Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 3,276 through 3,300 of 5,525 results

Bolt Action: Germany Strikes!

by Peter Dennis Warlord Games

In 1939, Germany shattered the peace of Europe with a lightning-quick strike against Poland. The next year, it captured Denmark and Norway, before launching its famous blitzkrieg against France, Belgium and The Netherlands. In less than two years of fighting, Nazi Germany had become the master of mainland Europe. This new theater book for Bolt Action allows players to command armies of Germany tanks in WWII driving across the lowlands or to lead the desperate defense of the outgunned allied armies.

The Pacific War: From Pearl Harbor to Okinawa

by Dale Dye Robert O'Neill

On December 7, 1941, Japanese fighter planes appeared from the clouds above Pearl Harbor and fundamentally changed the course of history; with this one surprise attack, the previously isolationist America was irrevocably thrown into the fray and World War II had begun in earnest.This definitive history reveals each of the major battles that America would fight in the ensuing struggle against Imperial Japan, from the naval clashes at Midway and Coral Sea to the desperate, bloody fighting on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Each chapter reveals both the horrors of the battle and the Allies' grim yet heroic determination to wrest victory from what often seemed to be certain defeat, offering a valuable guide to the long road to victory in the Pacific. It is the definitive guide to a unique conflict in history, documenting the rise of naval aviation, spectacular amphibious operations, co-ordinated suicide tactics, and the birth of the atomic age.

Lewes and Evesham 1264-65

by Richard Brooks

At the crescendo of the Second Barons' War were the battles of Lewes and Evesham. It was an era of high drama and intrigue, as tensions between crown and aristocracy had boiled over and a civil war erupted that would shape the future of English government. In this detailed study, Richard Brooks unravels the remarkable events at the battles of Lewes and Evesham, revealing the unusually tactical nature of the fighting, in sharp contrast to most medieval conflicts which were habitually settled by burning and ravaging. At Lewes, Simon de Montfort, the powerful renegade leader of the Baronial faction, won a vital victory, smashing the Royalist forces and capturing Henry III and Prince Edward. Edward escaped, however, to lead the Royalist armies to a crushing victory just a year later at Evesham. Using full color illustrations, bird's eye views and detailed maps to generate an arresting visual perspective of the fighting, this book tells the full story of the battles of Lewes and Evesham, the only pitched battles to be fought by English armies in the mid-13th century.

The Regiment: 15 Years in the SAS

by Rusty Firmin

This is the unforgettable chronicle of Rusty's combat experiences, transporting the reader back to the cutting edge of the SAS's deadly covert missions during the crises of the 80s and 90s. But even more fascinating is his intimate portrayal of what the service was actually like to live and work in. Having served as a paramedic, a demolitions expert, a linguist and ultimately the senior SAS bodyguard instructor, Rusty draws on a unique breadth of experience to delve into the hidden world of the SAS as an institution.From its early beginnings in World War II, the Special Air Service (SAS) has won renown in some of the most dramatic, dangerous and controversial military special operations of the 20th century. It is a secretive and mysterious unit, whose operations and internal structures are hidden from the public eye. Now, one of its longest-serving veterans offers a glimpse into the shadowy world of the SAS. Rusty Firmin spent an incredible 15 years with 'The Regiment' and was a key figure in the assault on the Iranian Embassy in London in May 1980, the near-suicidal planned attack on Argentina (operation MIKADO) during the Falklands war and the secret conflict between the SAS and the IRA in the 80s.

The Wars of Atlantis

by Phil Masters

On the very edge of recorded history, the fabled island of Atlantis formed the centre of a vast and powerful empire. From there, the divinely-descended lords of the western ocean made war on the rest of the world, until a brave resistance drove them back, and the gods punished them for their hubris. In that last cataclysmic struggle, between gods and mortals, the whole island continent was cast into the sea.For the first time, this book reconstructs the fact and fiction of that lost age of gods and heroes, including the political organization of the Atlantean Empire, the equipment and tactics of the armies of Atlantis and their enemies, and the stories of the great wars themselves, from the early struggles between Atlantean colonies and the Amazons of North Africa to the final and catastrophic counter-invasion of Atlantis by the peoples of Europe and Asia.

