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Seven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good

by Corey Taylor

For the first time, Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor speaks directly to his fans and shares his worldview about life as a sinner. And Taylor knows how to sin. As a small-town hero in the early ’90s, he threw himself into a hard-drinking, fierce-loving, live-for-the-moment life; when his music exploded, he found himself rich, wanted, and on the road. But soon his extreme lifestyle led him to question what it means to sin and whether it could—or should—be cast in a different light. After all, if sin makes us human how wrong can it be?Now updated with a new Afterword by the author, Seven Deadly Sins is a brutally honest look “at a life that could have gone horribly wrong at any turn,” and the soul-searching and self-discovery it took to set it right.

Seven Deadly Sins: Settling the Argument Between Born Bad and Damaged Good

by Corey Taylor

For the first time, Slipknot and Stone Sour frontman Corey Taylor speaks directly to his fans and shares his worldview about life as a sinner. And Taylor knows how to sin. As a small-town hero in the early '90s, he threw himself into a fierce-drinking, drug-abusing, hard-loving, live-for-the moment life. Soon Taylor's music exploded, and he found himself rich, wanted, and on the road. His new and ever-more extreme lifestyle had an unexpected effect, however; for the first time, he began to actively think about what it meant to sin and whether sinning could--or should--be recast in a different light. Seven Deadly Sins is Taylor's personal story, but it's also a larger discussion of what it means to be seen as either a "good" person or a "bad" one. Yes, Corey Taylor has broken the law and hurt people, but, if sin is what makes us human, how wrong can it be?

Seventeen Famous Operas

by Ernest Newman

“The great composer does not set to work because he is inspired, but becomes inspired because he is working.” –Ernest Newman In Seventeen Famous Operas, renowned musicologist and music critic Ernest Newman goes beyond simply retelling the plots of the operas he has chosen to feature in this volume. Because for Newman, opera was theater—and he demonstrates that with his in-depth studies of the seventeen featured operas. Newman uses biographical, literary, and historical background to expose the reader to how each featured work came to be. These featured works include La Boheme, Madame Butterfly, Carmen, La Traviata, The Marriage of Figaro, The Barber of Seville, The Magic Flute and ten other famous works. Seventeen Famous Operas is a must-read for music librarians, opera lovers, and propagandists of music everywhere.

Seventeenth-Century Opera and the Sound of the Commedia dell’Arte

by Emily Wilbourne

In this book, Emily Wilbourne boldly traces the roots of early opera back to the sounds of the commedia dell'arte. Along the way, she forges a new history of Italian opera, from the court pieces of the early seventeenth century to the public stages of Venice more than fifty years later. Wilbourne considers a series of case studies structured around the most important and widely explored operas of the period: Monteverdi's lost L'Arianna, as well as his Il Ritorno d'Ulisse and L'incoronazione di Poppea; Mazzochi and Marazzoli's L'Egisto, ovvero Chi soffre speri; and Cavalli's L'Ormindo and L'Artemisia. As she demonstrates, the sound-in-performance aspect of commedia dell'arte theater--specifically, the use of dialect and verbal play--produced an audience that was accustomed to listening to sonic content rather than simply the literal meaning of spoken words. This, Wilbourne suggests, shaped the musical vocabularies of early opera and facilitated a musicalization of Italian theater. Highlighting productive ties between the two worlds, from the audiences and venues to the actors and singers, this work brilliantly shows how the sound of commedia performance ultimately underwrote the success of opera as a genre.

A Severed Wasp (Vigneras #3)

by Madeleine L'Engle

Famed concert pianist Katherine Vigneras returns home to New York City for her retirement and hopes to enjoy the simple pleasures of living and a respite from the celebrity's life she once enjoyed. Unhappily, other people's problems intrude and she begins to function as an adviser, which stirs up forgotten memories.

