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The Man Within (Virago Modern Classics)

by Graham Greene

The “strikingly original” debut novel by the masterful British author is “a perfect adventure” of love and smuggling on the English coast (The Nation). Francis Andrews is a reluctant smuggler living in the shadow of his brutish father’s legacy. To exorcise the ghosts of the man he loathes, Andrews betrays his colleagues to authorities and takes flight across the downs. It’s here that he stumbles upon the isolated cottage of a beguiling stranger named Elizabeth—an empathetic young woman who is just as lonely, every bit the outsider as he, and reconciling a troubling past of her own. Andrews, a man on the run from those he exposed, believes he’s found refuge and salvation. But when Elizabeth encourages him to return to the courts of Lewes and give evidence against his accomplices, the treacherous and deadly repercussions may be beyond their control. “The ultimate strengths of [Graham] Greene’s books is that he shows us the hazards of compassion,” a theme that would find its earliest expression in The Man Within, his first published novel (Pico Iyer).

Lock 14

by Georges Simenon Robert Baldick

In Lock 14, Simenon plunges Maigret into the unfamiliar canal world of shabby bars and shadowy towpaths, drawing together the strands of a tragic case of lost identity.

A Man's Head

by Georges Simenon Geoffrey Sainsbury

Set in the oppressively squalid streets of Paris, A Man's Head features Simenon's famed detective as he tracks a killer on the run, while the writer's sharp prose evokes the atmosphere of Parisian luxury hotels, seedy bars, and dark alleys.

The Psychology of Love

by Sigmund Freud

Freud?s landmark writings on love and sexuality?including the famous case study of Dora? newly translated and in one volume for the first time This original collection brings together the most important writings on the psychology of love by one of the great thinkers of the twentieth century. Sigmund Freud?s discussions of the ways in which sexuality is always psychosexuality?that there is no sexuality without fantasy? have changed social, cultural, and intellectual attitudes toward erotic life. Among the influential pieces included here are ?On Female Sexuality,? ?The Taboo of Virginity,? ?A Child Is Being Beaten,? and the widely cited case history of the eighteen-year-old Dora, making The Psychology of Love essential reading for anyone who wants to understand Freud?s tremendous legacy. .

The Greek Coffin Mystery (Penguin Drop Caps Ser.)

by Ellery Queen

In one of his earliest cases, Ellery Queen confronts a murder in blue bloodAmerica's master of deduction, Ellery Queen, has made his name by combining dazzling feats of pure reason with the old-fashioned legwork that comes with being the son of a New York cop. Before he became the nation's most famous sleuth, he was just an untested talent--a bookworm who thought he might put his genius to work solving crimes. Young Queen made his bones on the Khalkis case. The scion of a famous New York art-dealing family, Georg Khalkis has spent several years housebound with blindness--a misery he is relieved of when a heart attack knocks him dead on the library floor. After the funeral, his will vanishes, and an exhaustive search of home, churchyard, crypt, and mourners reveals nothing. Baffled, the police turn to a headstrong young genius named Ellery Queen. During this case, Queen develops his deductive method--and swings dramatically between failure and success.

Orient Express: Orient Express, It's A Battlefield, And A Gun For Sale (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

by Graham Greene

Greene’s “sharply, often incisively etched” novel of the interlocked fates of unwary strangers on a train from Belgium to Constantinople (The New York Times). The Orient Express has embarked from Ostend for a three-day journey to Cologne, Vienna, and Constantinople. The passenger list includes a Jewish trader from London with business interests in Turkey—and a score to settle; a vulnerable chorus girl on her last legs; a boozy and spiteful journalist who’s found an unrequited love in her paid companion, and her latest scoop in second class—a Serbian dissident in disguise on his way to lead a revolution; and a murderer on the run looking for a getaway. As the train hurtles across Europe, the fates of everyone on board will collide long before the Orient Express rushes headlong to its final destination. Originally published in the UK as Stamboul Train in 1932, Graham Greene’s “novel has movement, variety, interest; taken on the surface, it is an interesting and entertaining story of adventure, penetrated through and through with the consciousness of the on-rushing train, with that curious sense of the temporary suspension of one’s ordinary existence which comes to many on ship or train” (The New York Times).

