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Feminist Review: Issue 46

by The Feminist The Feminist Review Collective

A unique combination of the activist and the academic, Feminist Review has an acclaimed place within women's studies courses and the women's movement. Feminist Review is produced by a London-based editorial collective and publishes and reviews work by women; featuring articles on feminist theory, race, class and sexuality, women's history, cultural studies, Black and Third World feminism, poetry, photography, letters and much more. Feminist Review is available both on annual subscription and from bookstores. For a Free Sample Copy or for further subscription details please contact: Trevina Johnson, Routledge Subscriptions, ITPS Ltd, Cheriton House, North Way, Andover SP10 5BE. UK.

States of Childhood: From the Junior Republic to the American Republic, 1895-1945

by Jennifer S. Light

How "virtual adulthood"--children's role play in simulated cities, states, and nations--helped construct a new kind of "sheltered" childhood for American young people.A number of curious communities sprang up across the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century: simulated cities, states, and nations in which children played the roles of legislators, police officers, bankers, journalists, shopkeepers, and other adults. They performed real work--passing laws, growing food, and constructing buildings, among other tasks--inside virtual worlds. In this book, Jennifer Light examines the phenomena of "junior republics" and argues that they marked the transition to a new kind of "sheltered" childhood for American youth. Banished from the labor force and public life, children inhabited worlds that mirrored the one they had left.

The Scottish Miners, 1874–1939: Volume 1: Industry, Work and Community

by Alan Campbell

The Scottish miners experienced enormous changes during these sixty-five years. Enjoying a high degree of autonomy underground throughout the nineteenth century, their work situation was transformed in the twentieth as Scotland became the most intensively mechanised of the British coalfields. Grievances generated by this change led to strike rates in Scotland being up to ten and fifteen times higher than in the major English coalfields. Such militancy displayed considerable geographical variation however, and the translation of grievances into industrial conflict was mediated by variables rooted in the community as well as the pit. A central theme of this volume is to explore the differences between the four principal mining regions in Scotland through the detailed study of ten localities within them. This innovative, two-tiered comparison is used to analyse the competing loyalties of class, gender and ethnicity, to map the uneven terrain of popular protest and social disorder, and to challenge traditional stereotypes of ’a peaceable kingdom’. This historical sociology of the Scottish coalfields frames the analysis of trade unionism and politics which is developed in the companion volume to this book.

Gateways Of Asia

by Broeze

First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Great Britain and the Opening of Japan 1834-1858: 1858

by William G Beasley William G. Beasley

Reissue in paperback (with new Introduction) of the 1951 classic analysis of the crucial years leading up to the Meiji restoration in which Britain provided Japan with its wealth and power model.

Signifying Identities: Anthropological Perspectives on Boundaries and Contested Identities

by Anthony P. Cohen

This collection of extended papers examines the ways in which relations between national, ethnic, religious and gender groups are underpinned by each group's perceptions of their distinctive identities and of the nature of the boundaries which divide them. Questions of frontier and identity are theorised with reference to the Maori, Australian aborigines and Celtic groups.The theoretical arguments and ethnographic perspectives of this book place it at the cutting edge of contemporary anthropological scholarship on identity, with respect to the study of ethnicity, nationalism, localism, gender and indigenous peoples. It will be of value to scholars and students of social and cultural anthropology, human geography and social psychology.

Rhetoric, Cultural Studies, and Literacy: Selected Papers From the 1994 Conference of the Rhetoric Society of America

by John Frederick Reynolds

This volume presents a representative cross-section of the more than 200 papers presented at the 1994 conference of the Rhetoric Society of America. The contributors reflect multi- and inter-disciplinary perspectives -- English, speech communication, philosophy, rhetoric, composition studies, comparative literature, and film and media studies. Exploring the historical relationships and changing relationships between rhetoric, cultural studies, and literacy in the United States, this text seeks answers to such questions as what constitutes "literacy" in a post-modern, high-tech, multi-cultural society?

