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Delphi Cookbook - Second Edition

by Daniele Teti

Over 60 hands-on recipes to help you master the power of Delphi for cross-platform and mobile development on multiple platforms About This Book * Get to grips with Delphi to build and deploy various cross-platform applications * Design, develop, and deploy real-world applications by implementing a single source codebase * This swift guide will increase your productivity to develop applications with Delphi Who This Book Is For If you are an intermediate developer with a basic knowledge of Delphi and you want to develop cross-platform applications, then this book is for you. Familiarity with the fundamentals of RAD (Rapid Application Development) Studio is expected. What You Will Learn * Develop visually stunning applications using FireMonkey * Deploy LiveBinding effectively with the right OOP approach * Create server-side programs to serve RESTful web services and provide data to your mobile apps * Use well-defined GUI design patterns to build mobile applications that provide a great user experience * Build mobile apps that read data from a remote server efficiently * Call the platform native API on Android and iOS even for an unpublished API * Manage software customization for your customer by making better use of an extended RTTI * Implement the most popular design pattern without wasting too much time on debugging and bug fixing In Detail Delphi is a cross-platform Integrated Development Environment (IDE) that supports rapid application development for Microsoft Windows, Apple Mac OS X, Google Android, and Apple iOS. It helps you to concentrate on the real business and save yourself the pain of wandering amid GUI widget details, or having to tackle inter-platform incompatibilities. It also has a wide range of drag-and-drop controls, helping you code your business logic into your business model, and it compiles natively for desktop and mobile platforms. This book will teach you how to design and develop applications, deploy them on the cloud platform, and distribute them within an organization via Google Play and other similar platforms. You will begin with the basics of Delphi and get acquainted with JSON format strings, XSLT transformations, unicode encodings and various types of streams. We then move on to more advanced topics such as developing higher-order functions and using enumerators and RTTI. You will get an understanding of how Delphi RTL functions and how to use FireMonkey in a VCL application. We will then cover topics such as multithreading, using the parallel programming library and putting Delphi on a server. We will also take a look at the new feature of WebBroker Apache modules and then ride the mobile revolution with FireMonkey. By the end of the book, you will be able to develop and deploy cross-platform applications using Delphi. Style and approach Delphi Cookbook is an easy-to-follow guide, rich with hands-on examples of real-world programming tasks in Delphi.

Texas on My Mind

by Delores Fossen

The McCord Brothers are the most eligible bachelors in Spring Hill, Texas. But these cowboys are about to get wrangled by the love of some very unique women-the kind who can melt hearts and lay it all on the line. Air force captain Riley McCord has come home on medical leave to find one heck of a welcome reception. Every unattached woman in Spring Hill, Texas, wants to nurse him back to health. That includes his childhood friend Claire Davidson-the only person who understands how damaged he really feels. In high school, she chose his best friend over him. According to Riley's rules, that should make her off-limits forever. But when Claire suggests a no-strings fling, he can't refuse. Claire always wanted Riley-but she also craved the safety and stability he couldn't offer. So she chose another path, only to end up crazier about him than ever. She's even convinced herself that this time she won't be devastated when he leaves. Yet once Riley realizes the depth of Claire's feelings-and his own-he'll have to make the ultimate choice: return to the job he loves or stay home for the woman who's always lived in his heart.

Getting to Work on Summer Learning: Recommended Practices for Success

by Laura Zakaras Catherine H. Augustine Jennifer Sloan Mccombs Heather L. Schwartz

RAND is conducting a longitudinal study that evaluates the effectiveness of voluntary summer learning programs in reducing summer learning loss, which contributes substantially to the achievement gap between low- and higher-income students. Based on evaluations of programs in six school districts, this second report in a series provides research-based advice for school district leaders as they create and strengthen summer programs.

Hard Sell: Work and Resistance in Retail Chains

by Peter Ikeler

Along with fast-food workers, retail workers are capturing the attention of the public and the media with the Fight for $15. Like fast-food workers, retail workers are underpaid, and fewer than 5 percent of them belong to unions. In Hard Sell, Peter Ikeler traces the low-wage, largely nonunion character of U.S. retail through the history and ultimate failure of twentieth-century retail unionism. He asks pivotal questions about twenty-first-century capitalism: Does the nature of retail work make collective action unlikely? Can working conditions improve in the absence of a union? Is worker consciousness changing in ways that might encourage or further inhibit organizing? Ikeler conducted interviews at New York City locations of two iconic department stores--Macy's and Target. Much of the book's narrative unfolds from the perspectives of these workers in America's most unequal city.When he speaks to workers, Ikeler finds that the Macy's organization displays an adversarial relationship between workers and managers and that Target is infused with a "teamwork" message that enfolds both parties. Macy's workers identify more with their jobs and are more opposed to management, yet Target workers show greater solidarity. Both groups, however, are largely unhappy with the pay and precariousness of their jobs. Combined with workplace-generated feelings of unity and resistance, these grievances provide promising inroads to organizing that could help take the struggle against inequality beyond symbolic action to real economic power.

