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Showing 3,101 through 3,125 of 8,180 results

All This Could Be Yours

by Joshua Trotter

Like the promise of its title, All This Could Be Yours is full of elusive gifts. Joshua Trotter's debut collection is a metaphysical hall of windows that seem to be mirrors and mirrors presenting themselves as windows.

I Wrote Stone: The Selected Poetry of Ryszard Kapuscinski

by Ryszard Kapuscinski Diana Kuprel Marek Kusiba

Bringing together for the first time in English a selection of poems from his two previously published collections, Kapuscinski offers up a thoughtful, philosophical verse, often aphoristic in tone and structure, that is engaged politically, morally, and viscerally with the world around him. Translated from the Polish.

From Sarajevo With Sorrow

by Goran Simic Amela Simic

From Sarajevo, with Sorrow restores all that is offensive, despairing and necessary to our understanding of war by capturing the poems' original power and humanity. This collection contains both previously unpublished poems, written "under the candlelight" of the siege, and new poems returning to the sniper's alleys and bunkers of Sarajevo. This is a disturbingly resonant, timely and important collection.

Time's Covenant

by Eric Ormsby

Bringing together Eric Ormsby's entire poetic oeuvre thus far, including a healthy selection of previously unpublished poems, Time's Covenant is timeless, by one of America's best poets. Essential reading.

Jailbreaks

by Zachariah Wells

In 1910 Lawrence J. Burpee published an anthology of 100 Canadian Sonnets. Poet and critic Zachariah Wells figured it was high time for an update on that dusty tome. In Jailbreaks, Wells has gathered 99 of his favourite sonnets written by Canadians, from the 19th century to the present day.

My Town

by Marty Gervais

My Town brings together more than 70 snapshots of the people and places that have called Windsor home. More than this, they have made Windsor, for better and for worse, the city it is today. Some of these faces you will recognize; others will have slipped beneath the radar. Marty has sought them out and made their stories his own.

A Night at the Opera

by Ray Smith

Set in the small German city of Waltherrott, this novel is a madcap excursion from the 1980s back to 1848, the year of revolutions, then back to the time of the Black Death in the late 1340s. A startling comedy, A Night at the Opera is a tour de force in the unexpected, the bizarre, and the serendipitous.

Good Morning Comrades

by Stephen Henighan Ondjaki

The first publication in English by one of the most talented, prolific and celebrated novelists in Africa, Ondjaki's Good Morning Comrades looks at the calm before the storm of the Angolan Civil War from the perspective of a young boy. Translated from the Portuguese.

The Goldfish Dancer

by Patricia Robertson

Set in locales and time periods as varied as nineteenth century England, contemporary Spain, and postwar Alberta, these five stories and two novellas introduce us to characters whose obsessions occupy the borderlands between fantasy and reality. In the title story, the half-black grand-daughter of slaves becomes an exotic dancer in New York during WWI and develops a passion for goldfish.

The English Stories

by Cynthia Flood

A series of twelve linked fictions detailing the story of Amanda Ellis, a young Canadian girl who goes with her parents to England "for a year that stretched into two," and her life at St. Mildred's school. Not limited to first person narration by the heroine, this collection is spiced with a wide range of perspectives and voices.

Catalogue Raisonne

by Mike Barnes

Puzzles start to multiply for Paul, an ex-rock guitarist and current art gallery attendant, when an exhibition of Surrealist art arrives. Before long, he is trying to find his way through a maze that includes a chess problem, violent death, cocaine, a strip and its art-patron owner, and a host of clashing egos and agendas in the gallery.

Airstream

by Patricia Young

A woman who cannot leave her house loses everything, her only companion a garrulous radio talk show host; a house fire sets into motion the end of a marriage; a teenage girl cannot extract herself from a doomed relationship with a heroin addict. Innocence, and the loss thereof, are handled with humour, compassion, and heartbreaking honesty.

A Very Small Something

by Alexander Griggs-Burr David Hickey

From A Very Small Something:Somewhere past the wrinkled maps, and underanother sun, where favourite earrings find new earsand missing marbles run, the hillsides madetheir marvelous shapes for a town called Covington-And a great pink factory as long as the breezeweighed truckfuls and truckfuls of bubblegum.Olivia Bezzlebee lives by the sea in a fantastic town with the world's biggest bubblegum factory, where its citizens blow bubbles all day. But Olivia can't blow a single one and feels as if everyone looks down on her. Leaving Covington to find a place where she might belong, she learns the true meanings of family and home.A Very Small Something, beautifully illustrated by Alexander Griggs-Burr, is a story to which all children-and any tuned-in parent-will be able to relate. Blowing bubbles may indeed be a very small something . . . but when you are a small child and it's the thing you most want to do, a bubble can mean the whole world.David Hickey is one of the leading young poets in Canada, and the author of two collections, including Open Air Bindery . He has tested his children's poems in schools across the country for the last seven years. He is finishing a PhD at the University of Western in London, Ontario.Alexander Griggs-Burr illustrated the Ontario Library Association Red Maple-nominated Nieve in 2010. He lives and works in Stratford, Ontario.

