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Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet

by Joanne Proulx

Luke Hunter thinks he's joking when he tells a good friend exactly when - 8:37 the following morning - and how - hit by a red van from out of town - that friend will die. But when events unfold as Luke foretold, he wants none of it: he has enough problems being an average teenager without the added burden of seeing into the future - not to mention the ever-after. Terrified, but pretending not to be, Luke pushes his friends and family away, while the local news crew, a Christian fundamentalist preacher and a missing girl's frantic mother all draw nearer, seeking to profit from Luke's new-found 'gift'. Written in clear, precise prose, Anthem of a Reluctant Prophetis a darkly comic coming-of-age novel with a difference. Hormonal and humorous, exhilarating and wise, it is a book about fear and truth, life and death, and the music that plays inside us all. Written in clear, precise prose, Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet is a darkly comic coming-of-age novel about death and life. 'If great literature is your religion, read the gospel according to Luke Hunter. This debut novel is walk-on-water magical, a true revelation' Neil Smith, author of Bang Crunch 'Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet is the rarest of things: a well-written, funny, and entertaining first novel' Ray Robertson, author of Moody Foodand Gently Down the Stream 'Joanne Proulx is a rare talent and Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet is perfectly drawn, with great voice, humour, complexity and an unforgettable setting' Lauren B. Davis, author of The Radiant City and The Stubborn Season

Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction

by Sue Townsend

Adrian Mole's pen is scribbling for the twenty-first century. Working as a bookseller and living in Leicester's Rat Wharf; finding time to write letters of advice to Tim Henman and Tony Blair; locked in mortal combat with a vicious swan called Gielgud; measuring his expanding bald spot; and trying to escape the clutches of Marigold and win over her voluptuous sister Daisyhellip; Adrian still yearns for a better, more meaningful world. and he's not ready to surrender his pen yet.

Abracadaver (Sergeant Cribb #3)

by Peter Lovesey

Sergeant Cribb and Constable Thackeray prove themselves among Scotland Yard's finest as they pursue the trail of a mysterious and vicious criminal through the riotous music halls of nineteenth-century London. Performers have been falling victim to a series of bizarre and humiliating practical jokes perpetrated during performances. But no one is laughing the night a young woman is murdered during her disappearing act at the Paragon Music Hall. Cribb and Thackeray go undercover to investigate . . .

Tiger's Heart

by Aisling Juanjuan Shen

"Like a suspense novel, this book is impossible to put down. All readers interested in China, as well as memoir fans (especially of success stories), must read this astonishing title."--Library Journal (Starred Review) "In Aisling Juanjuan Shen's remarkable and assured memoir, a peasant girl born to illiterate parents and bleak prospects rises to prominence as the first person in her village to graduate college. Determined to escape the trappings of rural village life, she leaves the stability of a government-assigned teaching post behind and bravely ventures to the south in search of wealth and happiness. Shen offers a brutally honest and vivid portrait of the early days of China's economic boom, the fascinating interplay between the provinces, the lives of those who leave and those who remain behind, and the cost of abandoning tradition for the promise of prosperity."--Felicia C. Sullivan, The Sky Isn't Visible from Here "A brave and honest tale of one woman's struggle to overcome her circumstances and triumph against all odds."--Alison Weaver, Gone to the Crazies: A Memoir Aisling Juanjuan Shen was born to illiterate peasants in a tiny rice-farming hamlet in China's Yangtze Delta in 1974. Pronounced useless by her parents because she wasn't good at planting rice, she became the first person from her village ever to attend college. After graduating from teachers college, she was assigned by the government to a remote and low-paying teaching job that she was expected to hold for the rest of her life. Deeply dissatisfied, she bought her way out of her secure government job and left for the special economic zones of southern China in search of happiness and success in the business world. A Tiger's Heart chronicles Aisling's rise from poverty in the rice fields of rural China to a successful career in business in the early days of the country's economic boom, illustrating the massive economic and social changes that have taken place in China over the past several decades. Her story is emblematic of a new generation of Chinese women who are leaving the rice paddies and government jobs in order to enter the free market and determine the course of their own lives. Aisling Juanjuan Shen worked as a teacher, saleswoman, and translator in China before immigrating to the United States in 2000. In 2005 she graduated magna cum laude from Wellesley College; she currently works for an investment management firm in Boston. Excerpts of A Tiger's Heart have appeared in Pindeldyboz and H.O.W.From the Hardcover edition.