Jerry Thomas' Bartenders Guide: How to Mix All Kinds of Plain and Fancy Drinks

by Jerry Thomas

Care for a Morning Glory Cocktail, a Blue Blazer, or a Philadelphia Julep? Recipes for these and hundreds of other tasty libations appear in this landmark volume. Originally published in 1862, Jerry Thomas' Bartenders Guide is widely considered by drink historians as the first serious American book on cocktails and punches. "A new beverage is the pride of the bartender, and its appreciation and adoption his crowning glory," declared Jerry Thomas (1830-85), the most famous bartender of his era. Known as "the father of American mixology," Thomas developed the showy techniques practiced at his saloons throughout California and New York. From hot whiskey toddies to wedding punch to "temperance drinks," this extensive compilation of timeless recipes will delight modern-day mixologists and their guests. "There are so many bartending recipes in this book, it's doubtful you'll need any other guide." -- The Paperback Stash.

Scouting for Boys: The Original 1908 Edition

by Robert Baden-Powell

Written by Robert Baden-Powell, Lieutenant General in the British Army and founder of the international Scouting movement, Scouting for Boys is one of the most influential manuals for youth ever published. First printed in 1908, it remains an all-time bestseller in the English-speaking world, second only to the Bible. The original blueprint and "self-instructor" of the Boy Scout Movement, Scouting for Boys is a fascinating fusion of "yarns and pictures," an irresistible mixture of nationalistic narrative, tracker legend, and quotations from Baden-Powell's own autobiography and the popular adventure fiction of Rudyard Kipling, James Fenimore Cooper, and Alexander Dumas. The book provides practical advice on lighting fires, building boats and stalking animals, alongside proper Victorian-era education on chivalry and manners, self-discipline and improvement, and above all, good citizenship. Expounding upon the topics intrinsic to the life of a scout -- tracking, woodcraft, camp life, endurance, patriotism, and more -- this classic is essential for anyone interested in popular culture and the history of scouting and youth education. Ninety original diagrams and illustrations enhance the text.

Let Them Play: The Power & Joy of Mindful Sports Parenting

by Jerry Lynch

American youth sports are in crisis: Parents are fighting with referees, coaches, their kids, and one another. Micromanaged kids are losing their passion to play. In Let Them Play, sports psychologist and team consultant Dr. Jerry Lynch provides an antidote to parental overinvolvement. Combining psychological insight with spiritual principles from Taoism and Buddhism, Lynch lays out core principles to help parents achieve equanimity and provide healthy direction for their kids. He gives parents strategies and tools taken from his work with national champions to help kids to perform at higher levels, become better team players, and most important, have more fun. Filled with easy-to-implement advice, Let Them Play will empower your athletic child to be mentally strong for sports and life.

Dropping the Struggle: Seven Ways to Love the Life You Have

by Roger Housden

Is it possible to fully accept, even love, the life you have? Is it possible to drop the struggle to make yourself and your life different? Acclaimed teacher and bestselling author Roger Housden says yes in this profound alternative to nonstop striving and self-criticism. Whether about our relationships, careers, or spirituality, many of us judge ourselves as not measuring up. But fulfillment comes when we stop struggling and learn to trust the wisdom of what life presents us with. Housden wrote Dropping the Struggle as someone who, up until a few years ago, spent much of his time in a covert struggle with life. Despite his success, he often felt that something was missing. He struggled for years with an ongoing spiritual longing, with questions of meaning and purpose, with the search for love, with all the usual difficulties of being human, until he finally realized -- though not with his thinking mind -- that the only thing life was asking of him was to rest in a deeper knowing that was always there, usually silently, behind the arguments and strategies that would so commonly occupy his conscious self. "Struggle will never get us the things we want most," Housden writes, "love; meaning; presence; freedom from anxiety over the past and future; contentment with ourselves exactly as we are, imperfections and all; the acceptance of our mortality -- because these things lie outside the ego's domain. For these, we need another way. That way begins and ends in surrender, in letting go of our resistance to life as it presents itself."

