeed with these tasks. This book explains the academic writing process from start to finish, and practises all the key writing skills in the context of Business Studies. The book can be used either with a teacher or for self-study, and is clearly organised into four parts, with each divided into short units that contain examples, explanations and exercises for use in the classroom or for self-study: The Writing Process, from assessing sources to proofreading Elements of Writing, practising skills such as making comparisons Vocabulary for Writing, dealing with areas such as nouns and adjectives, adverbs and verbs, synonyms, prefixes and prepositions, in an academic context Writing Models, illustrating case studies, reports, longer essays and other key genres This is an up-to-date book that reflects the interests and issues of contemporary Business Studies, with revised exercises, updated reading texts and a new glossary to ensure accessibility and maximise usability. Students wanting to expand their academic potential will find this practical and easy-to-use book an invaluable guide to writing in English for their degree courses, and it will also help students planning a career with international companies or organisations, where proficiency in written English is a key skill. All aspects of writing clearly explained, with full glossary for reference Full range of practice exercises, with answer key included Use of authentic academic texts Fully updated, with sections on finding electronic sources and evaluating internet material

Academic Writing and Publishing: A Practical Handbook

by James Hartley

Academic Writing and Publishing will show academics (mainly in the social sciences) how to write and publish research articles. Its aim is to supply examples and brief discussions of recent work in all aspects of the area in short, sharp chapters. It should serve as a handbook for postgraduates and lecturers new to publishing. The book is written in a readable and lively personal style. The advice given is direct and based on up-to-date research that goes beyond that given in current textbooks. For example, the chapter on titles lists different kinds of titles and their purposes not discussed in other texts. The chapter on abstracts instructs the reader on writing structured abstracts from the start.

Academic Writing and Identity Constructions: Performativity, Space And Territory In Academic Workplaces

by Louise M. Thomas Anne B. Reinertsen

This book presents multiple cultural and contextual takes on working performances of academic/writer/thinker, both inside and outside the academy. With worldwide, seismic shifts taking place in both the contexts and terrains of universities, and subsequently the altering of what it means to write as an academic and work in academia, the editors and contributors use writing to position and re-position themselves as academics, thinkers and researchers. Using as a point of departure universities and academic/writing work contexts shaped by the increasing dominance of commodification, measurement and performativity, this volume explores responses to these evolving, shifting contexts. In response to the growing global interest in writing as performance, this book breaks new ground by theorizing multiple identity constructions of academic/writer/researcher; considering the possibilities and challenges of engaging in academic writing work in ways that are authentic and sustainable. This reflective and interdisciplinary volume will resonate with students and scholars of academic writing, as well as all those working to reconcile different facets of identity.

Academic Writing and Grammar for Students (SAGE Study Skills Series)

by Alex Osmond

This handy guide shows students how to use academic English grammar and punctuation. The author identifies common grammar mistakes and how to avoid them, making extensive use of examples and advice from tutors from a range of subjects. This valuable book enables readers to immediately improve their work at university.<P> Inside, you will find practical advice on:<P> * common mistakes<P> * punctuation<P> * conciseness<P> * proofreading<P> * referencing<P> * and more.<P> The advice in the book has been tried and tested through workshops that the author runs with students. It will be useful to undergraduates on a wide range of courses, and will help promote independent learning as well as practical writing skills.

Academic Writing and Grammar for Students (SAGE Study Skills Series)

by Alex Osmond

Available as an E-Inspection Copy! Go here to order Grappling with grammar? Struggling with punctuation? Whether you're writing an essay or assignment, report or dissertation, this useful guide shows you how to improve the quality of your work at university – fast – by identifying and using the correct use of English grammar and punctuation in your academic writing. Using tried and tested advice from student workshops, Alex Osmond shares practical examples that illustrate common mistakes, and shows you how to avoid them. You’ll also discover guidance on: Writing structure – the what and how of crafting sentences and paragraphs Conciseness – how to express your point succinctly and clearly, showing you understand the topic Effective proofreading – the importance of the final ‘tidy up’, so your work is ready to hand in Referencing – common systems, and how to reference consistently (and avoid plagiarism). This new edition also includes separate chapters on critical thinking and referencing, exploring each topic in more detail, and learning outcomes in every chapter, so you can identify what new skills you’ll take away. Personal tips and advice direct from Alex Osmond For access to additional resources and one-to-one advice from Alex, 'like' his Facebook page Academic Writing and Grammar for Students. SAGE Study Skills are essential study guides for students of all levels. From how to write great essays and succeeding at university, to writing your undergraduate dissertation and doing postgraduate research, SAGE Study Skills help you get the best from your time at university. Visit the SAGE Study Skills hub for tips, resources and videos on study success!

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Showing 50,701 through 50,725 of 51,576 results