Love Poems

by Jaime Sabines Colin Carberry

"Love is the finest," writes Jaime Sabines, "the most shuddering, / the most unendurable, silence."Available for the first time as a complete selection in English, Love Poems presents Jaime Sabines' powerful erotic verse in an exceptional translation by Irish Canadian poet Colin Carberry.Jaime Sabines, Mexico's most influential modern poet, was born in Chiapas in 1926. He received numerous literary awards and honors over the course of his career. Sabines died in Mexico City in 1999.

Groundwork

by Amanda Jernigan

Amanda Jernigan's Groundwork is epic in ambition and scope, a collection of poetic sequences, both intensely personal and mythopoetic, representing stages in the poet's thinking about language and place. They form a series of parallel meditations on the past, present, and the mythological constructs with which we seek to join them.Amanda Jernigan, American and Canadian, lives and writes in Hamilton, Ontario.

Century

by Ray Smith

Century begins with the nightmare visions of a young woman named Jane Seymour, catching the reader up in a chronicle on the Seymour family that moves from Austria, America and Africa, through Edinburgh and Venice, and then back through the Paris of the Belle Epoque and forward to 1923 Germany. One of the most far-reaching novels ever published in Canada.

Suitable Precautions

by Laura Boudreau

When a woman discovers a fortune in the attic, she begins a pilgrimage that takes her to the knife-edge between blessing and curse. Two fatherless children think Mr. Crisander is nothing more than the creepy next-door neighbor-until they nearly kill his pot-bellied pig and learn the secrets of his past. A young girl talks about grade six, stealing cigarettes, and her sister's no-food diet while being photographed by an Internet pornographer.The stories of Suitable Precautions are fresh and haunting, resonant with the bitter beauty of lives derailed, reclaimed, celebrated, and questioned. By turns funny and absurd, unexpected and devastating, these stories reveal the strange and tenuous bonds between people in love, marriage, and friendship.Laura Boudreau's work has been published in Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Switzerland. She lives in London, England, where she works in publishing.

In the Field

by Claire Tacon

Ellie Lucan's about as far as she can get from the screwed-up teenager she used to be. She's got a doctorate, her husband's a prominent academic, and their children are excelling at a Montessori.When she loses her teaching job, however, she packs up her sons to spend the summer in her hometown. She finds her mother suffering from dementia and the house in squalor, and she is forced to confront small town prejudice towards her biracial sons.As Ellie is drawn back into the community, the strain on her marriage intensifies and she is forced to decide where her loyalties lie.Clare Tacon has an MFA in writing from the University of British Columbia and is a past editor of Prism Magazine. In the Field is her first novel.

The Big Dream

by Rebecca Rosenblum

At Dream Inc., a lifestyle magazine publisher, people are struggling not only to do their jobs-or even to keep them-but to fall in love and stay that way, to have friends, to be good parents and good children, to eat lunch and answer the phone and be happy. Which can be pretty interesting . . . even on company time.In The Big Dream, acclaimed short story writer Rebecca Rosenblum offers a suite of linked stories exploring the working world in all its dark and humorous complexity, creating an In Our Time for our time.Rebecca Rosenblum's debut collection Once drew comparison to Alice Munro's Dance of the Happy Shades" (Quill & Quire). She works in publishing in Toronto, Ontario.

The Wage Slave's Glossary

by Joshua Glenn Mark Kingwell Pseud Seth

When The Idler's Glossary was released in October 2008 the world was on the cusp of experiencing its greatest economic collapse since the Great Depression. Depending on your sense of irony, this was either foolhardy or prescient. The Wage Slave's Glossary, a second volume of anti-economic etymology, comes as we climb out of recession, and continues to explore and challenge the interconnected world of work and leisure and labor and how the language we use continues to keep us in chains.

Why Not?

by Ray Robertson

Featured on The Hour with George Stroumboulopoulos.SHORTLISTED FOR THE $60,000 HILARY WESTON WRITERS' TRUST PRIZE FOR NONFICTIONLonglisted for the $25,000 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction."Clear-eyed ... Robertson is no stranger to confronting unsavoury truths."-Steven Beattie, That Shakespearean Rag"Many of us sense that the world has too many moving parts and can become utterly defeated. Ray Robertson found a 'road back' in this splendid and intriguing book." -Jim HarrisonShortly after completing his sixth novel, Ray Robertson suffered a depression of suicidal intensity. Soon after his recover, he decided to try and answer two of the biggest questions we can ask. What makes humans happy? And what makes a life worth living?His answers aren't what you might expect from a mental illness memoir-but they're exactly what you'd expect from Ray Robertson. With the vitality of Nick Hornby and a brashness all his own, Robertson runs his hands over life, death, intoxication, and art. Unashamedly working-class and unabashedly literary, Why Not? is a rolling, rocking, anti-Sisyphean odyssey.Ray Robertson is the celebrated author of eight books and six novels, including What Happened Later, about Jack Kerouac's last years. He lives and writes in Toronto, Ontario.

