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Africa and the World Trade Organization

by Richard E. Mshomba

Mshomba provides a systematic study of Africa as it relates to the World Trade Organization. He examines the WTO's enforcement mechanism; the WTO's broadened mandate, illustrated by the Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights; agriculture in the Doha Round; issues relating to transparency in government procurement; and the endeavor to streamline assistance to developing countries through an "Aid for Trade" initiative. The author integrates theory and practice, with a clear presentation of important economic concepts. He provides a rigorous analysis of key issues and proposals. He presents African countries as having an important role to play in the WTO, especially as they actively engage in bargaining through various coalitions. Mshomba acknowledges that WTO negotiations will always be complex and at times contentious due to wide economic and political differences between countries. He views the differences, however, as creating opportunities for a mutually beneficial exchange of goods, services, and ideas.

African-American Art

by Sharon F. Patton

From its origins in early 18th century slave communities to the end of the 20th century, African-American art has made a vital contribution to the art of the United States. This book provides a major reassessment of the subject, setting the art in the context of the African-American experience.

After Abu Ghraib: Exploring Human Rights in America and the Middle East

by Shadi Mokhtari

This book traverses three pivotal human rights struggles of the post-September 11th era: the American human rights campaign to challenge the Bush administration's "War on Terror" torture and detention policies, Middle Eastern efforts to challenge American human rights practices (reversing the traditional West to East flow of human rights mobilizations and discourses), and Middle Eastern attempts to challenge their own leaders' human rights violations in light of American interventions. This book presents snapshots of human rights being appropriated, promoted, claimed, reclaimed, and contested within and between the American and Middle Eastern contexts. The inquiry has three facets: first, it explores intersections between human rights norms and power as they unfold in the era. Second, it lays out the layers of the era's American and Middle Eastern encounter on the human rights plane. Finally, it draws out the era's key lessons for moving the human rights project forward.

After Kinship

by Janet Carsten

After Kinship examines what has happened to kinship through various tropes: the house, gender, personhood, substance, and reproductive technologies. It is s much about what has happened to the anthropological study of kinship in recent years as it is about what has happened to our everyday experience of kinship.

After Liberalism: Mass Democracy in the Managerial State

by Paul Edward Gottfried

In this trenchant challenge to social engineering, Paul Gottfried analyzes a patricide: the slaying of nineteenth-century liberalism by the managerial state. Many people, of course, realize that liberalism no longer connotes distributed powers and bourgeois moral standards, the need to protect civil society from an encroaching state, or the virtues of vigorous self-government. Many also know that today's "liberals" have far different goals from those of their predecessors, aiming as they do largely to combat prejudice, to provide social services and welfare benefits, and to defend expressive and "lifestyle" freedoms. Paul Gottfried does more than analyze these historical facts, however. He builds on them to show why it matters that the managerial state has replaced traditional liberalism: the new regimes of social engineers, he maintains, are elitists, and their rule is consensual only in the sense that it is unopposed by any widespread organized opposition. Throughout the western world, increasingly uprooted populations unthinkingly accept centralized controls in exchange for a variety of entitlements. In their frightening passivity, Gottfried locates the quandary for traditionalist and populist adversaries of the welfare state. How can opponents of administrative elites show the public that those who provide, however ineptly, for their material needs are the enemies of democratic self-rule and of independent decision making in family life? If we do not wake up, Gottfried warns, the political debate may soon be over, despite sporadic and ideologically confused populist rumblings in both Europe and the United States.

After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory (3rd edition)

by Alasdair Macintyre

In this classic work, Alasdair MacIntyre examines the historical and conceptual roots of the idea of virtue, diagnoses the reasons for its absence in personal and public life, and offers a tentative proposal for its recovery.

Against Bioethics

by Jonathan Baron

Governments, health professionals, patients, research institutions, and research subjects look to bioethicists for guidance in making important decisions about medical treatment and research.

