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The Clown of God

by Tomie Depaola

In this retelling of the old French legend, a juggler offers to the Christ Child the only Christmas gift he has. Other books by this author are available in this library.

The Caesar Clue

by M. K. Shuman

[From the inside book flap:] When a mysterious young woman places an urgent call to Micah Dunn, the New Orleans private eye dutifully agrees to meet her incoming flight at the airport. Though a bit puzzled by Julia Morvant's cryptic telephone message, Dunn has no reason to suspect a case out of the ordinary--until his prospective client's plane is blown from the sky on its final approach to New Orleans International Airport. When the authorities confirm that foul play is responsible for the tragic explosion, Dunn knows that Julia Morvant must somehow be connected. But was she an unwitting accomplice to the heinous act or an innocent victim? Micah Dunn resolves to find out as much as he can about Julia Morvant--who she was, where she came from, and why she so desperately needed to meet him. He soon finds himself sniffing out a corrupt trail that winds from the dingiest alleys of New Orleans' underworld to much higher--and even more dangerous--places. M.K. Shuman's first Micah Dunn mystery, The Maya Stone Murders, was praised for its haunting, atmospheric portrayal of New Orleans' gritty streets and textured people. The Caesar Clue offers an even more revealing glimpse of the Crescent City and its subtle intrigues.

The Boston Italians

by Steve Puleo

In this lively and engaging history, Stephen Puleo tells the story of the Boston Italians from their earliest years, when a largely illiterate and impoverished people in a strange land recreated the bonds of village and region in the cramped quarters of the North End. Focusing on this first and crucial Italian enclave in Boston, Puleo describes the experience of Italian immigrants as they battled poverty, illiteracy, and prejudice; explains their transformation into Italian Americans during the Depression and World War II; and chronicles their rich history in Boston up to the present day.

Boss Talk

by Wall Street Journal

Timeless and effective business lessons from twenty-one top CEOsEvery business leader--from manager to entrepreneur--wants to know the ideas that motivate and inspire the world's most successful CEOs. Boss Talk presents twenty-one CEOs who give expert advice on issues important to today's businessperson. The topics include:*Motivating Your Employees*Managing Growth*Building a Brand*Learning from the New Economy*Trendspotting*Beating the Competition*Leading a Successful Turnaround or TransitionHere's what some bosses are talking about:"You have to get rewarded in the soul and in the wallet. The money isn't enough, but a plaque isn't enough either."--Jack Welch, General Electric Co."Lead by example. If you do that as CEO, your style will filter down through your team."--John Chambers, Cisco Systems"We do a lot of quantitative stuff. But coupled with that is having an employee staff and culture that is inherently interested in what we do."--Tom Freston, MTV Networks"Surround yourself with people you trust. You can't run a business over a certain size and sign off on everything."--Emily Woods, J.CrewFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

The Book of the Courtesans

by Susan Griffin

From Pulitzer-Prize-nominated author Susan Griffin comes an unprecedented, provocative look at the dazzling world of the West's first independent women, whose lively liaisons brought them unspoken influence, wealth, and freedom.While they charmed some of Europe's most illustrious men honing their social skills as well as their sexual ones, the great courtesans gained riches, power, education, and sexual freedom in a time when other women were denied all of these. From Imperia of sixteenth-century Rome, who personified the Renaissance ideal of beauty; Mme. de Pompadour, the arbiter of all things fashionable in eighteenth-century Paris and Versailles; Liane de Pougy, known in France during the Belle Epoque as "Our National Courtesan"; to Sarah Bernhardt, who, following in her mother's footsteps, supported herself in her early career with a second profession, The Book of the Courtesans tells the life stories and intricacies of the lavish lifestyles of these women. Unlike their geisha counterparts, courtesans neither lived in brothels nor bent their wills to suit their suitors. They were strong- willed, autonomous, and plucky.An open secret, their presence can be felt throughout our culture. The muses who enflamed the hearts and imaginations of our most celebrated artists, they were also artists in their own right. They wrote poetry and novels, invented the cancan at the Moulin Rouge, and presented celebrated acts at the Folies Bergères. They helped to influence and shape the sensibility of modern literature, painting, and fashion. When Greek sculptor Praxiteles wanted to depict Venus he used a famous courtesan as a model, as in later centuries Titian, Veronese, Raphael, Giorgione, and Boucher did when they painted goddesses. When Marcel Proust was a young man it was the courtesan Laure Hayman who took him under her wing, introducing him to the right people, and providing inspiration for one of literature's greatest masterpieces. And they often had considerable political influence too. When King Louis XV needed advice on foreign affairs or appointments of state he turned to Jeanne du Barry as well as Pompadour.In her witty and insightful prose, as Griffin celebrates these alluring and fascinating women, she restores a lost legacy of women's history. She gives us the stories of these amazing women who, starting from impoverished or unimpressive beginnings, garnered chateaux, fine coaches, fabulous collections of jewelry, and even aristocratic titles along the way. And through a brilliant exploration of their extraordinary abilities, skills, and talents which Griffin playfully categorizes as their virtues "Timing, Beauty, Cheek, Brilliance, Gaiety, Grace, and Charm" her book explains how, while helping themselves, through their often outrageous, always entertaining examples, the great courtesans not only enriched our cultural heritage but helped to liberate women from the social, sexual, and economic strictures that confined them.Intensively researched and beautifully crafted, The Book of the Courtesans delves into scintillating but often hidden worlds, telling stories gleaned from many sources, including courtesans' memoirs, presented along with stunning rare photographs to create memorable portraits of some of the most pivotal figures in women's history.

