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The Power and the Glory (Novel Ser.novel Series)

by Graham Greene

This prize-winning novel of a fugitive priest in Mexico is quite simply “Graham Greene’s masterpiece” (John Updike, The New York Review of Books). In the Mexican state of Tabasco in the 1930s, all vestiges of Catholicism are being outlawed by the government. As churches are razed, icons are banned, and the price of devotion is execution, an unnamed member of the clergy flees. He’s known only as the “whisky priest.” Beset by heretical vices, guilt, and an immoral past, he’s torn between self-destruction and self-preservation. Too modest to be a martyr, too stubborn to follow the law, and too craven to take a bullet, he now travels as one of the hunted—attending, in secret, to the spiritual needs of the faithful. When a peasant begs him to return to Tabasco to hear the confessions of a dying man, the whisky priest knows it’s a trap. But it’s also his duty—and possibly his salvation. Named by Time magazine as one of the hundred best English-language novels written since 1923, The Power and the Glory is “a violent, raw” work on “suffering, strained faith, and ultimate redemption” (The Atlantic).

Sue Barton, Superintendent of Nurses (Sue Barton #5)

by Helen Dore Boylston

Redheaded Sue Barton became a rural nurse in a little New Hampshire town just to be near, and to help, her fiancé, Dr. Bill Barry. Their efforts in solving the mystery of the typhoid carrier and their work in the hurricane finally brought the town's wealthiest citizen to present the community with a small hospital. Now Sue and Bill get married, and together try to run the little hospital in the New England hills. Sue is Superintendent of Nurses, and her old friend Kit is helping her. After all their exciting nursing adventures, one might think they would find their new work rather tame. It was anything but tame for Sue, however, with that irrepressible street urchin, Marianna, as a student nurse; with Jean Ditmarr, sophisticated New Yorker, thinking she could put something over on the young Superintendent; with Dr. Bill so busy being a good doctor that Sue feared for a while he might not prove such a good husband; above all, with the mysterious disappearance of the hospital sheets! This is Sue Barton at her best with an authentic background of rural hospital life and all the excitement and fun we have come to associate with that lively redhead.

A Winter in Arabia

by Freya Stark

One of the most unconventional and courageous explorers of her time, Freya Stark chronicled her extraordinary Travels in the Near East, establishing herself as a twentieth century heroine. A Winter in Arabia recounts her 1937-8 expedition in what is now Yemen, a journey which helped secure her reputation not only as a great travel writer, but also as a first-rate geographer, historian, and archaeologist. There, in the land whose "nakedness is clothed in shreds of departed splendor, " she and two companions spent a winter in search of an ancient South Arabian city. Offering rare glimpses of life behind the veil -- the subtleties of business and social conduct, the elaborate beauty rituals of the women, and the bitter animosities between rival tribes, Freya Stark conveys the "perpetual charm of Arabia . . . that the traveler finds his own level there simply as a human being. " Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

The Great Gatsby: Originals (Originals (raleigh, Nc) Ser.)

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

**The twentieth-century masterpiece, the authoritative new edition** With a new foreword by Jesmyn Ward, author of the Women's Prize-shortlisted Sing, Unburied, Sing‘There was music from my neighbour’s house through the summer nights. In his blue gardens men and girls came and went like moths among the whisperings and the champagne and the stars.’ Enigmatic, intriguing and fabulously wealthy, Jay Gatsby throws lavish parties at his West Egg mansion to impress Daisy Buchanan, the object of his obsession, now married to bullish Tom Buchanan. Over a Long Island summer, his neighbour Nick Carraway, a writer and a cousin to Daisy, looks on as Gatsby and Daisy’s affair deepens. Tragedy looms in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece third novel, frequently named among the best novels of the twentieth century. Praise for The Great Gatsby: ‘A classic, perhaps the supreme American novel’ Sunday Times ‘More than an American classic; it’s become a defining document of the national psyche, a creation myth, the Rosetta Stone of the American dream’ Guardian ‘F. Scott Fitzgerald was better than he knew, for in fact and in the literary sense he invented a generation’ New York Times ‘An unquiet masterpiece whose mystery never fails to exert its power’ Robert McCrum, Observer, ‘The 100 Best Novels in English’

