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Yellow Rose Bride

by Lori Copeland

Seven years ago, seamstress Vonnie Taylor's husband of twenty-four hours, Adam Baldwin, had their marriage annulled. Now she faces the ultimate indignity: sewing the wedding dress for his new intended! Vonnie hasn't gotten over the handsome Texas rancher, though she'd tried to put him out of her mind after a family feud had doomed their love. Now, as past secrets are uncovered and danger unleashed, Vonnie is thrown together once more with the man who broke her heart. And as the difficulties bring the pair ever closer, this Yellow Rose of Texas discovers that love is always worth the wait.

Yellow Star

by Jennifer Rozines Roy

From 1939, when Syvia is four and a half years old, to 1945 when she has just turned ten, a Jewish girl and her family struggle to survive in Poland's Lodz ghetto during the Nazi occupation.

The Yengishiki/The Englishiki

by Various

Shinto ("the way of the gods") is the indigenous faith of the Japanese people and as old as Japan herself. It remains Japan's major religion besides Buddhism. "Shinto gods" are called kami. They are sacred spirits which take the form of things and concepts important to life, such as wind, rain, mountains, trees, rivers and fertility. Humans become kami after they die and are revered by their families as ancestral kami. The kami of extraordinary people are even enshrined at some shrines. The Sun Goddess Amaterasu is considered Shinto's most important kami.

Yentl's Revenge: The Next Wave of Jewish Feminism

by Danya Ruttenberg

A diverse group of young women--from witches to rabbis--explore the new Judaism. Contributors ponder Jewish transgenderdom, Jewish body image, Jewish punk, the stereotype of the Jewish American Princess, intermarriage, circumcision, faith, and intolerance.

Yes, But Not Quite: Encountering Josiah Royce's Ethico-Religious Insight

by Dwayne A. Tunstall

This book contends that Josiah Royce bequeathed to philosophy a novel idealism based on an ethico-religious insight. This insight became the basis for an idealistic personalism, wherein the Real is the personal and a metaphysics of community is the most appropriate approach to metaphysics for personal beings, especially in an often impersonal and technological intellectual climate. The first part of the book traces how Royce constructed his idealistic personalism in response to criticisms made by George Holmes Howison. That personalism is interpreted as an ethical and panentheistic one, somewhat akin to Charles Hartshorne's process philosophy. The second part investigates Royce's idealistic metaphysics in general and his ethico-religious insight in particular. In the course of these investigations, the author examines how Royce's ethico-religious insight could be strengthened by incorporating the philosophical theology of Dr. Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and Emmanuel Levinas's ethical metaphysics. The author concludes by briefly exploring the possibility that Royce's progressive racial anti-essentialism is, in fact, a form of cultural, antiblack racism and asks whether his cultural, antiblack racism taints his ethico-religious insight.

Yes, Lord, I Have Sinned - 20th Anniversary Edition

by James W. Moore

In the past 20 years, this book has never been out or print. Celebrate this milestone Abingdon has created this Anniversary Edition! James W. Moore is a master storyteller. Individuals and groups across the country have read and enjoyed his books and what they reveal to us about God and our selves. In this book, Moore observes that people often give lame excuses for their arrogance, dishonesty, hostility, and presumptuousness. He challenges readers to recognize such situations and to grow beyond them. He addresses such "sins" as half-heartedness, spiritual arrogance, deception, overreaction, hostility, presumptuousness, losing spiritual balance, and more. He also discusses the joys of redemption and grace.

Yes, Lord, I'm Comin' Home! Country Music Stars Share Their Stories of Knowing God

by Lesley Sussman

From the Grand Ole Opry to Radio City and beyond, country music is sweeping the globe. But country is more than just the new sound of America; many of its artists are also capturing audiences with their faith-inspired spirit. Yes, Lord, I'm Comin' Home! presents these heart-warming true stories about faith and renewal, from some of today's hottest country stars and legends of the past as they reveal the tragedy and triumph of their spiritual journeys. With startling honesty and emotional vulnerability, superstars like Naomi Judd, Barbara Mandrell, and Donna Fargo tell how they turned to faith to sustain them through discouragement, depression, and their darkest hours. Others, like Marty Raybon of Shenandoah, B. J. Thomas, Glen Campbell, and Steve Gatlin lived a life of drug and alcohol abuse until it all came crashing down. There are also moving stories behind the beautiful voices of Doug Stone, Ricky Lynn Gregg, and Louise Mandrell, who offer personal and passionate glimpses of their lives--and faith. In Yes, Lord, I'm Comin' Home!, a show-stopping list of country music legends and superstars share their joy of coming to know God. Artists such as Ferlin Husky, Penny DeHaven, John Berry, Rick Trevino, Toby Keith, Mark Collie, Susie Luchsinger, Paul Overstreet, Ken Holloway, MidSouth's Kent Humphrey, Deborah Allen, Brian Barrett, and Joy Lynn White radiate with their love of God.

