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Early Modern Playhouse Manuscripts and the Editing of Shakespeare

by Paul Werstine

Early Modern Playhouse Manuscripts and the Editing of Shakespeare argues for editing Shakespeare's plays in a new way, without pretending to distinguish authorial from theatrical versions. Drawing on the work of the influential scholars A. W. Pollard and W. W. Greg, Werstine tackles the difficult issues surrounding 'foul papers' and 'promptbooks' to redefine these fundamental categories of current Shakespeare editing. In an extensive and detailed analysis, this book offers insight into the methods of theatrical personnel and a reconstruction of backstage practices in playhouses of Shakespeare's time. The book also includes a detailed analysis of nineteen manuscripts and three quartos marked up for performance - documents that together provide precious insight into how plays were put into production. Using these surviving manuscripts as a framework, Werstine goes on to explore editorial choices about what to give today's readers as 'Shakespeare'.

Theatre, Performance, and Memory Politics in Argentinay

by Brenda Werth

Since Argentina's transition to democracy, the expression of human fragility on the stage has taken diverse forms. This book examines the intervention of theatre and performance in the memory politics surrounding Argentina's return to democracy and makes a case for performance's transformative power.

Imagining Human Rights in Twenty-First-Century Theater

by Brenda Werth Florian N. Becker Paola S. Hern�ndez

There is extraordinary diversity, depth, and complexity in the encounter between theatre, performance, and human rights. Through an examination of a rich repertoire of plays and performance practices from and about countries across six continents, the contributors open the way toward understanding the character and significance of this encounter.

W.C. Fields from the Ziegfeld Follies and Broadway Stage to the Screen

by Arthur Frank Wertheim

This book reveals how Fields became a character comedian while performing in Broadway's most illustrious revue, the Ziegfeld Follies. As the first biography to use the recently opened Fields Papers at the Motion Picture Academy, the book explores how Fields years as a Follies entertainer portraying a beleaguered husband and a captivating conman became a landmark turning point in his career, leading to his fame as a masterful film comedian. The book also untangles a web of mysteries about Fields's turbulent private life, from the heartrending stories about the tragic relationship with his calculating wife who refused to divorce him, to his estranged son controlled by his mother, to the seven-year extra-marital affair with a chorus girl that led to the birth of an unwanted child. This electrifying saga illuminates a complex dual personality, whirling from tenderness to brusqueness, who endured so much anguish in order to bring the gift of laughter to millions. Although vilified by Ziegfeld and assailed by demons, Fields survived the cutthroat rigors of Broadway show biz to become a legendary American iconoclast and cultural icon.

Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights And Other Identities

by Cornel West Anna Deavere Smith

Derived from interviews with a wide range of people who experienced or observed New York's 1991 Crown Heights racial riots, Fires In The Mirror is as distinguished a work of commentary on current Black-White tensions as it is a work of drama.

Dreamers Often Lie

by Jacqueline West

Liar meets Romeo and Juliet in this Shakespeare-inspired young adult novel about whether to trust yourself when everyone is telling you your instincts are wrong--for fans of Holly Black, Laini Taylor, and Black Swan, by New York Times bestselling author Jacqueline West. Jaye wakes up in the hospital, disoriented, and beset by a slippery morphing of reality into something else. She repeatedly sees a boy who she feels like she knows--but that's impossible. Determined to get back to school and back to A Midsummer Night's Dream, in which she's starring, she lies to her sister, her mom, and her doctors--she's fine, she says. She's fine, she's fine, she's fine. But then on her first day back, she takes a seat in class . . . next to the mysterious boy. Queasy with anxiety ("I can't see you," she hisses at him, "because you're not really here"), Jaye realizes this boy is, in fact, real. And he has no idea what she's talking about. Caught between this fascinating, empathetic new kid and her childhood friend turned recent love interest, Jaye begins to notice unnerving similarities between her circumstances and those of some of Shakespeare's most famous plays. Tingling banter and clandestine meet-ups give way to darker, muddier incidents. As things escalate to a frightening pitch, how much of what's happening is real, how much is in Jaye's head, and how much does it matter as she's hurtling toward a fateful end over which she seems to have no control?

