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Tales of the Madman Underground

by John Barnes

Wednesday, September 5, 1973: The first day of Karl Shoemaker's senior year in stifling Lightsburg, Ohio. For years, Karl's been part of what he calls "the Madman Underground" - a group of kids forced (for no apparent reason) to attend group therapy during school hours. Karl has decided that senior year is going to be different. He is going to get out of the Madman Underground for good. He is going to act - and be - Normal. But Normal, of course, is relative. Karl has five after-school jobs, one dead father, one seriously unhinged drunk mother . . . and a huge attitude. Welcome to a gritty, uncensored rollercoaster ride, narrated by the singular Karl Shoemaker. .

The Magic Ladder to Success

by Napoleon Hill

A primer in success-building, The Magic Ladder to Success is Hill's compact distillation of his lifetime of learning. The Magic Ladder to Success is the volume in which Napoleon Hill first distilled the seventeen factors that make up his "Law of Success" philosophy. These key principles capture the ethics and actions that empower all who harness them to become leaders in the field of their choice. Leaders are not born, Hill argues, they are molded by a remarkably similar, simple, and dynamic set of habits. The Magic Ladder to Success is Napoleon Hill's lost classic-long out of print, it is newly available as a stand-alone edition, revised and updated for the twenty-first century. .

Packing the Court

by Burns James Macgregor

From renowned political theorist and Pulitzer Prize winner James MacGregor Burns, an illuminating critique of how an unstable, unaccountable, and frequently partisan Supreme Court has come to wield more power than the founding fathers ever intended For decades, James MacGregor Burns has been one of the great masters of the study of power and leadership in America. Now he turns his eye to an institution of government that he believes has become more powerful, and more partisan, than the founding fathers ever intended-the Supreme Court. Much as we would like to believe that the Court remains aloof from ideological politics, Packing the Court reveals how often justices behave like politicians in robes. Few Americans appreciate that the framers of the Constitution envisioned a much more limited role for the Supreme Court than it has come to occupy. In keeping with the founders' desire for balanced government, the Constitution does not grant the Supreme Court the power of judicial review-that is, the ability to veto acts of Congress and the president. Yet throughout its history, as Packing the Court details, the Supreme Court has blocked congressional laws and, as a result, often derailed progressive reform. The term "packing the court" is usually applied to FDR's failed attempt to expand the size of the Court after a conservative bench repeatedly overturned key elements of the New Deal. But Burns shows that FDR was not the only president to confront a high court that seemed bent on fighting popular mandates for change, nor was he the only one to try to manipulate the bench for political ends. Many of our most effective leaders-from Jefferson to Jackson, Lincoln to FDR- have clashed with powerful justices who refused to recognize the claims of popularly elected majorities. Burns contends that these battles have threatened the nation's welfare in the most crucial moments of our history, from the Civil War to the Great Depression-and may do so again. Given the erratic and partisan nature of Supreme Court appointments, Burns believes we play political roulette with the Constitution with each election cycle. Now, eight years after Bush v. Gore, ideological justices have the tightest grip on the Court in recent memory. Drawing on more than two centuries of American history, Packing the Court offers a clear-eyed critique of judicial rule and a bold proposal to rein in the Supreme Court's power over the elected branches.

Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict

by Rigler Laurie Viera

The eagerly anticipated sequel to Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict Laurie Viera Rigler's debut novel, Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict, was a hit with fans and critics, and a BookSense and Los Angeles Times bestseller. Its open-to-interpretation ending left readers begging for more-and Rude Awakenings of a Jane Austen Addict delivers. While Confessions took twenty-first-century free spirit Courtney Stone into the social confines of Jane Austen's era, Rude Awakenings tells the parallel story of Jane Mansfield, a gentleman's daughter from Regency England who inexplicably awakens in Courtney's overly wired and morally confused L. A. life. For Jane, the modern world is not wholly disagreeable. Her apartment may be smaller than a dressing closet, but it is fitted up with lights that burn without candles, machines that wash bodies and clothes, and a glossy rectangle in which tiny people perform scenes from her favorite book, Pride and Prejudice. Granted, if she wants to travel she may have to drive a formidable metal carriage, but she may do so without a chaperone. And oh, what places she goes! Public assemblies that pulsate with pounding music. Unbound hair and unrestricted clothing. The freedom to say what she wants when she wants-even to men without a proper introduction. Jane relishes the privacy, independence, even the power to earn her own money. But how is she to fathom her employer's incomprehensible dictates about "syncing a BlackBerry" and "rolling a call"? How can she navigate a world in which entire publications are devoted to brides but flirting and kissing and even the sexual act itself raise no matrimonial expectations? Even more bewildering are the memories that are not her own. And the friend named Wes, who is as attractive and confusing to Jane as the man who broke her heart back home. It's enough to make her wonder if she would be better off in her own time, where at least the rules are clear-that is, if returning is even an option.

Along for the Ride

by Sarah Dessen

It's been so long since Auden slept at night. Ever since her parents' divorce-or since the fighting started. Now she has the chance to spend a carefree summer with her dad and his new family in the charming beach town where they live. A job in a clothes boutique introduces Auden to the world of girls: their talk, their friendship, their crushes. She missed out on all that, too busy being the perfect daughter to her demanding mother. Then she meets Eli, an intriguing loner and a fellow insomniac who becomes her guide to the nocturnal world of the town. Together they embark on parallel quests: for Auden, to experience the carefree teenage life she's been denied; for Eli, to come to terms with the guilt he feels for the death of a friend. In her signature pitch-perfect style, Sarah Dessen explores the hearts of two lonely people learning to connect.

Myths, Illusions, and Peace

by Dennis Ross

Two experts debunk misconceptions about the Middle East and set clear-eyed policies for the future Why has the United States consistently failed to achieve its strategic goals in the Middle East? According to Dennis Ross and David Makovsky, two of America's leading experts on the region, it is because we have been laboring under false assumptions, or mythologies, about the nature and motivation of Middle East countries and their leaders. In Myths, Illusions, and Peace, the authors debunk these damaging fallacies, held by both the right and the left, and present a concise and far-reaching set of principles that will help America set an effective course of action in the region. Among the myths that the authors show to be false and even dangerous is the idea that Israeli-Palestinian peace is the key to solving all the Middle East's problems; that regime change is a prerequisite for peace and democracy; and that Iran's leadership is immune from diplomatic and economic pressure. These and other historic misunderstandings have generated years' worth of failed policies and crippled America's ability to make productive decisions in this volatile part of the world, a region that will hold the key to our security in the twenty-first century. Ross and Makovsky offer a critical rethinking of American perceptions at a time of great import and change.

March

by Geraldine Brooks

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and Richard and Judy pick. From the author of the acclaimed 'Year of Wonders' and 'People of the Book', a historical novel and love story set during a time of catastrophe on the front lines of the American Civil War. Set during the American Civil War, 'March' tells the story of John March, known to us as the father away from his family of girls in 'Little Women', Louisa May Alcott's classic American novel. In Brooks's telling, March emerges as an abolitionist and idealistic chaplain on the front lines of a war that tests his faith in himself and in the Union cause when he learns that his side, too, is capable of barbarism and racism. As he recovers from a near-fatal illness in a Washington hospital, he must reassemble the shards of his shattered mind and body, and find a way to reconnect with a wife and daughters who have no idea of the ordeals he has been through. As Alcott drew on her real-life sisters in shaping the characters of her little women, so Brooks turned to the journals and letters of Bronson Alcott, Louisa May's father, an idealistic educator, animal rights exponent and abolitionist who was a friend and confidante of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. The story spans the vibrant intellectual world of Concord and the sensuous antebellum South, through to the first year of the Civil War as the North reels under a series of unexpected defeats. Like her bestselling 'Year of Wonders', 'March' follows an unconventional love story. It explores the passions between a man and a woman, the tenderness of parent and child, and the life-changing power of an ardently held belief.

