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Advertising Promotion and Other Aspects of Integrated Marketing Communications

by Terence A. Shimp

The eighth edition of Shimp's market-leading Advertising, Promotion, And Other Aspects Of Integrated Marketing Communications fully integrates all aspects of marketing communication. While continuing to focus on the time honored IMC methods, the text reflects new academic literature and practitioner developments in the field.

Aeschylus I: Oresteia: Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, The Eumenides (The Complete Greek Tragedies #1)

by Aeschylus David Grene Richmond Lattimore

"These authoritative translations consign all other complete collections to the wastebasket."--Robert Brustein, The New Republic. "This is it. No qualifications. Go out and buy it everybody."--Kenneth Rexroth, The Nation. "The translations deliberately avoid the highly wrought and affectedly poetic; their idiom is contemporary.... They have life and speed and suppleness of phrase."--Times Education Supplement. "These translations belong to our time. A keen poetic sensibility repeatedly quickens them; and without this inner fire the most academically flawless rendering is dead."--Warren D. Anderson, American Oxonian. "The critical commentaries and the versions themselves... are fresh, unpretentious, above all, functional."--Commonwealth. "Grene is one of the great translators."--Conor Cruise O'Brien, London Sunday Times. "Richmond Lattimore is that rara avis in our age, the classical scholar who is at the same time an accomplished poet."--Dudley Fitts, New York Times Book Review.

Aesthetic Nervousness: Disability and the Crisis of Representation

by Ato Quayson

Focusing primarily on the work of Samuel Beckett, Toni Morrison, Wole Soyinka, and J. M. Coetzee, Ato Quayson launches a thoroughly cross-cultural, interdisciplinary study of the representation of physical disability. Quayson suggests that the subliminal unease and moral panic invoked by the disabled is refracted within the structures of literature and literary discourse itself, a crisis he terms "aesthetic nervousness." The disabled reminds the able-bodied that the body is provisional and temporary and that normality is wrapped up in certain social frameworks. Quayson expands his argument by turning to Greek and Yoruba writings, African American and postcolonial literature, depictions of deformed characters in early modern England and the plays of Shakespeare, and children's films, among other texts. He looks at how disability affects interpersonal relationships and forces the character and the reader to take an ethical standpoint, much like representations of violence, pain, and the sacred. The disabled are also used to represent social suffering, inadvertently obscuring their true hardships.

Aesthetics and Analysis in Writing on Religion: Modern Fascinations

by Daniel Gold

This is a book that looks at contemporary challenges to studying and writing in religion, rethinking the discipline in a way that takes seriously both the aesthetic dimensions and its need for scientific discipline. Gold pursues a new line of thought about the art of religion, arguing for something he calls interpretive writing.

Africa and the World Trade Organization

by Richard E. Mshomba

Mshomba provides a systematic study of Africa as it relates to the World Trade Organization. He examines the WTO's enforcement mechanism; the WTO's broadened mandate, illustrated by the Agreement on Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights; agriculture in the Doha Round; issues relating to transparency in government procurement; and the endeavor to streamline assistance to developing countries through an "Aid for Trade" initiative. The author integrates theory and practice, with a clear presentation of important economic concepts. He provides a rigorous analysis of key issues and proposals. He presents African countries as having an important role to play in the WTO, especially as they actively engage in bargaining through various coalitions. Mshomba acknowledges that WTO negotiations will always be complex and at times contentious due to wide economic and political differences between countries. He views the differences, however, as creating opportunities for a mutually beneficial exchange of goods, services, and ideas.

African-American Art

by Sharon F. Patton

From its origins in early 18th century slave communities to the end of the 20th century, African-American art has made a vital contribution to the art of the United States. This book provides a major reassessment of the subject, setting the art in the context of the African-American experience.

After Abu Ghraib: Exploring Human Rights in America and the Middle East

by Shadi Mokhtari

This book traverses three pivotal human rights struggles of the post-September 11th era: the American human rights campaign to challenge the Bush administration's "War on Terror" torture and detention policies, Middle Eastern efforts to challenge American human rights practices (reversing the traditional West to East flow of human rights mobilizations and discourses), and Middle Eastern attempts to challenge their own leaders' human rights violations in light of American interventions. This book presents snapshots of human rights being appropriated, promoted, claimed, reclaimed, and contested within and between the American and Middle Eastern contexts. The inquiry has three facets: first, it explores intersections between human rights norms and power as they unfold in the era. Second, it lays out the layers of the era's American and Middle Eastern encounter on the human rights plane. Finally, it draws out the era's key lessons for moving the human rights project forward.