The Pastures of Heaven

by John Steinbeck

In Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck’s beautifully rendered depictions of small yet fateful moments that transform ordinary lives, these twelve early stories introduce both the subject and style of artistic expression that recur in the most important works of his career. Each of these self-contained stories is linked to the others by the presence of the Munroes, a family whose misguided behavior and lack of sensitivity precipitate disasters and tragedies. As the individual dramas unfold, Steinbeck reveals the self-deceptions, intellectual limitations, and emotional vulnerabilities that shape the characters’ reactions and gradually erode the harmony and dreams that once formed the foundation of the community. This edition includes an introduction and notes by James Nagel. .

Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880

by W. E. B. Du Bois David Levering Lewis

Provides the history of millions of Africans in America for the twenty years and interprets their fates and experiences in the new world.

Mistress Pat

by L. M. Montgomery

The definitive paperback editions of L.M. Montgomery's beloved novels get a brand-new look for the next hundred years!When she was twenty, nearly everyone thought Patricia Gardiner ought to be having beaus--except, of course, Pat herself. For Pat, Silver Bush was both home and heaven. All she could ever ask of life was bound in the magic of the lovely old house on Prince Edward Island, "where good things never change." And now there was more than ever to do, what with planning for the Christmas family reunion, entertaining a countess, playing matchmaker, and preparing for the arrival of the new hired man. Yet as those she loved so dearly started to move away, Pat began to question the wisdom of her choice of Silver Bush over romance. Was it possible to be lonely at Silver Bush?

The Short Novels of John Steinbeck: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)

by John Steinbeck

Collected here for the first time in a deluxe paperback volume are six of Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck’s most widely read and beloved short novels-Tortilla Flat, The Red Pony, Of Mice and Men, The Moon Is Down, Cannery Row and The Pearl. From Steinbeck’s tale of commitment, loneliness, and hope in Of Mice and Men, to his tough yet charming portrait of people on the margins of Monterey society in Cannery Row, to The Pearl’s mythic examination of the fallacy of the American dream, Steinbeck created stories that were realistic, rugged, and imbued with energy and resilience. .

Sometimes a Great Notion

by Ken Kesey

The magnificent second novel from the legendary author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Sailor Song is a wild-spirited and hugely powerful tale of an Oregon logging clan. A bitter strike is raging in a small lumber town along the Oregon coast. Bucking that strike out of sheer cussedness are the Stampers: Henry, the fiercely vital and overpowering patriarch; Hank, the son who has spent his life trying to live up to his father; and Viv, who fell in love with Hank's exuberant machismo but now finds it wearing thin. And then there is Leland, Henry's bookish younger son, who returns to his family on a mission of vengeance - and finds himself fulfilling it in ways he never imagined. Out of the Stamper family's rivalries and betrayals Ken Kesey has crafted a novel with the mythic impact of Greek tragedy. .

A Gun for Sale: An Entertainment (The\collected Edition Ser.)

by Graham Greene

A detective and a chorus girl stalk the shadows of a murderer in this thriller from “a pioneer of the modern mood we now think of as noir” (LA Weekly). Born out of a brutal childhood, Raven is an assassin for hire whose latest hit—a government minister—is one calculated to ignite a war. When the most wanted man in England is paid off in marked bills, he also becomes the easiest to track—and police detective Jimmy Mather has the lead. But Raven’s got an advantage. Crossing paths with a sympathetic dancer named Anne Crowder, the emotionally scarred Raven has found someone in the wreckage of his life he can trust, maybe his only hope for salvation. Or at least, escape—because Anne is also Mather’s fiancée. Now the fate of two men will depend on her. And either way, it’s betrayal. With its themes of deception, double cross, and the consequences of indiscriminate passion, the breathless cinematic narrative of Graham Greene’s thriller became a perfect fit for the classic 1942 film noir starring Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake.