Year of Wonders

by Geraldine Brooks

This text guide is written by a highly experienced classroom teacher of senior English and Literature who is currently Head of English at Emmaus College in Melbourne. She is a long-established and top writer of Insight Text Guides and co-author of a number of English text books who is known for her clear and incisive thinking. This is a top text guide!

Woof!

by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas Lee Montgomery

As the popularity of Marley & Me attests, people love their dogs?and everyone else?s too. For all the time spent on grooming, petting, and other care?it?s as if owning a dog is a religion unto itself. Woof! brings together original essays from acclaimed writers ruminating on the sometimes tumultuous, often selfless love affair between human and dog. Alternately poignant and hilarious, these collected stories of mutts and purebreds alike will win the hearts of the millions who?ve ever loved a member of the world?s most loyal species.

When Duty Calls

by William C. Dietz

As the war with the Ramanthian continues, Captain Antonio Santana and his force of biobods and cyborgs find themselves surrounded by enemy forces, faced with annihilation at every turn. On the home front, diplomat Christine Vanderveen finds herself torn between her love for Santana and her new loyalty towards the charismatic, recently elected president of the Clone Republic. As Christine fights her own divided heart, light years away, Santana is in a battle for his life. And this battle may be his last.

Warning at One

by Ann Purser

The tenants of Lois Meade's terrace house in Tresham are frustrated by their neighbor's feisty pet cockerel, Satan. His owner, Clem Fitch, refuses to part with his feathery companion-making Lois's tenants fly the coop. Luckily, her son Douglas agrees to rent the house. But when Clem and Satan are found dead, Douglas-who is involved with Clem's daughter-becomes a prime suspect in some foul business.

The Lost of Art of Walking

by Geoff Nicholson

How we walk, where we walk, why we walk tells the world who and what we are. Whether it's once a day to the car, or for long weekend hikes, or as competition, or as art, walking is a profoundly universal aspect of what makes us humans, social creatures, and engaged with the world. Cultural commentator, Whitbread Prize winner, and author of Sex Collectors Geoff Nicholson offers his fascinating, definitive, and personal ruminations on the literature, science, philosophy, art, and history of walking. Nicholson finds people who walk only at night, or naked, or in the shape of a cross or a circle, or for thousands of miles at a time, in costume, for causes, or for no reason whatsoever. He examines the history and traditions of walking and its role as inspiration to artists, musicians, and writers like Bob Dylan, Charles Dickens, and Buster Keaton. In The Lost Art of Walking, he brings curiosity, imagination, and genuine insight to a subject that often strides, shuffles, struts, or lopes right by us. .

The Decadent Duke

by Virginia Henley

The New York Times bestselling author of Notorious From the New York Times bestselling author comes an epic Regency love story, filled with all the sensuality, glitter, and drama that Virginia Henley?s readers have come to expect. Lady Georgina?s four sisters have all married prominent dukes or earls, and much to her dismay and frustration, she is expected to make an even better match. Georgina?s mother has no doubt who her daughter should marry: Francis Russell, Duke of Bedford. The dull duke does absolutely nothing for Georgina, but despite her best efforts, she finds herself engaged to marry him. But Georgina cannot deny the passionate sparks between herself and a different man?John Russell, the duke?s younger brother. . . .

The Clone Elite

by Steven L. Kent

2514 A.D.: An unstoppable alien force is advancing on Earth, wiping out the Unified Authority's colonies one by one. It's up to Wayson Harris, an outlawed model of a clone, and his men to make a last stand on the planet of New Copenhagen, where they must win the battle and the war--or lose all.

