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Postsocialist Europe

by La¡szla³ Kuiˆrti Peter Skalna­k

Now that nearly twenty years have passed since the collapse of the Soviet bloc there is a need to understand what has taken place since that historic date and where we are at the moment. Bringing together authors with different historical, cultural, regional and theoretical backgrounds, this volume engages in debates that address new questions arising from recent developments, such as whether there is a need to reject or uphold the notion of post-socialism as both a necessary and valid concept ignoring changes and differences across both time and space. The authors' firsthand ethnographies from their own countries belie such a simplistic notion, revealing, as they do, the cultural, social, and historical diversity of countries of Central and Southeastern Europe.

The Lights Go On Again

by Kit Pearson

In 1945, after living in Canada for five years to escape the war in Europe, ten-year-old Gavin and his fifteen-year-old sister Norah face the prospect of returning home to their family in England with radically different emotions.

War in the St. Lawrence

by Roger Sarty

From 1942 to 1944 fifteen German submarines carried out extended combat missions in the St. Lawrence. They destroyed or severely damaged 27 ships, including three Canadian warships, a U. S. Army troop transport, and the Newfoundland ferry Caribou. One ship went down near Rimouski, Quebec, less than 300 kilometers from Quebec City. More than 250 lives were lost, many of them women and children. It was the only battle of the twentieth century to take place within Canada's boundaries, and the only battle to be fought almost exclusively by Canadian forces under Canadian, rather than Alliance, high command. The battle took place during moments of grave political crisis for prime minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, and directly influenced his government's leadership of the war effort. And for over 40 years the battle was characterized as a Canadian defeat. Yet was it a defeat? No one looked at the classified wartime records until the 1980s, and the first full account to draw on them appeared only in 2003. Canada, those records suggested, mounted a successful defense with far fewer resources and in the face of much greater challenges than previously known. The book presents new material from wartime records-including "ultra" top secret Allied decryptions of German naval radio communications. It draws vivid pictures of the intense combat on Canada's shores, the sailors and airmen who stretched shoe-string resources to the limits and beyond, and the interplay of the St. Lawrence battle with war politics in Ottawa, Washington, and London. .

Room for All of us

by Adrienne Clarkson

In this exciting and revealing personal inquiry, former governor general Adrienne Clarkson explores the immigrant experience through the people who have helped transform Canada. The Canadians she befriends-whether an Ismaili doctor, a Holocaust survivor, a Chilean-Canadian artist, or a Vietnam War deserter-illustrate the changing idea of what it means to be Canadian and the kind of country we have created over the decades. Like her, many of the people who came here did not have a real choice: they often arrived friendless and with a sense of loss. Yet their struggles and successes have enriched Canada immeasurably. What drove them to become the kind of people they have become? What would have happened to them if Canada had not taken them in? What have they added to our national life us as we go forward in the twenty-first century? Written with humour and insight, and enriched by Clarkson's own memories of her trajectory from Hong Kong refugee to distinguished Canadian figure, Room for All of Us is a tale of many destinies. It is a richly textured, intimate, and unforgettable portrait of a changing country and its people.

Randy Bachman's Vinyl Tap Stories

by Randy Bachman

Randy Bachman has been rolling out chart-topping songs his whole life-"You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet," "These Eyes," "American Woman," "Taking Care of Business"-and, since 2005, treating fans to a lifetime of stories on his hit CBC Radio show Randy's Vinyl Tap. His approach is always fresh-even the most hardcore music fans will be surprised by what they can learn from Randy. Writing music and lyrics, performing live and recording #1 songs, producing new music, organizing reunion tours-Randy has done it all. Music is his life, and his anecdotes put you at the centre of it all. These are his best stories. Even with all his success Randy is "still that kid from Winnipeg," and his enthusiasm for great music is as strong as ever. Hear how after years of dreaming Randy finally got to see his musical heroes, The Shadows, play live, and then got to record a Shadows tribute song with longtime friend Neil Young. Encounters with celebrities and rock legends abound, but it is the music that is the driving force behind his extraordinary career, and what brings us back for more stories from Randy's Vinyl Tap.