After Kinship

by Janet Carsten

After Kinship examines what has happened to kinship through various tropes: the house, gender, personhood, substance, and reproductive technologies. It is s much about what has happened to the anthropological study of kinship in recent years as it is about what has happened to our everyday experience of kinship.

After Liberalism: Mass Democracy in the Managerial State

by Paul Edward Gottfried

In this trenchant challenge to social engineering, Paul Gottfried analyzes a patricide: the slaying of nineteenth-century liberalism by the managerial state. Many people, of course, realize that liberalism no longer connotes distributed powers and bourgeois moral standards, the need to protect civil society from an encroaching state, or the virtues of vigorous self-government. Many also know that today's "liberals" have far different goals from those of their predecessors, aiming as they do largely to combat prejudice, to provide social services and welfare benefits, and to defend expressive and "lifestyle" freedoms. Paul Gottfried does more than analyze these historical facts, however. He builds on them to show why it matters that the managerial state has replaced traditional liberalism: the new regimes of social engineers, he maintains, are elitists, and their rule is consensual only in the sense that it is unopposed by any widespread organized opposition. Throughout the western world, increasingly uprooted populations unthinkingly accept centralized controls in exchange for a variety of entitlements. In their frightening passivity, Gottfried locates the quandary for traditionalist and populist adversaries of the welfare state. How can opponents of administrative elites show the public that those who provide, however ineptly, for their material needs are the enemies of democratic self-rule and of independent decision making in family life? If we do not wake up, Gottfried warns, the political debate may soon be over, despite sporadic and ideologically confused populist rumblings in both Europe and the United States.

After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory (3rd edition)

by Alasdair Macintyre

In this classic work, Alasdair MacIntyre examines the historical and conceptual roots of the idea of virtue, diagnoses the reasons for its absence in personal and public life, and offers a tentative proposal for its recovery.

Against Bioethics

by Jonathan Baron

Governments, health professionals, patients, research institutions, and research subjects look to bioethicists for guidance in making important decisions about medical treatment and research.

Against Injustice: The New Economics of Amartya Sen

by Reiko Gotoh Paul Dumouchel

Traditional theories of justice as formulated by political philosophers, jurists and economists have all tended to see injustice as simply a breach of justice, a breakdown of the normal order. Amartya Sen's work acts as a corrective to this tradition by arguing that we can recognise patent injustices, and come to a reasoned agreement about the need to remedy them, without reference to an explicit theory of justice. Against Injustice brings together distinguished academics from a variety of different fields - including economics, law, philosophy and anthropology - to explore the ideas underlying Sen's critique of traditional approaches to injustice. The centrepiece of the book is the first chapter by Sen in which he outlines his conception of the relationship between economics, ethics and law. The rest of the book addresses a variety of theoretical and empirical issues that relate to this conception, concluding with a response from Sen to his critics.

Against the Protestant Gnostics

by Philip J. Lee

Since the discovery of original gnostic documents at Nag Hammadi in 1945, many scholars have recognized a familiar presence within this ancient heresy. To some authors the main features of gnosticism--belief in a secret revelation available only to an initiated elite, rejection of the physical world, and escape into the self--seemed reminiscent of modern cult groups and secular movements. However, Philip Lee, noting that most of the early gnostics were firmly ensconced within the Church, locates modern gnosticism within the Protestant establishment itself. "As a Protestant, I believe I have identified the elusive modern gnostics and they are ourselves," he writes. In this penetrating and provocative assessment of the current state of religion and its effect on values in society at large, Lee criticizes conservatives and liberals alike as he traces gnostic motifs to the very roots of American Protestantism. With references to an extraordinary spectrum of writings from sources as diverse as John Calvin, Martin Buber, Tom Wolfe, Margaret Atwood and Emily Dickinson among many others, he probes the effects of gnostic thinking on issues ranging from politics to feminism, from ecology to parenthood. The ethical ramifications of such a gnostic turn have been negative and frightening, he maintains. The book points to positive ways of restoring health to endangered Protestant churches. Calling for the restoration of a dialectical faith and practice, Lee offers an agenda for reform, including a renewal of obedience to the scriptures and an affirmation of life and creation within the circle of the extended family.