A Deadly Paradise

by Grace Brophy

Even in paradise, evil lurks beneath the surface.

A Dead Man in Barcelona

by Michael Pearce

Barcelona, 1912. A city still recovering from the dramatic incidents of the so-called 'Tragic Week' when Catalonian conscripts bound for the unpopular war in Spanish Morocco had rebelled at the city's dockside against the royalist forces. In the fighting, many were killed, and afterwards, even more put in prison. Including an Englishman, who was later found dead in his cell. The dead man had been a prominent businessman in Gibraltar, so what had he been doing in Barcelona? What part did he play in the illicit three-way trade between Gibraltar, Spanish Morocco and Barcelona? And just how did he really meet his end - murdered, in a prison cell? The case, in Gibraltar's view, crys out for investigation - and by someone independent of the Spanish authorities. So Scotland Yard are summoned to send out one of their men - but who? Seymour ticks all the right boxes - he has experience of the tangled diplomatic world of that part of the Mediterranean. He speaks foreign languages. And possibly most importantly of all _ he grew up near the docks of London_s East End so with any luck, knows how to swim if pushed in the water 'PRAISE FOR MICHAEL PEARCE'S A DEAD MAN IN- SERIES' His sympathetic portrayal of an unfamiliar culture, impeccable historical detail and entertaining dialogue make enjoyable reading. _ Sunday Telegraph 'The steady pace, atmospheric design, and detailed description re-create a complicated city. Arecommended historical series. ' Library Journal'Sheer fun.' The Times

A Darker Side

by Shirley Wells

Forensic psychologist, Jill Kennedy, has given up police work to enjoy a quiet life in the Lancashire village of Kelton Bridge, but when Martin Hayden, a seventeen-year-old schoolboy, is murdered, DCI Max Trentham, Jill_s ex-colleague and ex-lover, wants her back at work. As they hunt Martin_s killer, they discover that nothing is as it seems. For a start, it seems likely that Martin, not the innocent child his parents claim, wasn_t above a spot of blackmail. On top of that, Martin_s father isn_t the distraught parent one would expect, and his mother is determined to take her own secrets to the grave. When the killer strikes again, Jill and Max find themselves in a desperate race against time_

A Case of Spirits (Sergeant Cribb #6)

by Peter Lovesey

Praise for the Sergeant Cribb series: "Delightful Victorian mysteries, featuring Sergeant Cribb and Constable Thackeray of the Yard. . . . [A] fine picture of period vice, good mystery plotting, and fun."-San Francisco Chronicle. "These are humorous novels and the humor is character-based... Cribb was the first of the new-wave Victorian crime-fighters and is still arguably the best."-Sherlock Holmes Magazine. The spiritualist movement has captivated a segment of society: manifestations, the occult, and 'sensitives' are in vogue. But the séance sites seem to be targeted for burglaries. Then, while Cribb is on the case, someone murders the medium. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Best Thing For You