Behind Enemy Lines

by Wendy Holden Marthe Cohn

Marthe Cohn was in her late teens when Hitler was rising to power. Living across the German border in Alsace-Lorraine, her family began taking in Jews who were fleeing the Nazis, as well as the Jewish children being sent away by terrified parents. Soon her own homeland was under Nazi rule, and she and her parents, brothers, and sisters were forced to live the restricted lives of all Jews. As the Nazi occupation of France escalated along with the war, Marthe's sister was arrested and eventually sent to Auschwitz, and the rest of her family was forced to flee to the south of France. Always a fighter, Marthe joined the French Army.Behind Enemy Lines is Marthe Cohn's memoir of a time and place that has mesmerized the world for more than half a century. But at its heart it is the tale of an ordinary human being who, under extraordinary circumstances, became the hero her country needed her to be.Recently, at the age of eighty, Marthe Cohn was awarded France's highest military honor, the Medaille Militaire, a relatively rare medal awarded for outstanding military service and given, in the past, to the likes of Winston Churchill. With this award came official acknowledgment of the heroic exploits of a beautiful young Jewish woman who faced death every day as she sought to help defeat the Nazi empire.When the spotlight was turned on Marthe Cohn, not even her children or grandchildren knew to what extent this modest woman had been involved with the Allies in fighting the evils of the greatest war of the twentieth century. She had fought valiantly to retrieve needed inside information about Nazi troop movements by slipping behind enemy lines, utilizing her perfect German accent and blond hair to pose as a young German nurse who was desperately trying to obtain word about a fictional fiancé. In traveling about the countryside and approaching troops sympathetic to her plight, she learned where they were going next and was able to alert Allied commanders.From the Hardcover edition.

Arthur Murray's Popularity Book

by Arthur Murray

First published in 1944, The Popularity Book is a vintage guidebook full of wise and wonderful advice on living well, building poise and maintaining fulfilling relationships. Drawn from books, testimonials and magazines from the World War II era, this book shows the forthright common sense and romanticism of the "Greatest Generation", a generation inspired by debonair role models such as Clark Gable, Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn. As relevant today as it was in the 1940s, The Popularity Book offers counsel on being an unforgettably great date, devising a game-plan for making a man propose marriage, and pointers how to be charming. Compiled and originally published by Arthur Murray, who famously said he could teach anyone who could walk how to dance, it also features his iconic step-by-step footprint instructions on how to Samba, Fox Trot and Rumba divinely!

