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An Enemy of the People

by Henrik Ibsen Arthur Miller

<P>When Dr. Stockmann discovers that the water in the small Norwegian town in which he is the resident physician has been contaminated, he does what any responsible citizen would do: reports it to the authorities. <P>But Stockmann's good deed has the potential to ruin the town's reputation as a popular spa destination, and instead of being hailed as a hero, Stockmann is labeled an enemy of the people. <P>Arthur Miller's adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's classic drama is a classic in itself, a penetrating exploration of what happens when the truth comes up against the will of the majority. This edition includes Arthur Miller's preface and an introduction by John Guare.

The Late Romances

by William Shakespeare

The first of Shakespeare's late romances moves spectacularly from one dramatic period to another as the hero, Pericles, sails off to adventure and love, and experiences what for him is a miracle. Cymbeline: A favorite romantic drama, this play of a wife unjustly accused of faithlessness moves from a world of intrigue and slander to one of reconciliation and forgiveness, and contains two of Shakespeare's most poignantly beautiful songs. The Winter's Tale: From a darkly melodramatic beginning to a joyous pastoral ending, this romance of a jealous king and his long-suffering queen is superb entertainment, with revelations, plot twists, and a final compelling theatrical moment of discovery. The Tempest: This tale of the exiled Duke of Milan, marooned on an enchanted island, is so richly filled with music and magic, romance and comedy, that its theme of love and reconciliation offers a splendid feast for the senses and the heart.

The Meaning Of Shakespeare Volume 1

by Harold C. Goddard

In two magnificent and authoritative volumes, Harold C. Goddard takes readers on a tour through the works of William Shakespeare, celebrating his incomparable plays and unsurpassed literary genius.

The Meaning of Shakespeare (Volume II)

by Harold C. Goddard

In two magnificent and authoritative volumes, Harold C. Goddard takes readers on a tour through the works of William Shakespeare, celebrating his incomparable plays and unsurpassed literary genius.

Showboats: The History of an American Institution

by Philip Graham

This book is a delightful and authoritative record of America''s showboats from the first one, launched in 1831, to the last, ultimately tied up at a St. Louis dock. It is also a record of the men and women who built and loved these floating theaters, of those who performed on their stages, and of the thousands who sat in their auditoriums. And, lastly, it is a record of a genuine folk institution, as American as catfish, which for more than a century did much to relieve the social and cultural starvation of our vast river frontier. For these showboats brought their rich cargoes of entertainment--genuine laughter, a glimpse of other worlds, a respite from the grinding hardship of the present, emotional relaxation--to valley farmers, isolated factory workers and miners, and backwoodsmen who otherwise would have lacked all such opportunities. To the more privileged, the showboats brought pleasant reminder of a half-forgotten culture. They penetrated regions where churches and school had not gone, and where land theaters were for generations to be impossible. Like circuit preachers, they carried their message to the outer fringes of American civilization. In spite of many faults, it was a good message. The frontier had created this institution to fill a genuine need, and it lasted only until other and better means of civilizing these regions could reach them--good roads, automobiles, motion pictures, schools, churches, newspapers, and theaters. But although the showboats have passed into history, they have left a rich legacy. As long as the Mississippi flows into the Gulf, their story will fire the imagination of Americans. Showboating has become so legendary that few Americans know what this unique institution was really like. In Showboats, at long last, the true story emerges. It differs in many important respects from the motion picture and fictional versions to which Americans are accustomed, but it is not a whit the less glamorous. Philip Graham has told his story with imagination, genuine insight, and complete devotion to facts. No one who is interested in America''s past should fail to read it. This book is a delightful and authoritative record of America''s showboats from the first one, launched in 1831, to the last, ultimately tied up at a St. Louis dock. It is also a record of the men and women who built and loved these floating theaters, of those who performed on their stages, and of the thousands who sat in their auditoriums. And, lastly, it is a record of a genuine folk institution, as American as catfish, which for more than a century did much to relieve the social and cultural starvation of our vast river frontier. For these showboats brought their rich cargoes of entertainment - genuine laughter, a glimpse of other worlds, a respite from the grinding hardship of the present, emotional relaxation - to valley farmers, isolated factory workers and miners, and backwoodsmen who otherwise would have lacked all such opportunities. To the more privileged, the showboats brought pleasant reminder of a half-forgotten culture. They penetrated regions where churches and school had not gone, and where land theaters were for generations to be impossible. Like circuit preachers, they carried their message to the outer fringes of American civilization. In spite of many faults, it was a good message. The frontier had created this institution to fill a genuine need, and it lasted only until other and better means of civilizing these regions could reach them - good roads, automobiles, motion pictures, schools, churches, newspapers, and theaters. But although the showboats have passed into history, they have left a rich legacy. As long as the Mississippi flows into the Gulf, their story will fire the imagination of Americans. Showboating has become so legendary that few Americans know what this unique institution was really like. In Showboats, at long last, the true story emerges. It differs in many important respects from the motion picture and fictional versions to which Americans are accustome...