Shanghai Shadows

by Lois Ruby

A young girl fleeing Hitler takes refuge in Shanghai, where she learns that she must fight to survive Throughout tomboy Ilse's childhood, her mother has tried to force her to behave like a proper Austrian lady. But when Hitler annexes their country, the family flees, boarding a packed freighter and sailing around the world in search of a safe harbor. The United States refuses to take them, so they proceed to China and make a new home in steamy, mysterious Shanghai. Their lodgings are cramped, money is tight, and Ilse's father cannot find work--but Ilse is enchanted by the city's international flavor. In Shanghai's shadows she finds the adventure of a lifetime. When the Japanese occupy the city, Ilse and her brother begin working in an underground resistance cell. Each day, the city grows more dangerous, and Ilse must lie, cheat, and steal in order for her family to eat. She is a long way from Austria, but she will do whatever it takes to survive.

This Old Man

by Lois Ruby

A spunky young girl forms an unlikely friendship with a dying Chinese man while living in a group home For Greta, having light and carefree Hackey hanging around her mom is a lot more fun than having an ordinary dad. But Hackey isn't her father--he's more like a pimp, and no matter how friendly he is, he still treats Greta's mom like dirt. When the situation at home goes from bad to worse, Greta is moved into a home for at-risk children where she meets some of the most interesting girls she has ever known--and a shy young boy named Wing. Greta's riding a San Francisco cable car when she notices Wing carrying a huge basket of delicious-smelling food. It's for his grandfather, Old Man, who is dying in the Chinese hospital. Although they don't speak the same language, Greta and Old Man will become fast friends--two survivors, who refuse to give up on life.

Skin Deep

by Lois Ruby

An angry young man is sucked into a gang of neo-Nazis Dan shows up on his first day at a new school with long blond hair, John Lennon glasses, and a shy grin that makes every girl in the hallway swoon. But he only has eyes for Laurel, who's in his English class. Laurel stirs feelings in Dan that he never knew existed, and suddenly, he understands love. Soon, he will understand hate as well. When a gang of violent young men invades the annual Halloween party, most of Laurel's friends stay away. The men are white supremacists with shaved heads, steel-toed boots, and a look in their eyes that says they're ready to fight. But something in their attitude draws Dan toward them. He's angry at the world, and these skinheads seem to understand how he feels. As he sinks deeper into their twisted world of hate and rage, Dan risks losing not only Laurel, but also his soul.

Miriam's Well

by Lois Ruby

A terminally ill teenager is forced to choose between her religion and her life Adam doesn't think much of it when Miriam faints in class. She's an oddball, a student who hardly talks, never makes eye contact, and wears clothes that seem straight out of the nineteenth century. She says she feels OK, and he wants to believe her. But when she passes out while they're working on an English assignment, Adam takes Miriam to the last place she wants to go: the hospital. Miriam has bone cancer. She believes that God will heal her, but if He doesn't, she plans to let herself die. Miriam is a member of a devout religious sect in which women have little power and medicine is strictly forbidden. In order for Miriam to forgo treatment, Adam's father sues the state on her behalf--even as Adam himself tries to convince her to accept the doctors' help. As her illness rages on, Miriam will teach Adam the meaning of love and faith--and he will give her a reason to live.

Getting Rid of Marjorie

by Betty Ren Wright

When summer comes, Emily is looking forward to spending more time with Grandfather. Ever since Grandma Ellen's death, Emily has felt especially close to him. He's never too busy to listen to her, and he always understands her feelings. But Emily's summer is unexpectedly ruined when Grandfather returns from a vacation with a new wife. Her name is Marjorie, and Emily hates her. There's no way Marjorie can replace Grandma Ellen, and she's certain to destroy Grandfather's happiness. So Emily decides to get rid of her. The jealousy and problems caused by Marjorie's arrival are refreshingly handled in the first novel by Betty Ren Wright.

Nothing But Trouble

by Betty Ren Wright Jacqueline Rogers

Vannie Kirkland is spending the summer on her Aunt Bert's farm while her parents are looking for work in California. At first, she feels uncomfortable: Aunt Bert is cranky and plainspoken, and she constantly reminds Vannie of how much she dislikes Vannie's yappy little dog, Muffy. Then, just when Vannie is beginning to appreciate Aunt Bert and her way of life, trouble starts brewing. Someone has been lurking around the farm, vandalizing the property. To top it all off, Muffy gets lost! Vannie helps Aunt Bert figure out who's trying to scare them, captures the culprit, and learns a thing or two about what it means to compromise.