Against the Protestant Gnostics

by Philip J. Lee

Since the discovery of original gnostic documents at Nag Hammadi in 1945, many scholars have recognized a familiar presence within this ancient heresy. To some authors the main features of gnosticism--belief in a secret revelation available only to an initiated elite, rejection of the physical world, and escape into the self--seemed reminiscent of modern cult groups and secular movements. However, Philip Lee, noting that most of the early gnostics were firmly ensconced within the Church, locates modern gnosticism within the Protestant establishment itself. "As a Protestant, I believe I have identified the elusive modern gnostics and they are ourselves," he writes. In this penetrating and provocative assessment of the current state of religion and its effect on values in society at large, Lee criticizes conservatives and liberals alike as he traces gnostic motifs to the very roots of American Protestantism. With references to an extraordinary spectrum of writings from sources as diverse as John Calvin, Martin Buber, Tom Wolfe, Margaret Atwood and Emily Dickinson among many others, he probes the effects of gnostic thinking on issues ranging from politics to feminism, from ecology to parenthood. The ethical ramifications of such a gnostic turn have been negative and frightening, he maintains. The book points to positive ways of restoring health to endangered Protestant churches. Calling for the restoration of a dialectical faith and practice, Lee offers an agenda for reform, including a renewal of obedience to the scriptures and an affirmation of life and creation within the circle of the extended family.

Agendas and Instability in American Politics (2nd edition)

by Frank R. Baumgartner Bryan D. Jones

When Agendas and Instability in American Politics appeared fifteen years ago, offering a profoundly original account of how policy issues rise and fall on the national agenda, the Journal of Politics predicted that it would "become a landmark study of public policy making and American politics." That prediction proved true and, in this long-awaited second edition, Bryan Jones and Frank Baumgartner refine their influential argument and expand it to illuminate the workings of democracies beyond the United States.The authors retain all the substance of their contention that short-term, single-issue analyses cast public policy too narrowly as the result of cozy and dependable arrangements among politicians, interest groups, and the media. Jones and Baumgartner provide a different interpretation by taking the long view of several issues--including nuclear energy, urban affairs, smoking, and auto safety--to demonstrate that bursts of rapid, unpredictable policy change punctuate the patterns of stability more frequently associated with government. Featuring a new introduction and two additional chapters, this updated edition ensures that their findings will remain a touchstone of policy studies for many years to come.

Agglomeration Economics

by Edward L. Glaeser

When firms and people are located near each other in cities and in industrial clusters, they benefit in various ways, including by reducing the costs of exchanging goods and ideas.One might assume that these benefits would become less important as transportation and communication costs fall. Paradoxically, however, cities have become increasingly important, and even within cities industrial clusters remain vital. Agglomeration Economics brings together a group of essays that examine the reasons why economic activity continues to cluster together despite the falling costs of moving goods and transmitting information. The studies cover a wide range of topics and approach the economics of agglomeration from different angles. Together they advance our understanding of agglomeration and its implications for a globalized world.

Agribusiness Management and Entrepreneurship (Third Edition)

by Michael E. Newman Walter J. Wills

Agribusiness Management and Entrepreneurship is intended to fill the need for a basic textbook covering the planning, organizing, and managing of an operation; as well as provide a comprehensive source for those who wish to consider a business from the ownership point of view, specifically as it relates to the vast area of agribusiness.

Air Words: Writing for Broadcast News

by John Hewitt

An introductory text for broadcast newswriting, with numerous exercises and examples illustrating broadcast news style. Defines and explains standard industry formats, rules, and procedures, and covers fact checking, ethics, script formats, shifting from print to broadcast, writing leads, interviews, aspects of TV writing, and copyediting and producing. Includes chapter glossaries. This second edition discusses technology advances such as wire capture and producing from CRTs. Lacks a bibliography. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Alain L. Locke: Biography of a Philosopher