Star Song

by Florence Ryerson

Christmas Play / 4m, 5f / The scene is an inn on the way to Bethlehem on the night of Christ's birth. The inn's occupants are too busy with their squabbles and personal worries to sense the great, holy event occurring in a stable nearby. Only a slave and a little lame girl are prepared for this momentous occasion. It is a very dramatic, touching play. A good opportunity for singing clubs or choirs, but the music may be minimal if desired.

The Hollow

by Agatha Christie

Drama / 6m,6f / Interior Set. An unhappy game of romantic follow-the-leader explodes into murder one weekend at The Hollow, home of Sir Henry and Lucy Angkatell. Dr. Cristow is at the center of the trouble when his mistress Henrietta, ex-mistress Veronica, and wife Gerda, simultaneously arrive at The Hollow. Also visiting are Edward (who is in love with Henrietta) and Midge (who loves Edward). Veronica ardently desires to marry Cristow and succeeds in reopening their affair but is unable to get him to divorce his wife. Veronica unwisely states that if she cannot have him, no one shall. Within five minutes Cristow is dead. Nearly everyone has a motive and most had the opportunity. Enter Inspector Colquhoun and Sergeant Penny to solve the crime.

Japanese Theatre in Highlight: A Pictorial Commentary

by Faubion Bowers Earle Ernst Francis Haar

Words cannot explain to an outsider the sight and feel of the Japanese stage. And definitions and descriptions do not convey an exact image to people brought up on a concept of the theatre that differs so greatly from the Japanese as ours. In seeing something foreign, too, our eyes must be guided carefully, so that we know what we are seeing and how to look at it profitably. All of us are to be grateful for this book, because now, without leaving our contries, or for that matter our armchairs, we can peer at leisure into expertly selected, edited and glossed highlights of the three great classical theatre arts of Japan-Noh, Bunraku and Kabuki. The Fifty-four ensuing photgraphs, with their textual commentary, are the equivalent, in my mind, of fifty-four choice seats at some of the best performances in modern Japan and intimate visits backstage.

Merry Widow

by Charles George

Operetta \ 6 m, 12 f w/flexible chorus. \ Int. \ All the world famous songs have been retained, embellished with new lyrics that critics believe to be the best words ever to the Lehar score. There's a new story of a dashing European prince and his romance with a beautiful American widow. The comedy is clever and wholesome and is not difficult to cast or stage.

27 Wagons Full of Cotton and Other Plays

by Tennessee Williams

The thirteen one-act plays collected in this volume include some of Tennessee Williams's finest and most powerful work. They are full of the perception of life as it is, and the passion for life as it ought to be, which have made The Glass Menagerie and A Streetcar Named Desire classics of the American theater. Only one of these plays (The Purification) is written in verse, but in all of them the approach to character is by way of poetic revelation. Whether Williams is writing of derelict roomers in a New Orleans boarding house (The Lady of Larkspur Lotion) or the memories of a venerable traveling salesman (The Last of My Solid Gold Watches) or of delinquent children (This Property is Condemned), his insight into human nature is that of the poet. He can compress the basic meaning of life--its pathos or its tragedy, its bravery or the quality of its love--into one small scene or a few moments of dialogue. Mr. Williams's views on the role of the little theater in American culture are contained in a stimulating essay, "Something wild...," which serves as an introduction to this collection.

Aeschylus I: Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides (The Complete Greek Tragedies #1)

by Aeschylus David Grene Richmond Lattimore

"These authoritative translations consign all other complete collections to the wastebasket."--Robert Brustein, The New Republic. "This is it. No qualifications. Go out and buy it everybody."--Kenneth Rexroth, The Nation. "The translations deliberately avoid the highly wrought and affectedly poetic; their idiom is contemporary.... They have life and speed and suppleness of phrase."--Times Education Supplement. "These translations belong to our time. A keen poetic sensibility repeatedly quickens them; and without this inner fire the most academically flawless rendering is dead."--Warren D. Anderson, American Oxonian. "The critical commentaries and the versions themselves... are fresh, unpretentious, above all, functional."--Commonwealth. "Grene is one of the great translators."--Conor Cruise O'Brien, London Sunday Times. "Richmond Lattimore is that rara avis in our age, the classical scholar who is at the same time an accomplished poet."--Dudley Fitts, New York Times Book Review.