Dismantling The Dream Factory

by Hester Baer

The history of postwar German cinema has most often been told as a story of failure, a failure paradoxically epitomized by the remarkable popularity of film throughout the late 1940s and 1950s. Through the analysis of 10 representative films, Hester Baer reassesses this period, looking in particular at how the attempt to 'dismantle the dream factory' of Nazi entertainment cinema resulted in a new cinematic language which developed as a result of the changing audience demographic. In an era when female viewers comprised 70 per cent of cinema audiences a 'women's cinema' emerged, which sought to appeal to female spectators through its genres, star choices, stories and formal conventions. In addition to analyzing the formal language and narrative content of these films, Baer uses a wide array of other sources to reconstruct the original context of their reception, including promotional and publicity materials, film programs, censorship documents, reviews and spreads in fan magazines. This book presents a new take on an essential period, which saw the rebirth of German cinema after its thorough delegitimization under the Nazi regime.

Gardening The World

by Veronica Strang

Around the world, intensifying development and human demands for fresh water are placing unsustainable pressures on finite resources. Countries are waging war over transboundary rivers, and rural and urban communities are increasingly divided as irrigation demands compete with domestic desires. Marginal groups are losing access to water as powerful elites protect their own interests, and entire ecosystems are being severely degraded. These problems are particularly evident in Australia, with its industrialised economy and arid climate. Yet there have been relatively few attempts to examine the social and cultural complexities that underlie people's engagements with water. Based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork in two major Australian river catchments (the Mitchell River in Cape York, and the Brisbane River in southeast Queensland), this book examines their major water using and managing groups: indigenous communities, farmers, industries, recreational and domestic water users, and environmental organisations. It explores the issues that shape their different beliefs, values and practices in relation to water, and considers the specifically cultural or sub-cultural meanings that they encode in their material surroundings. Through an analysis of each group's diverse efforts to 'garden the world', it provides insights into the complexities of human-environmental relationships.

Mediating Europe

by Bridgette Wessels Dr Jackie Harrison

The on-going constitutionalization of Europe has led to various changes in media and communications, opening up areas of debate regarding the role of traditional and new media in developing a specific European public sphere as part of the wider European Project. This timely volume addresses the little understood relationship between old and new media, communications policy at the European level, issues of regulation and competition within the EU, the role of the European Parliament in media policymaking, and the questions emerging about the sustainability of traditional public service broadcasting. To understand the concrete significance of these debates two contributions address specific practical areas, i.e. the potential of online environments and specific developments in European media contexts, such as channel strategies, web-related services, iDTV and community networks. Consequently, Mediating Europe provides an original and important contribution to understanding the role of the media in shaping a European public sphere.

A Walk To The River In Amazonia

by Carla Stang

Our lives are mostly composed of ordinary reality -- the flow of moment-to-moment existence -- and yet it has been largely overlooked as a subject in itself for anthropological study. In this work, the author achieves an understanding of this part of reality for the Mehinaku Indians, an Amazonian people, in two stages: first by observing various aspects of their experience and second by relating how these different facets come to play in a stream of ordinary consciousness, a walk to the river. In this way, abstract schemata such as 'cosmology,' 'sociality,' 'gender,' and the 'everyday' are understood as they are actually lived. This book contributes to the ethnography of the Amazon, specifically the Upper Xingu, with an approach that crosses disciplinary boundaries between anthropology, philosophy, and psychology. In doing so it attempts to comprehend what Malinowski called the 'imponderabilia of actual life.'

Culture And Rhetoric

by Ivo Strecker Stephen Tyler

While some scholars have said that there is no such thing as culture and have urged to abandon the concept altogether, the contributors to this volume overcome this impasse by understanding cultures and their representations for what they ultimately are - rhetorical constructs. These senior, international scholars explore the complex relationships between culture and rhetoric arguing that just as rhetoric is founded in culture, culture is founded in rhetoric. This intersection constitutes the central theme of the first part of the book, while the second is dedicated to the study of figuration as a common ground of rhetoric and anthropology. The book offers a compelling range of theoretical reflections, historical vistas, and empirical investigations, which aim to show how people talk themselves and others into particular modalities of thought and action, and how rhetoric and culture, in this way, are co-emergent. It thus turns a new page in the history of academic discourse by bringing two disciplines - anthropology and rhetoric - together in a way that has never been done before.