The Captive Heart

by Bertrice Small

From the New York Times bestselling author?the third passionate romance in the Border Chronicles series. The year is 1461, and the winds of war rage across England, uprooting Alix Givet, the daughter of Queen Margaret?s physician, and the rest of Henry VI?s court. Alix?s plight becomes bleaker still when, out of duty to her queen, and to her ill, widowed father, she?s locked into a loveless marriage to a cruel Northumbrian. But when her luck changes, Alix has another chance to flee?this time to save herself. Escaping north over the border into Scotland, she throws herself at the mercy of a dark and brooding laird who might provide the everlasting love of her dreams?if she can warm his cold heart. .

Sun in a Bottle

by Charles Seife

When weapons builders detonated the first hydrogen bomb in 1952, they tapped into the biggest source of energy in our solar system - the phenomenon that makes the sun shine. Nuclear fusion seems a virtually unlimited source of power, but it has been at the center of a tragic and comic pursuit that has left scores of scientists battered and disgraced. Like the eternal quest to build a perpetual motion machine, the dream of harnessing the energy of a miniature star is irresistible. Not only would a fusion energy device give the world endless electrical power, it would give power to its inventors - financial power, the power of fame, even military might. Right now the world's richest countries are spending billions of dollars trying to build a giant fusion reactor. Yet if history is any guide, the money will not bring the dream of fusion energy within reach. Indeed, the quest for fusion energy has been a failure, generation after generation. Fusion is at the heart of some of the biggest scientific scandals of all time, and Charles Seife traces its story from its beginning into the twenty-first century. Even after fusion scientists face defeat after defeat, they continue trying to put the sun in a bottle, hoping against hope that they will succeed where others have failed. The science of wishful thinking is as strong as ever, and this book is our key to understanding why.

The Stone Diaries

by Carol Shields

This book combines perspectives from political science, history and geography to provide a comprehensive introduction to `Europe' or European space as we understand it today. Central to the book is the phenomenon of the sovereign state and the question of alternative ways of organizing Europe politically and economically. The book explores four different ways of organizing space: state, union, region and network. By tracing the origins of the sovereign state in Europe, the book first reviews the resilience and adaptability of the sovereign state historically, and then looks at the implications of the contradictory processes of integration and fragmentation, or globalization and regionalization, present today. A key concept developed throughout the book is that of networks, especially with respect to the European Union, and the relationship between regions, networks and cities, a relationship long traditional to Europe's political organization. The authors review critically popular notions of a 'Europe of regions' or 'the end of the sovereign state' and instead serve to combine their different disciplinary conceptual tools and perspectives to provide new insights into the future organization of European space. Organizing European Space will be essential reading for all students of contemporary Europe seeking a deeper understanding of the modern state and the complexity of changing notions of identity, political organization and territoriality inherent in Europe in the past, present and future.

Shot Girl

by Olson Karen E.

New Haven police reporter Annie Seymour has a talent for running into trouble. So it should come as no surprise when her co-worker's bachelorette party at a local club quickly turns into a crime scene. What is surprising is that the dead club manager in the parking lot happens to be Annie's ex-husband-and the bullet shells around his body match the gun she has in her car. . .

The Secret Papers of Madame Olivetti

by Annie Vanderbilt

The coast of Southern France sparkles in this sexy, mature, and engaging debut novel. Lily has come to southern France in search of a new perspective, hoping that the sun?s soft rays and the fragrant sea breezes will provide a relaxing respite from the demands of her lively daughter and her family?s Idaho cattle ranch. Two years after her husband?s sudden death, in the house that?s been in his family for generations, she finally finds some stolen weeks to make sense of the past. To Madame Olivetti?her cranky old manual typewriter?Lily entrusts all her secrets, pounding out the story of the men she loved, the betrayals she endured, the losses she still regrets. And with the companionship of Yves, the seductive handyman who comes by to make repairs, Lily comes closer to understanding her exhilarating past?and to discovering she has a new story to tell?one about the delights of starting over. .

Power Play

by Deirdre Martin

Just in time for hockey season Hockey player Eric Mitchell is a man in demand. First he was traded to save the New York Blades, and now the publicity department has loaned him out to help boost daytime diva Monica Geary?s career. What no one knows is that one of People magazine?s hottest bachelors is also a closet soap opera fan. He?s had his eyes on Monica for years?and can?t wait to get his arms around her.