George Washington, Nationalist

by Edward J. Larson

George Washington was the unanimous choice of his fellow founders for president, and he is remembered to this day as an exceptional leader, but how exactly did this manifest itself during his lifetime? In George Washington, Nationalist, acclaimed author Edward J. Larson reveals the fascinating backstory of Washington's leadership in the political, legal, and economic consolidation of the new nation, spotlighting his crucial role in forming a more perfect union. The years following the American Revolution were a critical period in American history, when the newly independent states teetered toward disunion under the Articles of Confederation. Looking at a selection of Washington's most pivotal acts--including conferring with like-minded nationalists, establishing navigational rights on the Potomac, and quelling the near uprising of unpaid revolutionary troops against the Confederation Congress--Larson shows Washington's central role in the drive for reform leading up to the Constitutional Convention. His leadership at that historic convention, followed by his mostly behind-the-scenes efforts in the ratification process and the first federal election, and culminating in his inauguration as president, complete the picture of Washington as the nation's first citizen. This important and deeply researched book brings Washington's unique gift for leadership to life for modern readers, offering a timely addition to the growing body of literature on the Constitution, presidential leadership, executive power, and state-federal relations.Gay Hart Gaines Distinguished LecturesPreparation of this volume has been supported by The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon and by a gift from Mr. and Mrs. Lewis E. Lehrman.

Doing Development in West Africa: A Reader by and for Undergraduates

by Charles Piot

In recent years the popularity of service learning and study abroad programs that bring students to the global South has soared, thanks to this generation of college students' desire to make a positive difference in the world. This collection contains essays by undergraduates who recount their experiences in Togo working on projects that established health insurance at a local clinic, built a cyber café, created a microlending program for teens, and started a local writers group. The essays show students putting their optimism to work while learning that paying attention to local knowledge can make all the difference in a project's success. Students also conducted research on global health topics by examining the complex relationships between traditional healing practices and biomedicine. Charles Piot's introduction contextualizes student-initiated development within the history of development work in West Africa since 1960, while his epilogue provides an update on the projects, compiles an inventory of best practices, and describes the types of project that are likely to succeed. Doing Development in West Africa provides a relatable and intimate look into the range of challenges, successes, and failures that come with studying abroad in the global South.Contributors. Cheyenne Allenby, Kelly Andrejko, Connor Cotton, Allie Middleton, Caitlin Moyles, Charles Piot, Benjamin Ramsey, Maria Cecilia Romano, Stephanie Rotolo, Emma Smith, Sarah Zimmerman

Ghost Protocol: Development and Displacement in Global China

by Carlos Rojas Ralph A. Litzinger

Even as China is central to the contemporary global economy, its socialist past continues to shape its capitalist present. This volume's contributors see contemporary China as haunted by the promises of capitalism, the institutional legacy of the Maoist regime, and the spirit of Marxist resistance. China's development does not result from historical imperatives or deliberate economic strategies, but from the effects of discrete practices the contributors call protocols, which stem from an overlapping mix of socialist and capitalist institutional strategies, political procedures, legal regulations, religious rituals, and everyday practices. Analyzing the process of urbanization and the ways marginalized communities and migrant workers are positioned in relation to the transforming social landscape, the contributors show how these protocols constitute the Chinese national imaginary while opening spaces for new emancipatory possibilities. Offering a nuanced theory of contemporary China's hybrid political economy, Ghost Protocol situates China's development at the juncture between the world as experienced and the world as imagined.Contributors Yomi Braester, Alexander Des Forges, Kabzung, Rachel Leng, Ralph A. Litzinger, Lisa Rofel, Carlos Rojas, Bryan Tilt, Robin Visser, Biao Xiang, Emily T. Yeh

Radiation Brain Moms and Citizen Scientists: The Gender Politics of Food Contamination after Fukushima

by Aya Hirata Kimura

Following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in 2011 many concerned citizens--particularly mothers--were unconvinced by the Japanese government's assurances that the country's food supply was safe. They took matters into their own hands, collecting their own scientific data that revealed radiation-contaminated food. In Radiation Brain Moms and Citizen Scientists Aya Hirata Kimura shows how, instead of being praised for their concern about their communities' health and safety, they faced stiff social sanctions, which dismissed their results by attributing them to the work of irrational and rumor-spreading women who lacked scientific knowledge. These citizen scientists were unsuccessful at gaining political traction, as they were constrained by neoliberal and traditional gender ideologies that dictated how private citizens--especially women--should act. By highlighting the challenges these citizen scientists faced, Kimura provides insights into the complicated relationship between science, foodways, gender, and politics in post-Fukushima Japan and beyond.