Indoor Sport

by Jack Perry

Comedy / 3 m., 3 f. / Interior / This ideal comedy for summer stock originally toured with Darren McGavin as the often absent soldier of fortune cargo pilot who desperately attempts to stop his wife's divorce plans and intentions to marry another man. Sheila gave up her tennis career for marriage and is fed up with living alone. Unaware of her plans, Gary returns for their anniversary with lavish gifts and romantic thoughts, accompanied by an ultra cynical foreign correspondent who's soured on marriage. Sheila's intended is a handsome, ex pro football star from her home town. In high school, he was Sheila's older sister's steady. Sister is now an ad agency account executive. As the evening develops into a night of veiled hostility, tactical maneuvering and one upmanship. An incorrigible, nosy cleaning woman rounds out the cast.

The Living Room: A Play

by Graham Greene

The illicit affair of a devout woman in London ignites a shattering family crisis in the author’s “ruthlessly honest” first play (The Guardian). In a dour Holland Park house with rooms and secrets long shuttered live three unyielding forces for morality: rigidly religious sisters Helen and Teresa, and their brother, a Roman Catholic priest. Into the lives of this insular trio comes their young grandniece, Rose Pemberton, following the death of her mother. To the mortification of her aunts, Rose has also brought her lover, Michael Dennis, who is twenty-five years Rose’s senior, married, and a psychology lecturer dictated by reason, not faith. In a home that reeks of sanctimony, Rose and Michael are as welcome as sin. But it’s the arrival of Michael’s distraught wife—armed with righteous emotional blackmail and worse—that ignites an unexpected fury and makes real the family’s greatest fears. Premiering in London in 1953 and moving to Broadway one year later, Graham Greene’s debut as a dramatist was hailed by Kenneth Tynan as “the best first play of its generation.”

Natalie Needs a Nightie

by Neil Schaffner

Farce / 4m, 3f / Interior / A guaranteed laugh riot! In an apartment house Tommy Briggs has his mail, calls, and visitors frequently misdirected to a girl's apartment whose pen name is also Tommy Briggs. Tommy's boss expects his young executives to be married so he tries to have someone pose as his wife. The trouble is he ends up with too many "wives." Then as he got a big bonus on the strength of a new "baby" he has to produce one for the boss. Again, there's too many, including one not of his race. Adding to this confusion is a compulsive chambermaid who snitches drinks and takes all clothing found on a particular chair to the cleaners including many vital articles such as the boss's garments placed there while he is in the shower.

The Bacchae and Other Plays: Ion the Women of Troy Helen the Bacchae

by Philip Vellacott

The plays of Euripides have stimulated audiences since the fifth century BC. This volume, containing Phoenician Women, Bacchae, Iphigenia at Aulis, Orestes, and Rhesus.

The Confidential Clerk

by T. S. Eliot

A motley play of family mysteries, The Confidential Clerk follows Sir Claude and Lady Elizabeth as they reconnect with their long-lost illegitimate children--even though they aren't quite certain whose child is whose. "Extraordinarily good fun," this is one of Eliot's greatest comedies, full of wit, crisp dialogue, and parental hijinks laced with some of Eliot's finest poetry and existential reveries (The Atlantic).

The Crucible: Complete Teacher's Kit (Penguin Plays)

by Arthur Miller

A haunting examination of groupthink and mass hysteria in a rural community <P><P>The place is Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692, an enclave of rigid piety huddled on the edge of a wilderness. Its inhabitants believe unquestioningly in their own sanctity. <P>But in Arthur Miller's edgy masterpiece, that very belief will have poisonous consequences when a vengeful teenager accuses a rival of witchcraft--and then when those accusations multiply to consume the entire village. <P>First produced in 1953, at a time when America was convulsed by a new epidemic of witch-hunting, The Crucible brilliantly explores the threshold between individual guilt and mass hysteria, personal spite and collective evil. <P>It is a play that is not only relentlessly suspenseful and vastly moving but that compels readers to fathom their hearts and consciences in ways that only the greatest theater ever can.

Cyrano de Bergerac

by Edmond Rostand

Widely considered the most popular modern French play, Cyrano de Bergerac has dazzled audiences with its wit and eloquence since it premiered in 1897. <P><P>Cyrano, a quarrelsome, hot-tempered swordsman, as famous for his dueling skills and pugnacity as for his inordinately long nose, is hopelessly enamored of the beautiful Roxane. <P>She, in turn, is in love with Christian, a handsome but inarticulate and slow-witted suitor. <P>Asked for help by Christian in wooing Roxane, Cyrano pours out his heart in romantic dialogues -- delivered under cover of night and dense foliage -- and through ardent love letters written in the name of Christian. <P>Presented here in a rich blank verse translation by poet Louis Untermeyer, this beloved romantic comedy will be warmly received by theater buffs as well as students and teachers of drama and literature.