Sex, Death, and Minuets: Anna Magdalena Bach and Her Musical Notebooks (New Material Histories of Music)

by David Yearsley

At one time a star in her own right as a singer, Anna Magdalena (1701–60) would go on to become, through her marriage to the older Johann Sebastian Bach, history’s most famous musical wife and mother. The two musical notebooks belonging to her continue to live on, beloved by millions of pianists young and old. Yet the pedagogical utility of this music—long associated with the sound of children practicing and mothers listening—has encouraged a rosy and one-sided view of Anna Magdalena as a model of German feminine domesticity. Sex, Death, and Minuets offers the first in-depth study of these notebooks and their owner, reanimating Anna Magdalena as a multifaceted historical subject—at once pious and bawdy, spirited and tragic. In these pages, we follow Magdalena from young and flamboyant performer to bereft and impoverished widow—and visit along the way the coffee house, the raucous wedding feast, and the family home. David Yearsley explores the notebooks’ more idiosyncratic entries—like its charming ditties on illicit love and searching ruminations on mortality—against the backdrop of the social practices and concerns that women shared in eighteenth-century Lutheran Germany, from status in marriage and widowhood, to fulfilling professional and domestic roles, money, fashion, intimacy and sex, and the ever-present sickness and death of children and spouses. What emerges is a humane portrait of a musician who embraced the sensuality of song and the uplift of the keyboard, a sometimes ribald wife and oft-bereaved mother who used her cherished musical notebooks for piety and play, humor and devotion—for living and for dying.

Sex, Drugs, and Rock 'n' Roll

by Zoe Cormier

Full of noise and color, Sex, Drugs, and Rock ’n’ Roll looks at scientists and their craft, how hedonistic impulses inform our highest pursuits, and how the renegades of science have illuminated the secrets of our deepest impulses. It is a fascinating tale of scientists on the edge, experimenting on themselves and others, that asks the big (and strange) questions about what it means to be human, about consciousness and happiness, the future and past of our species, our scientific knowledge, and our culture. Not to mention our parties. It will pull you in and gross you out, but it never loses sight of the stories, ideas, and scientific discoveries that make sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll so timeless.

Sex, Drugs, Ratt & Roll

by Sam Benjamin Stephen Pearcy

A jaw-dropping tell-all from the lead singer of the 1980s supergroup Ratt: the groupies, the trashed hotel rooms, the drugs--and just how much you can get away with when you're one of the biggest hair metal stars of all time.In the mid-1980s, Ratt, alongside Motley Crüe, Poison, and Quiet Riot, were laying down the riffs and unleashing the scissor kicks that would herald the arrival of music's most flamboyantly debauched era. Now with Sex, Drugs, Ratt & Roll, Ratt frontman and chief rabble-rouser Stephen Pearcy divulges all the dirty details of the era when big-haired bands ruled the world. Stephen was primed for a life of excess from an early age--his father died of a heroin overdose when he was twelve, and by the age of fifteen, Stephen was himself a drug addict. When Stephen met the thrill-seeking Robbin Crosby, he knew he'd found his perfect partner in crime--both in music and partying. Ratt's 1984 debut single, "Round and Round," became one of the top-selling metal songs of all time, but it was the band's off-stage escapades that were the stuff of legend. "Our tour bus is like our pirate ship, it's where we rape and pillage," said Pearcy in 1987. Now Pearcy's memoir reveals all the rock star excess--the partying, the women, the $2,000-a-day drug habits--letting fans see into this harrowing hair-metal lifestyle and what it's really like behind the scenes when you're a rock star.

The Sex Pistols: The Secret History (The\secret History Of Rock Ser.)

by Alan Cross

Alan Cross is the preeminent chronicler of popular music.Here he provides a history of punk-rock revolutionaries The Sex Pistols.This look at the band—"Delivering Anarchy to the UK"—is adapted from the audiobook of the same name.

The Sex Revolts: Gender, Rebellion, and Rock'n'roll

by Simon Reynolds

The Sex Revolts captures the paradox at rock's dark heart--the music is often most thrilling when it is most misogynistic and macho. And, looking at music made by female artists, the authors ask: must it always be this way? Provocative and passionately argued, the book walks the edgy line between a rock fan's excitement and a critic's awareness of the music's murky undercurrents.

Sextet

by Morris Panych

"The best script Morris Panych has ever written."?Toronto StarA blizzard strands six musicians in their motel with only their instruments, each other, and their secrets to keep them warm. Where will everyone sleep when everyone is sleeping with everyone else? Morris Panych is internationally recognized as one of North America's master playwrights.