Shooting Victoria: Madness, Mayhem, and the Rebirth of the British Monarchy

by Paul Thomas Murphy

From a hunchbacked dwarf to a paranoid poet-assassin, a history of Victorian England as seen through the numerous assassination attempts on Queen Victoria during her reign During Queen Victoria's 64 years on the British throne, no fewer than eight attempts were made on her life. Murphy follows each would-be assassin and the repercussions of their actions, illuminating daily life in Victorian England, the development of the monarchy under Queen Victoria, and the evolution of the attacks in light of changing social issues and technology. There was Edward Oxford, a bartender who dreamed of becoming an admiral, who was simply shocked when his attempt to shoot the pregnant Queen and Prince consort made him a madman in the world's eyes. There was hunchbacked John Bean, who dreamed of historical notoriety in a publicized treason trial, and William Hamilton, forever scarred by the ravages of the Irish Potato Famine. Roderick MacLean enabled Victoria to successfully strike insanity pleas from Britain's legal process. Most threatening of all were the "dynamitards" who targeted her Majesty's Golden Jubilee--signaling the advent of modern terrorism with their publicly focused attack. From these cloak-and-dagger plots to Victoria's brilliant wit and steadfast courage, Shooting Victoria is historical narrative at its most thrilling, complete with astute insight into how these attacks actually revitalized the British crown at a time when monarchy was quickly becoming unpopular abroad. While thrones across Europe toppled, the Queen's would-be assassins contributed greatly to the preservation of the monarchy and to the stability that it enjoys today. After all, as Victoria herself noted, "It is worth being shot at--to see how much one is loved."

Bible in China: The History of the Union Version or the Culmination of Protestant Missionary Bible Translation in China (Monumenta Serica Monograph Ser.)

by JostOliver Zetzsche

The Union Version, China's preeminent and most widely used translation of the Bible, had achieved the status of a sacred Chinese classic within the Chinese Church not long after its publication in 1919. Jost Zetzsche's monograph on this remarkable translation traces the historical and linguistic background that led to the decision to translate the Union Version, with detailed analyses of the translation efforts that preceeded it. Special attention is given to the cooperation and confrontation among Protestant denominations as well as the rising prominence of the Chinese translators as these groups attempted to form a cohesive translation of the Bible. This is set against the background of the development of the Chinese language during the 30-year translation process, both in the perception of the translators and in the country at large.

The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography (The\best Sellers Of 1919 Ser.)

by Henry Adams

The Modern Library's number-one nonfiction book of the twentieth century and winner of the Pulitzer Prize: The acclaimed memoir of a brilliant man reckoning with an era of profound change The great-grandson of President John Adams and the grandson of President John Quincy Adams, Henry Adams possessed one of the most remarkable minds of his generation. Yet he believed himself fundamentally unsuited to the era in which he lived--the tumultuous period between the Civil War and World War I. One of the finest autobiographies ever written, The Education of Henry Adams is a remarkable and uniquely unclassifiable work. Written in third person and originally circulated in a private edition to friends and family only, it recounts Adams's lifelong search for self-knowledge and moral enlightenment and bears witness to some of the most significant developments in American history. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Great American Lives: The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant, Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie, and The Education of Henry Adams

by Benjamin Franklin Henry Adams Andrew Carnegie Ulysses S Grant

Brilliant, captivating, and unforgettable memoirs from four of the greatest minds in American history. Penned between 1771 and 1790 and published after his death, TheAutobiography of Benjamin Franklin is one of the most acclaimed and widely read personal histories ever written. From his youth as a printer's assistant working for his brother's Boston newspaper through his own publishing, writing, and military careers, his scientific experiments and worldwide travels, his grand triumphs and heartbreaking tragedies, Franklin tells his story with aplomb, bringing to life the flesh-and-blood man behind the American icon. Completed just days before his death, Ulysses S. Grant's Personal Memoirs is a clear and compelling account of his military career, focusing on two great conflicts: the Mexican-American War and the Civil War. Lauded for its crisp and direct prose, Grant's autobiography offers frank insight into everything from the merits of the war with Mexico to the strategies and tactics employed by Union forces against the Confederacy to the poignancy of Grant's meeting with General Lee at Appomattox Court House. Documenting a world of tariffs, insider deals, and Wall Street sharks as well as his stunning rise from bobbin boy to steel baron, The Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie opens a window into the great industrialist's decision-making process. His insights on education, business, and the necessity of giving back for the common good set an inspirational example for aspiring executives and provide a fitting testament to the power of the American dream. The Education of Henry Adams is the Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir of a brilliant man reckoning with an era of profound change. The great-grandson of President John Adams and the grandson of President John Quincy Adams, Henry Adams possessed one of the most remarkable minds of his generation. Yet he believed himself fundamentally unsuited to the era in which he lived--the tumultuous period between the Civil War and World War I. Written in third person, this uniquely unclassifiable autobiography is the Modern Library's number-one nonfiction book of the twentieth century. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

White Supremacy in Children's Literature: Characterizations of African Americans, 1830-1900 (Children's Literature and Culture)

by Donnarae MacCann

This penetrating study of the white supremacy myth in books for the young adds an important dimension to American intellectual history. The study pinpoints an intersecting adult and child culture: it demonstrates that many children's stories had political, literary, and social contexts that paralleled the way adult books, schools, churches, and government institutions similarly maligned black identity, culture, and intelligence. The book reveals how links between the socialization of children and conservative trends in the 19th century foretold 20th century disregard for social justice in American social policy. The author demonstrates that cultural pluralism, an ongoing corrective to white supremacist fabrications, is informed by the insights and historical assessments offered in this study.

Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents

by Jean-Francois Blanchette

An examination of the challenges of establishing the authenticity of electronic documents—in particular the design of a cryptographic equivalent to handwritten signatures.The gradual disappearance of paper and its familiar evidential qualities affects almost every dimension of contemporary life. From health records to ballots, almost all documents are now digitized at some point of their life cycle, easily copied, altered, and distributed. In Burdens of Proof, Jean-François Blanchette examines the challenge of defining a new evidentiary framework for electronic documents, focusing on the design of a digital equivalent to handwritten signatures.From the blackboards of mathematicians to the halls of legislative assemblies, Blanchette traces the path of such an equivalent: digital signatures based on the mathematics of public-key cryptography. In the mid-1990s, cryptographic signatures formed the centerpiece of a worldwide wave of legal reform and of an ambitious cryptographic research agenda that sought to build privacy, anonymity, and accountability into the very infrastructure of the Internet. Yet markets for cryptographic products collapsed in the aftermath of the dot-com boom and bust along with cryptography's social projects.Blanchette describes the trials of French bureaucracies as they wrestled with the application of electronic signatures to real estate contracts, birth certificates, and land titles, and tracks the convoluted paths through which electronic documents acquire moral authority. These paths suggest that the material world need not merely succumb to the virtual but, rather, can usefully inspire it. Indeed, Blanchette argues, in renewing their engagement with the material world, cryptographers might also find the key to broader acceptance of their design goals.

The Burgoyne Diaries: The First Winter at Ypres with the Irish Rifles

by Gerald Achilles Burgoyne

These are the diaries of Gerald Achilles Burgoyne, wrote from the trenches just south of Ypres while he was with the Royal Irish Rifles in the Great War.The author's daughter, Claudia Davison, was not even born when these diaries were originally written and was only 12-years-old when her father died in 1936 after being bombed by the Italian Air Force while he and his mules were conveying a Red Cross unit in Ethiopia.Claudia found the diaries in a trunk full of personal effects when her mother died and, after showing them to a long-standing friend who loved the diaries, she sent them off to be published.Despite conditions of all-pervading mud, bitter cold and wind, let alone the bursting shells and the 'sipping' bullet, Burgoyne dispassionately recorded and drew what he saw. These vivid accounts, written on pages of a notebook, were almost daily sent back to his wife. Each day is a gem of interest, from the very first entry in November 1914 to the last in May 1915.The diaries end as abruptly as they begin. In May 1915 Burgoyne was wounded and sent back to England after a gruesome and abortive attack on the notorious Hill 60.Complete with maps and sketches drawn by Burgoyne at the time, this book is essential reading for all Great War enthusiasts and those wishing to learn more about the key conflicts that occurred in 1914 and 1915.

Daniel Deronda: Volume 2...

by George Eliot

Two members of the British upper class are drawn together--and torn asunder--by their search for self in this "startling and unexpected novel" (A. S. Byatt). As a true scion of the English gentry, Daniel Deronda has been raised with the expectation that he will take his rightful place in society--despite being possessed of a disquiet he cannot ignore. When he spies the beautiful Gwendolen Harleth, he senses a similarly dissatisfied soul in her. However, their shared discontent takes them in vastly different directions. Upon discovering some unsettling possibilities about his own ancestry, Daniel is drawn into the world of Judaism and the discipline and spiritual growth it entails while Gwendolen fiercely desires to be freed from her oppressive marriage to noble Henleigh Mallinger Grandcourt and rectify mistakes from her past in order to live on her own terms. The two find their paths intertwined as they seek life outside of their station. Set at the height of the British Empire, where racism, sexism, and the strict hierarchy of an absolutely uncompromising society held sway, Daniel Deronda is a jarring, emotional tale of a time and place often romanticized but rarely examined in all its facets, both glorious and grotesque. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Mature Women Students: Separating Of Connecting Family And Education (Gender And Society Ser.)

by Rosalind Edwards South Bank University.