Agendas and Instability in American Politics (2nd edition)

by Frank R. Baumgartner Bryan D. Jones

When Agendas and Instability in American Politics appeared fifteen years ago, offering a profoundly original account of how policy issues rise and fall on the national agenda, the Journal of Politics predicted that it would "become a landmark study of public policy making and American politics." That prediction proved true and, in this long-awaited second edition, Bryan Jones and Frank Baumgartner refine their influential argument and expand it to illuminate the workings of democracies beyond the United States.The authors retain all the substance of their contention that short-term, single-issue analyses cast public policy too narrowly as the result of cozy and dependable arrangements among politicians, interest groups, and the media. Jones and Baumgartner provide a different interpretation by taking the long view of several issues--including nuclear energy, urban affairs, smoking, and auto safety--to demonstrate that bursts of rapid, unpredictable policy change punctuate the patterns of stability more frequently associated with government. Featuring a new introduction and two additional chapters, this updated edition ensures that their findings will remain a touchstone of policy studies for many years to come.

Agglomeration Economics

by Edward L. Glaeser

When firms and people are located near each other in cities and in industrial clusters, they benefit in various ways, including by reducing the costs of exchanging goods and ideas.One might assume that these benefits would become less important as transportation and communication costs fall. Paradoxically, however, cities have become increasingly important, and even within cities industrial clusters remain vital. Agglomeration Economics brings together a group of essays that examine the reasons why economic activity continues to cluster together despite the falling costs of moving goods and transmitting information. The studies cover a wide range of topics and approach the economics of agglomeration from different angles. Together they advance our understanding of agglomeration and its implications for a globalized world.

Agribusiness Management and Entrepreneurship (Third Edition)

by Michael E. Newman Walter J. Wills

Agribusiness Management and Entrepreneurship is intended to fill the need for a basic textbook covering the planning, organizing, and managing of an operation; as well as provide a comprehensive source for those who wish to consider a business from the ownership point of view, specifically as it relates to the vast area of agribusiness.

Agricultural Subsidies in the WTO Green Box: Ensuring Coherence with Sustainable Development Goals

by Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz Christophe Bellmann Jonathan Hepburn

Do the World Trade Organization's rules on 'green box' farm subsidies allow both rich and poor countries to achieve important goals such as food security, or do they worsen poverty, distort trade and harm the environment? Current WTO requirements set no ceiling on the amount of green box subsidies that governments can provide, on the basis that these payments cause only minimal trade distortion. Governments are thus increasingly shifting their subsidy spending into this category, as they come under pressure to reduce subsidies that are more directly linked to production. However, growing evidence nonetheless suggests that green box payments can affect production and trade, harm farmers in developing countries and cause environmental damage. By bringing together new research and critical thinking, this book examines the relationship between green box subsidies and the achievement of sustainable development goals, and explores options for future reform.

Air Words: Writing for Broadcast News

by John Hewitt

An introductory text for broadcast newswriting, with numerous exercises and examples illustrating broadcast news style. Defines and explains standard industry formats, rules, and procedures, and covers fact checking, ethics, script formats, shifting from print to broadcast, writing leads, interviews, aspects of TV writing, and copyediting and producing. Includes chapter glossaries. This second edition discusses technology advances such as wire capture and producing from CRTs. Lacks a bibliography. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Alain L. Locke: Biography of a Philosopher

by Leonard Harris Charles Molesworth

Alain L. Locke (1886-1954), in his famous 1925 anthology "The New Negro", declared that "the pulse of the Negro world has begun to beat in Harlem". Often called the father of the Harlem Renaissance, Locke had his finger directly on that pulse, promoting, influencing, and sparring. Leonard Harris and Charles Molesworth trace Locke's story through his Philadelphia upbringing, his undergraduate years at Harvard and his tenure as the first African American Rhodes Scholar. The heart of their narrative illuminates Locke's heady years in 1920s New York City and his forty-year career at Howard University, where he helped spearhead the adult education movement of the 1930s and wrote on topics ranging from the philosophy of value to the theory of democracy. Harris and Molesworth show that throughout this illustrious career -- despite a formal manner that many observers interpreted as elitist or distant -- Locke remained a warm and effective teacher and mentor, as well as a fierce champion of literature and art as means of breaking down barriers between communities. The multifaceted portrait that emerges from this engaging account effectively reclaims Locke's rightful place in the pantheon of America's most important minds.