by Annabel Lyon

Annabel Lyon's debut book of fiction, Oxygen, "left the country's literary elite breathless" (Elm Street magazine). Now, in The Best Thing for You, Lyon has taken her tough, unflinching style to new heights and all the anticipation is rewarded. Here, in three novellas, Lyon reveals the potential for darkness that lurks behind even the most perfect-seeming veneer. In the first novella, "No Fun," a middle-class family in present-day Vancouver is thrown into turmoil when their teenage son is charged in connection with the beating of a disabled man. In "The Goldberg Metronome," a young couple discovers an antique metronome taped up and hidden under a sink in their new apartment. Its dark past weaves a story that crosses centuries and continents. Then, in the stunning title novella, a riveting and layered film-noirish piece set in wartime 1940s Vancouver, a housewife in her twenties plots and carries out her husband's murder with sang-froid, with the help of her lover, a young grocery-store clerk. Later, the son of the insurance agent who loses his job over the woman's claim must deal with his family's financial downfall as he nurses his own obsession with her crime and its connection to the music in his head. Lyon draws us in with her vivid characters and sharp, highly charged prose and holds us in the worlds she creates. Along the way, she challenges the fragile illusion of goodness in our lives. Once again Annabel Lyon has demonstrated herself to be one of Canada's boldest, most exciting new voices.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Whetstone

by Lorna Crozier

National-award-winning poet Lorna Crozier's new collection of poems are peopled by the seasons and their elements, her beloved prairies, sorrow, joy, and the dead. Central to their themes are revisitations of family and marriage, and the land-death that is drought. Universal, deeply moving, crowded with breathtaking imagery, these are darkly resonant poems of middle age: alert to the beauty in loss, cherishing the humanity that is whetted on that stone. This is Lorna Crozier, one of Canada's most highly celebrated poets, at the top of her form.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Morning in the Burned House

by Margaret Atwood

These beautifully crafted poems-by turns dark, playful, intensely moving, tender and intimate-come together as Atwood's most accomplished and versatile gathering of poems to date, "setting foot on the middle ground/between body and word." Some draw on history, and on myth, both classical and popular. Other, more personal poems concern themselves with love, with the fragility of the natural world, and with death-especially in the elegiac series of meditations on the death of a parent-as they inhabit a contemporary landscape haunted by images of the past.Generous, compassionate, disturbing, this is poetry that emanates from the heart of human experience and seeks balance between the luminous realm of memory and the realities of everyday, between darkness and light, the capacity to perpetrate and the strength to forgive.Morning in the Burned House is infused with breathtaking insight, technical virtuosity, and a clarity of vision that has the force to change the way we look at our lives.From the Hardcover edition.

The Door

by Margaret Atwood

A stunning lyrical achievement and Atwood's first collection of new poems in over a decade.The Door is Margaret Atwood's first book of poetry since the award-winning Morning in the Burned House (1995). Its fifty lucid yet urgent poems range in tone from lyric to ironic to meditative to prophetic, and in subject from the personal to the political, viewed in its broadest sense. They investigate the mysterious writing of poetry itself, as well as the passage of time and our shared sense of mortality. The collection begins with poems that consider the past and ends with harbingers of things to come.Brave and compassionate, The Door interrogates the certainties that we build our lives on.From the Hardcover edition.

Listening

by Margaret Avison

A Globe and Mail Best Book of the YearMargaret Avison was widely acknowledged as one of Canada's foremost poets. Taut, sublime, subtle, and crystalline, the poems in her brilliant new collection, published posthumously, showcase Avison at her best, and constitute the final chapter in an extraordinary artistic legacy that spanned more than forty years.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Rising Sun, Falling Skies

by Jeffrey Cox

A fresh look at the disastrous Java Sea Campaign of 1941-42 which heralded a wave of Japanese naval victories in the Pacific but which eventually sowed the seeds of their eventual change in fortunes. In the immediate aftermath of Pearl Harbor, the Japanese juggernaut quickly racked up victory after victory. Desperate to secure resource-rich regions in the Pacific and ensure their continued dominance of South East Asia, Japanese forces were determined in their efforts to conquer Malaya, Singapore and the oil-rich islands around Java Sea - Borneo, Sumatra and Java itself. In the face of this seemingly unstoppable tide stood a small Allied force - American, Australian, British and Dutch. Thrown together by circumstance; cut off from reinforcements or in many cases retreat; operating with old, obsolete equipment and dwindling supplies, there was little hope of victory. Indeed, the month-long Java Sea Campaign, as it subsequently became known, quickly evolved from a traditional test of arms into a test of character. In the face of a relentless enemy and outnumbered, outgunned and alone, they defiantly held on, attempting to buy weeks, days, even hours until a better line of defense - and offense - could be established. These were the men of the US Asiatic Feet, the British Far Eastern Fleet, the Royal Netherlands Navy's East Indies Squadron and the Royal Australian Navy. And their supporting units like Patrol Wing Ten, the Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service, the US Army Air Force's 17th Pursuit Squadron and submarines of all these fine nations. A campaign that has been too often either ignored by historians or criticised for poor command decisions, this is the story of the sailors and the airmen at the sharp end, and how they fought and endured the first months of the War in the Pacific.