Yes, No, and Maybe: Living with the God of Immeasurably More

by Wendy Pope

Sometimes when life feels routine, women succumb to the weariness of every unfulfilled dream and unanswered prayer. In Yes, No, & Maybe, Wendy Pope invites readers to discover anew the call to live the life Jesus died to give—the immeasurably more life. Along the way, they’ll discover three words that can revitalize their relationship with Christ: yes, no, and maybe. As Pope writes, a woman’s heartfelt • Yes cultivates trust with God.• No invites revelation into who God designed her to be.• Maybe welcomes the freedom to confidently love, give, and serve in God’s kingdom.

Yes, No, and Maybe Study Guide: Living with the God of Immeasurably More

by Wendy Pope

God created His children for more than a mundane life. With Scripture readings, Bible study prompts, discussion questions, and space for reflection, this study guide is a powerful companion to understanding the practice of saying yes to God, no to self, and maybe to others. Includes leader’s guide and a bonus session featuring more background on some of the people who have been part of Wendy’s journey.

Yes or No

by Jeff Shinabarger

As you face daily choices that require yes or no decisions, there are times when you feel paralyzed--either from fear of making the wrong choice or because of too many seemingly equal options. Social entrepeneur Jeff Shinabarger helps you break through these moments of tension and transition with proven ways to move toward good choices. Discover opportunities to become a decision maker as you gain strength in saying no, develop your personal philosophy of choice, and start using a practical process for making good choices even in difficult situations.

Yeshiva Boys: Poems

by David Lehman

David Lehman, a poet of wit, ingenuity, and formidable skill, draws upon his heritage as a grandson of Holocaust victims and offers a stirring autobiographical collection of poems that is his most ambitious work to date. It covers an expansive range of subjects -- from love, sex, and romance to repentance, humility, the meaning of democracy, Existentialism, modern European history, military intelligence, and the rituals associated with faith and prayer. The title poem, "Yeshiva Boys," is a work in twelve parts that blends the elements of espionage fiction, memory, history, and moral philosophy. It reflects David's experience as a student in an orthodox Yeshiva, and it, along with many other poems in the book, explores what it means to be a Jew in America, what is gained and lost in assimilating to secular culture, how to understand the peculiar destiny of the Jewish people, and how to reconcile the existence of God with the knowledge of evil. Beautiful, provocative, and accessible, this is David Lehman's most inspired collection.

Yeshiva Fundamentalism

by Nurit Stadler

2009 Choice Outstanding Academic TitleThe ultra-Orthodox yeshiva, or Jewish seminary, is a space reserved for men, and for a focus on religious ideals. Fundamentalist forms of piety are usually believed to be quite resistant to change. In Yeshiva Fundamentalism, Nurit Stadler uncovers surprising evidence that firmly religious and pious young men of this community are seeking to change their institutions to incorporate several key dimensions of the secular world: a redefinition of masculinity along with a transformation of the family, and participation in civic society through the labor market, the army, and the construction of organizations that aid terror victims. In their private thoughts and sometimes public actions, they are resisting the demands placed on them to reject all aspects of the secular world.Because women are not allowed in the yeshiva setting, Stadler's research methods had to be creative. She invented a way to simulate yeshiva learning with young yeshiva men by first studying with an informant to learn key religious texts, often having to do with family life, sexuality, or participation in the larger society. This informant then invited students over to discuss these texts with Stadler and himself outside of the yeshiva setting. This strategy enabled Stadler to gain access to aspects of yeshiva life in which a woman is usually unable to participate, and to hear "unofficial" thoughts and reactions which would have been suppressed had the interviews taken place within the yeshiva.Yeshiva Fundamentalism provides an intriguing - and at times surprising - glimpse inside the all-male world of the ultra-orthodox yeshivas in Israel, while providing insights relevant to the larger context of transformations of fundamentalism worldwide. While there has been much research into how contemporary feminism has influenced the study of fundamentalist groups worldwide, little work has focused on ultra-Orthodox men's desires to change, as Stadler does here, showing how fundamentalist men are themselves involved in the formulation of new meanings of piety, gender, modernity and relations with the Israeli state.

Yeshua: A Guide to the Real Jesus and the Original Church

by Ron Mosley

Opens up the Jewish roots of the Christian faith.

