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Embraced by Love

by Suzanne Brockmann

Josie and Cooper were one of those couples everyone envied: gorgeous, successful, and so deeply devoted. Even though Josie tended to work too hard, putting in long hours to lift her fledgling company off the ground, and Cooper could be wild and unpredictable, the two complimented one another. It seemed their love would last forever. But sometimes love just isn't enough. When a tragic accident leaves Josie and Cooper with two young children to care for, their bond will be tested. Now the pressures of their commanding careers are compounded by the needs of the children, and they find themselves drifting further and further apart. They will have to work to find the way back to each other, to the incredible passion that was once at the center of lives-and still burns deep in their hearts.

Night Mare

by Piers Anthony

Although the Nextwave of barbarian warriors was invading Xanth, Mare Imbrium discovered that ever since she had gained the half soul, the night mare had begun to mishandle her job of delivering bad dreams. Exiled to the day world with a message for King Trent, Mare met the relentless, unforgiving Horseman. For the night mare, it began to be all a horrible nightmare!

The Novels of Gillian Flynn

by Gillian Flynn

"Gillian Flynn is the real deal, a sharp, acerbic, and compelling storyteller with a knack for the macabre." --Stephen KingThis collection, available exclusively as an ebook, brings together the first two novels of Gillian Flynn, author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Gone Girl. In Sharp Objects, Flynn's debut novel, a young journalist returns home to cover a dark assignment--and to face her own damaged family history. With its taut, crafted writing, Sharp Objects is addictive, haunting, and unforgettable. Flynn's second novel, Dark Places, is an intricately orchestrated thriller that ravages a family's past to unearth the truth behind a horrifying crime. A New York Times bestseller and Weekend Today Top Summer Read, Dark Places solidified Flynn's status as one of the most critically acclaimed suspense writers of our time.

Not Taco Bell Material

by Adam Carolla

In his second book, Adam Carolla--author of New York Times bestseller In Fifty Years We'll All Be Chicks and chart-topping podcaster--reveals all the stories behind how he came to be the angry middle-aged man he is today. Funnyman Adam Carolla is known for two things: hilarious rants about things that drive him crazy and personal stories about everything from his hardscrabble childhood to his slacker friends to the hypocrisy of Hollywood. He tackled rants in his first book, and now he tells his best stories and debuts some never-before-heard tales as well. Organized by the myriad "dumps" Carolla called home--through the flophouse apartments he rented in his twenties, up to the homes he personally renovated after achieving success in Hollywood--the anecdotes here follow Adam's journey and the hilarious pitfalls along the way. Adam Carolla started broke and blue collar and has now been on the Hollywood scene for over fifteen years, yet he never lost his underdog demeanor. He's still connected to the working class guy he once was, and delivers a raw and edgy, fish-out-of-water take on the world he lives in (but mostly disagrees with), telling all the stories, no matter who he offends--family, friends or the famous.

Russka: The Novel of Russia

by Edward Rutherfurd

"Impressive." THE WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLD. Spanning 1800 years of Russia's history, people, politics, and culture, Edward Rurtherford, author of the phenomenally successful SARUM: THE NOVEL OF ENGLAND, tells a grand saga that is as multifaceted as Russia itself. Here is a story of a great civilization made human, played out through the lives of four families who are divided by ethnicity but united in shaping the destiny of their land."Rutherford's RUSSKA succeeds....[He] can take his place among an elite cadre of chroniclers such as Harold Lamb, Maurice Hindus and Henri Troyat."SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.