Murder With Reservations

by Elaine Viets

Working at Sybil's Full Moon Hotel in Fort Lauderdale is keeping Helen Hawthorne both financially and physically fit. But when a maid turns up dead in a Dumpster, no one feels safe- especially not Helen. To make matters worse, her philandering ex just checked into the very hotel where she works. The cops don't seem to care much about a murdered maid, but they have noticed there's something shady about Helen. And if she doesn't manage to dodge their questions and shake off her ex, it could be checkout time. . .

Magic to the Bone

by Devon Monk

Using magic means it uses you back, and every spell exacts a price from its user. But some people get out of it by Offloading the cost of magic onto an innocent. Then it's Allison Beckstrom's job to identify the spell-caster. And when she finds a boy dying from a magical Offload that has her father's signature all over it, Allie is thrown into a world of black magic.

Just the Sexiest Man Alive

by Julie James

From the New York Times bestselling Julie James comes this dazzling romance about a hunky heartthrob and the woman who refuses to let him capture her heart. For fans of Susan Elizabeth Phillips and Rachel Gibson. COOL. CALM. COLLECTED... Nothing fazes Taylor Donovan. In the courtroom, she never lets the opposition see her sweat. In her personal life, she never lets any man rattle her--not even her cheating ex-fiancé. So when she's assigned to coach People's "Sexiest Man Alive" for his next big legal drama, she refuses to fall for the Hollywood heartthrob's charms. Even if he is the Jason Andrews. CONFIDENT. FAMOUS. IRRESISTIBLE... Jason Andrews is used to having women fall at his feet. When Taylor Donovan gives him the cold shoulder, he's thrown for a loop. She's unlike any other woman he's ever met: uninterested in the limelight, seemingly immune to his advances, and shockingly capable of saying no to him. She's the perfect challenge. And the more she rejects him, the more he begins to realize she may just be his perfect match...

Inside Drucker's Brain

by Jeffrey A. Krames

Soccer moms drive Priuses. Sport utility vehicles are going hybrid. Families are using hemp shopping bags. More and more companies are developing "green" buildings. What's more, the business consultants say going green is easy and profitable. In reality, though, many green-leaning businesses, families, and governments are still fiddling with the small stuff while the planet burns. Why? Because implementing sustainability is brutally difficult. In this witty and contrarian audiobook, Auden Schendler, a sustainable business foot soldier with fifteen year's worth of experience, gives us a peek under the hood of the green movement. The consultants, he argues, are clueless. Fluorescent bulbs might be better for our atmosphere, but what do you say to the boutique hotel owner who thinks they detract from his? And how do you convince a chain-smoking karate expert mechanic to put biodiesel in his vehicles?Scientists tell us we have to cut CO2 emissions 80 percent by mid-century. That's going to take more than a recycling program. We'll only solve our problems if we're realistic about the challenge of climate change. In this eye-opening inspiring audio book, Schendler illuminates the path. This recording features a new introduction wriiten and read by the author. Also, a new Afterword based on an article written by the author for Orion Magazine has been added to this recording.

How I Found the Perfect Dress

by Maryrose Wood

Maryrose Wood follows up her hilarious hit Why I Let My Hair Grow Out with another irreverent, teen angst-filled, girl-power romp.On a bike tour of Ireland last summer, Morgan Rawlinson fell for Colin, the hunky guide, and entered a portal that turned her into the goddess Morganne. Now she?s back to her painfully normal life and her relationship with Colin has fizzled to the occasional e-mail?until he writes saying he?s coming to Connecticut?just in time for the prom. But when he arrives, he?s exhausted. It seems that when Morgan crossed the portal as Morganne, a spell was cast on Colin. In his dreams he?s being forced to dance ?til dawn with the faeries, who want to boogie with him for eternity. Somehow she has to break the spell on her date, help plan the prom, and find the perfect dress. Oh, what a night?

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