First Published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Princess and Curdie: With Colour Plates And Black And White Illustrations (The Princess Irene and Curdie Series #2)

by George MacDonald

The sequel to The Princess and the Goblin from the Victorian-era Scottish author who influenced C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Madeleine L&’Engle. A year or two after the adventures of The Princess and the Goblin, a group of corrupt ministers are plotting to poison the king, Princess Irene&’s father. Curdie, a mineworker and loyal friend, joins forces with Princess Irene to stop them. &“Along the way the ugliest and most fearful of monster-companions help him, and the final great battle where they stand alone is decisive. A great adventure and, like its predecessor, with hidden levels of meaning. Makes Hairy [sic] Potter look feeble&” (AllReaders.com). &“The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie are two of the most unusual and haunting fairy tales ever written.&” —The Guardian

Shetkaryancha Asud: शेतकऱ्यांचा आसूड

by Mahatma Jyotirao Phule

महात्मा फुले लिखित शेतकऱ्याचा आसूड या पुस्तकामध्ये शेतकऱ्यांच्या आर्थिक परिस्थितीवरील अडचणी, शेतकऱ्यांची होणारी पिळवणूक आणि फसवणूक व त्यावरील सरकारचे दुर्लक्ष हे सविस्तर पणे पुस्तकामध्ये दिलेले आहे.

The Return of the Soldier

by Rebecca West

West's superb novel--now available as an ebookRebecca West's stunning debut novel: The classic story of a soldier's amnesia and its effect on the women in his lifeA strange woman arrives at the door with unsettling news for Jenny and her sister-in-law Kitty: Jenny's husband has lost his memory while fighting in the war. As their solider returns home, the women discover that his mind is stuck on the woman he loved fifteen years before--the same woman who first delivered the news of his memory loss and whom Jenny and Kitty regard as socially beneath them. As they care for him and react to this news, they come to understand the power of love--past, present, unrequited, and unconditional. Psychologically astute, West's unforgettable first work of fiction reveals her innate skill at understanding the constructs of class that hamper people's attempts to connect with one another.

The Annual of Psychoanalysis, V. 28

by Jerome A. Winer

Volume 28 of The Annual features stimulating, original essays on the relationship between psychoanalysis and the neurosciences. Edelman's Neural Darwinism informs Barry's investigaton of the psychoanalytic theory of internalization and Fajardo's reassessment of "breaks in consciousness" whereas Gedo's hierarchical model of mental functioning informs Fisher's presentation of the treatment of an autistic child. Elsewhere, Hadley proposes a neurobiologically distinct motivational system devoted to the development of autonomy; Solms attempts to bridge psychoanalysis and the neurophysiology of dreaming; Levin and Trevarthen examine the relationship of conscious and unconscious functions to the executive control network (ECN) of the brain; Levin examines the contributions of chaos theory to psychoanalysis; and Modell explores metaphor as the crucial aspect of the developing mind and brain through which cognition itself occurs. Moraitis's examination of why analysis has been so slow to integrate its findings with the insights of contemporary neuroscience and cognitive psychology, and Sadow's reprise on the role of theory in the evolution of psychoanalysis usefully frame the contributions to this section. Section II of Volume 28 reengages a subject area for which The Annual has become well-known. The four characteristically excellent studies in applied psychoanalysis found here cover the effect of early father loss on the work of the American watercolorist Charles Burchfield, "The Creativity of Women," the unconscious influence of metaphor on attitudes and value judgments, and the application of self psychology to the dramas of Eugene O'Neill. It is altogether typical of this fine series that a collection of essays dedicated to the development of a psychobiologically sophisticated psychoanalysis should be followed by contributions that testify to the explanatory vitality of psychoanalysis with respect to issues of literature, art, and creativity.

Far from the Madding Crowd: The 1874 Thomas Hardy's Fourth Novel (Ubspd's World Classics Ser.)

by Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy's classic tale of a woman brave enough to defy convention: Now a major motion picture starring Carey Mulligan Spirited, impulsive, and beautiful, Bathsheba Everdene arrives in Wessex to live with her aunt. She strikes up a friendship with a neighbor, Gabriel Oak, and even saves the young shepherd's life. But when he responds by asking for her hand in marriage, she refuses. She cannot sacrifice her independence for a man she does not love. Years later, misfortune has bankrupted Gabriel, while Bathsheba has inherited her uncle's estate and is now a wealthy woman. She hires Gabriel as a shepherd but is interested in William Boldwood, a prosperous farmer whose reticence inspires her to playfully send him a valentine. William, like Gabriel before him, quickly falls in love with Bathsheba and proposes. But it is the dashing Sergeant Francis Troy who finally wins her heart. Despite the warnings of her first two suitors, Bathsheba accepts his proposal--a decision that brings long-buried secrets to the fore and leaves everything for which she has fought so hard hanging in the balance. Published a century and a half ago, Far from the Madding Crowd was Thomas Hardy's first major success and introduced the themes he would continue to explore for the rest of his life. A love story wrapped in the cloak of tragedy, it is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the nineteenth century. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Grasping the Changing World (European Association of Social Anthropologists)