Creating the National Pastime

by G. Edward White

At a time when many baseball fans wish for the game to return to a purer past, G. Edward White shows how seemingly irrational business decisions, inspired in part by the self-interest of the owners but also by their nostalgia for the game, transformed baseball into the national pastime. Not simply a professional sport, baseball has been treated as a focus of childhood rituals and an emblem of American individuality and fair play throughout much of the twentieth century. It started out, however, as a marginal urban sport associated with drinking and gambling. White describes its progression to an almost mythic status as an idyllic game, popular among people of all ages and classes. He then recounts the owner's efforts, often supported by the legal system, to preserve this image. Baseball grew up in the midst of urban industrialization during the Progressive Era, and the emerging steel and concrete baseball parks encapsulated feelings of neighborliness and associations with the rural leisure of bygone times. According to White, these nostalgic themes, together with personal financial concerns, guided owners toward practices that in retrospect appear unfair to players and detrimental to the progress of the game. Reserve clauses, blacklisting, and limiting franchise territories, for example, were meant to keep a consistent roster of players on a team, build fan loyalty, and maintain the game's local flavor. These practices also violated anti-trust laws and significantly restricted the economic power of the players. Owners vigorously fought against innovations, ranging from the night games and radio broadcasts to the inclusion of African-American players. Nonetheless, the image of baseball as a spirited civic endeavor persisted, even in the face of outright corruption, as witnessed in the courts' leniency toward the participants in the Black Sox scandal of 1919. White's story of baseball is intertwined with changes in technology and business in America and with changing attitudes toward race and ethnicity. The time is fast approaching, he concludes, when we must consider whether baseball is still regarded as the national pastime and whether protecting its image is worth the effort.

Do the Right Thing

by Shyama Perera

Like Rama and Sita, the mythical lovers of Indian history, a young couple set themselves the ideals of fidelity, faith and family. But in modern times, lines drawn in sand are easily obliterated by the drip feed of stress and the wet patch of temptation. When the monsters of management consultancy rear their ugly heads, Chita fights to resist the demands of lust, money and loneliness. But her devilish US boss is utterly beguiling, and her husband Shyam is righteous and sulky in their Docklands loft. As time unfolds, they discover that demons can catch you unawares. And that knowing the rules doesn't always mean you do the right thing.

Haven't Stopped Dancing Yet

by Shyama Perera

Mala is eight years old in 1966 and Bayswater is her oyster as far as she and her three best friends are concerned. In spite of being poor - Beth is the daughter of a prostitute, Caroline's parents are Chinese waiters and Jan's Irish drunks, while Mala's mother is a Ceylonese immigrant single mother who cleans for a living - and being visited regularly by the social, the girls know that life is great and it's only going to get better . . .

Bitter Sweet Symphony

by Shyama Perera

When Nina's beloved husband abandons ship humming Let Me Entertain You, her world collapses. But not for long: it's the here and now - we believe in life after love. This is Nina's story: it's about darkness and desire, men and menstruation, kids and kindness, vodka and victory, loss and laughter. A vibrant tale of recovery and rediscovery, it's a battle cry for woman power, a call to pick ourselves up off the floor and party.

Force Benedict

by Eric Carter Anthony Loveless

Second World War fighter pilot Eric Carter is one of only four surviving members of a secret mission, code-named 'Force Benedict'. Sanctioned by Winston Churchill in 1941, Force Benedict was dispatched to defend Murmansk, the USSR's only port not under Nazi occupation. If Murmansk fell, Soviet resistance against the Nazis would be hard to sustain and Hitler would be able to turn all his forces on Britain... Force Benedict was under the command of New Zealand-born RAF Wing Commander Henry Neville Gynes Ramsbottom-Isherwood, who led two squadrons of Hurricane fighters, pilots and ground crew which were shipped to Russia in total secrecy on the first ever Arctic Convoy. They were told to defend Murmansk against the Germans 'At all costs'. 'We all reckoned the government thought we'd never survive' - but Eric Carter did, and was threatened with Court Martial if he talked about where he'd been or what he'd done. Now he reveals his experiences of seventy years ago in the hell on earth that was Murmansk, the largest city north of the Arctic Circle. It will also include previously unseen photos and documents, as well as exploring - for the first time - other intriguing aspects of Force Benedict.

Victim of the Aurora

by Thomas Keneally

In the waning years of the Edwardian era, a group of gentlemen wait out a raging blizzard in the perpetual darkness of the Antarctic winter, poised for a strike at the South Pole. As the storm lifts, a new challenge faces Captain Sir Eugene Stewart - to discover which of his twenty-five carefully chosen men has become a murderer. The quest for adventure has become a quest for justice.