Letters from the Front

by Andrew Roberts

Similar to Letters From Iwo Jima and All Quiet On The Western Front, this book tells the story of young men from many nations thrown into the crucible of war, fighting not just to survive, but to understand what was happening to them and their comrades. It tells it in the words of the soldiers themselves, in their letters home.A legacy of an empire and a nation at war, Love, Tommy, is a collection of letters housed at Imperial War Museums sent by British and Commonwealth troops from Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa from the front line of war to their loved ones at home. Poignant expressions of love, hope and fear sit alongside amusing anecdotes, grumbles about rations and thoughtful reflections, eloquently revealing how, despite the passage of time, many experiences of the fighting man are shared in countless wars and battles. From the muddy trenches of the Somme to frozen ground of the Falklands to the heat and dust of Iraq, these letters are the ordinary soldier's testament to life on the front line.

Albatros D.III

by James Miller

In 1916, Imperial German aerial domination, once held by rotary-engined Fokker and Pfalz E-type wing-warping monoplanes, had been lost to the more nimble French Nieuport and British DH 2s which not only out-flew the German fighters but were present in greater numbers. Born-from-experience calls from German fighter pilots requested that, rather than compete with the maneuverability of these adversaries, new single-engine machines should be equipped with higher horsepower engines and armed with two, rather than the then-standard single machine guns. The Robert Thelen-led Albatros design bureau set to work on what became the Albatros D.I and D.II and by April 1916 they had developed a sleek yet rugged machine that featured the usual Albatros semi-monocoque wooden construction and employed a 160hp Mercedes D.III engine with power enough to equip the aeroplane with two forward-firing machine guns. Visual hallmarks of the D.I and early production D.II include fuselage mounted Windhoff radiators and matching chords for the upper and lower wings. Meanwhile, Albatros had already produced the prototype of the D.II's successor, the D.III. Influenced by the French Nieuport sesquiplane design, the D.III featured lower wings of reduced chord and single-spar construction, with the interplane struts now meeting the lower wings in a 'V'. After arriving at the Front en masse in early 1917, the Royal Flying Corps did not possess a fighter that could arrest the Albatros' onslaught against the RFC reconnaissance machines and thus they suffered appalling casualties in a desperate period known as 'Bloody April'. However, despite the D.III's success, the sesquiplane design led to structural flaws that resulted in the deaths of several pilots, which caused the type to be grounded until the lower wings could be strengthened or replaced. Still, even after their return to service, German pilots knew not to prosecute a dive too aggressively lest they invite structural catastrophe.Always chasing performance enhancements, by the time of 'Bloody April' Albatros had already designed and received a production order for the D.V.D.IIIs were manufactured concurrently but production was shifted to the Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW) in Schneidmuhl, where they received more robust construction. They differed little from their Johannisthal D.III brethren externally, save for a slightly different skin application on the nose and a D.V-type rudder, which had a curved rather than straight trailing edge. They also had Mercedes engines of 175 hp, versus the 160 hp engines of the Johannisthal D.III. Overall they benefitted from the teething experience of the earlier D.IIIs and avoided the structural problems that resurfaced with the Johannisthal-built D.Vs. In all, 500 D.IIIs and 840 D.III(OAW)s were produced and saw heavy service throughout 1917. They extracted a serious toll on the enemy but as the year progressed faced an increasing number of new enemy fighter types, including the Sopwith Pup, Sopwith Triplane, SPAD VII, and SE5a, but remained at the Front in high numbers (446 of both types were recorded on 31 October) until dwindling in spring 1918 (from 357 in February to 82 in June) with the arrival of the Fokker Dr.I and D.VII.