Rosie and the Dance of the Dinosaurs

by Betty Ren Wright

Even though Rosie has only nine fingers, she's always managed well. Until now. For some reason, she can't master the piano solo she's been rehearsing for the annual recital. It's called "The Dance of the Dinosaurs," and it's hard! As the recital draws near, Rosie is desperate. Why does everything seem so much more difficult now? Is it because she misses her father? Since he moved to Milwaukee to take a new job, Rosie's been miserable, and her mother has been acting kind of strange. Or is Rosie having trouble because she's worried about the burglar who's been secretly visiting her house? Then, too, there's Mary Jean, the new girl in town. Not only is she rich and pretty, but she plays the piano beautifully. In the weeks before the recital, Rosie fights some hard battles. To her surprise, she discovers that having nine fingers isn't such a bad thing after all.

The Scariest Night

by Betty Ren Wright

Erin enjoyed being Erin Lindsay, the much-loved only child of schoolteacher parents. Everything in her life was just he way she wanted it, until nine-year-old Cowper moved in. A musical prodigy, he was adopted by Erin's parents after his mother and father were killed in a car crash. Suddenly, Erin was no longer the center of attention. Her parents became obsessed with Cowper. Now Erin faces a long, lonely summer away from her friends and familiar surroundings. The Lindsays are renting an apartment in Milwaukee so Cowper can take piano lessons at the conservatory. Erin is crazed with boredom, until she meets senior citizen and medium Molly Panca . . . and experiences the scariest night of her life.

The Summer of Mrs. MacGregor

by Betty Ren Wright

Twelve-year-old Caroline feels torn. She grieves over her sister who has a severe heart problem that keeps her in and out of the hospital. But at the same time, she is jealous of her sister's beauty and sweet disposition, which causes everyone to admire her. Caroline longs to be beautiful, to get attention from her parents--just to be somebody, anybody, other than plain old Caroline Cabot. Her self-image changes, however, when she meets glamorous seventeen-year-old Lillina MacGregor. Lillina makes her feel like somebody, but does Lillina tell the truth? Is she really 17? And married? And a model in New York? Caroline must rely on her inner strengths as she discovers the truth about Lillina, and will face several challenging situations during "the summer of Mrs. MacGregor."

The Wish Master

by Betty Ren Wright

Most years Corby likes summer vacation, but not now. He's stuck at his grandparents' house in Wisconsin, where his grandfather constantly reminds him how timid he is and how different his father was at his age. And his new friend Buck seems to think he's chicken, too, just because he'd rather be sensible than risk getting hurt. To prove he's tough, Corby joins Buck for a nighttime journey into the woods to find the Wish Master, a fierce, giant statue that is rumored to grant wishes. Soon it seems as if the Wish Master does have special powers--though it doesn't always get things exactly right. When Corby wishes for a puppy, a mangy stray comes into his life. He soon grows attached to the loyal mutt. Then the dog gets Corby in big trouble, and Corby decides it's time to wish for what he really wants: to go home. But will this wish bring more harm than good?

The Red Collar

by Adriana Hunter Jean Christophe Rufin

In 1919, in a small town in the province of Berry, France, under the crushing heat of summer heat wave, a war hero is being held prisoner in an abandoned barracks. In front of the door to his prison, a mangy dog barks night and day. Miles from where he is being held, in the French countryside, a young extraordinarily intelligent woman works the land the land, waiting and hoping. A judge whose principles have been sorely shaken by the war is travelling to an unknown location to sort out certain affairs of which it is better not to speak. Three characters. In their midst, a dog who holds the key both to their destinies and to this intriguing plot. Full of poetry and life, The Red Collar is at once a delightly simple narrative about the human spirit and a profound work about loyalty and love.