The Lost Colony

by Paul Green

In 1937, The Lost Colony, Paul Green's dramatic retelling of the founding and mysterious disappearance of the Roanoke Island colony, opened to standing-room-only audiences and rave reviews. Since then, the beloved outdoor drama has played to more than 3 million people, and it is still going strong. Produced by the Roanoke Island Historical Association at the Waterside Theater near Manteo, North Carolina, The Lost Colony has run for more than sixty summers almost without interruption. (Production was suspended during World War II, when the threat of German submarines prowling the coast made an extended blackout necessary.)The model for modern outdoor theater, The Lost Colony combines song, dance, drama, special effects, and music to breathe life into shadowy legend. This rendering of the play's text, edited and with an introduction by Laurence Avery, brings this pioneering work back into print.

Spider's Web

by Agatha Christie

Full Length Play / Mystery Thriller / 8m, 3f / Interior Set. Clarissa, the second wife of Henry Hailsham Brown, is adept at spinning tales of adventure for their bored diplomatic circle. When a murder takes place in her drawing room she finds live drama much harder to cope with, especially as she suspects the murderer might be her young stepdaughter Pippa. Worse still, the victim is the man who broke up Henry's first marriage. Moreover Henry will be arriving shortly with a V.I.P. who might take a dim view of bodies in the drawing room. Clarissa's fast talking places her and Pippa in some hair raising experiences. By the time Henry arrives, the murderer has been unmasked and all is normal so normal that Henry is unable to believe Clarissa when she explains why there are no refreshments for their honored guest.

Storm is Breaking

by Jim Damico

Comedy / 1 m., 1 f. (off stage), 1 boy / Ext. / Winner of the first National Collegiate Playwriting Contest, this is a portrait of a boy who has been following an ant along the sidewalk for several hours. It is a picture that is hard to put out of your mind, and its intimations leave lasting thoughts. The boy prevents a man from stepping on the bug-- insect, the boy corrects him. For to the boy, everything on earth has size and significance.

Thirty Pieces of Silver

by Howard Fast

A couple in Washington, DC, is torn apart when a friend is accused of treasonJane and David Graham live upper-middle-class lives in mid-century Washington, DC. Jane minds the home with the help of a fulltime maid, and David works at the Treasury Department. But when the FBI visits their house one evening to ask questions about a friend's political beliefs, the answers the two give separately cause them both to wonder whether they truly know each other. Soon nothing is certain as the ideological fears plaguing the nation threaten to destroy Jane and David's family. Howard Fast's first play, Thirty Pieces of Silver was performed in several countries, from Australia to Europe, and offers an insightful look at the destructive power of reactionary politics in America. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Howard Fast including rare photos from the author's estate.

Under Milk Wood

by Dylan Thomas

The definitive new edition of Thomas's famous radio play Under Milk Wood is the masterpiece "radio play for voices" Dylan Thomas finished just before his death in 1953. First commissioned by the BBC and broadcast in 1954, it has been performed and celebrated by Anthony Hopkins, Richard Burton, Elton John, Tom Jones, Catherine Zeta Jones, Elizabeth Taylor, Peter O'Toole, and many others. In Under Milk Wood, Thomas gave fullest expression to his sense of the magnificent flavor and variety of life. A moving and hilarious account of a spring day in a small Welsh town, the play begins with dreams and ghosts before dawn and closes "as the rain of dusk brings on the bawdy night." This new edition contains the definitive version of the play, edited by the noted Dylan Thomas scholars Walford Davies and Ralph Maud, with an in-depth introduction by Davies as well as extensive and helpful textual and explanatory notes.

Waiting for Godot: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts

by Samuel Beckett

From an inauspicious beginning at the tiny Left Bank Theatre de Babylone in 1953, followed by bewilderment among American and British audiences, Waiting for Godot has become of the most important and enigmatic plays of the past fifty years and a cornerstone of twentieth-century drama. As Clive Barnes wrote, “Time catches up with genius … Waiting for Godot is one of the masterpieces of the century.” <P><P>The story revolves around two seemingly homeless men waiting for someone—or something—named Godot. Vladimir and Estragon wait near a tree, inhabiting a drama spun of their own consciousness. The result is a comical wordplay of poetry, dreamscapes, and nonsense, which has been interpreted as mankind’s inexhaustible search for meaning. Beckett’s language pioneered an expressionistic minimalism that captured the existential post-World War II Europe. His play remains one of the most magical and beautiful allegories of our time.

Witness For The Prosecution

by Agatha Christie

Full Length Play / Mystery Thriller / 8m, 5f / Interior Set. Leonard Vole stands in the dock, accused of murder. His wife can prove his innocence but when she takes the stand she denies his alibi. Can he escape the hangman's noose? Winner! New York Critics Circle Award.

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