US Cold War Aircraft Carriers

by Brad Elward Paul Wright

Supercarriers became the ultimate in aircraft carrier design after World War II. Naval aviation allows fleets to project mobile power across vast distances, and these floating cities epitomize this mission design. The Forrestal class (Forrestal, CV-59; Saratoga, CV-60; Ranger, CV-61 and Independence, CV-62) was the first completed class of US Navy supercarriers, so-named for their 25 percent size increase over the World War II-era carriers such as the Midway class, and the strength of their air wings (80-100 aircraft, compared to 65-75 for the Midway, and fewer than 50 for the Essex class). Design-wise, the Forrestals were a huge improvement over their predecessors, being more stable and comfortable, while maintaining advancements such as the armored flight decks that had been introduced with the Midway. The Kitty Hawk class was an improvement on the Forrestal-class designs, and four were built in the 1960s - Kitty Hawk (CV-63), Constellation (CV-64), America (CV-66) and John F. Kennedy (CV-67). These were even longer than the Forrestals, and fitted with advanced defensive weapons systems and an improved elevator layout. John F. Kennedy, while originally intended as one of the Kitty Hawk class, received so many modifications during construction that she essentially formed her own class, and was originally planned to become the US Navy's first nuclear-powered carrier. This plan never came to fruition, however, and that honor was left to her successor, USS Enterprise (CVN-65). The only ship of her class, Enterprise holds several other distinctions - the longest naval vessel in the world, the second-oldest commissioned vessel in the US Navy (after the USS Constitution), and, when retired in 2013, will have served 51 years - far longer than any other US carrier. All nine of the carriers covered by this volume are icons, and hold a much-respected place in US naval history. They are also some of the more well-known vessels outside of the military, for their long service histories, as well as for some of the more unfortunate events that seem to follow them - from Kitty Hawk's infamous 1972 "grilled cheese" race riot, to the fires that ravaged Forrestal in 1967 and Enterprise in 1969. Though swiftly superseded, first by each other, then by the Nimitz class, these vessels were the US Navy's backbone during the Cold War.

Bayonne and Toulouse 1813-14

by Nick Lipscombe

The news of Wellington's momentous victory at Vitoria on 21 June 1813 reached London in early July. The celebration spawned an expectation of a rapid conclusion to events in the Peninsula. His Majesty's Government gave authority for Wellington to invade France and made noises and plans for the redeployment of the Peninsular Army in support of Russia and Prussia. Wellington, however, did not see things in quite the same way. His army was worn out and there remained sizeable French forces in Spain, so what followed had to be a carefully thought out and planned campaign.The invasion of France is a complicated aspect of the culmination of the War in Iberia: indeed many historians consider the invasion and subsequent operations in southern France as separate from the Peninsular War as a whole. The preliminaries include Wellington's need to capture Pamplona and San Sebastian prior to the invasion and Soult's attempts to relieve both garrisons resulting in the Battle of the Pyrenees (July-August) and San Marcial (late August) respectively.The invasion itself commenced with the daring Allied crossing of the Bidassoa estuary in early October 1813 and was followed by an operational pause prior to the Battle of Nivelle in November, another pause to re-group and the subsequent offensives on the River Nive and the Battle of St. Pierre. This phase, and ipso facto the invasion, was complete by mid December 1813. Finally, the subsequent operations, which commenced early in 1814, provided the aftermath to the invasion and the conclusion to the Peninsular War. These actions focus primarily on the investment of Bayonne and the pursuit of Soult's army east, and include the battles and engagements at Garris, Orthez, Aire, Tarbes and the final showdown at Toulouse in April 1814.

