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New and Selected Poems 1974-1994

by Stephen Dunn

Justly celebrated as one of our strongest poets, Stephen Dunn selects from his eight collections and presents sixteen new poems marked by the haunting "Snowmass Cycle."

The Death of Hitler: The Full Story with New Evidence from Secret Russian Archives

by Peter Watson Ada Petrova

"Revealing and well-written. . . . A significant book."--Houston Chronicle It is one of the most enduring mysteries of the twentieth century: how, exactly, Adolf Hitler died and what happened to his remains. With access to the Russians' Hitler Archive, this book reveals not only what happened after the Russians captured Hitler's bunker but also why the Soviets felt the details of his death had to be suppressed.

Landscape at the End of the Century: Poems

by Stephen Dunn

"Here is the mature work of a poet who has always managed to delight--but who now demands something more of us. He asks us to enter the twenty-first century with open eyes: attentive to the past, eager for the future, naming what we love."--Judith Kitchen, Georgia Review

Jacobson's Organ: And the Remarkable Nature of Smell

by Lyall Watson

Nothing is more memorable than a smell. So why do we persist in dismissing the nose as a blunt instrument? Smell is our most seductive and provocative sense, invading every domain of our lives. We can identify our relatives, detect the availability of a potential mate, sniff out danger, and distinguish between good and bad food just with our noses. In this surprising and delightful book, Lyall Watson rescues our most unappreciated sense from obscurity. He brings to light new evidence concerning Jacobson's Organ: an anatomical feature discovered high in the nose in 1811 and dismissed for centuries as a vestigial ghost. Yet recent research has shown Jacobson's Organ to be an incredibly influential pheromonal mechanism that feeds the area of the brain affecting our awareness, emotional states, and sexual behavior. Following the seven classes of smell devised by the pioneering botanist Carolus Linnaeus in his Odores Medicamentorum, Watson examines the roles of smell and pheromones in humans, plants, and animals. He reveals the curious ways in which trees communicate their distress, the olfactory abilities of feral children, the bond we have with our offspring, the psychosexual effects of perfume, and the link between smell and memory formation. Jacobson's Organ unlocks the door to the strange world of this mysterious sense.

Between Angels

by Stephen Dunn

"Between Angels affirms what we are capable of in our best moments--grace, tenderness, love--while acknowledging that the human heart can be merciless. It's a book of great breadth."--Gregory Djanikian, Philadelphia Inquirer

Elephantoms: Tracking the Elephant

by Lyall Watson

A scientific safari and personal memoir celebrating the enigmatic dignity of the world's largest land animal. As a child in South Africa, spending summers exploring the wild with his boyhood friends, Lyall Watson came face to face with his first elephant. This "entertaining and enchanting" work (Washington Post Book World) chronicles how Watson's fascination grew into a lifelong quest to understand the nature and behavior of this impressive creature. From that moment on, Watson's fascination grew into a lifelong obsession with understanding the nature and behavior of this impressive creature. Around the world, the elephant--at once a symbol of spiritual power and physical endurance--has been worshipped as a god and hunted for sport. "Watson's insights and speculations are dazzling, but what lends them power is his extraordinary knowledge of evolutionary biology and animal behavior, ethnography and South African history" (Wade Davis, National Geographic Society). "Like a shaman, Watson conjures up the spirit of the massive beast" (Publishers Weekly), documents the animal's wide-ranging capabilities to remember and to mourn, and reminds us of its rich mythic origins, its evolution, and its devastation in recent history. Part meditation on an elusive animal, part evocation of the power of place, Elephantoms presents an alluring mix of the mysteries of nature and the wonders of childhood.

Dread: Poems

by Ai

A searing collection of poems about America's loss of innocence from the National Book Award-winning author of Vice. In poems that travel from the horrific flight of a World War II pilot to the World Trade Center attack, from the death of JFK Jr. to the poet's own bastard birth, Ai conjures purity as a distant memory and the knowledge of evil as an "infinite dark night." "An undoubtedly powerful personae."--Publishers Weekly "Ai's cleansing soliloquies give voice to pain both personal and communal....[Dread] presents her most masterfully unnerving works to date."--Booklist "Dread has the characteristic moral strength that makes Ai a necessary poet."--The New York Times Book Review