The Americas

by Felipe Fernández-Armesto 

From food to the spread of political ideas, the landmass from northern Canada to the southern tip of Argentina is complexly bound together, yet these connections are generally ignored. In this groundbreaking and vividly rendered work, leading historian Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells, for the first time, the story of our hemisphere as a whole, showing why it is impossible to understand North, Central, and South America in isolation, and looking instead to the intricate and common forces that continue to shape the region.With his trademark erudition, imagination, and thematic breadth, Fernández-Armesto ranges over commerce, religion, agriculture, the environment, the slave trade, culture, and politics. He takes us from man's arrival in North America to the Colonial and Independence periods, to the "American Century" and beyond. For most of human history, the south dominated the north: as Fernández-Armesto argues in his provocative conclusion, it might well again. A panoramic yet richly textured story that embodies fresh ways of looking at cross-cultural exchange, conflict, and interaction, The Americas demolishes our traditional ways of looking at the hemisphere, putting in place a compelling and fruitful new vision.From the Hardcover edition.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Shines Again

by Robert L. May

Devastated when his nose loses its shine, Rudolph spends all his time crying and feeling sorry for himself until he becomes involved in the search for two baby rabbits. Other books about Rudolph are available in this library.

Alien: The Official Movie Novelization

by Alan Dean Foster

Alan Dean Foster is the acclaimed author of movie tie-ins for Star Wars, Alien, Transformers. He was awarded the IAMTW Grand Master Scribe Award in 2008. A best-selling science-fiction and fantasy author in his own right; the popular Pip and Flinx novels and the Founding of the Commonwealth series.

Alien 3: The Official Movie Novelization

by Alan Dean Foster

After her escape from planet LV-426 in the movie Aliens, an escape pod carrying Ellen Ripley crashes onto a remote prison inhabited by killers and other scum. While trapped in the ore refinery, Ripley discovers the horrifying reason for her crash: an alien stowaway. As the alien matures and begins to kill off the inhabitants, Ripley becomes unaware that her true enemy is more than just the killer alien...

The Alchemist

by Donna Boyd

In a sweeping epic of dazzling magic, soaring suspense, and dark longing, three immortal souls are united by fate and a fearless ambition that will change the course of history-even as it destroys their own way of life. . . . On an upper floor of a plush, high-security building on Central Park West, an elegant man sits in the office of Dr. Anne Kramer, confessing to the heinous murder that has horrified the modern world. Randolf Sontime is renowned for his personal charm, and Dr. Kramer is fighting to keep from falling victim to it. For the first time in her life, she truly understands the meaning of the word "charisma." Not knowing that her own destiny is irrevocably tied to his, Anne Kramer listens to the story of Sontime's life."It began with the magic, you see. And so, perforce, must I." As a boy named Han at the House of Ra, an isolated oasis in the Egyptian desert of a far ancient time, Sontime lived in privilege. There the chosen were trained in the science of alchemy-magic, philosophy, miracles. Only two other initiates were as skilled as he: Akan, quiet and studious, a boy whose thirst for knowledge was matched only by his hunger for truth; and Nefar, beautiful and brilliant, a girl as filled with wonder and unfathomable ambition as Han himself. Together they discovered that in union, theirs was a power unmatched in the physical world.But even in the House of Ra, there were boundaries to be observed, knowledge that only the masters understood and feared. As the threesome's thirst for answers-and for each other-deepened, they were tempted by the dark arts that they had sworn to avoid. "Look at three magnificent youths who stand astride your world and scoff at the rules you must obey. . . . Look at us, and call us gods." Their power was palpable, their desire total-until the fateful moment when their alliance was forever damned, their gifts horribly corrupted.A seductive work that seethes with mystery and passion, The Alchemist hurtles readers back through time to an era when magic was sacred and the workings of the world lay in the hands of a few gifted, but tortured souls. In a stunning feat of unbridled imagination, Donna Boyd has created her most hypnotic novel to date.From the Hardcover edition.

The Abomination

by Paul Golding

Cruising the seamy underbelly of London's gay scene, James Moore Zamora is as eager to repel men as he is to seduce them. Handsome, sophisticated, intelligent, and vain, beneath his immaculately maintained exterior lies an elaborate network of deeply embedded scars from a lifetime filled with betrayal and isolation. Born to negligent, self-absorbed parents and raised among upper crust society on a picturesque Spanish island, at nine-years-old James is sent off to an exclusive Catholic boarding school in England. Met with savageness by his peers, and seduced by the twisted affections of his teachers, he soon develops a self-consciousness that passes for self-awareness and a profound cynicism that masks savage anger. Charged with linguistic precision, brutal honesty, and caustic wit, The Abomination is a disturbing yet electrifying account of one man's tortured coming of age.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Miss Dog's Christmas Treat

by James Marshall

Every year Miss Dog gets a selection of Christmas candies. And every year she eats them all before Christmas. But this year is going to be different... Other books by this author are available in this library.