Troy - Last War of the Heroic Age

by Jose Pena Si Sheppard

Homer's Iliad, read by college underclassmen everywhere, tells the story of Helen, 'the face that launched a thousand ships', the trojan horse, and Achilles' heel. The Iliad provides the basis for this modern exploration of one of the most famous legendary wars of all time, a story at least partly based in fact.When Paris, prince of Troy, ran off with Helen, wife of the king of Sparta, it launched the greatest war of the mythic age of Greece. Heroes and gods assembled on both sides, as the combined armies of Greece launched a siege that would last for ten years. During that time, famous heroes, such as Achillies, Ajax, and Hector, would find glory on the battlefield, before being cut down by their enemies. Others, such as Agamemnon, Odysseus, and Aeneas, would survive the war, only to face even greater challenges afterwards. Thanks to the Iliad of Homer, and numerous other ancient sources, the story of the siege of Troy has survived for over 3,000 years. In this new book in the Myths and Legends series, Professor Si Sheppard draws together all of these ancient writings to tell the complete story of the Trojan war, from the flight of the 'face that launched a thousand ships' to the great wooden horse that brought the city to bloody ruin. Accompanied by both classical and modern artwork, this book is the perfect primer for those interested in the greatest war of the ancient world, and the last great conflict between the gods of Ancient Greece.

Mysteries in Our National Parks: Buried Alive

by Gloria Skurzynski Alane Ferguson

Who was that man in the Park Service uniform who brought Jack and Ashley Landon into the wilds of Alaska's Denali National Park along with their friend Nicky Milano? Whoever he was, he has given them a dogsled ride to certain death unless somebody finds them soon. Their troubles are about to get a whole heap deeper as the first rumblings of an avalanche turn into a deafening roar!From the Paperback edition.

Witches

by Rosalyn Schanzer

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor Book2012 Notable Children's Books--ALSCNCSS--Notable Social Studies Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies 2012School Library Journal Best Books of 2011SLJ's 100 Magnificent Children's Books of 2011Chicago Public Library Best of the Best 2011In the little colonial town of Salem Village, Massachusetts, two girls began to twitch, mumble, and contort their bodies into strange shapes. The doctor tried every remedy, but nothing cured the young Puritans. He grimly announced the dire diagnosis: the girls were bewitched! And then the accusations began. The riveting, true story of the victims, accused witches, crooked officials, and mass hysteria that turned a mysterious illness affecting two children into a witch hunt that took over a dozen people's lives and ruined hundreds more unfolds in chilling detail in this young adult book by award-winning author and illustrator Rosalyn Schanzer. With a powerful narrative, chilling primary source accounts, a design evoking the period, and stylized black-white-and-red scratchboard illustrations of young girls having wild fits in the courtroom, witches flying overhead, and the Devil and his servants terrorizing the Puritans, this book will rivet young readers with novelistic power. Taught in middle and high schools around the U.S., the 17th-century saga remains hauntingly resonant as people struggle even today with the urgent need to find someone to blame for their misfortunes. In addition to the Sibert Honor, Witches! has been honored by the Society of Illustrators with their Original Art Award Gold Medal, has been named a Notable book by both the American Library Association and the National Council for the Social Studies, and was chosen one of School Library Journal's 100 Magnificent Children's Books and one of Chicago Public Library's Best of the Best Children's Books.