Yesterday, Today and Forever

by Maria Von Trapp

True stories of Maria Von Trapp's family and her life.

Yesterday, Today & Forever

by Maria Von Trapp

A warm and intimate look into the spiritual life of Maria von Trapp's famous Sound of Music family. In this best-selling work, Maria takes you beyond the thrilling story of her family's desperate and determined flight from Austria to her new life in America, as well as providing: A personal and profound insight into this extraordinary woman and her life An inspiring look at the constancy of the Savior in our lives A wealth of insight and faith from years spent in study, devotion, and worship Maria von Trapp shares how she and her husband told their children about the life of Jesus and how His story entered into their lives and imaginations. Be enriched and inspired as you enjoy this beloved classic.

Yesterday's Embers

by Deborah Raney

On Thanksgiving Day, Douglas DeVore kissed his beloved wife good-bye, unaware that it would be the last time he'd see her -- or their precious daughter Rachel. Left with five kids to raise on his own, and already juggling two jobs to make ends meet, Doug wonders how he'll manage moment by moment, much less day after day, without Kaye's love and support. When Mickey Valdez, a daycare teacher, hears of the tragedy, she offers to lend a helping hand. After all, it isn't like she has a family of her own waiting for her at home. Her brothers are all happily married, but love seems to have passed her by. Then a spark ignites...but will the flame be too hot to handle?

Yesterday's Eyes

by Catherine Flowers

Ida has never been close to her mother, Mavis, but she is a little too close to Mavis's husband, the less-than-godly preacher of First Presbyterian Church. When Ida gives birth to a baby boy, she claims the preacher is the baby's father. After Ida is convicted of negligent homicide and goes to prison, Mavis finds herself faced with the task of raising Ida's six-year-old daughter, Tia. Mavis barely knows her grandchild, and must find a way to form a bond while she's still struggling with her husband's betrayal. Tia has already spent time with an abusive foster parent, and now must learn to survive with her emotionally distant grandmother. Catherine Flowers brings readers the powerful story of three generations of women who must come to terms with the past and learn how to forgive one another if there is any hope of healing.

Yesterday's Eyes

by Catherine Flowers

Ida has never been close to her mother, Mavis, but she is a little too close to Mavis's husband, the less-than-godly preacher of First Presbyterian Church. When Ida gives birth to a baby boy, she claims the preacher is the baby's father. After Ida is convicted of negligent homicide and goes to prison, Mavis finds herself faced with the task of raising Ida's six-year-old daughter, Tia. Mavis barely knows her grandchild, and must find a way to form a bond while she's still struggling with her husband's betrayal. Tia has already spent time with an abusive foster parent, and now must learn to survive with her emotionally distant grandmother.Catherine Flowers brings readers the powerful story of three generations of women who must come to terms with the past and learn how to forgive one another if there is any hope of healing.

Yesterday's Promise (East of the Sun)

by Linda Lee Chaikin

He fought to seek his fortune. Would he lose a greater treasure: the love he left behind? As the son of the squire of Grimston Way, aristocrat Rogan Chantry has fought hard to win his independence from Sir Julien Bley and the British South Africa Company. Now, his pursuit of a mysterious deposit of gold, marked on a map willed to him by his murdered uncle, Henry Chantry, is challenged by a new complication: the impending British colonization of South Africa. Can Sir Rogan find the gold in the midst of escalating tensions among the native tribesmen, the missionaries sent to win them, and the new colonists? Meanwhile, Evy Varley, the woman Rogan loves back in England, is headed for a brave yet dangerous confrontation with Henry's killer-but at what price? With so much against Rogan and Evy, a reunion seems improbable, if not impossible. Can yesterday's promise hold them faithful to the hope of future freedom and a victorious love?From the Trade Paperback edition.

Yesterday's Promise

by Linda Lee Chaikin

He fought to seek his fortune. Would he lose a greater treasure: the love he left behind? As the son of the squire of Grimston Way, aristocrat Rogan Chantry has fought hard to win his independence from Sir Julien Bley and the British South Africa Company. Now, his pursuit of a mysterious deposit of gold, marked on a map willed to him by his murdered uncle, Henry Chantry, is challenged by a new complication: the impending British colonization of South Africa. Can Sir Rogan find the gold in the midst of escalating tensions among the native tribesmen, the missionaries sent to win them, and the new colonists? Meanwhile, Evy Varley, the woman Rogan loves back in England, is headed for a brave yet dangerous confrontation with Henry's killer-but at what price? With so much against Rogan and Evy, a reunion seems improbable, if not impossible. Can yesterday's promise hold them faithful to the hope of future freedom and a victorious love?From the Trade Paperback edition.