Economic Persuasions

by Stephen Gudeman

As the transition from socialism to a market economy gathered speed in the early 1990s, many people proclaimed the final success of capitalism as a practice and neoliberal economics as its accompanying science. But with the uneven achievements of the "transition"--the deepening problems of "development," persistent unemployment, the widening of the wealth gap, and expressions of resistance--the discipline of economics is no longer seen as a mirror of reality or as a unified science. How should we understand economics and, more broadly, the organization and disorganization of material life? In this book, international scholars from anthropology and economics adopt a rhetorical perspective in order to make sense of material life and the theories about it. Re-examining central problems in the two fields and using ethnographic and historical examples, they explore the intersections between these disciplines, contrast their methods and epistemologies, and show how a rhetorical approach offers a new mode of analysis while drawing on established contributions.

Culture, Rhetoric And The Vicissitudes Of Life

by Michael Carrithers

Inspired by the Rhetoric Culture Project, this volume focuses on the use of imagery, narrative, and cultural schemes to deal with predicaments that arise during the course of life. The contributors explore how people muster their resources to understand and deal with emergencies such as illness, displacement, or genocide. In dealing with such circumstances, people can develop new rhetorical forms and, in the process, establish new cultural resources for succeeding generations. Several of the contributions show how rhetorical cultural forms can themselves create emergencies. The contributors bring expertise from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology and communications studies, underlining the volume's wider relevance as a reflection on the human condition.

Islam And New Kinship

by Morgan Clarke

Assisted reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization have provoked global controversy and ethical debate. This book provides a groundbreaking investigation into those debates in the Islamic Middle East, simultaneously documenting changing ideas of kinship and the evolving role of religious authority in the region through a combination of in-depth field research in Lebanon and an exhaustive survey of the Islamic legal literature. Lebanon, home to both Sunni and Shiite Muslim communities, provides a valuable site through which to explore the overall dynamism and diversity of global Islamic debate. As this book shows, Muslim perspectives focus on the moral propriety of such controversial procedures as the use of donor sperm and eggs as well as surrogacy arrangements, which are allowed by some authorities using surprising and innovative legal arguments. These arguments challenge common stereotypes of the rigidity and conservatism of Islamic law and compel us to question conventional contrasts between 'liberal' and Islamic notions of moral freedom, as well as the epistemological assumptions of anthropology's own 'new kinship studies'. This book will be essential reading for anyone interested in contemporary Islam and the impact of reproductive technology on the global social imaginary.

When God Comes To Town

by Rik Pinxten Lisa Dikomitis

Around 1800 roughly three per cent of the human population lived in urban areas; by 2030 this number is expected to have gone up to some seventy per cent. This poses problems for traditional religions that are all rooted in rural, small-scale societies. The authors in this volume question what the possible appeal of these old religions, such as Christianity, Judaism, or Islam could be in the new urban environment and, conversely, what impact global urbanization will have on learning and on the performance and nature of ritual. Anthropologists, historians and political scientists have come together in this volume to analyse attempts made by churches and informal groups to adapt to these changes and, at the same time, to explore new ways to study religions in a largely urbanized environment.

A Thousand Farewells

by Nahlah Ayed

Born in Canada to immigrant parents, raised in Jordan as a Palestinian refugee, award-winning CBC reporter for the Middle East, Nahlah Ayed offers a unique insider's perspective to Canadians. When she was a child, Ayed's parents made the fateful decision to move from Manitoba back to Jordan to ensure that their four children remained connected to their culture and heritage. For Nahlah and her siblings, it was a shocking change: they'd left their comfortable Winnipeg home for the squalor of a refugee camp in Amman. Living first in a tent, then in a concrete house, Ayed meets her extended family and learns of the sorrows of generations of displaced Palestinians. Uprooted and prevented from returning to their ancestral lands by the new geopolitical reality of Israel, they struggle to forge a new life in daunting conditions. At the same time, she is confronted with the sometimes uncomfortable realities of growing up female in a restrictive culture. Driven towards journalism by a desire to challenge wrongdoing, Nahlah found herself, unexpectedly, covering both the Afghanistan and then Iraq wars. She continues to cover the recent upheavals in Egypt and Libya. However, it is not war that she is following, but the plight of the region's people who struggle to rebuild lives amid danger, uncertainty, and perpetual displacement. .