by Leonard Harris Charles Molesworth

Alain L. Locke (1886-1954), in his famous 1925 anthology "The New Negro", declared that "the pulse of the Negro world has begun to beat in Harlem". Often called the father of the Harlem Renaissance, Locke had his finger directly on that pulse, promoting, influencing, and sparring. Leonard Harris and Charles Molesworth trace Locke's story through his Philadelphia upbringing, his undergraduate years at Harvard and his tenure as the first African American Rhodes Scholar. The heart of their narrative illuminates Locke's heady years in 1920s New York City and his forty-year career at Howard University, where he helped spearhead the adult education movement of the 1930s and wrote on topics ranging from the philosophy of value to the theory of democracy. Harris and Molesworth show that throughout this illustrious career -- despite a formal manner that many observers interpreted as elitist or distant -- Locke remained a warm and effective teacher and mentor, as well as a fierce champion of literature and art as means of breaking down barriers between communities. The multifaceted portrait that emerges from this engaging account effectively reclaims Locke's rightful place in the pantheon of America's most important minds.

Alexander to Actium

by Peter Green

The Hellenistic Age, the three extraordinary centuries from the death of Alexander in 323 B. C. to Octavian's final defeat of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium, has offered a rich and variegated field of exploration for historians, philosophers, economists, and literary critics. Yet few scholars have attempted the daunting task of seeing the period whole, of refracting its achievements and reception through the lens of a single critical mind. Alexander to Actium was conceived and written to fill that gap. In this monumental work, Peter Green--noted scholar, writer, and critic--breaks with the traditional practice of dividing the Hellenistic world into discrete, repetitious studies of Seleucids, Ptolemies, Antigonids, and Attalids. He instead treats these successor kingdoms as a single, evolving, interrelated continuum. The result clarifies the political picture as never before. With the help of over 200 illustrations, Green surveys every significant aspect of Hellenistic cultural development, from mathematics to medicine, from philosophy to religion, from literature to the visual arts. Green offers a particularly trenchant analysis of what has been seen as the conscious dissemination in the East of Hellenistic culture, and finds it largely a myth fueled by Victorian scholars seeking justification for a no longer morally respectable imperialism. His work leaves us with a final impression of the Hellenistic Age as a world with haunting and disturbing resemblances to our own. This lively, personal survey of a period as colorful as it is complex will fascinate the general reader no less than students and scholars.

Algebra for College Students (4th Edition)

by Mark Dugopolski

The unifying theme of this text is the development of the skills necessary for solving equations and inequalities, followed by the application of those skills to solving applied problems. Every section ending in the text begins with six simple writing exercises. These exercises are designed to get students to review the definitions and rules of the section before doing more traditional exercises.

Algebra for College Students (Sixth Edition)

by Robert Blitzer

Algebra, in this book, is presented with utmost fun and thought-provoking applications, making it an interesting, friendly and engaging book for students.

Alice in Action with Java

by Joel Adams

The book provides CS1 users with a meaningful and motivating introduction to object-oriented programming. The author introduces key object-oriented topics using Alice 2.0, then circles back to the same concepts in Java. Alice was developed to help teach introductory programming techniques in a less syntax-intensive environment, and addresses some of the barriers that currently prevent many users from successfully learning to program.

The Amazing Death of Calf Shirt and Other Blackfoot Stories: Three Hundred Years of Blackfoot History

by Hugh Aylmer Dempsey

The result of more than forty years of research, The Amazing Death of Calf Shirt and Other Blackfoot Stories is a unique oral history spanning three hundred years of the Blackfoot people. Dating back as far as 1690, the stories collected here by Hugh Dempsey tell of renowned Blackfoot warriors such as Calf Shirt and Low Horn, of those who tried to adapt to a changing world, and of others who rebelled against the government's attempts to control their lives. These stories are factual, based on extensive interviews with Blackfoot elders as well as research into government documents, accounts of early travelers, and records kept by missionaries, Indian Department officials, and the Mounted Police. "Once free and independent buffalo hunters, the members of the Blackfoot Nation - the Blood, Blackfoot, and Peigan - were forced onto reserves in the 1880s. These stories portray the problems and traumas accompanying those changes: the clash of Native and white cultures and the hardships the Blackfoot endured through years of poverty on their new reserves. The elders' tales are reminiscences on buffalo hunts, exciting raids on enemy camps, and the freedom of wandering the prairies. Good and evil spirits being an everyday reality of Blackfoot life, the stories also explore the supernatural."--BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