Journey Without Maps: Una Aventura Por El Corazón De Liberia (Twentieth Century Classics Ser. #Vol. 7)

by Graham Greene

The British author embarks on an awe-inspiring trek through 1930s West Africa in “one of the best travel books [of the twentieth] century” (The Independent). When Graham Greene left Liverpool in 1935 for what was then an Africa unmarked by colonization, it was to leave the known transgressions of his own civilization behind for those unknown. First by cargo ship, then by train and truck through Sierra Leone, and finally on foot, Greene embarked on a dangerous and unpredictable 350-mile, four-week trek through Liberia with his cousin, and a handful of servants and bearers, into a world where few had ever seen a white man. For Greene, this odyssey became as much a trip into the primitive interiors of the writer himself as it was a physical journey into a land foreign to his experience. “No one who reads this book will question the value of Greene’s experiment, or emerge unshaken by the penetration, the richness, the integrity of this moving record.” —The Guardian

Of Mice and Men

by John Steinbeck

A controversial tale of friendship and tragedy during the Great Depression Over seventy-five years since its first publication, Steinbeck's tale of commitment, loneliness, hope, and loss remains one of America's most widely read and taught novels. An unlikely pair, George and Lennie, two migrant workers in California during the Great Depression, grasp for their American Dream. They hustle work when they can, living a hand-to-mouth existence. For George and Lennie have a plan: to own an acre of land and a shack they can call their own. When they land jobs on a ranch in the Salinas Valley, the fulfillment of their dream seems to be within their grasp. But even George cannot guard Lennie from the provocations, nor predict the consequences of Lennie's unswerving obedience to the things George taught him. Of Mice and Men represents an experiment in form, which Steinbeck described as "a kind of playable novel, written in a novel form but so scened and set that it can be played as it stands." A rarity in American letters, it achieved remarkable success as a novel, a Broadway play, and three acclaimed films. This edition features an introduction by Susan Shillinglaw, one of today's leading Steinbeck scholars.

Of Mice and Men and The Moon Is Down

by John Steinbeck

This Penguin Classics edition celebrates Steinbeck’s dramatic adaptations of his most powerful short novels, Of Mice and Men and The Moon Is Down, featuring a foreword by award-winning actor James Earl Jones. Of Mice and Men represents an experiment in form, as Steinbeck put it, "a kind of playable novel, written in novel form but so scened and set that it can be played as it stands. ” A rarity in American letters, it achieved remarkable success as a novel, a Broadway play, and three acclaimed films. Of Mice and Men received the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play in 1937-1938. A number of acclaimed actors have interpreted the iconic roles of George and Lennie for stage and screen, including James Earl Jones, John Malkovich and Gary Sinise. The Moon Is Down uncovers profound, often unsettling truths about war and human nature. It tells the story of a peaceable town taken by enemy troops, and had an extraordinary impact as Allied propaganda in Nazi-occupied Europe. This Penguin Classics edition of the theatrical adaptations of Steinbeck’s two classic short novels are essential to actors, playwrights, filmmakers and directors studying the dramatic work of the Nobel Prize winning author of The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden. .

Rebecca

by Daphne Du Maurier Virago

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again . . .Working as a lady's companion, the orphaned heroine of Rebecca learns her place. Life begins to look very bleak until, on a trip to the South of France, she meets Maxim de Winter, a handsome widower whose sudden proposal of marriage takes her by surprise. Whisked from glamorous Monte Carlo to his brooding estate, Manderley, on the Cornish Coast, the new Mrs de Winter finds Max a changed man. And the memory of his dead wife Rebecca is forever kept alive by the forbidding Mrs Danvers . . . Not since Jane Eyre has a heroine faced such difficulty with the Other Woman. An international bestseller that has never gone out of print, Rebecca is the haunting story of a young girl consumed by love and the struggle to find her identity.