Milwaukee's Live Theater

by Jonathan West

Milwaukee's live theater scene is the sum of several exciting parts. For many, Milwaukee live theater means world-class productions done by resident actors at one of the nation's leading regional theaters. For others, it has been defined by the machinations of a respected experimental theater troupe that traveled throughout Europe in the 1980s and was once honored with an Obie Award. There was a time when Milwaukee live theater meant a big top arena where some of the biggest stars of American musical theater frolicked and played for local audiences. Audiences in Milwaukee have enjoyed the classics, new plays, and contemporary hits performed by never-say-die producers who boast personalities larger than the stages their companies play upon. The Milwaukee theater style is not fussy or overblown. It is informed by a thrilling past, buoyant future, unsurpassed community support, and unfailing devotion to solid midwestern work ethics channeled into artistic innovation. Simply put, Milwaukee's live theater scene is the best-kept artistic secret in the United States.

Shakespeare as Political Thinker

by Thomas G. West John E. Alvis

The essays contained in this book proceed from the common conviction that Shakespeare's poetry conveys a wisdom about politics commensurate with his artistry. Well-known thinkers discuss Shakespeare's understanding of politics, the idea of the best polity, the relationship between character and political life, and the interpenetration of poetry, politics, religion, and philosophy.

Staging Loss: Performance as Commemoration

by Andrew Westerside Michael Pinchbeck

This book locates and critically theorises an emerging field of twenty-first century theatre practice concerned, either thematically, methodologically, or formally, with acts of commemoration and the commemorative. With notions of memorial, celebration, temporality and remembrance at its heart, and as a timely topic for debate, this book asks how theatre and performance intersects with commemorative acts or rituals in contemporary theatre and performance practice. It considers the (re)performance of history, commemoration as a form of, or performance of, ritual, performance as memorial, performance as eulogy and eulogy as performance. It asks where personal acts of remembrance merge with public or political acts of remembrance, where the boundary between the commemorative and the performative might lie, and how it might be blurred, broken or questioned. It explores how we might remake the past in the present, to consider not just how performance commemorates but how commemoration performs.

Staging The Slums, Slumming The Stage

by J. Chris Westgate

Drawing on traditional archival research, reception theory, cultural histories of slumming, and recent work in critical theory on literary representations of poverty, Westgate argues that the productions of slum plays served as enactments of the emergent definitions of the slum and the corresponding ethical obligations involved therein.

Urban Drama

by J. Chris Westgate

Identifying an apprehension about the nature and constitution of urbanism in North American plays, Westgate examines how cities like New York City and Los Angeles became focal points for identity politics and social justice at the end of the twentieth century, and how urban crises inform the dramaturgy of contemporary playwrights.

World Theatre: The Basics (The Basics)

by E. J. Westlake

World Theatre: The Basics presents a well-rounded introduction to non-Western theatre, exploring the history and current practice of theatrical traditions in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Oceania, the Caribbean, and the non-English-speaking cultures of the Americas. Featuring a selection of case studies and examples from each region, it helps the reader to understand the key issues surrounding world theatre scholarship and global, postcolonial, and transnational performance practices. An essential read for anyone seeking to learn more about world theatre, World Theatre: The Basics provides a clear, accessible roadmap for approaching non-Western theatre.

The Film Director's Intuition: Script Analysis And Rehearsal Techniques

by Judith Weston

A filmmaker's most precious assets - not just for directing actors, but also for making all the storytelling decision - are his instincts, imagination, and intuition. The author reveals the secrets that can keep an imagination alive and free a director's intuition, so everyone on the set can function at full creativity. You will learn about: sources of imagination ; goals of script analysis ; tools of the storyteller ; the lost art of rehearsal ; and the director's authority.

Jack & Louisa: Act 2

by Kate Wetherhead Andrew Keenan-Bolger

A show-stopping series about life in the spotlight from Broadway actors and internet sensations Andrew Keenan-Bolger and Kate Wetherhead Shaker Heights Middle School is putting on Guys and Dolls and best friends Jack and Lou are hoping to get lead roles. But a mysterious new director soon arrives to town and threatens to meddle with their dreams. Is Shaker Heights big enough for two Broadway legends? Fans of Tim Federle's Better Nate Than Ever will rejoice to meet Jack & Lou--the newest MTN's (musical theater nerds) on the block.

Jack & Louisa: Act 1 (Jack & Louisa #1)

by Kate Wetherhead Andrew Keenan-Bolger

Twelve-year old Jack Goodrich was a Broadway star, with two shows under his belt and a third in rehearsals. But when his voice changes suddenly, Jack and his parents leave the spotlight and move from New York City to Shaker Heights, Ohio. While Jack hopes to leave his Broadway past behind, his new neighbor refuses to let him off the hook. Louisa is a self proclaimed "musical theater nerd" and can hardly believe when an actor moves to town. What's more, the local theater has announced auditions for her favorite show, "Into the Woods." As the audition date looms nearer, the two are faced with difficult choices. Should Jack risk humiliation and return to the stage? Will Louisa have confidence to go it alone? And can their friendship survive all those complicated octave leaps?