The Best Place to Be

by John Lownsbrough

For six months in 1967, from late April until the end of October, Canada and its world's fair, Expo '67, became the focus of national and international attention in a way the country and its people had rarely experienced before. At a time when Canada celebrated its centennial, Expo 67 seemed in a lot of ways to crystallize the buoyant mood and newfound sense of confidence many felt that year. Expo was a great world's fair-some claimed the greatest-in the way it brought together the worlds of art and architecture, film and the performing arts, science and technology, under its theme of Man and His World. For many Canadians around at the time, whether or not they made the trip to Montreal, Expo's host city, Expo became a touchstone, a popular event that penetrated the collective psyche. The Best Place to Be takes a look at Expo and at the context, social and political, in which it occurred. It is above all a story of people, the planners and administrators who took on the challenge of building and running Expo; the young men and women who worked there; the many visitors, not least the citizens of Montreal who returned again and again to savor the delights of an exhibition that helped to so transform their city. .

Daughters who Walk this Path

by Yejide Kilanko

Daughters Who Walk This Path depicts the dramatic coming of age of Morayo, a spirited and intelligent girl growing up in 1980s Ibadan who is thrust into a web of oppressive silence woven by the adults around her. Only Aunty Morenike¿once protected by her own mother¿provides Morayo with a safe home, and a sense of female community which sustains Morayo as she grows into a young woman in bustling, politically charged, often violent Nigeria.

Everything Was Good-Bye

by Gurjinder Basran

THE YOUNGEST OF SIX daughters raised by a widowed mother, Meena is a young woman struggling to find her place in the world. Originally from India, her family still holds on to many old-world customs and traditions that seem stifling to a young North American woman. She knows that the freedom experienced by others is beyond her reach. But unlike her older sisters, Meena refuses to accept a life dictated by tradition. Against her mother's wishes, she falls for a young man named Liam who asks her to run away with him. Meena must then make a painful choice--one that will lead to stunning and irrevocable consequences. Heartbreaking and beautiful, "Everything Was Good-bye" is an unforgettable story about family, love, and loss, and the struggle to live in two different cultural worlds.

Cross Katie Kross

by Donna Morrissey

In this charming children's story from award-winning author Donna Morrissey and her daughter, Bridgette, we meet Katie Kross, a curmudgeonly old woman who hates just about everything. Katie becomes so fed up with life on her farm that she decides to leave her home in search of Love Valley: a beautiful, idyllic place where she can be on her own, away from tedious chores, pestering neighbours, and pesky animals. But Katie's journey leads her to learn that sometimes dreams come true in the most surprising ways. Donna's lovely story is accompanied by her daughter Bridgette's charming and quirky illustrations. .

The Beggar's Opera

by Peggy Blair

IN BEAUTIFUL, CRUMBLING OLD Havana, detective Mike Ellis hopes the sun and sand will save his troubled marriage. He doesn't yet know that it's dead in the water, much like the little Cuban boy last seen begging the couple for a few pesos on the world famous Malecón. For Inspector Ricardo Ramirez, head of the Havana Major Crimes Unit, arresting Ellis isn't the problem--the law is. He has only seventy-two hours to secure an indictment and prevent a vicious killer from leaving the island. And Ramirez has his own troubles. He's dying of the same dementia that killed his grandmother, an incurable disease that makes him see the ghosts of victims of his unsolved cases. As he races against time, the dead haunt his every step. . . . First in a new series featuring Inspector Ramirez, The Beggar's Opera exposes the bureaucracy, corruption, and beauty of Hemingway's Havana. .

Balkan Departures

by Wendy Bracewell Alex Drace-Francis

In writings about travel, the Balkans appear most often as a place travelled to. Western accounts of the Balkans revel in the different and the exotic, the violent and the primitive -- traits that serve (according to many commentators) as a foil to self-congratulatory definitions of the West as modern, progressive and rational. However, the Balkans have also long been travelled from. The region's writers have given accounts of their travels in the West and elsewhere, saying something in the process about themselves and their place in the world. The analyses presented here, ranging from those of 16th-century Greek humanists to 19th-century Romanian reformers to 20th-century writers, socialists and 'men-of-the-world', suggest that travellers from the region have also created their own identities through their encounters with Europe. Consequently, this book challenges assumptions of Western discursive hegemony, while at the same time exploring Balkan 'Occidentalisms'.