Yesterday's Santa and the Chanukah Miracle

by Sarah Hartt-Snowbell Patty Gallinger

Annie can’t believe her eyes! The "Santa" in the mall looks so much like her grandfather’s friend, Simon. A Jewish Santa? Annie lines up to get a closer look - and ends up "placing an order". Simon Greenbaum, flat broke, has taken the job at the Winter Castle to earn a few dollars between jobs. And after all, with his long white beard, he looks just like Santa already. "Don’t breathe a word to your Zaideh that you saw me here," he says. "If you don’t tell him that I’m a Santa Claus, I won’t tell him what you asked for. It’s a deal?" When Annie’s parents find out, however, that she has placed an order with Santa for a Christmas tree, they are disappointed and tell her that she must learn to be her own person and stand up for her beliefs in order to earn the respect of others. Meanwhile, Annie wants to help Mr. Greenbaum and comes up with a plan. But to carry out her plan, she must reveal his secret. What will she do?

Yet I Loved Jacob

by Joel S. Kaminsky

God's favor towards some serves God's plan for the larger world. The fact that the Jewish people are especially chosen by God is an idea affirmed by both early Christians and rabbis. However, the idea that God would favor one person or group over another is highly problematic in today's democratic and pluralistic society. Being the Chosen is often seen as better ignored or even repudiated by both Christians and Jews. According to Joel Kaminsky, God's larger plan for the world is worked out through the three-way relationship between God, Israel, and the nations of the world. He asserts that we need to reexamine the Bible in light of this matter. What is needed is a better understanding of what the Bible really says about God's choosing. Beginning with the familiar stories in Genesis (Cain and Abel; Isaac and Ishmael; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers; but also Hagar and Sarah; Leah and Rachel; Isaac and Rebekah), Kaminsky shows how God chooses, how humans participate, what we know from the Bible about God's intentions, and whether God's plan for the chosen people succeeds. The book continues through the Old Testament, asking about the fates of those whom God chooses to favor, those whom God rejects, and those who are neither favored nor rejected. Finally, Kaminsky shows how both the New Testament authors and the rabbis affirmed the Old Testament view of God's election. Each chapter engages modern problems with a theology of election and every chapter affirms the biblical paradox the God's choice in favor of some serves God's plan to benefit all.

YHWH and Israel in the Book of Judges: An Object – Relations Analysis (Society for Old Testament Study Monographs)

by Deryn Guest

In the Book of Judges the narrator presents an image of the good parent YHWH whose enduring love and loyalty is offset by his wayward child Israel who defaults on the relationship repeatedly. Biblical scholars have largely concurred, demonstrating the many faults of Israel while siding with YHWH's privileged viewpoint. When object-relations theory (which examines how human beings relate to each other) is applied to Judges, a different story emerges. In its capacity to illuminate why and how relationships can be intense, problematic, rewarding, and enduring, object-relations theory reveals how both YHWH and Israel have attachment needs that are played out vividly in the story world. Deryn Guest reveals how its narrator engages in a variety of psychological strategies to mask suppressed rage as he engages in an intriguing but rather dysfunctional masochistic dance with a dominant deity who has reputation needs.

The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes (World Thought in Translation)

by Cheng Yi

A translation of a key commentary on perhaps the most broadly influential text of classical China This book is a translation of a key commentary on the Book of Changes, or Yijing (I Ching), perhaps the most broadly influential text of classical China. The Yijing first appeared as a divination text in Zhou-dynasty China (ca. 1045–256 bce) and later became a work of cosmology, philosophy, and political theory as commentators supplied it with new meanings. While many English translations of the Yijing itself exist, none are paired with a historical commentary as thorough and methodical as that written by the Confucian scholar Cheng Yi, who turned the original text into a coherent work of political theory.

YICHUD (Seclusion)

by Julie Tepperman

The Yichud Room is the place where the bride and groom go to be alone immediately following the wedding ceremony. In the case of Rachel and Chaim, who have only had a handful of chaperoned dates, this is the first time they have ever been alone together.In another part of the synagogue, tensions rise between the groom's older brothers, Ephraim and Menachem, rival Torah scholars who haven't seen each other in four years. Meanwhile, the bride's parents, Mordechai and Malka, are secretly planning to divorce after the wedding. YICHUD (Seclusion) directly confronts the tensions that exist in the Orthodox Jewish world between tradition and modernity, powerfully dramatizing issues of love, marriage, respect, sex, honour, and duty.

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