Anne of Ingleside

by L. M. Montgomery

There's never a dull moment for busy, bustling Anne, who's now the mother of five children and has a sixth one on the way. With her visiting aunt, the insufferable Mary Maria, also in the mix--and soon wearing out her welcome--Anne's life is a constant whirl. But despite the endless demands on her time, Anne can't think of any place she'd rather be than her beloved Ingleside. At least not until the day she begins to imagine that her cherished Gilbert doesn't love her anymore. Could it possibly be true? She's a little older, maybe, but in her heart she knows she's still the same fiery redhead who came to Green Gables all those years ago. She hasn't changed, but has he? Never one to go down without a fight, the irrepressible, indomitable Anne sets out to make her husband fall in love with her all over again.

Darling Monster

by Diana Cooper

Lady Diana Cooper was an aristocrat, a socialite, an actress of stage and early screen. When she married rising political star Duff Cooper, they became the golden couple who knew everyone who was anyone; they sat at the very heart of British public life.Diana's letters to her only son, John Julius Norwich, cover the period 1939 to 1952. They take us from the rumblings of war, through the Blitz, which the Coopers spent holed up in the Dorchester (because it was newer, and therefore less vulnerable, than the Ritz), to rural Sussex where we see Diana blissfully setting up a smallholding as part of the war effort. After a spell with the Free French in Algiers, Duff was appointed British Ambassador to France and the couple settled into the glorious embassy in post-Liberation Paris.Over and beyond all the glitz, Diana emerges in these letters as highly intelligent, funny, fiercely loyal: a woman who disliked extravagance, who was often cripplingly shy, who was happiest in the countryside with her cow and goats and whose greatest love and preoccupation were her husband and son.As a portrait of a time and some of history's most dramatic and important events, these letters are invaluable. But they also give us a vivid and touching portrait of the love between a mother and son, separated by war, oceans--and the constraints of the time they lived in.

Darling Monster: The Letters of Lady Diana Cooper to Son John Julius Norwich, 1939-1952

by John Julius Norwich Diana Cooper

Lady Diana Cooper was an aristocrat, a socialite, an actress of stage and early screen. When she married rising political star Duff Cooper, they became the golden couple who knew everyone who was anyone; they sat at the very heart of British public life. Diana's letters to her only son, John Julius Norwich, cover the period 1939 to 1952. They take us from the rumblings of war, through the Blitz, which the Coopers spent holed up in the Dorchester (because it was newer, and therefore less vulnerable, than the Ritz), to rural Sussex where we see Diana blissfully setting up a smallholding as part of the war effort. After a spell with the Free French in Algiers, Duff was appointed British Ambassador to France and the couple settled into the glorious embassy in post-Liberation Paris. Over and beyond all the glitz, Diana emerges in these letters as highly intelligent, funny, fiercely loyal: a woman who disliked extravagance, who was often cripplingly shy, who was happiest in the countryside with her cow and goats and whose greatest love and preoccupation were her husband and son. As a portrait of a time and some of history's most dramatic and important events, these letters are invaluable. But they also give us a vivid and touching portrait of the love between a mother and son, separated by war, oceans--and the constraints of the time they lived in.

The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin Audio Classics Ser.)