Reflections in a Golden Eye: The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter / Reflections In A Golden Eye / The Ballad Of The Sad Café / The Member Of The Wedding / Clock Without Hands (Modern Classics Ser. #1)

by Carson Mccullers

Set on a Southern army base in the 1930s, REFLECTIONS IN A GOLDEN EYE tells the story of Captain Penderton, a bisexual whose life is upset by the arrival of Major Langdon, a charming womanizer who has an affair with Penderton's tempestuous and flirtatious wife, Leonora. Upon the novel's publication in 1941, reviewers were unsure of what to make of its relatively scandalous subject matter. A critic for Time Magazine wrote, "In almost any hands, such material would yield a rank fruitcake of mere arty melodrama. But Carson McCullers tells her tale with simplicity, insight, and a rare gift of phrase." Written during a time when McCullers's own marriage to Reeves was on the brink of collapse, her second novel deals with her trademark themes of alienation and unfulfilled loves.

Chickenhawk: Life After Vietnam (Chickenhawk: Back In The World Ser.)

by Robert Mason

A stunning book about the right stuff in the wrong war. As a child, Robert Mason dreamed of levitating. As a young man, he dreamed of flying helicopters - and the U. S. Army gave him his chance. They sent him to Vietnam where, between August 1965 and July 1966, he flew more than 1,000 assault missions. In Chickenhawk, Robert Mason gives us a devastating bird's eye-view of that war in all its horror, as he experiences the accelerating terror, the increasingly desperate courage of a man 'acting out the role of a hero long after he realises that the conduct of the war is insane,' says the New York Times, 'And we can't stop ourselves from identifying with it. '

Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (Perennial Bestsellers Series)

by Zora Neale Hurston

First published in 1942 at the height of her popularity, Dust Tracks on a Road is Zora Neale Hurston's candid, funny, bold, and poignant autobiography, an imaginative and exuberant account of her rise from childhood poverty in the rural South to a prominent place among the leading artists and intellectuals of the Harlem Renaissance. <P><P>As compelling as her acclaimed fiction, Hurston's very personal literary self-portrait offers a revealing, often audacious glimpse into the life -- public and private -- of an extraordinary artist, anthropologist, chronicler, and champion of the black experience in America. <P>Full of the wit and wisdom of a proud, spirited woman who started off low and climbed high, Dust Tracks on a Road is a rare treasure from one of literature's most cherished voices.

The Robber Bridegroom: The Robber Bridegroom - Delta Wedding - The Ponder Heart - Losing Battles - The Optimist's Daughter (Virago Modern Classics)

by Eudora Welty

Legendary figures of Mississippi's past-flatboatman Mike Fink and the dreaded Harp brothers-mingle with characters from Eudora Welty's own imagination in an exuberant fantasy set along the Natchez Trace. Berry-stained bandit of the woods Jamie Lockhart steals Rosamond, the beautiful daughter of pioneer planter Clement Musgrove, to set in motion this frontier fairy tale. "For all her wild, rich fancy, Welty writes prose that is as disciplined as it is beautiful" (New Yorker).

The Color of Summer

by Thomas Colchie Andrew Hurley Reinaldo Arenas

Critics worldwide have praised Reinaldo Arenas's writing. His extraordinary memoir, Before Night Falls, was named one of the fourteen "Best Books of 1993" by the editors of The New York Times Book Review and has now been made into a major motion picture.The Color of Summer, Arenas's finest comic achievement, is also the fulfillment of his life's work, the Pentagonía, a five-volume cycle of novels he began writing in his early twenties. Although it is the penultimate installment in his "secret history of Cuba," it was, in fact, the last book Arenas wrote before his death in 1990. A Rabelaisian tale of survival by wits and wit, The Color of Summer is ultimately a powerful and passionate story about the triumph of the human spirit over the forces of political and sexual repression.

The Ministry of Fear: An Entertainment (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics #Vol. 10)

by Graham Greene

In London during the Blitz, an amnesiac must outwit a twisted Nazi plot in this “master thriller” of espionage, murder, and deception (Time). On a peaceful Sunday afternoon, Arthur Rowe comes upon a charity fete in the gardens of a Cambridgeshire vicarage where he wins a game of chance. If only this were an ordinary day. Britain is under threat by Germany, and the air raid sirens that bring the bazaar to a halt expose Rowe as no ordinary man. Recently released from a psychiatric prison for the mercy killing of his wife, he is burdened by guilt, and now, in possession of a seemingly innocuous prize, on the run from a nest of Nazi spies who want him dead. Pursued on a dark odyssey through the bombed-out streets of London, he becomes enmeshed in a tangle of secrets that reach into the dark recesses of his own forgotten past. And there isn’t a soul he can trust, not even himself. Because Arthur Rowe doesn’t even know who he really is. “A storyteller of genius,” Graham Greene composed his serpentine mystery of authentic wartime espionage—and one the author’s personal favorites—while working for MI6 (Evelyn Waugh). But The Ministry of Fear “is more than a mere thriller . . . [it’s a] hypnotic moonstone of a novel” (The New York Times).