Lucky Bruce

by Bruce Jay Friedman

"Like a Twilight zone with Charlie Chaplin"-Mario PuzoWriter, screenwriter, playwright, editor, actor, teacher: Bruce Jay Friedman has done it all, charming the glitziest industries of American golden-age culture for more than half a century. Lucky Bruce is his long-awaited memoir, and it's everything we'd expect and more: here is Friedman at his best, waltzing from Madison Avenue to Hollywood and back again, and reilluminating with brilliant clarity the dazzle of post-war American life.Self-effacing, wry, sharp, and laugh-out-loud funny, Friedman details with lovable candor his friendships and rivalries with the greatest writers, actors, publishers, directors and personalities of the last fifty years. He stands shoulder-to-shoulder with Steve Martin and Woody Allen. He's a dynamo of comedy and a recognized master of American letters. And in Lucky Bruce, whether he's fist-fighting with Norman Mailer, explaining to Richard Pryor why there are so few Jewish junkies, or writing screenplays in a closet with Natalie Wood as his secretary, Friedman is the king of understated charm. With cameos by Joseph Heller, Philip Roth, Mario Puzo, Lillian Hellman, Warren Beatty, Marlene Dietrich, Brian Grazer, Candida Donadio, Crazy Joe Gallo, Joyce Carol Oates, Jack Richardson, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Kurt Vonnegut, and the irreplaceable Elaine, Lucky Bruce is moving, scandalous, and guaranteed to shed new light on the brightest of American luminaries ... with Bruce Jay Friedman bright among them.Bruce Jay Friedman is a best-selling author, an Academy Award-nominated screenwriter, a magazine editor, a Hollywood actor, and a celebrated playwright. He lives in Manhattan, New York.

All the Voices Cry

by Alice Petersen

WINNER OF THE QWF FIRST BOOK PRIZE"Alice Petersen writes as eloquently about the natural world as she does about the world of human emotion and desire. This is a wise and impressive collection of stories."-David Bezmozgis, author of The Free WorldAlice Petersen's All the Voices Cry is masterful and potent-incredibly satisfying for a reader.- Kathleen Winter, author of AnnabelAn academic's wife, struggling to keep up with her husband's quest to find a long-dead author's Tahitian love-garden, realizes that her own idea of paradise no longer includes her husband. An architect dreams of slender redheads, Champlain's astrolabe, and a brush with mortality-and finds at least the latter at Danseuses 7 Jours. An elderly man boards a trans-Pacific flight in an attempt to elude the prediction of a psychic, only to understand too late how the prophecy has shaped his actions.In All the Voices Cry, modern life collides with all the old pushes and pulls: city and country, the global and the local, the ideal and the real. Petersen's characters chase the mirage of escape, and are brought up hard by reality. This is a book rooted in landscape, tangled in the brambles of personal history, and it introduces in Alice Petersen a wondrous new voice that is yours to discover.Alice Petersen is a writer and critic whose work has been shortlisted for numerous Canadian prizes and awards. She was born in New Zealand and now lives and works in Montreal, Quebec.

Psychology and Other Stories

by C. P. Boyko

FINALIST FOR THE ETHEL WILSON FICTION PRIZEFINALIST FOR THE VICTORIA BUTLER BOOK PRIZE"C.P. Boyko's second offering is brilliantly bold. Playful and dire and scholarly all at once, Psychology may well be the most audaciously original collection of Canadian fiction, ever. Mr. Mustard alone is worth the price of admission."-Bill Gaston, author of Mount Appetite"Very revealing."-Hubert T. Ross, PhD, PsyD, DPsyPsychologists are people we admire and resent. At best, they're compassionate detectives of the human soul, healers and diagnosticians, assessing the internal machinations that structure our lives and behavior. At worst, however, they're smug, hyper-educated, bombastic, yappy, socially deaf, thrice-divorced and twice-separated spouse-swapping cat-torturing perverts. Plus, they're all in this book. And so are their patients. C.P. Boyko's Psychology and Other Stories is replete with analysts, attorneys, criminals, Freudians, wardens, and self-help gurus. From Dr. Pringle's treatment-resisting young patient in "Reaction-Formation" to the philandering forensic psychiatrist of "The Blood-Brain Barrier," Psychology is a droll dissection of industry archetypes-as well as a brilliant study of mental illness, mental health, and the people who try to tell them apart.

The End of the Story

by Liliana Heker Andrea Labinger

"Liliana Heker is one of the most remarkable voices of the Argentinean generation after Borges ... her fiction chronicles the small tragedies that take place within the vast tragedy of our history. A universal and indispensable writer." - Alberto ManguelWhen Diana Glass witnesses Leonora's abduction from a street in Buenos Aires, she despairs that her friend has joined the ranks of los desaparaecidos, the missing ones. She begins to write the story of their friendship, but certain memories, details, and whispered allegations about Leonora's fate consistently intrude. Leonora was born to drink life down to the bottom of the glass. But, Diana wonders, is that necessarily a virtue?Gripping, intelligent, and intricately structured, Liliana Heker's novel of an unstable revolutionary pasionaria has inflamed readers across Latin America. The End of the Story is a shocking study of the pyschology of torture, and a tragic portrait of Argentina's Dirty War.

Showing 3,101 through 3,125 of 8,180 results

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