Barely Composed: Poems

by Alice Fulton

"Fulton is exactly the kind of poet Shelley had in mind when he said 'Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.' " --Verse In this eagerly awaited collection of new poems--her first in over a decade--Alice Fulton reimagines the great lyric subjects--time, death, love--and imbues them with fresh urgency and depth. Barely Composed unveils the emotional devastations that follow trauma or grief--extreme states that threaten psyche and language with disintegration. With rare originality, the poems illuminate the deepest suffering and its aftermath of hypervigilance and numbness, the "formal feeling" described by Emily Dickinson. Elegies contemplate temporal mysteries--the brief span of human/animal life, the nearly eternal existence of stars and nuclear fuel, the enduring presence of the arts--and offer unsparing glimpses of personal loss and cultural suppressions of truth. Under the duress of silencing, whether chosen or imposed, language warps into something uncanny, rich, and profoundly moving. Various forms of inscription--coloring book to redacted document--enact the combustible power of the unsaid. Though "anguish is the universal language," there also is joy in the reciprocity of gifts and creativity, intellect and intimacy. Gorgeous vintage rhetorics merge with incandescent contemporary registers, and this recombinant linguistic mix gives rise to poems of disarming power. Visionaries--truth tellers, revelators, beholders--offer testimony as beautiful as it is unsettling. Shimmering with the "good strangeness of poetry," Barely Composed bears witness to love's complexities and the fragility of existence. In the midst of cruelty, a world in which "the pound is by the petting zoo," Fulton's poems embrace the inextinguishable search for goodness, compassion, and "the principles of tranquility."

The Narrow Road to the Interior: Poems

by Kimiko Hahn

An expansive work inspired by Japanese prose-poetry from a poet of "rigorous intelligence, fierce anger, and deep vulnerability" (Mark Doty). Kimiko Hahn, "a welcome voice of experimentation and passion" (Bloomsbury Review), takes up the Japanese prose-poetry genre zuihitsu--literally "running brush," which utilizes tactics such as juxtaposition, contradiction, and broad topical variety--in exploring her various identities as mother and lover, wife and poet, daughter of varied traditions.

Mosquito and Ant: Poems

by Kimiko Hahn

This breakthrough volume by award-winning poet Kimiko Hahn is her most rigorously "female" work to date as she reclaims the female body and reinvents an ancient Chinese correspondence. Mosquito and Ant refers to the style in which nu shu--a nearly extinct script used by Chinese women to correspond with one another--is written. Here in this exciting and totally original book of poems the narrator corresponds with L. about her hidden passions, her relationship with her husband and adolescent daughters, lost loves, and erotic fantasies. Kimiko Hahn's collection takes shape as a series of wide-ranging correspondences that are in turn precocious and wise, angry and wistful. Borrowing from both Japanese and Chinese traditions, Hahn offers us an authentic and complex narrator struggling with the sorrows and pleasures of being a woman against the backdrop of her Japanese-American roots.

The Artist's Daughter: Poems

by Kimiko Hahn

"Kimiko Hahn stands as a welcome voice of experimentation and passion."--Bloomsbury Review Kimiko Hahn's poetry explores the interplay--and tensions--among her various identities: mother, lover, wife, poet, and daughter of both the Midwest and Asia. However astonishing her subjects--from sideshow freaks to sadomasochistic fantasy--they ultimately emerge in this startling collection as moving images of the deepest levels of our shared humanity.

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

by Bruce Schneier

You are under surveillance right now. Your cell phone provider tracks your location and knows who's with you. Your online and in-store purchasing patterns are recorded, and reveal if you're unemployed, sick, or pregnant. Your e-mails and texts expose your intimate and casual friends. Google knows what you're thinking because it saves your private searches. Facebook can determine your sexual orientation without you ever mentioning it. The powers that surveil us do more than simply store this information. Corporations use surveillance to manipulate not only the news articles and advertisements we each see, but also the prices we're offered. Governments use surveillance to discriminate, censor, chill free speech, and put people in danger worldwide. And both sides share this information with each other or, even worse, lose it to cybercriminals in huge data breaches. Much of this is voluntary: we cooperate with corporate surveillance because it promises us convenience, and we submit to government surveillance because it promises us protection. The result is a mass surveillance society of our own making. But have we given up more than we've gained? In Data and Goliath, security expert Bruce Schneier offers another path, one that values both security and privacy. He shows us exactly what we can do to reform our government surveillance programs and shake up surveillance-based business models, while also providing tips for you to protect your privacy every day. You'll never look at your phone, your computer, your credit cards, or even your car in the same way again.