The Vienna Melody

by Elizabeth Reynolds Hapgood Ernst Lothar

All Vienna knows that the inhabitant of number 10 Seilerstatte is none other than Christopher Alt, piano maker, the best in Vienna, probably in all of Austria, and possiblly the world over. His piano keys have given life to melodies by Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, and many more. On his deathbed, moved by the wish to keep his children united, he leaves a will specifying that his descendants, if they are to get their inheritance, must live together in the family home. Over successive generations of the Alt family, history itself passes through the doors, down the halls, and into the private rooms of the Alt's building. There is intrigue at the court of Franz-Josef: an heir to the throne has fallen in love with Henrietta Alt, who will have to carry the guilt for his eventual suicide. There are betrayals, beloved illegitimate children, and despised legitimate offspring. There are seething passions and icy relations, a world war and the rise of Nazism to contend with. There are duals, ambitions, hopes, affairs of the heart and affairs of state. Three generations of Alts live and die at number 10 Silerstatte and each member of the family, in his or or her own way, is a privileged witness to the winds of change and a Europe at the height of both its splendor and decadence

Polish Spitfire Aces

by Wojtek Matusiak Robert Grudzien

Of all Allied airmen, Polish pilots had had the most experience of fighting the Luftwaffe by the time the war came to Britain. As the Battle of Britain raged, they quickly proved themselves as highly aggressive and skilful interceptors, especially when flying the famous Spitfire. The Polish Air Force eventually became the largest non-Commonwealth Spitfire operator, using some 1,500 Mks I, II, V, IX and XVI to devastating effect. Top scoring USAAF ace of the ETO, Francis "Gabby" Gabreski and a whole host of other Allied and Commonwealth aces flew with Polish squadrons, adding even more to their fighting quality. Conversely, several Polish pilots were attached to other Allied squadrons throughout the war, demonstrating their prowess alongside airmen from a whole host of nations. From an expert on Polish fighter aviation, this is a peerless account of the fiery, talented Polish "Spit" pilots, whose country had been overrun and whose aggression and determination to shoot down Axis aircraft was unmatched.

Leyte 1944

by Clayton Chun

The loss of the Phillipines in 1942 was the worst defeat in American military history. General Douglas MacArthur, the 'Lion of Luzon', was evacuated by order of the President just before the fall, but he vowed to return, and in August 1944 he kept his word when he led the largest amphibious assault of the Pacific War to date on the island of Leyte. This is the full story of that fateful battle, one of the most ferocious campaigns of World War II and one of huge strategic and symbolic significance. Preceding it had been the largest naval battle ever fought: the battle of Leyte Gulf, in which the Imperial Japanese Navy was decisively crushed. This paved the way for four divisions of Lieutenant-General Krueger's Sixth Army to spear-head the assault. In the face of stubborn Japanese resistance, including the first systematic use of kamikaze attacks, the US forces ground slowly forwards before another amphibious assault took the vital position of Ormoc in the last decisive battle of the campaign. Based on extensive research in the US Army's Military History Institute, along with other archival and veteran sources, this important study sheds new light on the operation that saw the US finally return to the Phillipines and in doing so placed another nail firmly in the coffin of the Japanese Empire.

Armies of the Greek-Turkish War 1919-22

by Philip Jowett

This is a comprehensive guide to the armies that fought a devastating and decisive conflict in the Eastern Mediterranean between the two World Wars of the 20th century. From the initial Greek invasion, designed to "liberate" the 100,000 ethnic Greeks that lived in Western Turkey and had done for centuries, to Mustapha Kemal Ataturk's incredibly efficient formation of a national government and a regular army, this was a war that shaped the geopolitical landscape of the Mediterranean to this day. It gave birth to the modern Turkish state, displacing millions and creating bitter memories of atrocities committed by both sides. Augmented with very rare photographs and beautiful illustrations, this ground-breaking title explores the history, organization, and appearance of the armies, both guerilla and conventional, that fought in this bloody war.

Ottoman Navy Warships 1914-18

by Paul Wright Ryan Noppen

At the start of the 20th century the Ottoman Navy was a shadow of its former might, a reflection of the empire as a whole - the "Sick Man of Europe". Years of defeat, nepotism, and neglect had left the Ottoman Navy with a mix of obsolete vessels, whilst the list of prospective enemies was ever-growing. An increasing Russian naval presence in the Black Sea and the alarming emergence of Italy and Greece as regional Naval powers proved beyond all doubt that intensive modernization was essential, indeed, the fate of the Empire as a naval power depended on it. So the Ottoman Navy looked to the ultimate naval weapon of the age, the dreadnought battleship, two of which were ordered from the British with extreme alacrity. But politics intervened, and a succession of events culminated in the Ottoman Navy fielding a modern German battlecruiser and state-of-the-art light cruiser instead - with dramatic consequences. In this meticulous study, Ryan Noppen presents a fresh appraisal of the technical aspects and operations of the warships of the Ottoman Navy in World War I. It is the first work of its kind in the English language - produced with a wealth of rare material with the cooperation of the Turkish Consulate and Navy. Packed with precise technical specifications, revealing illustrations and exhaustive research, this is an essential guide to a crucial chapter in the Aegean arms raceFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