The Dog Lover's Guide to Travel

by Kelly Carter

National Geographic's ultimate resource for traveling with your furry friend features hundreds of dog-friendly places to pamper your pooch, from doggie daycare to canine couture. Special features include walks you can take with your dog, insider tips from local pet parents on how to best enjoy their area with a pup, and sidebars detailing unique opportunities for coddled canines, such as winery hikes in California wine country. New York Times bestselling author and pet parent Kelly E. Carter, and her beloved longhaired Chihuahua, Lucy, give you the inside scoop on pet-friendly hotels and restaurants, beaches, parks, and dog runs, plus the lowdown on events for four-legged visitors and dog-friendly attractions. A detailed introduction discussed everything you need to know when taking your pooch on vacation, including the lay of the land for road tripping and flying cross-country. From Sanibel Island, FL, to Whistler, BC, from Montreal QC, and Nantucket, MA to San Francisco, CA, The Dog Lover's Guide to Travel showcases 75 of the best pet-friendly vacation destinations across the U.S. and Canada.

Shiloh, 1862

by Winston Groom

In the spring of 1862, many Americans still believed that the Civil War, "would be over by Christmas." The previous summer in Virginia, Bull Run, with nearly 5,000 casualties, had been shocking, but suddenly came word from a far away place in the wildernesses of Southwest Tennessee of an appalling battle costing 23,000 casualties, most of them during a single day. It was more than had resulted from the entire American Revolution. As author Winston Groom reveals in this dramatic, heart-rending account, the Battle of Shiloh would singlehandedly change the psyche of the military, politicians, and American people--North and South--about what they had unleashed by creating a Civil War. In this gripping telling of the first "great and terrible" battle of the Civil War, Groom describes the dramatic events of April 6 and 7, 1862, when a bold surprise attack on Ulysses S. Grant's encamped troops and the bloody battle that ensued would alter the timbre of the war. The Southerners struck at dawn on April 6th, and Groom vividly recounts the battle that raged for two days over the densely wooded and poorly mapped terrain. Driven back on the first day, Grant regrouped and mounted a fierce attack the second, and aided by the timely arrival of reinforcements managed to salvage an encouraging victory for the Federals. Groom's deft prose reveals how the bitter fighting would test the mettle of the motley soldiers assembled on both sides, and offer a rehabilitation of sorts for Union General William Sherman, who would go on from the victory at Shiloh to become one of the great generals of the war. But perhaps the most alarming outcome, Groom poignantly reveals, was the realization that for all its horror, the Battle of Shiloh had solved nothing, gained nothing, proved nothing, and the thousands of maimed and slain were merely wretched symbols of things to come. With a novelist's eye for telling and a historian's passion for detail, context, and meaning, Groom brings the key characters and moments of battle to life. Shiloh is an epic tale, deftly told by a masterful storyteller.From the Hardcover edition.

The People's Pharmacy Quick and Handy Home Remedies

by Joe Graedon Terry Graedon

A guide to healing foods and home remedies reported to and verified by Joe and Terry Graedon, including their carefully researched responses on how and why such treatments work. The core of this title is organized as Q&As between the general public and the Graedons. It contains as much information as a voluminous encyclopedia of home remedies, yet it's quick, easy, inviting, and fun to read, with the same friendly and authoritative personality conveyed in their popular call-in radio show. The Graedons also offer a dozen new recipes for food so good for you, it serves as preventive medicine. Organized alphabetically by ailment and then, within each of those, by food or remedy. Offers the basics of three standard diets for health, weight control, and fitness, along with a dozen new recipes for preparing food to match the diets. Includes a helpful index and cross-referencing system, making the book both a good shelf reference and an entertaining browse. This book builds on the reputation of The People's Pharmacy and adds the extra value that comes from a partnership with National Geographic.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Dog Tips From DogTown

by Best Friends Animal Society Trainers

Following in the paw prints of the successful first DogTown book, companion to the hit show on the National Geographic Channel, Dog Tips from Dogtown is the pet owner's practical guide to building a healthy, happy relationship with a dog. Relying on the unparalleled expertise of the trainers at the Best Friends Animal Society, this manual shows, with step-by-step illustrations, how to apply the power of positive reinforcement to train a pet. From adoption tips to canine communication lessons and training strategies that make a regimen fun for everyone, Dog Tips from DogTown is a complete guide to the tried and true methods that work miracles every day at the Best Friends Animal Society.

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