The Fall Line: America's Rise to Ski Racing's Summit

by Nathaniel Vinton

A journey into the world's original extreme sport: downhill ski racing. Harnessing nature's most powerful forces, elite downhillers descend icy, rugged slopes at speeds cresting 90 miles per hour. For decades, American skiers struggled to match their European counterparts, and until this century the US Ski Team could not claim a lasting foothold on the roof of the Alps, where the sport's legends are born. Then came a fledgling class of American racers that disrupted the Alpine racing world order. Led by Bode Miller and Lindsey Vonn, Julia Mancuso and Ted Ligety, this band of iconoclasts made a place for their country on some of the world's most prestigious race courses. Even as new technology amplified the sport's inherent danger, the US Ski Team learned how to win, and they changed downhill racing forever. The Fall Line is the story of how it all came together, a deeply reported reconstruction of ski racing's most dramatic season. Drawing on more than a decade of research and candid interviews with some of the sport's most elusive figures, award-winning journalist Nathaniel Vinton reveals the untold story of how skiers like Vonn and Miller, and their peers and rivals, fought for supremacy at the Olympic Winter Games. Here is an authoritative portrait of a group of men and women taking mortal risks in a bid for sporting glory. A white-knuckled tour through skiing's deep traditions and least-accessible locales, The Fall Line opens up the sexy, high-stakes world of downhill skiing--its career-ending crashes, million-dollar sponsorship deals, international intrigue, and showdowns with nature itself. With views from the starting gate, the finish line, and treacherous turns in between, The Fall Line delivers the adrenaline of one of the world's most beautiful and perilous sports alongside a panoramic view of skiing's past, present, and future.

Preemption: A Knife That Cuts Both Ways (Issues of Our Time)

by Alan M. Dershowitz

"A path-breaking must-read for government leaders, strategists, and all concerned Americans."--General Wesley K. Clark In Preemption one of our nation's foremost legal scholars puts forward a controversial new theory on crime and punishment in the postmodern world. Using the American government's 2003 invasion of Iraq as a starting point, Alan M. Dershowitz tracks our society's increasing reliance on preemptive action. In Preemption, which Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals calls "lucid, sober, courageous, and historically informed," Dershowitz has brought together all of his diverse and considerable talents and experiences to confront the idea of preemptive action as it applies to some of our most urgent political and moral dilemmas.

Glare

by A. R. Ammons

"Glare is a high-energy, relentlessly self-aware collision with the whole of life."--Albert Mobilio, Salon A superb long poem by the contemporary master of the form, Glare comprises two sections, "Strip" and "Scat Scan." The poem demonstrates, yet again, why A. R. Ammons's poetic voice is a national treasure: by turns cosmic, self-inflating, self-deflating, eloquent, intimate, bawdy, comic, precise--and always unmistakably his own.

Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt

by Michael Lewis

#1 New York Times Bestseller -- With a new Afterword "Guaranteed to make blood boil." --Janet Maslin, New York Times In Michael Lewis's game-changing bestseller, a small group of Wall Street iconoclasts realize that the U.S. stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders. They band together--some of them walking away from seven-figure salaries--to investigate, expose, and reform the insidious new ways that Wall Street generates profits. If you have any contact with the market, even a retirement account, this story is happening to you.

A Stranger's Mirror: New and Selected Poems 1994-2014

by Marilyn Hacker

A selection of poems that addresses the quotidian and the global, from one of our most essential poets. Drawing on two decades worth of award-winning poetry, Marilyn Hacker's generous selections in A Stranger's Mirror include work from four previous volumes along with twenty-five new poems, ranging in locale from a solitary bedroom to a refugee camp. In a multiplicity of voices, Hacker engages with translations of French and Francophone poets. Her poems belong to an urban world of cafés, bookshops, bridges, traffic, demonstrations, conversations, and solitudes. From there, Hacker reaches out to other sites and personas: a refugee camp on the Turkish/Syrian border; contrapuntal monologues of a Palestinian and an Israeli poet; intimate and international exchanges abbreviated on Skype--perhaps with gunfire in the background. These poems course through sonnets and ghazals, through sapphics and syllabics, through every historic-organic pattern, from renga to rubaiyat to Hayden Carruth's "paragraph." Each is also an implicit conversation with the poets who came before, or who are writing as we read. A Stranger's Mirror is not meant only for poets. These poems belong to anyone who has sought in language an expression and extension of his or her engagement with the world--far off or up close as the morning's first cup of tea.

In the Shadow of a Rainbow: The True Story of a Friendship Between Man and Wolf

by Robert Franklin Leslie

First published in 1974, this classic tale of friendship, courage, and the wild has captured hearts of all ages. In 1970, a young Indian who introduced himself as Gregory Tah-Kloma beached his canoe near the author's Babine Lake campsite in the backwoods of British Columbia. Night after night by the campfire, the young Indian told the remarkable story of his devotion to a pack of timber wolves and their legendary female leader: Náhani, "the one who shines." This extraordinary tale has touched many readers over the years with its moving portrayal of the friendship between Greg and Náhani. Certain names and locations have been altered, but the facts of Gregory Tah-Kloma's adventures with Náhani are as he told them to Robert Leslie.

What Goes On: Selected and New Poems 1995-2009

by Stephen Dunn

Brilliant new poems and an expansive gathering from six collections by a Pulitzer Prize winner celebrated as "indispensable." What Goes On displays the evolving style and sensibility of a major award-winning poet, and a traceable growth that has blossomed into a provocative confrontation with questions of consciousness and existence. Stephen Dunn's poems probe life's big questions without ever losing sight of the significance of the mundane.