Riddles in Mathematics: A Book of Paradoxes (Dover Recreational Math)

by Prof. Daniel S. Silver Eugene P Northrop

Two fathers and two sons leave town. This reduces the population of the town by three. True? Yes, if the trio consists of a father, son, and grandson. This entertaining collection consists of more than 200 such riddles, drawn from every branch of mathematics. Math enthusiasts of all ages will enjoy sharpening their wits with riddles rooted in areas from arithmetic to calculus, covering a wide range of subjects that includes geometry, trigonometry, algebra, concepts of the infinite, probability, and logic. But only an elementary knowledge of mathematics is needed to find amusement in this imaginative collection, which features complete solutions and more than 100 black-and-white illustrations. "Mr. Northrop writes well and simply. Every so often he will illuminate his discussion with an amusing example. While reading a discussion of topology, the reviewer learned how to remove his vest from beneath his jacket. It works every time." -- The New York Times

Black Boy (P. S. Series)

by Richard Wright

<P>Richard Wright grew up in the woods of Mississippi, with poverty, hunger, fear, and hatred. He lied, stole, and raged at those around him; at six he was a "drunkard," hanging about taverns. <P>Surly, brutal, cold, suspicious, and self-pitying, he was surrounded on one side by whites who were either indifferent to him, pitying, or cruel, and on the other by blacks who resented anyone trying to rise above the common lot. <P>Black Boy is Richard Wright's powerful account of his journey from innocence to experience in the Jim Crow South. <P>It is at once an unashamed confession and a profound indictment-a poignant and disturbing record of social injustice and human suffering. <P>[This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 11-12 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

Cannery Row

by John Steinbeck

Steinbeck's tough yet charming portrait of people on the margins of society, dependant on one another for both physical and emotional survival Published in 1945, Cannery Row focuses on the acceptance of life as it is: both the exuberance of community and the loneliness of the individual. Drawing on his memories of the real inhabitants of Monterey, California, including longtime friend Ed Ricketts, Steinbeck interweaves the stories of Doc, Dora, Mack and his boys, Lee Chong, and the other characters in this world where only the fittest survive, to create a novel that is at once one of his most humorous and poignant works. In her introduction, Susan Shillinglaw shows how the novel expresses, both in style and theme, much that is essentially Steinbeck: "scientific detachment, empathy toward the lonely and depressed...and, at the darkest level...the terror of isolation and nothingness."For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.From the Trade Paperback edition.

1919: Volume Two of the U.S.A. Trilogy (U.S.A. Trilogy #2)

by John Dos Passos

With 1919, the second volume of his U.S.A. trilogy, John Dos Passos continues his "vigorous and sweeping panorama of twentieth-century America" (Forum), lauded on publication of the first volume not only for its scope, but also for its groundbreaking style. Again, employing a host of experimental devices that would inspire a whole new generation of writers to follow, Dos Passos captures the many textures, flavors, and background noises of modern life with a cinematic touch and unparalleled nerve.1919 opens to find America and the world at war, and Dos Passos's characters, many of whom we met in the first volume, are thrown into the snarl. We follow the daughter of a Chicago minister, a wide-eyed Texas girl, a young poet, a radical Jew, and we glimpse Woodrow Wilson, Theodore Roosevelt, and the Unknown Soldier.

The 42nd Parallel: U. S. A. - The 42nd Parallel; 1919; The Big Money (U.S.A. Trilogy #1)

by John Dos Passos

With his U.S.A. trilogy, comprising THE 42nd PARALLEL, 1919, and THE BIG MONEY, John Dos Passos is said by many to have written the great American novel. While Fitzgerald and Hemingway were cultivating what Edmund Wilson once called their "own little corners," John Dos Passos was taking on the world. Counted as one of the best novels of the twentieth century by the Modern Library and by some of the finest writers working today, U.S.A. is a grand, kaleidoscopic portrait of a nation, buzzing with history and life on every page.The trilogy opens with THE 42nd PARALLEL, where we find a young country at the dawn of the twentieth century. Slowly, in stories artfully spliced together, the lives and fortunes of five characters unfold. Mac, Janey, Eleanor, Ward, and Charley are caught on the storm track of this parallel and blown New Yorkward. As their lives cross and double back again, the likes of Eugene Debs, Thomas Edison, and Andrew Carnegie make cameo appearances.