Flight or Fight

by Dirk Greyson

Life in the big city wasn't what Mackenzie "Mack" Redford expected, and now he's come home to Hartwick County, South Dakota, to serve as sheriff. Brantley Calderone is looking for a new life. After leaving New York and buying a ranch, he's settling in and getting used to living at a different pace--until he finds a dead woman on his porch and himself the prime suspect in her murder. Mack and Brantley quickly realize several things: someone is trying to frame Brantley; he is no longer safe alone on his ranch; and there's a definite attraction developing between them, one that only increases when Mack offers to let Brantley stay in his home. But as their romance escalates, so does the killer. They'll have to stay one step ahead and figure out who wants Brantley dead before it's too late. Only then can they start the life they're both seeking--together.

Unbreak My Heart

by K-Lee Klein

2nd EditionBrett Taylor's world collapsed three years ago when he lost the love of his life. Almost as bad as the grief is the advice he's starting to get from everyone and their brother, telling him it's time to move on. They're flat-out wrong. He left his career as a musician and escaped to his ranch because he needs the peace and quiet, and he's doing just fine. He doesn't want anyone invading his memory-filled, booze-fueled solitude. JT Campbell's world has been defined by his parents' money, status, and his own empty relationships, until he's desperately sick of it. A quest to find something meaningful leads him to Brett's failing ranch. It's supposed to be a brief stay. JT never wanted to be anyone's savior or compete with the ghosts of lovers past. Still, he can't help wanting this gruff and grieving man. JT's mind knows it's a bad idea, but his heart keeps pushing him to find out what lies beneath Brett's rough and broken exterior. Brett's not going to make it easy. JT can only be patient, keep his sense of humor, and hope for the day he may be allowed far enough into Brett's world to unbreak his heart.First Edition published by Amber Quill Press, 2013.

North Star

by Posy Roberts

Hugo and Kevin were best friends and secret lovers in high school, but a chance meeting years later proves that the spark that drew them together before is still there. In Spark, Hugo and Kevin must try to put together a relationship while overcoming the obstacles of coming out, divorce and children. In Fusion, an unexpected illness may tear apart all they've been building. And in Flare, though they've finally settled together happily, outside forces are working hard to upset their family.See excerpt for individual blurbs.

Gringo Gulch: Sex, Tourism, and Social Mobility in Costa Rica

by Megan Rivers-Moore

The story of sex tourism in the Gringo Gulch neighborhood of San José, Costa Rica could be easily cast as the exploitation of poor local women by privileged North American men--men who are in a position to take advantage of the vast geopolitical inequalities that make Latin American women into suppliers of low-cost sexual labor. But in Gringo Gulch, Megan Rivers-Moore tells a more nuanced story, demonstrating that all the actors intimately entangled in the sex tourism industry--sex workers, sex tourists, and the state--use it as a strategy for getting ahead. Rivers-Moore situates her ethnography at the intersections of gender, race, class, and national dimensions in the sex industry. Instead of casting sex workers as hapless victims and sex tourists as neoimperialist racists, she reveals each group as involved in a complicated process of class mobility that must be situated within the sale and purchase of leisure and sex. These interactions operate within an almost entirely unregulated but highly competitive market beyond the reach of the state--bringing a distinctly neoliberal cast to the market. Throughout the book, Rivers-Moore introduces us to remarkable characters--Susan, a mother of two who doesn't regret her career of sex work; Barry, a teacher and father of two from Virginia who travels to Costa Rica to escape his loveless, sexless marriage; Nancy, a legal assistant in the Department of Labor who is shocked to find out that prostitution is legal and still unregulated. Gringo Gulch is a fascinating and groundbreaking look at sex tourism, Latin America, and the neoliberal state.