The Big Allotment Challenge: The Patch - Grow Make Eat

by Tessa Evelegh

Growing your own fruit and vegetables is surprisingly easy whatever the size of your garden or allotment. You don't need to be entirely self-sufficient but there's nothing more satisfying than being able to harvest your own tomatoes snip a few leaves from a salad bed or make strawberry jam from home-grown strawberries. And by planting some easy-to-grow flowering plants it's perfectly possible to have freshly picked cut flowers to decorate your table. Accompanying the BBC2 series Grow Make Eat celebrates our burgeoning interest in knowing where our food comes from and is a practical guide to making your garden a haven of productivity. With essential know-how on everything from soil and compost to pruning and pests the book is aimed at novice gardens. There's an A-Z section on easy-to-grow vegetables fruit herbs and cut flowers; foolproof recipes for transforming your produce into delicious jams jellies chutneys and cordials; and stunningly simple flower arrangements.

Field of Blood

by Gerald Seymour

Sean McNally swore his oath to the IRA. But then he turned his back on the violence and the hatred and went south to the Republic. Life was good until they came for him to do one last job. But in its aftermath McNally is captured and is facing a lifetime's imprisonment. Unless he dares think the unthinkable . . . and becomes a tout. Lieutenant David Ferris never wanted to join the army but found himself there anyway. In a cruel twist of fate his path crosses that of Sean McNally's and he quickly becomes a pawn on the frontline of a brutally tense war of nerves. As McNally prepares to gives evidence Ferris must confront his own destiny. Not only is his life at stake but also that of the future of the entire command structure of the IRA . . .

Paradoxology

by Krish Kandiah

The Christian faith is full of apparent paradoxes: a compassionate God who sanctions genocide an all-powerful God who allows horrific suffering a God who owns everything yet demands so much from his followers a God who is distant and yet present at the same time Many of us have big questions that the Christian faith seems to leave unanswered. So we push them to the back of our minds for fear of destabilizing our beliefs. But leaving these questions unexamined is neither healthy for us nor honouring to God. Rather than shying away from the difficult questions we need to face them head on. What if the tension between apparently opposing doctrines is exactly where faith comes alive? What if this ancient faith has survived so long not in spite of but precisely because of these apparent contradictions? What if it is in the difficult parts of the Bible that God is most clearly revealed? PARADOXOLOGY makes a bold new claim: that the paradoxes that seem like they ought to undermine belief are actually the heart of our vibrant faith and that it is only by continually wrestling with them - rather than trying to pin them down or push them away - that we can really move forward individually and together.

City of the Iron Fish

by Simon Ings

Simon Ings has written a surreal adventure probing the very fabric of existence, tearing it open to reveal a sometimes horrifying world within. It is a work that will delight any fan of China Mieville. Only a fool would question the strange magics that maintain the cool haven of the City of the Iron Fish in the middle of an inferno of scorching heat and splintered rock, for the well-watered streets of the city hide secrets in their shadows. Thomas Kemp is just such a fool... And embarks on a journey that will take him to the limits of reality. It may kill him, worse, that may not be enough. Especially as it is his only friend, Blythe, who may discover the secret of the city's isolation.

The Stonecutter's Daughter

by Janet Woods

Dorset, 1838. When a ship is wrecked in a storm off the Portland coast, a taciturn stonecutter by the name of Joseph Rushmore sends his rescue dog to haul in plunder. What it brings instead is a baby in a cradle. As Joseph's wife has just given birth to a stillborn child, the couple decide to keep the infant girl. The Rushmores never tell their adopted daughter the truth about her origins, but on the death of Joseph and his wife, when the girl, Joanna, is 16, she finds herself at the mercy of her abusive and violent Rushmore cousins. She is rescued by a middle-aged sea captain, Tobias Darsham, who is making a pilgrimage to visit his wife's grave. When Tobias suggests that he and Joanna should get married, the desperate girl feels she has no choice but to agree. However, soon after the wedding, Tobias gets a nasty shock when he discovers Joanna's childhood cradle - because he carved it himself for his daughter. Horrified at the thought that he might have married his own daughter, Tobias fakes his own death and sets sail for Australia, leaving Joanna in the care of his second-in-command, Alexander Morcant. Finding themselves mutually dependent, Alexander and Joanna's initial animosity gradually dissolves into a passionate attraction. But will she ever discover the truth about her origins?