Betsy In Spite Of Herself

by Maud Hart Lovelace

From the Betsy Ray series. Follows Betsy and her crowd of friends through her sophmore year in High School.

Brave New World

by Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley's tour de force, Brave New World is a darkly satiric vision of a "utopian" future--where humans are genetically bred and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively serve a ruling order. <P><P>A powerful work of speculative fiction that has enthralled and terrified readers for generations, it remains remarkably relevant to this day as both a warning to be heeded as we head into tomorrow and as thought-provoking, satisfying entertainment.

Delta Wedding / The Ponder Heart: The Robber Bridegroom / Delta Wedding / The Ponder Heart / Losing Battles / The Optimist's Daughter (Library Of America Eudora Welty Edition Ser. #1)

by Eudora Welty

Set in 1923, Delta Wedding is an exquisitely woven story of southern family life, centered around the Fairchild family's preparations for a wedding at their Mississippi plantation. In The Ponder Heart, a comic masterpiece, Miss Edna Earle Ponder, one of the few living members of a once prominent family, tells a traveling salesman the history of her family and fellow townsfolk. This edition brings together two fine works from one of the most beloved writers of the American south.

Drill For Skill

by C. C. Rickett

Provides essentials of basic grammar, usage and mechanics. Includes practice drills and mastery tests.

Freddy the Pied Piper

by Kurt Wiese Walter R. Brooks

When the circus falls on hard times, Freddy concocts a plan to raise money by driving out the mice in a nearby village. However, he must also contend with angry farm mice, kidnapping, and a dangerous trek to Virginia. After all his hard work, Mr. Broomschmidt, the circus owner, refuses to accept any charity, and Freddy must find some other way to save his beloved circus. In Freddy the Pied Piper, Walter Brooks has told yet another rollicking, humorous adventure tale with wonderful illustrations by the inimitable Kurt Wiese.

The Hidden Treasure of Glaston

by Eleanore M. Jewett

From the book jacket:<P><P> This is a glowing, intimate story of medieval England, absorbing for all who love adventure, beauty, authentic details of the period and, above all, books themselves.<P> Young Hugh, a cripple with a love of ancient manuscripts inherited from his dead mother, is left by his mysterious father one stormy night in the sanctuary of the great Abbey of Glastonbury. Assisted by the good Brother John, librarian of the monastery, by his delightful friend, Dickon, and by the half-crazy songs and stories of a strange hermit, Hugh pieces together clues from partly destroyed documents which lead him on an exciting trail to a thrilling discovery, to recovered health, and to a glimpse of the Holy Grail itself.<P> A Newbery Honor book.

Freddy the Magician

by Kurt Wiese Walter R. Brooks

First published between 1927 and 1958, the 26 classic books about Freddy the Pig have delighted five generations of children and are now going on to delight a sixth generation. Freddy, who has won so many admirers in his roles of detective, pied piper, editor, general advisor to the animals on the Bean Farm, and--always--poet, will fascinate his readers in his role of magician. Freddy pulls some wonderful tricks, not the least of which is outwitting the fraudulent magician who comes to entertain the unsuspecting inhabitants of the nearby town of Centerboro.

Joy in the Morning (The\jeeves And Wooster Ser.)

by P. G. Wodehouse

"To dive into a Wodehouse novel is to swim in some of the most elegantly turned phrases in the English language."--Ben Schott Follow the adventures of Bertie Wooster and his gentleman's gentleman, Jeeves, in this stunning new edition of one of the greatest comic novels in the English language. Steeple Bumphleigh is a very picturesque place. But for Bertie Wooster, it is a place to be avoided, containing not only the appalling Aunt Agatha but also her husband, the terrifying Lord Worplesdon. So when a certain amount of familial arm-twisting is applied, Bertie heads for the sticks in fear and trepidation despite the support of the irreplaceable Jeeves.

Betsy and Joe

by Maud Hart Lovelace

From the Betsy Ray series. Betsy is now in High School. Follow Betsy and her crowd of friends through graduation and all the excitement of a senior year in High School.

The Eye of the World: Book One of 'The Wheel of Time' (Wheel of Time #1)

by Robert Jordan

The Wheel of Time turns and Ages come and go, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth returns again. In the Third Age, and Age of Prophecy, the World and Time themselves hang in the balance. What was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

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