Down, Out, and Under Arrest: Policing and Everyday Life in Skid Row

by Forrest Stuart

In his first year working in Los Angeles's Skid Row, Forrest Stuart was stopped on the street by police fourteen times. Usually for doing little more than standing there. Juliette, a woman he met during that time, has been stopped by police well over one hundred times, arrested upward of sixty times, and has given up more than a year of her life serving week-long jail sentences. Her most common crime? Simply sitting on the sidewalk--an arrestable offense in LA. Why? What purpose did those arrests serve, for society or for Juliette? How did we reach a point where we've cut support for our poorest citizens, yet are spending ever more on policing and prisons? That's the complicated, maddening story that Stuart tells in Down, Out and Under Arrest, a close-up look at the hows and whys of policing poverty in the contemporary United States. What emerges from Stuart's years of fieldwork--not only with Skid Row residents, but with the police charged with managing them--is a tragedy built on mistakes and misplaced priorities more than on heroes and villains. He reveals a situation where a lot of people on both sides of this issue are genuinely trying to do the right thing, yet often come up short. Sometimes, in ways that do serious harm. At a time when distrust between police and the residents of disadvantaged neighborhoods has never been higher, Stuart's book helps us see where we've gone wrong, and what steps we could take to begin to change the lives of our poorest citizens--and ultimately our society itself--for the better.

The Everything Dutch Oven Cookbook: Includes Overnight French Toast, Roasted Vegetable Lasagna, Chili with Cheesy Jalapeno Corn Bread, Char Siu Pork Ribs, Salted Caramel Apple Crumble...and Hundreds More!

by Kelly Jaggers

Easy, inventive, and delicious recipes for the most versatile pot in the kitchen! Are you a fan of Dutch oven cooking and searching for some new recipes to put on the table? Your search ends here. The Everything Dutch Oven Cookbook features 300 recipes for easy-to-prepare dishes for all occasions, including:Overnight French ToastBeef StroganoffClam and Potato ChowderChinese Vegetables in Brown SauceRoasted Chickpeas and ZucchiniStone Fruit Stew with ShortbreadWarm Chocolate Pudding CakeAlso featured is comprehensive information about how to select and care for cast-iron and enameled Dutch ovens. This guide is your ultimate resource for creative, delicious, and effortless one-pot meals.

Live from Dar es Salaam: Popular Music and Tanzania's Music Economy

by Alex Perullo

When socialism collapsed in Tanzania, the government-controlled music industry gave way to a vibrant independent music scene. Alex Perullo explores the world of the bands, music distributors, managers, and clubs that attest to the lively and creative music industry in Dar es Salaam. Perullo examines the formation of the city's music economy, considering the means of musical production, distribution, protection, broadcasting, and performance. He exposes both legal and illegal strategies for creating business opportunities employed by entrepreneurs who battle government restrictions and give flight to their musical aspirations. This is a singular look at the complex music landscape in one of Africa's most dynamic cities.

Moral Imagination

by David Bromwich

Spanning many historical and literary contexts, Moral Imagination brings together a dozen recent essays by one of America's premier cultural critics. David Bromwich explores the importance of imagination and sympathy to suggest how these faculties may illuminate the motives of human action and the reality of justice. These wide-ranging essays address thinkers and topics from Gandhi and Martin Luther King on nonviolent resistance, to the dangers of identity politics, to the psychology of the heroes of classic American literature. Bromwich demonstrates that moral imagination allows us to judge the right and wrong of actions apart from any benefit to ourselves, and he argues that this ability is an innate individual strength, rather than a socially conditioned habit. Political topics addressed here include Edmund Burke and Richard Price's efforts to define patriotism in the first year of the French Revolution, Abraham Lincoln's principled work of persuasion against slavery in the 1850s, the erosion of privacy in America under the influence of social media, and the use of euphemism to shade and anesthetize reactions to the global war on terror. Throughout, Bromwich considers the relationship between language and power, and the insights language may offer into the corruptions of power.Moral Imagination captures the singular voice of one of the most forceful thinkers working in America today.

Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum: How Humans Took Control of Climate

by William F. Ruddiman

The impact on climate from 200 years of industrial development is an everyday fact of life, but did humankind's active involvement in climate change really begin with the industrial revolution, as commonly believed?Plows, Plagues, and Petroleumhas sparked lively scientific debate since it was first published--arguing that humans have actually been changing the climate for some 8,000 years--as a result of the earlier discovery of agriculture. The "Ruddiman Hypothesis" will spark intense debate. We learn that the impact of farming on greenhouse-gas levels, thousands of years before the industrial revolution, kept our planet notably warmer than if natural climate cycles had prevailed--quite possibly forestalling a new ice age. Plows, Plagues, and Petroleumis the first book to trace the full historical sweep of human interaction with Earth's climate. Ruddiman takes us through three broad stages of human history: when nature was in control; when humans began to take control, discovering agriculture and affecting climate through carbon dioxide and methane emissions; and, finally, the more recent human impact on climate change. Along the way he raises the fascinating possibility that plagues, by depleting human populations, also affected reforestation and thus climate--as suggested by dips in greenhouse gases when major pandemics have occurred. While our massive usage of fossil fuels has certainly contributed to modern climate change, Ruddiman shows that industrial growth is only part of the picture. The book concludes by looking to the future and critiquing the impact of special interest money on the global warming debate. In a new afterword, Ruddiman explores the main challenges posed to his hypothesis, and shows how recent investigations and findings ultimately strengthen the book's original claims.