by Václav Hubinger

As different societies merge into one global society and face the concomitant crisis of identity, of purpose and interest, social anthropology urgently needs to bring its methodology up to date: new methods are needed to analyse, compare and understand different cultures across space and time.Grasping the Changing World collects papers read at the second biannual EASA conference in Prague in 1992. The conference took place in an extraordinary 'postmodern' setting. With the fall of communist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe old certainties and time-honoured concepts had become obsolete; at the same time, anthropology too was in upheaval, and long-established patterns of thought seemed inadequate to grasp the rapidly changing realities. These doubts and tensions are reflected in this collection.The first half of Grasping the Changing World focuses on ways of conceptualising, modelling and perceiving the present, while the second half reassesses the theoretical strength or otherwise of social anthropology as a modern science. Combining methodological rigour and originality, this collection will make invaluable reading for all students of social anthropology, sociology and politics and its methodology as it is applied to the comparison and understanding of societies across space and time.

International Encyclopedia of Terrorism

by Martha Crenshaw John Pimlott

This timely reference book places the growing 20th century phenomenon of terrorism in an historical context. Starting with the use of assassination in Ancient Greece and including the recent bombing of the American military complex in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, this encyclopedia covers the globe in its presentation of all aspects of terrorism: history, theories of, types of, and responses to, as well methods and techniques. There is a chronology of major terrorist events from 1945, an A to Z listing of terrorist groups and leaders, a select bibliography, and indexes (general, name, and geographical).

The People, No: A Brief History of Anti-Populism

by Thomas Frank

From the prophetic author of the now-classic What’s the Matter with Kansas? and Listen, Liberal, an eye-opening account of populism, the most important—and misunderstood—movement of our time.Rarely does a work of history contain startling implications for the present, but in The People, No Thomas Frank pulls off that explosive effect by showing us that everything we think we know about populism is wrong. Today “populism” is seen as a frightening thing, a term pundits use to describe the racist philosophy of Donald Trump and European extremists. But this is a mistake. The real story of populism is an account of enlightenment and liberation; it is the story of American democracy itself, of its ever-widening promise of a decent life for all. Taking us from the tumultuous 1890s, when the radical left-wing Populist Party—the biggest mass movement in American history—fought Gilded Age plutocrats to the reformers’ great triumphs under Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman, Frank reminds us how much we owe to the populist ethos. Frank also shows that elitist groups have reliably detested populism, lashing out at working-class concerns. The anti-populist vituperations by the Washington centrists of today are only the latest expression.Frank pummels the elites, revisits the movement’s provocative politics, and declares true populism to be the language of promise and optimism. The People, No is a ringing affirmation of a movement that, Frank shows us, is not the problem of our times, but the solution for what ails us.

American Women's Suffrage: Voices from the Long Struggle for the Vote 1776-1965 (The Library of America)


In their own voices, the full story of the women and men who struggled to make American democracy wholeWith a record number of female candidates in the 2020 election and women's rights an increasingly urgent topic in the news, it's crucial that we understand the history that got us where we are now. For the first time, here is the full, definitive story of the movement for voting rights for American women, of every race, told through the voices of the women and men who lived it. Here are the most recognizable figures in the campaign for women's suffrage, like Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, but also the black, Chinese, and American Indian women and men who were not only essential to the movement but expanded its directions and aims. Here, too, are the anti-suffragists who worried about where the country would head if the right to vote were universal. Expertly curated and introduced by scholar Susan Ware, each piece is prefaced by a headnote so that together these 100 selections by over 80 writers tell the full history of the movement--from Abigail Adams to the 1848 Declaration of Sentiments to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920 and the limiting of suffrage under Jim Crow. Importantly, it carries the story to 1965, and the passage of the Voting and Civil Rights Acts, which finally secured suffrage for all American women. Includes writings by Ida B. Wells, Mabel Lee, Margaret Fuller, Sojourner Truth, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Frederick Douglass, presidents Grover Cleveland on the anti-suffrage side and Woodrow Wilson urging passage of the Nineteenth Amendment as a wartime measure, Jane Addams, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, among many others.

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