Alexander to Actium

by Peter Green

The Hellenistic Age, the three extraordinary centuries from the death of Alexander in 323 B. C. to Octavian's final defeat of Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium, has offered a rich and variegated field of exploration for historians, philosophers, economists, and literary critics. Yet few scholars have attempted the daunting task of seeing the period whole, of refracting its achievements and reception through the lens of a single critical mind. Alexander to Actium was conceived and written to fill that gap. In this monumental work, Peter Green--noted scholar, writer, and critic--breaks with the traditional practice of dividing the Hellenistic world into discrete, repetitious studies of Seleucids, Ptolemies, Antigonids, and Attalids. He instead treats these successor kingdoms as a single, evolving, interrelated continuum. The result clarifies the political picture as never before. With the help of over 200 illustrations, Green surveys every significant aspect of Hellenistic cultural development, from mathematics to medicine, from philosophy to religion, from literature to the visual arts. Green offers a particularly trenchant analysis of what has been seen as the conscious dissemination in the East of Hellenistic culture, and finds it largely a myth fueled by Victorian scholars seeking justification for a no longer morally respectable imperialism. His work leaves us with a final impression of the Hellenistic Age as a world with haunting and disturbing resemblances to our own. This lively, personal survey of a period as colorful as it is complex will fascinate the general reader no less than students and scholars.

Algebra for College Students (4th Edition)

by Mark Dugopolski

The unifying theme of this text is the development of the skills necessary for solving equations and inequalities, followed by the application of those skills to solving applied problems. Every section ending in the text begins with six simple writing exercises. These exercises are designed to get students to review the definitions and rules of the section before doing more traditional exercises.

Algebra for College Students (Sixth Edition)

by Robert Blitzer

Algebra, in this book, is presented with utmost fun and thought-provoking applications, making it an interesting, friendly and engaging book for students.

Alice in Action with Java

by Joel Adams

The book provides CS1 users with a meaningful and motivating introduction to object-oriented programming. The author introduces key object-oriented topics using Alice 2.0, then circles back to the same concepts in Java. Alice was developed to help teach introductory programming techniques in a less syntax-intensive environment, and addresses some of the barriers that currently prevent many users from successfully learning to program.

Almost Chosen People: Oblique Biographies in the American Grain

by Michael Zuckerman

Few historians are bold enough to go after America's sacred cows in their very own pastures. But Michael Zuckerman is no ordinary historian, and this collection of his essays is no ordinary book. In his effort to remake the meaning of the American tradition, Zuckerman takes the entire sweep of American history for his province. The essays in this collection, including two never before published and a new autobiographical introduction, range from early New England settlements to the hallowed corridors of modern Washington. Among his subjects are Puritans and Southern gentry, Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Spock, P.T. Barnum and Ronald Reagan. Collecting scammers and scoundrels, racists and rebels, as well as the purest genius, he writes to capture the unadorned American character. Recognized for his energy, eloquence, and iconoclasm, Zuckerman is known for provoking- and sometimes almost seducing- historians into rethinking their most cherished assumptions about the American past. Now his many fans, and readers of every persuasion, can newly appreciate the distinctive talents of one of America's most powerful social critics.

Amartya Sen

by Christopher W. Morris

Amartya Sen was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998 "for his contributions in welfare economics." Although his primary academic appointments have been mostly in economics, Sen is also an important and influential social theorist and philosopher. His work on social choice theory is seminal, and his writings on poverty, famine, and development, as well his contributions to moral and political philosophy, are important and influential. Sen's views about the nature and primacy of liberty also make him a major contemporary liberal thinker. This volume of essays on aspects of Sen's work is aimed at a broad audience of readers interested in social theory, political philosophy, ethics, public policy, welfare economics, the theory of rational choice, poverty, and development. Written by a team of well-known experts, each chapter provides an overview of Sen's work in a particular area and a critical assessment of his contributions to the field.

Showing 51 through 75 of 2,696 results

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