The Power Of Law In A Transnational World

by Franz von Benda-Beckmann Keebet von Benda-Beckmann Anne Griffiths

How is law mobilized and who has the power and authority to construct its meaning? This important volume examines this question as well as how law is constituted and reconfigured through social processes that frame both its continuity and transformation over time. The volume highlights how power is deployed under conditions of legal pluralism, exploring its effects on livelihoods and on social institutions, including the state. Such an approach not only demonstrates how the state, through its various development programs and organizational structures, attempts to control territory and people, but also relates the mechanisms of state control to other legal modes of control and regulation at both local and supranational levels.

Wish Granted

by Don Yaeger Make-A-Wish®

A rare glimpse into the private lives of your favorite athletes and what gives these champion sportsmen and women a deeper satisfaction than any trophy or championship ring.It's no surprise that the stories in Wish Granted are profoundly inspiring. What is unexpected is how the life lessons have unfolded for the athletes with each wish granted. These athletes set about to make a difference for a child . . . but found, instead, that the child changed them.In Wish Granted, you'll become the confidant to twenty-five elite athletes as they share their most heartfelt thoughts. At the center of these stories, you'll find the victories, challenges, triumphs, and tears that sum up the experience of wish granting. Packed with compelling, never-before-published photos, Wish Granted focuses on the uplifting power people have to offer hope and joy to others--both athlete to child, and child to athlete.Wish Granted celebrates the strength and courage of the human spirit in the face of adversity--and a celebration you can be a part of. Every book sold will help grant life-changing wishes.

Flat Stanley's Worldwide Adventures #11: Framed in France

by Jeff Brown Macky Pamintuan

Flat Stanley is back to save the day in another exciting Worldwide Adventures chapter book, just in time to celebrate his fiftieth anniversary! This time, he explores Paris, France. And not only will kids love going on a fun adventure with Stanley, this eleventh installment of Jeff Brown's Worldwide Adventures series has fun, fascinating facts about Paris in the back of the book, and is perfect for common core state standards, like multicultural adventure, plot and character development story elements, and compare and contrast.Stanley Lambchop is headed to France to the most famous museum in Paris--the Louvre. Readers will experience the city of light, soar to the top of the Eiffel Tower, and solve a mystery when one of the most famous paintings in history is stolen. And when Stanley Lambchop is asked to help catch an art thief, he can't help but be excited! Posing as a painting in the Louvre on a wall across from the famous Mona Lisa?--c'est magnifique! However, Stanley soon grows bored--until he meets Etoile, an art student who shows him around Paris. But when Stanley goes back to the museum, he realizes that the Mona Lisa looks . . . different. It's been switched for a fake! Will Stanley be able to nab the thief before he or she strikes again?Supports the Common Core State Standards

The Body Doesn't Lie

by Vicky Vlachonis

Integrative medical practitioner and pain expert Vicky Vlachonis shares her proven program to replace chronic aches and pains with renewed energy and life-enhancing radiance.Back problems, nightly headaches, tight shoul-ders, achy feet--all of us have nagging, daily pains that seem to get worse when our lives get busier. While the immediate reaction to pain is to take short-term measures to make it go away, this does nothing to address the underlying cause. In The Body Doesn't Lie, Vicky Vlachonis shows us how to locate the source of our pain, understand its origin and manifestation in the body, and then let it go, using a holistic approach that includes easy-to-implement approaches to diet, exercise, and emotional well-being.Vlachonis's successful pain-eradication pro-gram was developed over years working with a wide range of clients, from celebrities and CEOs to overworked ballet dancers and working moms. Her Positive Feedback Program guides readers through three stages: Reflect, Release, and Radiate.The book includes a detailed meal plan with recipes, body maps to identify areas of pain and healing touch points, and step-by-step remedies for specific issues including fatigue, digestive problems, and depression. This groundbreaking approach uses pain as a tool--not the un-defeatable enemy--to help you look and feel better immediately and release your body from physical and emotional pain for good.

Showing 3,101 through 3,125 of 9,826 results

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