The Elves at the Top of the World

by Meg Waters

Based on the movie "Santa Claus: The Movie," readers are introduced to the elves in Santa Claus' workshop.

THE HUMAN BODY

by Shawn Braley Kathleen M. Reilly

Kids will be amazed at all the action that's going on right inside their own bodies, from understanding just how that apple turns into energy to how the "leftovers" make their exit. The Human Body: 25 Fantastic Projects Illuminate How the Body Works will engage kids with hands-on activities that will show them all the fantastic, well-orchestrated systems at work in their very own bodies-they'll see exactly how smoke affects the lung, how the heart really acts as a liquid pump, and how the different joints are structured and serve different purposes. Kids will gain a concrete understanding of their bodies-and realize in the process just how amazing they really are.

Someone Else's Wedding Vows

by Bianca Stone

Someone Else's Wedding Vows reflects on the different forms of love, which can be both tremendously joyous and devastatingly destructive. The title poem confronts a human ritual of marriage from the standpoint of a wedding photographer. Within the tedium and alienation of the ceremony, the speaker grapples with a strange human hopefulness. In this vein, Stone explores our everyday patterns and customs, and in doing so, exposes them for their complexities. Drawing on the neurological, scientific, psychological, and even supernatural, this collection confronts the difficulties of love and family. Stone rankles with a desire to understand, but the questions she asks are never answered simply. These poems stroll along the abyss, pointing towards the absurdity of our choices. They recede into the imaginative in order to understand and translate the distressing nature of reality. It is a bittersweet question this book raises: Why we are like this? There is no easy answer. So while we look down at our hands, perplexed, Someone Else's Wedding Vows raises a glass to the future.

The Silk Road

by Kathy Ceceri

From Roman times until the Age of Exploration, the Silk Road carried goods and ideas across Central Asia between two major centers of civilization, the Mediterranean Sea and China. In The Silk Road: Explore the World's Most Famous Trade Route, readers ages 9-12 will learn about the history, geography, culture, and people of the Silk Road region.Marco Polo was just one of many who set out on the Silk Road in search of wealth, power, or knowledge. These adventurers braved vast deserts, towering mountain peaks, warring tribes, and marauding bandits. Silk garments, wool rugs, and fine glass were the prizes for those who survived the trip. Activities using everyday materials bring the Silk Road to life. Young readers will see how ideas in math, science, religion, and art were spread by travelers along with the treasures they found.The Silk Road takes readers on an exciting, interactive adventure to a faraway place and celebrates its important role in human history and development..

Robotics

by Kathy Ceceri Sam Carbaugh

Once, robots were only found in science fiction books and movies. Today, robots are everywhere! They assemble massive cars and tiny computer chips. They help doctors do delicate surgery. They vacuum our houses and mow our lawns. Robot toys play with us, follow our commands, and respond to our moods. We even send robots to explore the depths of the ocean and the expanse of space. In Robotics, children ages 9 and up learn how robots affect both the future and the present. Hands-on activities make learning both fun and lasting.

The Rajneesh Chronicles

by Win Mccormack

The Rajneesh Chronicles is a collection of in-depth investigative and analytical articles published in Oregon Magazine covering the establishment of the city of Rajneeshpuram in Central Oregon in mid-1981 to its dramatic disintegration at the end of 1985. While most press treated the Rajneeshees' antics as a humorous sideshow typified by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh's dozens of Rolls-Royces, editor in chief Win McCormack and other of the magazine's writers systematically exposed the full range of the cult's depraved behavior, including its involvement in prostitution and international drug smuggling, sexual exploitation of children, abuse of homeless people imported into Rajneeshpuram to register as voters, and the use of brainwashing techniques bordering on torture. The tale of the Rajneeshees has become an amorphous legend few inside or outside of Oregon understand. The Rajneesh Chronicles fully illuminates the shocking reality behind that legend.