Riffs and Reciprocities: Prose Pairs

by Stephen Dunn

"This Astaire-like glide through our not-so-idle talk is a pleasure."--Publishers Weekly Stephen Dunn experiments with short, related pieces that play off each other in the manner of jazz improvisations. The resulting pairs cover such subjects as "Scruples/Saints," "Hypocrisy/Precision," and "Anger/Generosity." The wisdom and startling turns we've come to expect from Dunn are everywhere in the ninety miniatures (forty-five pairs) that comprise this volume.

Loosestrife: Poems

by Stephen Dunn

"Dunn's new poems are driven by the same tireless force that made his New and Selected Poems (1994) so powerful, but there is a new tone here, a deepening of his recognition of life's perversities."--Booklist In this tenth collection, Stephen Dunn turns his "wise, well-practiced eye" (Library Journal) on an America growing ever more stringent with its daily mercies. Not content merely to observe the world, Dunn's stance is always dual, complicit. And as he navigates through each paradox of his moral and aesthetic and erotic selves, this poet, described by Sydney Lea as one "who remains open to contradictions," travels to a place of exact and complicated vision.

Local Visitations: Poems

by Stephen Dunn

Wise and searching new poems from the winner of the 2000 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. In his twelfth collection, his first since winning the Pulitzer Prize, Stephen Dunn turns his keen gaze on Sisyphus, our contemporary Everyman. Free, for the time being, from the power of the gods and the ceaseless weight of the rock, he struggles to navigate twenty-first-century America. In language by turns mordant and tender, often elegiac, Dunn illuminates the quotidian burdens of his all-too-human hero, as well as the abrasions of ambivalence and choice, finally concluding that "here / and there, though mostly here, even fate is reversible / with struggle or luck." In a second sequence of poems, nineteenth-century novelists become "local visitors" to the author's South Jersey towns. "Chekhov in Port Republic," "Jane Austen in Egg Harbor," "Dostoyevsky in Wildwood": these inventions and others give Dunn provocative new latitudes. As in his previous books, "he balances the casual and the vivid as he plumbs the ambiguity and mystery of human relations" (New York Times Book Review).

The Insistence of Beauty: Poems

by Stephen Dunn

An evocation of beauty's often-surprising manifestations; even in the face of tragedy. "Beauty isn't nice. Beauty isn't fair;" So, in part, states an epigraph for this stunning new collection, his thirteenth, by the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry (2000). First traversing betrayal and loss, Stephen Dunn then moves to speak of new love, with its attendant pleasures and questioning. The title poem, perhaps emblematic of the book as a whole, is evocative of beauty's often surprising manifestations even in the light of tragedy; as on that terrible day "when those silver planes came out of the perfect blue." Because beauty jars us, makes us look twice, it is as startling as a good poem, and as insistent. Fortunately, it is never too late to search for the right words for what we've seen, felt, endured. With quiet authority Dunn enacts what it feels like to be a particular man at a particular juncture of his life; struggling not to deny, but to name, then rename.

Here and Now: Poems

by Stephen Dunn

"A wonderful example of the poet's ability to satisfy readers and anticipate their thoughts."--Elizabeth Lund, Washington Post In his sixteenth collection, Stephen Dunn continues to bring his imagination and intelligence to what Wallace Stevens calls "the problems of the normal," which of course pervade most of our lives. The poem "Don't Do That" opens with the lines: "It was bring-your-own if you wanted anything / hard, so I brought Johnnie Walker Red / along with some resentment I'd held in / for a few weeks." In other poems, Dunn contemplates his own mortality, echoing Yeats--"That is no country for old men / cadenced everything I said"--only to discover he's joined their ranks. In "The Writer of Nudes" his speaker is in search of the body's "grammar" but tells his models, "Don't expect to see yourself as other / than I see you." Full of grace, wit, humor, and masterful precision, the poems in Here and Now attest to the contradictions we live with in the here and now. Political and metaphysical, these astonishing poems remind us of the essential human comedy of getting through each day. from "The House on the Hill" . . . from out of the fog, a large, welcoming house would emerge made out of invention and surprise. No things without ideas! you'd shout, and the doors would open, and the echoes would cascade down to the valleys and the faraway towns.

Everything Else in the World: Poems

by Stephen Dunn

"Essential to contemporary poetry collections."--Library Journal In his fourteenth collection, Stephen Dunn, "one of our indispensable poets" (Miami Herald), continues to probe brilliantly the unsaid and the elusive in the lives we live, in language that Gerald Stern has called "unbearably fearless and beautiful."

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