by John Steinbeck Robert Demott

The Pulitzer Prize-winning epic of the Great Depression, a book that galvanized--and sometimes outraged--millions of readers.<P><P> First published in 1939, Steinbeck's Pulitzer Prize-winning epic of the Great Depression chronicles the Dust Bowl migration of the 1930s and tells the story of one Oklahoma farm family, the Joads-driven from their homestead and forced to travel west to the promised land of California. Out of their trials and their repeated collisions against the hard realities of an America divided into Haves and Have-Nots evolves a drama that is intensely human yet majestic in its scale and moral vision, elemental yet plainspoken, tragic but ultimately stirring in its human dignity.<P> A portrait of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless, of one man's fierce reaction to injustice, and of one woman's stoical strength, the novel captures the horrors of the Great Depression and probes into the very nature of equality and justice in America.<P> <i>The Grapes of Wrath</i> summed up its era in the way that Uncle Tom's Cabin summed up the years of slavery before the Civil War. Sensitive to fascist and communist criticism, Steinbeck insisted that "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" be printed in its entirety in the first edition of the book--which takes its title from the first verse: "He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored." At once a naturalistic epic, captivity narrative, road novel, and transcendental gospel, Steinbeck's powerful landmark novel is perhaps the most American of American Classics.<P> This edition contains an introduction and notes by Steinbeck scholar Robert Demott.

Christmas at Cold Comfort Farm

by Stella Gibbons

Available for the first time since its original publication more than fifty years ago, Christmas at Cold Comfort Farm is a charming collection whose hilarious title story features Christmas dinner with the Starkadders before Flora's arrival. With Adam playing Santa while draped in Mrs. Starkadders's shawls, the family shares their traditional "Christmas pudding"-a mélange containing random objects of doom foretelling the coming year: a coffin nail for death, a bad sixpence for financial ruin, and a menthol cone to indicate that the lucky recipient will go "blind wi' headache. " These lively tales will delight anyone who loves Stella Gibbons and her signature wit. .

The Fair Adventure

by Elizabeth Gray

It was Page's graduation day. Everything seemed to be disappointing on this most important day of her life. Her mother had to go off to meet her married sister. Her other sister was graduating from Nurses training in the afternoon, and to top it all, father missed his bus and she thought he wasn't going to be there either. Page was not only reading an essay but she had to give the Valedictorian's speech. And none of the family seemed to think it was important. Page even left her essay at home in the excitement. After graduation came College Board exams. If she passed she could go away to college on a scholarship. Otherwise she must go to college at home where her father was a professor. She worked hard but didn't quite make it. Her family was so absorbed in their own affairs she could scarcely get them to listen to her troubles. She accepted bravely the prospects of staying at home but at the last minute nice things happened to change plans. It is a nice story of a real girl.

Freddy's Cousin Weedly

by Kurt Wiese Walter R. Brooks

The Freddy the Pig books have long been considered classics of American children's literature and with each new edition, this wonderful pig is charming his way into the hearts of more and more readers, adults and children alike. In Freddy's Cousin Weedly, Freddy's timid little cousin is sent to Bean Farm, in the hopes that Freddy can cure his shyness. Jinx the cat takes the piglet under his wing and concocts a scheme to cure Weedly of his fears, with the help of the other farm animals. Along the way, the animals must also deal with caterpillar attacks, trespassing relatives and a fight for a valuable family heirloom. Finally Freddy and the others come up with a way to make everyone happy, and gain some new friends as well.

The Joke and Its Relation to the Unconscious

by Sigmund Freud

Why do we laugh? The answer, argued Freud in this groundbreaking study of humor, is that jokes, like dreams, satisfy our unconscious desires. The Joke and Its Relation to the Unconscious explains how jokes provide immense pleasure by releasing us from our inhibitions and allowing us to express sexual, aggressive, playful, or cynical instincts that would otherwise remain hidden. In elaborating this theory, Freud brings together a rich collection of puns, witticisms, one-liners, and anecdotes, which, as Freud shows, are a method of giving ourselves away. .

Native Son (Fountas & Pinnell LLI Blue)

by Richard Wright

Right from the start, Bigger Thomas had been headed for jail. It could have been for assault or petty larceny; by chance, it was for murder and rape. <P><P>Native Son tells the story of this young black man caught in a downward spiral after he kills a young white woman in a brief moment of panic. <P>Set in Chicago in the 1930s, Wright's powerful novel is an unsparing reflection on the poverty and feelings of hopelessness experienced by people in inner cities across the country and of what it means to be black in America.

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