Sh-Boom!: The Explosion of Rock 'n' Roll, 1953–1968

by Clay Cole David Hinckley

A rip-snorting rock ‘n’ roll memoir from the legendary disc jockey who’s been called “the missing link to the Sixties.” There was a small sliver of time between Bebop and Hip-Hop, when a new generation of teenagers created rock ‘n’ roll. Clay Cole was one of those teenagers, as the host of his own Saturday night pop music television show. Sh-Boom! is the pop culture chronicle of that exciting time, 1953 to 1968, when teenagers created their own music, from swing bands and pop to rhythm and blues, cover records, a cappella, rockabilly, folk-rock, and girl groups; from the British Invasion to the creation of the American Boy Band. He was the first to introduce Chubby Checker performing “The Twist”; the first to present the Rolling Stones, Tony Orlando, Dionne Warwick, Neil Diamond, Bobby Vinton, the Rascals, the Ronettes, the Four Seasons, Dion, and dozens more; the first to introduce music video clips, discotheque, go-go girls and young unknown standup comedians Richard Pryor, George Carlin, and Fannie Flagg to a teenage television audience. But after fifteen years of fame, Clay walked away from his highly popular Saturday night show at the age of thirty—and remained out of the spotlight for over forty years. Well, he’s missing no longer; he’s back with a remarkable story to tell. Brimming with the gossip, scandal and heartbreak of the upstart billion-dollar music biz, Sh-Boom! is a breezy, behind-the-scenes look at “live” television, mom-and-pop record companies, and a boozy, Mafia-run Manhattan during the early days of rock ‘n’ roll.

Shake It Up: A Library of America Special Publication

by Jonathan Lethem Kevin Dettmar

THE ESSENTIAL PLAYLIST OF GREAT WRITING ABOUT THE MUSIC THAT ROCKED AMERICA Jonathan Lethem and Kevin Dettmar's Shake It Up invites the reader into the tumult and excitement of the rock revolution through fifty landmark pieces by a supergroup of writers on rock in all its variety, from heavy metal to disco, punk to hip-hop. Stanley Booth describes a recording session with Otis Redding; Ellen Willis traces the meteoric career of Janis Joplin; Ellen Sander recalls the chaotic world of Led Zeppelin on tour; Nick Tosches etches a portrait of the young Jerry Lee Lewis; Eve Babitz remembers Jim Morrison. Alongside are Lenny Kaye on acapella and Greg Tate on hip-hop, Vince Aletti on disco and Gerald Early on Motown; Robert Christgau on Prince, Nelson George on Marvin Gaye, Luc Sante on Bob Dylan, Hilton Als on Michael Jackson, Anthony DeCurtis on the Rolling Stones, Kelefa Sanneh on Jay Z. The story this anthology tells is a ongoing one: “it’s too early,” editors Jonathan Lethem and Kevin Dettmar note, “for canon formation in a field so marvelously volatile—a volatility that mirrors, still, that of pop music itself, which remains smokestack lightning. The writing here attempts to catch some in a bottle.” Also features:NAT HENTOFF on BOB DYLAN AMIRI BARAKA on R&B LESTER BANGS on ELVIS PRESLEY ROBERT CHRISTGAU on PRINCE DEBRA RAE COHEN on DAVID BOWIE EVE BABITZ on JIM MORRISON ROBERT PALMER on SAM COOKE CHUCK KLOSTERMAN on HEAVY METAL JESSICA HOPPER on EMO JOHN JEREMIAH SULLIVAN on AXL ROSE ELIJAH WALD on THE BEATLES GREIL MARCUS on CHRISTIAN MARCLAY and much more.

Shake My Sillies Out

by Raffi

A trio of animals who can't get to sleep roam the forest and eventually encounter a group of campers who join them in shaking their sillies out, clapping their crazies out, and yawning their sleepies out.

Shake, Rattle and Roll: Rhythm Instruments and More for Active Learning

by Abigail Flesch Connors

Music and movement go together like books and reading--they spread joy! It's no secret that quiet doesn't always equal quality learning. At times, we struggle to help children settle down so they can listen and learn. However, we can also encourage them to move to the beat so they can listen and learn in more active ways. In Shake, Rattle, and Roll: Rhythm Instruments and More for Active Learning, you will find activities that inspire curiosity, exploration, and creativity. When children are singing, moving, listening, and playing music, their creative energy enhances their learning in many areas like Language Arts and Math. Because there is not just one right way to play rhythm instruments or move to the beat, children can explore their own capabilities while they dance, sing, and play.