Act 3

by Kate Wetherhead Andrew Keenan-Bolger Ben Kirchner

A show-stopping middle-grade series about life in and out of the spotlight from Broadway stars and Internet sensations Andrew Keenan-Bolger and Kate Wetherhead.Two weeks at Camp Curtain-Up is just what Jack and Louisa need to fuel their passion for theater: Broadway musical sing-alongs, outdoor rehearsals, and tons of new MTNs (musical theater nerds) to meet... maybe even a special someone. It almost feels like fate when the two friends return home to find local auditions for The Sound of Music. But as Louisa fantasizes about frolicking in the Alps, Jack gets tempted by a student-run drama competition that would reunite the two with their camp friends. Will Jack get Louisa to skip an audition? Can Lou handle Jack as her director? And will someone finally get a big, Broadway happy ending?

Playing Juliet

by Joanne Stewart Wetzel

Beth Sondquist, age twelve and a half, dreams of playing the part of Juliet. For now she’s just the cat in Cinderella, but one day, she’s determined to become a real actress. But all her hopes for an acting career come crashing down when the Oakfield Children’s Theater is slated to be closed. Its new owner has decided to make it into an adult theater, a real theater. Beth and her best friend, Zandy, are willing to do whatever it takes to save the theater, but their plans quickly go awry. When Beth’s father catches her sneaking back into her bedroom window well past bedtime, Beth is in big, big trouble. With eviction looming, the children’s theater director decides to close the theater with the same play the theater opened with fifty years ago--Romeo and Juliet. But Beth’s grounded for the next two weeks, and she won’t be able to try out. How will Beth pull off playing Juliet if she can’t even make tryouts? Playing Juliet is funny and honest and celebrates bravery and doing the right thing even when it gets you into trouble. It’s about having the courage to go after what you want and making your dreams come true. It’s also about friendship and family. As an almost-thirteen-year-old, Beth has a unique bond with thirteen-year-old Juliet, and she eventually recognizes just how silly and immature Juliet’s decisions are. Only Beth can play Juliet as the kid that she is. With a little bit of luck, maybe she’ll get her chance.

Til The Fat Girl Sings: From an Overweight Nobody to a Broadway Somebody-A Memoir

by Sharon Wheatley

A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.

Performing Orthodox Ritual in Byzantium

by Andrew Walker White

In this groundbreaking, interdisciplinary study, Andrew Walker White explores the origins of Byzantine ritual - the rites of the early Greek Orthodox Church - and its unique relationship with traditional theatre. Tracing the secularization of pagan theatre, the rise of rhetoric as an alternative to acting, as well as the transmission of ancient methods of musical composition into the Byzantine era, White demonstrates how Christian ritual was in effect a post-theatrical performing art, created by intellectuals who were fully aware of traditional theatre but who endeavoured to avoid it. The book explores how Orthodox rites avoid the aesthetic appreciation associated with secular art, and conducts an in-depth study (and reconstruction) of the late Byzantine Service of the Furnace. Often treated as a liturgical drama, White translates and delineates the features of five extant versions, to show how and why it generated widely diverse audience reactions in both medieval times and our own.

Food and Theatre on the World Stage (Routledge Advances in Theatre & Performance Studies)

by Ann Folino White Dorothy Chansky

Putting food and theatre into direct conversation, this volume focuses on how food and theatre have operated for centuries as partners in the performative, symbolic, and literary making of meaning. Through case studies, literary analyses, and performance critiques, contributors examine theatrical work from China, Japan, India, Greece, Italy, France, Germany, England, the United States, Chile, Argentina, and Zimbabwe, addressing work from classical, popular, and contemporary theatre practices. The investigation of uses of food across media and artistic genres is a burgeoning area of scholarly investigation, yet regarding representation and symbolism, literature and film have received more attention than theatre, while performance studies scholars have taken the lead in examining the performative aspects of food events. This collection looks across dramatic genres, historical periods, and cultural contexts, and at food in all of its socio-political, material complexity to examine the particular problems and potentials of invoking and using food in live theatre. The volume considers food as a transhistorical, global phenomenon across theatre genres, addressing the explosion of food studies at the end of the twentieth century that has shown how food is a crucial aspect of cultural identity.