Portuguese

by Brandon Shimoda

The poems in Portuguese began while Brandon rode city buses around Seattle, and were inspired by his fellow passengers-their voices and their minds, their faces and their bodies, their exuberances and infirmities, and the ways in which they enlivened and darkened the days at once. It was with and within these people that poetry seemed most alive. At the same time, they began as responses to the words and writings of visual artists, mostly painters, whom Brandon was reading while riding the bus, especially Etel Adnan, Eugène Delacroix, Alberto Giacometti, Paul Klee, and Joan Mitchell, all of whom appear in the book. It was with and within these people, also, that poetry seemed most alive.In both senses, Portuguese is a work of color.Portuguese owes also a debt to a visit to Beirut, Lebanon (2009); six months spent in a cabin in the woods of western Maine (2010-2011); and the Japanese poets Kazuko Shiraishi, Ryuichi Tamura and Minoru Yoshioka, and their translators. It was written primarily in Seattle, Washington; Beirut, Lebanon; and Weld, Maine, though revised in Albany, California; Beacon, New York; and St. Louis, Missouri. In that sense, Portuguese is a travelogue, as well as a work of restlessness.Throughout writing the poems that became Portuguese, the presiding struggle was with poetry itself-the form and its impulses-voice and mind, face and body, exuberance and infirmity-as well as with the act of writing. The book actually began in the early 1980s, while on the bus to elementary school in a small town in New England, when Brandon was taunted for being "Portuguese." In that sense, Portuguese returns its author to this moment in which he felt challenged to become what he was being called, however falsely, and despite feeling confused, flushed and afraid. In that sense, Portuguese is a work of crossdressing.However, Portuguese is both more and less than all these things. It was-and is-a way to keep up with life in the form of drawing observations and feelings on paper, and to give form to the energy making up some part of memory. It is the fourth book in a series that began with The Alps, The Girl Without Arms, and O Bon. In this sense-and in all those above-it is an act of preservation, and therefore a work for his friends, his family, and for love.

A Journey Into the Transcendentalists' New England

by R. Todd Felton

This lavishly illustrated volume examines the major figures of the Transcendentalist movement and explores the places that inspired them. Beginning with Transcendentalism's birth in Boston and Cambridge, the book charts the development of a movement that revolutionized American ideas about the artistic, spiritual, and natural worlds. At the same time, it creates a vivid sense of New England in the nineteenth century, from its idyllic countryside and sleepy towns to its bustling ports and burgeoning cities. The book is divided geographically into chapters, each focusing on a town or village famous for its relationship to one or more of the Transcendentalists.

A Journey Into Michelangelo's Rome

by Angela K Nickerson

From St. Peter's Basilica to the Capitoline Hill, this unique resource-part biography, part history, and part travel guide-provides an intimate portrait of the relationship between Michelangelo and the city he restored to artistic greatness. Lavishly illustrated and richly informative, this travel companion tells the story of Michelangelo's meteoric rise, his career marked by successive artistic breakthroughs, his tempestuous relations with powerful patrons, and his austere but passionate private life. Providing street maps that allow readers to navigate the city and discover Rome as Michelangelo knew it, each chapter focuses on a particular work that amazed Michelangelo's contemporaries and modern tourists alike.

A Journey Into Flaubert's Normandy

by Susannah Patton

Richly illustrated with maps, historical and contemporary photographs, and period artwork, this guidebook takes tourists and armchair travelers on a stimulating journey through the small towns, rolling hills, and windswept coast of Flaubert's Normandy. The novelist's homes and the locations that are prominently featured in his controversial works are the focus of this pictorial travel guide, and include the ancient town of Rouen, where Flaubert was born in 1821; the resort town of Trouville and its frequently painted beach; Croisset, where Flaubert's riverside house gave him the refuge to write; and the quiet country town of Ry, which claims to be where the real Madame Bovary lived and died.

The Journal of Jules Renard

by Jules Renard

Spanning from 1887 to a month before his death in 1910, The Journal of Jules Renard is a unique autobiographical masterpiece that, though celebrated abroad and cited as a principle influence by writers as varying as Somerset Maugham and Donald Barthelme, remains largely undiscovered in the United States. Throughout his journal, Renard develops not only his artistic convictions but also his humanity, as he reflects on the nineteenth-century French literary and art scene and the emergence of his position as an important novelist and playwright in that world, provides aphorisms and quips, and portrays the details of his personal life-his love interests, his position as a socialist mayor of Chitry, the suicide of his father-which often appear in his work.

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