Germany's East Wall in World War II

by Adam Hook Neil Short

The East Wall was where the final battles for the stricken Third Reich were fought, amid scenes of utter carnage. Beginning life at the end of World War I, the wall became a pet project of Adolf Hitler's, whose ascent to power saw building work accelerated, with plans for a grand, 'Maginot-style' defence put in place. But with a characteristically erratic change of heart, Hitler began to systematically strip the wall of its best defensive assets to bolster the Atlantic Wall, never dreaming that he would face an attack on two fronts. Despite belated and somewhat bungled reinforcements later in the War, the Eastern Wall would face a monstrous challenge as it became the Reich's last redoubt in the face of the mighty Soviet war machine. Neil Short brings his expert knowledge to bear with an analysis of different stages of the wall's construction, the years of neglect and decay and the hasty, drastic redevelopment in the face of the looming Soviet threat.

Dornier Do 24 Units

by Chris Davey Peter Jong

Perhaps the most seaworthy flying boat ever built, the elegant, tri-motor Dornier Do 24 served with both the Allied and Axis forces in very different parts of the globe during World War II, garnering an excellent reputation along the way This study uses archival records, first-hand accounts and revealing photographs to illuminate the combat career of this remarkable aircraft for the first time in English. The German-built Do 24 was the Netherlands Navy's principal aerial asset during the Japanese invasion of the East Indies. While the survivors of that ordeal served in the Australian Air force, in occupied Holland and France production continued swiftly and the Do 24 equipped the German Air-Sea rescue service, whose crews loved and respected the machine. The type witnessed the rise and fall of the Luftwaffe over all the European seas, took part in the desperate evacuations of Wehrmacht troops on the Baltic in the face of the overwhelming Soviet advance, and was pressed out of service only with the withdrawal of Spanish Do 24s in 1969. This volume tells the long and eventful story of the faithful Do 24 in full.

Frostgrave

by Joseph Mccullough Dmitry Burmak

Amidst the frozen ruins of an ancient city, wizards of different creeds are locked in a ferocious struggle. Each of them must seek to discover the treasures of a fallen empire and master long-forgotten but incredibly powerful magical lore. Each player takes on the role of a wizard from one of ten schools of magic, and builds his band of followers. While the wizard's apprentice will usually accompany his master, more than a dozen other henchmen types are available for hire, from lowly thugs to heavily armored knights and stealthy assassins. Wizards can build their magical knowledge by unlocking ancient secrets, with the potential to learn up to 80 spells in total. As players gain power and wealth, they can develop their headquarters on the outskirts of the city, turning one of a dozen different basic locations into bastions of their art, equipping them with alchemical laboratories, mystical forges, astronomical telescopes and other magical resources. While individual games of Frostgrave are quick and can easily be played in an hour or two, it is by connecting these games into an ongoing campaign, that players will find the most enjoyment. The scenarios given in the book are merely the beginning of the limitless, thrilling adventures that can be found amidst the ruins of the lost city.

Hemingway's Student

by Paul Hendrickson

From the award-winning biography of Ernest Hemingway, Hemingway's Boat: the poignant story of Arnold Samuelson, who looked to the great author for mentorship in writing and life. He was a Midwesterner, a young journalist, haunted by inner demons, with a rambling gene, who headed down to Key West and was keen to establish his place in the pantheon of American writers. This was not Papa but Arnold Samuelson, a tormented and scarred young man who pocketed a newspaper photograph of his hero and role model and set off to find him in May of 1934. As luck would have it, Hemingway was home: he was in need of assistance on his new boat, Pilar, and happy to dole out writing advice between fishing and beers. This is the story of Hemingway the teacher, a rare glimpse of Hemingway sharing his craft--part education of a writer and part shadow story of a man who wanted to be Hemingway, and what that meant for him.

Showing 3,276 through 3,300 of 5,525 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.