Front Lines: Soldiers' Writing in the Early Modern Hispanic World

by Miguel Martínez

In Front Lines, Miguel Martínez documents the literary practices of imperial Spain's common soldiers. Against all odds, these Spanish soldiers produced, distributed, and consumed a remarkably innovative set of works on war that have been almost completely neglected in literary and historical scholarship. The soldiers of Italian garrisons and North African presidios, on colonial American frontiers and in the traveling military camps of northern Europe read and wrote epic poems, chronicles, ballads, pamphlets, and autobiographies--the stories of the very same wars in which they participated as rank-and-file fighters and witnesses. The vast network of agents and spaces articulated around the military institutions of an ever-expanding and struggling Spanish empire facilitated the global circulation of these textual materials, creating a soldierly republic of letters that bridged the Old and the many New Worlds of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.Martínez asserts that these writing soldiers played a key role in the shaping of Renaissance literary culture, which for its part gave to them the language and forms with which to question received notions of the social logic of warfare, the ethics of violence, and the legitimacy of imperial aggression. Soldierly writing often voiced criticism of established hierarchies and exploitative working conditions, forging solidarities among the troops that often led to mutiny and massive desertion. It is the perspective of these soldiers that grounds Front Lines, a cultural history of Spain's imperial wars as told by the common men who fought them.

Best Gay Erotica 2012

by Richard Labonté

Called "consistently outstanding" by the Lambda Book Review and cited for "glorious approaches to gay male sexual writing, " by the Harvard Gay and Lesbian Review, Richard Labonte's Best Gay Erotica series sets and raises the bar in the 2012 volume. Gathering the hottest, freshest, and most literary fiction for the year, Best Gay Erotica 2012 captures the tenderness and raw energy of man-on-man desire. From the innocent but oh-so-beautiful boy next door to the "seen it all" gritty street hustler, these provocative and potent short stories will grab your attention and your erotic imagination.

Best Gay Romance 2011

by Richard Labonté

Richard Labonté is a self-confessed true romantic and it shows -- Best Gay Romance 2011 covers every romantic possibility with first love, true love, wake-up sex, makeup sex, and everything in between. Labonté has gathered a sensational collection of stories about finding love at home, at work, at any age, and often in the most unexpected places. Sometimes rowdy, always randy, and surprisingly tender, these tales celebrate the uniting of souls as well as bodies. Each story revels in romance, great sex, and characters who are fully fleshed out (in more ways than one). Whether happily ever after or a happy ending, Labonté continues to raise the bar on gay love stories with compulsively readable great writing on true romance.

The Look Book

by Richard B. Wright Kathleen Grissom Robert Pobi K. A. Tucker Susan Philpott Kristi Charish Sally Christie Iain Reid Joan Crate Amy Stuart Ann Y. Choi

Complete with new beginnings and the promise of satisfying endings, The Look Book sampler offers the best in fiction from across the Simon & Schuster Canada Spring 2016 list. This array of debut authors and perennial favourites will allow you to step back in time with our historical fiction, time travel with our fantasy writers, fall in love with our inspirational romance, marvel at our literary stylists, and be enthralled by our dark thrillers. If you would like to learn more about any of our authors or the titles featured, please visit us at SimonandSchuster.ca, follow us on Twitter at @simonschusterCA, or like us at Facebook.com/SimonandSchusterCanada. With chapter excerpts from the following Spring 2016 new releases: Dark Territory, by Susan Philpott He Will Be My Ruin, by K.A. Tucker Owl and the City of Angels, by Kristi Charish Black Apple, by Joan Crate Still Mine, by Amy Stuart Glory Over Everything, by Kathleen Grissom The Rivals of Versailles, by Sally Christie Kay's Lucky Coin Variety, by Ann Y.K. Choi Nightfall, by Richard B. Wright Mannheim Rex, by Rob Pobi I'm Thinking of Ending Things, by Iain Reid

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