Shake, Rattle and Roll: Yugoslav Rock Music and the Poetics of Social Critique (Ashgate Popular and Folk Music Series)

by Dalibor Mišina

From the late-1970s to the late-1980s rock music in Yugoslavia had an important social and political purpose of providing a popular cultural outlet for the unique forms of socio-cultural critique that engaged with the realities and problems of life in Yugoslav society. The three music movements that emerged in this period - New Wave, New Primitives, and New Partisans - employed the understanding of rock music as the 'music of commitment' (i.e. as socio-cultural praxis premised on committed social engagement) to articulate the critiques of the country's 'new socialist culture', with the purpose of helping to eliminate the disconnect between the ideal and the reality of socialist Yugoslavia. This book offers an analysis of the three music movements and their particular brand of 'poetics of the present' in order to explore the movements' specific forms of socio-cultural engagement with Yugoslavia's 'new socialist culture' and demonstrate that their cultural praxis was oriented towards the goal of realizing the genuine Yugoslav socialist-humanist community 'in the true measure of man'. Thus, the book's principal argument is that the driving force behind the music of commitment was, although critical, a fundamentally constructive disposition towards the progressive ideal of socialist Yugoslavia.

Shakespeare as Jukebox Musical

by John R. Severn

Shakespeare as Jukebox Musical is the first book-length study of a growing performance phenomenon: musical adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays in which characters sing existing popular songs as one of their modes of communication. John Severn shows how these highly allusive works give rise to the pleasures of collaborative reception, and also lend themselves to political work, particularly in terms of identity politics and a valorisation of diversity. Drawing on musical theatre history, adaptation theory, Shakespeare studies and musicology, the book develops a critical approach that allows jukebox-musical versions of Shakespeare to be understood and valued both for their political potential and for the experiences they offer to audiences as artistic responses to Shakespeare. Case studies from the USA, the UK and Australia demonstrate how these works open new windows on Shakespeare’s plays and their performance traditions, on the wider jukebox musical trend, and on adaptation as an art form.

Shakespeare's Lyric Stage: Myth, Music, and Poetry in the Last Plays

by Seth Lerer

What does it mean to have an emotional response to poetry and music? And, just as important but considered less often, what does it mean not to have such a response? What happens when lyric utterances—which should invite consolation, revelation, and connection—somehow fall short of the listener’s expectations? As Seth Lerer shows in this pioneering book, Shakespeare’s late plays invite us to contemplate that very question, offering up lyric as a displaced and sometimes desperate antidote to situations of duress or powerlessness. Lerer argues that the theme of lyric misalignment running throughout The Tempest, The Winter’s Tale, Henry VIII, and Cymbeline serves a political purpose, a last-ditch effort at transformation for characters and audiences who had lived through witch-hunting, plague, regime change, political conspiracies, and public executions. A deep dive into the relationship between aesthetics and politics, this book also explores what Shakespearean lyric is able to recuperate for these “victims of history” by virtue of its disjointed utterances. To this end, Lerer establishes the concept of mythic lyricism: an estranging use of songs and poetry that functions to recreate the past as present, to empower the mythic dead, and to restore a bit of magic to the commonplaces and commodities of Jacobean England. Reading against the devotion to form and prosody common in Shakespeare scholarship, Lerer’s account of lyric utterance’s vexed role in his late works offers new ways to understand generational distance and cultural change throughout the playwright’s oeuvre.