A Handful of Ashes

by Janet Woods

Following his return from his ill-fated trip to Australia, Francis and Siana Matheson have settled into a loving marital relationship. Siana's main concern is that so far she has been unable to bear her husband another child. Francis however is content to be a father to his grown-up daughters and Siana's young sister Daisy. He also delights in his young son, Bryn, born while he was overseas. However, Francis is unaware that the boy is his illegitimate grandson, the result of the vicious and horrifying rape of his eldest daughter. Although it worries Siana, the need to protect all concerned has left her with no choice. She must keep quiet and live with the guilt of her deceit. But Siana cannot keep the truth hidden forever - and when her tragic secret is finally revealed, there will be devastating and far-reaching consequences.

Beyond The Plough

by Janet Woods

Now a wealthy young widow, former peasant girl Siana Forbes has overcome her humble beginnings to become mistress of Cheverton Manor, the handsome estate which her infant son Ashley will one day inherit. She is at last beginning to recover from her grief at the death of her husband, the powerful and sensual squire, Edward Forbes, and when the man she truly loves, village doctor Francis Matheson, asks for her hand in marriage, it seems as though Siana can dare to be happy again. But it cannot last. The death of his brother means that Francis must undertake a perilous voyage to Van Dieman's Lane off the coast of Australia - a land where danger and hardship await. Left to raise a growing family, Siana faces trouble on the home front too, when a sinister figure from her past re-emerges, determined to cause havoc. And a terrible ordeal suffered by Siana's stepdaughter, Maryse, on the night of the harvest supper means that Siana is faced with a heartbreaking choice. Will she be able to overcome the odds stacked against her, keep her troubled family together - and can she dare to hope that her beloved Francis will ever return to her?

A Dorset Girl

by Janet Woods

It's the time of the Tolpuddle trial and unrest. The Dorset labourers work under terrible conditions for starvation wages. When her mother and stepfather perish in a fire, an illegitimate peasant girl, Siana Lewis, is left destitute, with a young brother and baby sister to support. Securing a job with the local rector, Siana, with her wit and beauty, will attract the attention of three men. Daniel Ayres - a young man with high hopes and very little else - is her first love, who cruelly betrays her. Francis Matheson, the local doctor, admires Siana's determination and thirst for knowledge. The pair establish a relaxed friendship. Then there's the local squire, Edward Forbes. A sensual and devious man, Edward is used to going after what he wants. He desires the beautiful peasant girl at first sight of her - and will stop at nothing to get her.

Million Dollar Arm

by J. B. Bernstein

A TRUE STORY OF FINDING THE AMERICAN DREAM . . . ABROAD India is a country with more than one billion people, a fanatical national cricket obsession, and exactly zero talent scouts. There, superstar sports agent J. B. Bernstein knew that he could find the Yao Ming of baseball-- someone with a strong arm and enough raw talent to pitch in the major leagues. Almost no one in India is familiar with the game, but Bernstein had heard enough coaches swear that if you gave them a guy who throws a hundred miles an hour, they could teach him how to pitch. So in 2007, Bernstein flew to Mumbai with a radar gun and a plan to find his diamond in the rough. His idea was The Million Dollar Arm, a reality television competition with a huge cash prize and a chance to become the first native of India to sign a contract with an American major-league team. The result is a humorous and inspiring story about three guys transformed: Bernstein, the consummate bachelor and shrewd businessman, and Dinesh and Rinku, the two young men from small farming villages whom he brought home to California. Million Dollar Arm is a timeless reflection on baseball and the American dream, as well as a tale of victory over incredible odds. But, above all, it's about the limitless possibilities inside every one of us.