America: Religions and Religion (5th Edition)

by Catherine L. Albanese

Albanese (emerita, comparative religions, U. of California--Santa Barbara) introduces students to the variety of religions in the US, and to the theories and practices of studying religion. She considerably shortened and revised the 2007 fourth edition to account for changes in classes and students, and for this fifth takes account of changes in the religious landscape since then--including findings from the 2010 census. She covers the original cast, new-made in America, patterns of expansion and contraction, and American religion and American identity. Among specific topics are tradition and change among Native Americans, the presence of Roman Catholicism, the protestant churches and the mission mind, African American religion and nationhood, 19th-century new religions, Eastern peoples and Eastern religions, and many centers meeting.

America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-2006 (Tenth Edition)

by Walter Lafeber

Using extensive materials from both published and private sources, this concise text focuses on United States-Soviet diplomacy to explain the causes and consequences of the Cold War. It explores how the Cold War was shaped by domestic events in both the U. S. and the Soviet Union and presents a variety of other points of view on the conflict--Chinese, Latin American, European, and Vietnamese. The text includes both engaging anecdotes and quotes from primary sources to support key points and exemplify policies, and recent scholarship and materials from openings of the U. S. , Soviet, and Chinese archives.

American Architecture: Volume 1: 1607-1860

by Marcus Whiffen Frederick Koeper

The first volume of a two-volume survey of American Architecture, this book covers architectural developments from Jamestown to the Civil War.

American Bison: A Natural History

by Dale F. Lott

This book, sixth in the series of 'Organisms and environments', presents a peek at the rich and unique ways of life that evolved in the heart of America and dismantles many of the myths about these ways of life, and about the bison in particular, to reveal the animal itself: ruminating, reproducing, and rutting in its full glory. He portrays the bison with an element of appeal to conserve its wildness and consider the importance of the wild in our lives. A beautifully written book by a recognized expert on one of the great icons of the American West.

American Boundaries: The Nation, The States, The Rectangular Survey

by Bill Hubbard Jr.

For anyone who has looked at a map of the United States and wondered how Texas and Oklahoma got their Panhandles, or flown over the American heartland and marveled at the vast grid spreading out in all directions below, American Boundaries will yield a welcome treasure trove of insight. The first book to chart the country's growth using the boundary as a political and cultural focus, Bill Hubbard's masterly narrative begins by explaining how the original thirteen colonies organized their borders and decided that unsettled lands should be held in trust for the common benefit of the people. Hubbard goes on to show--with the help of photographs, diagrams, and hundreds of maps--how the notion evolved that unsettled land should be divided into rectangles and sold to individual farmers, and how this rectangular survey spread outward from its origins in Ohio, with surveyors drawing straight lines across the face of the continent. Mapping how each state came to have its current shape, and how the nation itself formed within its present borders, American Boundaries will provide historians, geographers, and general readers alike with the fascinating story behind those fifty distinctive jigsaw-puzzle pieces that together form the United States.

The American Century: A History of the United States in Modern Times

by Matthew T. Downey James R. Giese Mauricio Mazon

This is a United States History book that covers up to 1900 in two review units and devotes the remaining seven units to the 20th century. The major topics include the Progressive Era, the Depression, The Rise of Dictators and World War II, The Cold War, Vietnam, and Civil Rights Movements, Hemispheric Relations and Global Influence. The extensive use of primary sources helps users view historical controversies through multiple perspectives.

American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree

by Susan Freinkel

The American chestnut was one of America's most common, valued, and beloved trees. Susan Freinkel tells the dramatic story of the stubborn optimists who refused to let this cultural icon go. In a compelling weave of history, science, and personal observation, she relates their quest to save the tree through methods that ranged from classical plant breeding to cutting-edge gene technology.

Showing 51 through 75 of 2,377 results

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