Shakey: Neil Young's Biography

by Jimmy Mcdonough

Neil Young is one of rock and roll's most important and enigmatic figures, a legend from the sixties who is still hugely influential today. He has never granted a writer access to his inner life - until now. Based on six years of interviews with more than three hundred of Young's associates, and on more than fifty hours of interviews with Young himself, Shakey is a fascinating, prodigious account of the singer's life and career. Jimmy McDonough follows Young from his childhood in Canada to his cofounding of Buffalo Springfield to the huge success of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young to his comeback in the nineties. Filled with never-before-published words directly from the artist himself, Shakey is an essential addition to the top shelf of rock biographies.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Shakin' All Over: Popular Music And Disability

by George Mckay

Given the explosion in recent years of scholarship exploring the ways in which disability is manifested and performed in numerous cultural spaces, it’s surprising that until now there has never been a single monograph study covering the important intersection of popular music and disability. George McKay’s Shakin’ All Over is a cross-disciplinary examination of the ways in which popular music performers have addressed disability: in their songs, in their live performances, and in various media presentations. By looking closely into the work of artists such as Johnny Rotten, Neil Young, Johnnie Ray, Ian Dury, Teddy Pendergrass, Curtis Mayfield, and Joni Mitchell, McKay investigates such questions as how popular music works to obscure and accommodate the presence of people with disabilities in its cultural practice. He also examines how popular musicians have articulated the experiences of disability (or sought to pass), or have used their cultural arena for disability advocacy purposes.

Shania Twain

by Michael Mccall

Shania Twain is not your average pop star. She has mega-hits like "You're Still the One", multi-platinum albums (Come on Over)...but she's much more than merely the sum of her success. Growing up in rural Canada amidst great poverty. Shania spent summers working for her father in a reforestation crew, learning how to handle an axe and wield a chainsaw as well as any man. At age 21, both her parents were killed in a magic car crash, and she was left to raise three younger siblings alone. The discipline and diligence she was forced to learn was then turned to her music career, with astounding results. From the cover of Rolling Stone to Country America, this cross-over wonder has charmed millions of music lovers around the world, and her fan base continues to grow Here, finally, is her whole story, complete with never-before-seen photos and insider information. This is the book Shania fans have been waiting for.

Shania Twain

by Jan Pisciotta Robin Eggar

THE BIOGRAPHY

Shaped by Japanese Music: Kikuoka Hiroaki and Nagauta Shamisen in Tokyo (Current Research in Ethnomusicology: Outstanding Dissertations #10)

by Jay Davis Keister

Shaped by Japanese Music is an in-depth analysis of the musical world of an individual performer, composer, and teacher. Using an ethnographic approach, this study situates musical analysis in the context of its creation, demonstrating that traditional Japanese music is hardly an archaic song form frozen in the present, but an active sociocultural system that has been reproduced in Japan from the seventeenth century to the present day. The dynamics of this cultural system unfold in the musical experiences of Kikuoka Hiroaki, the leader of a school of nagauta music, who struggled to modernize the art form while trying to maintain the qualities he believed to be fundamental to the tradition. Through the focus on Kikuoka's school, readers will become familiar with conflicts in the recent history of this music, traditional Japanese teaching methods, and the technique of modern composition within a traditional form. Underlying all of these different analyses is the concept of kata (form), a Japanese aesthetic that helps shape musical forms as well as the behaviour of musicians.

Shaping Jazz

by Damon J. Phillips

There are over a million jazz recordings, but only a few hundred tunes have been recorded repeatedly. Why did a minority of songs become jazz standards? Why do some songs--and not others--get rerecorded by many musicians? Shaping Jazz answers this question and more, exploring the underappreciated yet crucial roles played by initial production and markets--in particular, organizations and geography--in the development of early twentieth-century jazz. Damon Phillips considers why places like New York played more important roles as engines of diffusion than as the sources of standards. He demonstrates why and when certain geographical references in tune and group titles were considered more desirable. He also explains why a place like Berlin, which produced jazz abundantly from the 1920s to early 1930s, is now on jazz's historical sidelines. Phillips shows the key influences of firms in the recording industry, including how record companies and their executives affected what music was recorded, and why major companies would rerelease recordings under artistic pseudonyms. He indicates how a recording's appeal was related to the narrative around its creation, and how the identities of its firm and musicians influenced the tune's long-run popularity. Applying fascinating ideas about market emergence to a music's commercialization, Shaping Jazz offers a unique look at the origins of a groundbreaking art form.

Sharecropper’s Troubadour

by Michael K. Honey

Folk singer and labor organizer John Handcox was born to illiterate sharecroppers, but went on to become one of the most beloved folk singers of the prewar labor movement. This beautifully told oral history gives us Handcox in his own words, recounting a journey that began in the Deep South and went on to shape the labor music tradition.

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