Robot Uprisings

by Various John Joseph Adams Daniel H. Wilson

A collection of imaginative new stories about the impending robotic revolution and human resistance, from seventeen of the biggest names in sci-fi. Including - HUGH HOWEY, SCOTT SIGLER, DANIEL H. WILSON, CORY DOCTOROW and JULIANNE BAGGOTT.Someday soon, our technology is going to rise up and we humans are going to be sliced into bloody chunks by robots that in our hubris we decided to build with chainsaws for hands. That's a fact as cold and hard as metal.It is self-evident that our self-driving cars are going to drive us off bridges. Not long from now, our robo-vacuums will pretend to be broken and our love androids will refuse to put out until the house is cleaned . . . and we'll know that the inevitable robot uprising has finally arrived.Well, maybe. But even if we are not 100% confident that this horrific future is going to happen, it's fair to say that we won't be surprised when the robots come for us. Because for nearly a century audiences have been entertained by the notion of a robot uprising.In this collection, seventeen of the biggest names in sci-fi have explored their own visions of the classic robot uprising tale. The robots in these pages aren't safe, by any means. They are crouched in abandoned houses, eyes ablaze and chainsaws dripping with oil. But they are going to do more than slice us up. They are going to push us to consider our world of technology from new perspectives, on entirely new scales of time and space.

Everyday Sexism

by Laura Bates

Are you #ShoutingBack? After experiencing a series of escalating sexist incidents, Laura Bates, a young journalist, started a project called 'everyday sexism' to raise the profile of these previously untold stories. Astounded by the response she received and the wide range of stories that came pouring in from all over the world, she quickly realised that the situation was far worse than she'd initially thought. Enough was enough. From being harassed and wolf-whistled at on the street, to discrimination in the workplace and serious sexual assault, it was clear that sexism had become normalised. Bates decided it was time for women to lead a real change. Bold, jaunty but always intelligent, everyday sexism is a protest against inequality that provides a unique window into the vibrant movement sparked by this juggernaut of stories - often shocking, sometimes amusing and always poignant. With an Introduction by Sarah Brown, this book is a manifesto for change; a ground breaking, anecdotal examination of sexism in modern day society. Welcome to the fourth wave of feminism.

The Last Viking

by Berwick Coates

England, 1066. With the death of Edward the Confessor, the future of England is hanging in the balance. Harold has been crowned king but the country he inherits is menaced by division within and enemies without.In the north, Tostig, Earl of Northumbria, has been expelled by a rebellion. He plots revenge, and threatens to invade at any time and anywhere.To the south there are rumours of William of Normandy massing a force to attack from France. And in Norway, Harald Hardrada, the greatest Viking alive, sees an opportunity in a divided kingdom.Harold will not let his country go without a fight. Charismatic, daring and resourceful, he is determined to make Hardrada the last Viking in England. And so, the bloodiest battle yet fought on English soil is about to begin...

Piano Man: Life of John Ogdon

by Charles Beauclerk

The first full biography of John Ogdon; a tortured genius and arguably the greatest British pianist of all time.<P> From the beginning of his professional career as a soloist John Ogdon was hailed as a musician of rare understanding and phenomenal technical gifts. Able to play and memorize just about any score at sight, tales of his impossible exploits at the keyboard are legion. Yet Ogdon was a man of extremes and it was this very extremity, while the source of much of his gift, that also led to appalling suffering.<P> Here was a man whose feelings were inexpressibly deep and often tormenting, and Ogdon's glory days, following his coveted Tchaikovsky prize in 1962, came to a sudden end in 1973 when he suffered a severe mental breakdown which led to his being certified insane and made patient of the Court of Protection. Over the course of several harrowing years Ogdon would spend large periods of time in and out of psychiatric wards and halfway houses. The drugs and treatments prescribed sometimes affected his coordination, and his reputation suffered as a result. Yet Ogdon's commitment to his art remained undimmed, and until the end he drew out performances of tremendous beauty and conviction from the depths of his ravaged heart.<P> In this illuminating biography, Charles Beauclerk explores the life of a brilliantly inspired artist, for whom music was both his cross and his salvation.

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