Enchanted Journey

by Cristina L. White

TYA, Children's Theatre \ 4m, 4f \ Simple Set \ A prediction warning Prince Gustav of giants, witches, and danger does not prevent him from traveling to the faraway Kingdom of Lira when he learns his help is needed. He begins a journey which is indeed enchanted, for in the midst of danger he finds unexpected friendship and laughter. Before he reaches Lira, Gustav meets two witches, whose charm makes them unlike any ever encountered, and befriends a coward named Alakazam who travels with him to the dark garden of Gothar the Giant. The journey ends when the surprising and secret ambition of Gothar is learned, and Alakazam achieves his deepest wish through an act of courage.

The Spiral Staircase

by Ethel White

"Adept at laying one icy finger on the back of your neck" - SpectatorHelen Capel is hired as a live-in lady-help to the Warren family in the countryside. She enjoys the eccentric household and her duties, but her peaceful and simple life is soon disturbed by a series of mysterious murders in the isolated community.As Helen's employer, Professor Sebastian Warren, battens down the hatches and locks all the doors of their remote country house, the eight residents begin to feel safe. But somewhere out there lurks a murderer of young girls. As the murders crawl closer to home, Helen starts to wonder if there really is safety in numbers--and what happens when those numbers start to dwindle?

Audience Participation in Theatre

by Gareth White

This book asks that we consider the practices that facilitate audience participation on equal terms with other elements of the theatre maker's art; it offers a theoretical basis for this new approach, illustrated by examples from diverse participatory performances.

Anne & Gilbert

by Nancy White Jeff Hochhauser Bob Johnston

Music by Bob Johnston and Nancy White Book by Jeff Hochhauser Lyrics by Nancy White, Bob Johnston and Jeff Hochhauser Based on the novels Anne of Avonlea and Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery Based on the sequel novels to Anne of Green Gables, this new Canadian musical continues the story of Anne Shirley's life. Set in the village of Avonlea and at Redmond College in Halifax, Anne and Gilbert follows Anne's journey to young adulthood and her romance with high school academic rival, Gilbert Blythe. Gilbert is in love with Anne, but she seems to be immune to his declarations of love. In the end, Anne realizes what everyone else already knows: that Gilbert is the love of her life. "Anne and Gilbert is a marvel." - The Toronto Star "When the curtain fell, I was disappointed to see it all end." - Variety "It is funny, charming, and musically and visually sensational. Writers, Jeff Hochauser, Nancy White, and Bob Johnstone...have succeeded in grand fashion. Refreshingly modern, Anne & Gilbert is magically artistic, and oh so romantic!" - The Buzz "Heartwarming, tear-inducing, thoroughly satisfying" - The Halifax Chronicle Herald

The Routledge Companion to Stanislavsky (Routledge Companions Ser.)

by R. Andrew White

Stanislavsky’s system of actor-training has revolutionised modern theatre practice, and he is widely recognised to be one of the great cultural innovators of the twentieth century. The Routledge Companion to Stanislavsky is an essential book for students and scholars alike, providing the first overview of the field for the 21st century. An important feature of this book is the balance between Stanislavsky’s theory and practice, as international contributors present scholarly and artistic interpretations of his work. With chapters including academic essays and personal narratives, the Companion is divided into four clear parts, exploring Stanislavsky on stage, as an acting teacher, as a theorist and finally as a theatre practitioner. Bringing together a dazzling selection of original scholarship, notable contributions include:Anatoly Smeliansky on Stanislavsky’s lettersWilliam D. Gunn on staging ideology at the Moscow Art TheatreSharon Marie Carnicke and David Rosen on opera Rosemary Malague on the feminist perspective of new translationsW.B. Worthen on cognitive scienceJulia Listengarten on the avant-gardeDavid Krasner on the System in America and Dennis Beck on Stanislavsky’s legacy in non-realistic theatre R. Andrew White is Associate Professor of Theatre at Valparaiso University, where he annually directs productions. He has an MFA in Acting from Carnegie Mellon University and the Moscow Art Theatre School, and has worked as an actor at a variety of theatres in the United States. In addition, his scholarship has appeared in edited works published by Routledge and Palgrave Macmillan, as well as in top American journals including Theatre Survey, TDR/The Drama Review, and New England Theatre Journal.

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