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The Short, Happy Life of Harry Kumar

by Ashok Mathur

Ashok Mathur's debut novel, Once Upon an Elephant, was a hilarious murder mystery steeped in Hindu mythology and starring elephant-headed Hindu deity Ganesh.The Short, Happy Life of Harry Kumar, nominated for Best Book in the regional Commonwealth Writers Prize, continues Mathur's playful jaunt through mythology, this time blending the Hindu epic, the Ramayana, with the geography of Canada and Australia. Harry Kumar is an unlikely hero who finds himself vaulted into a globe-trotting quest to rescue his closest friend and confidant who's been kidnapped by a mysterious villain. With his travelling companion, a somewhat high-strung dog named Hanuman, Harry becomes embroiled in the odd politics that govern our world--and his own history. Harry travels a fantastic, twisting trail in search of a woman, his best friend and perhaps lover, in a twisting tale of fate and the backwards/forwards of time."A fine, subtle look at the ancient myth of Rama and Sita. . . . Mathur's decidedly feminist take on the Rama myth is decidedly unconventional."--Calgary Herald"A rich and multilayered story."--Georgia StraightPraise for Once Upon an Elephant:"Mathur's novel is as funny as it is smart. Once Upon an Elephant is wry, sly, and perfectly suited to the tusk, er, task, at hand."--Toronto Star"Whimsical. . . . The novel conjures up a cosmos of mirthful chaos. Mathur's debut is a comic celebration."--Vancouver Sun"Epic, shrewd, funny, convincing, sexed-up, and full of a kind of glittering gravitas."--Quill & QuireAshok Mathur teaches critical studies at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in Vancouver.

Stoney Creek Woman

by Bridget Moran

The captivating story of Mary John (who passed away in 2004), a pioneering Carrier Native whose life on the Stoney Creek reserve in central BC is a capsule history of First Nations life from a unique woman's perspective. A mother of twelve, Mary endured much tragedy and heartbreak--the pangs of racism, poverty, and the deaths of six children--but lived her life with extraordinary grace and courage. Years after her death, she continues to be a positive role model for Aboriginals across Canada. In 1997 she received the Order of Canada. This edition of Stoney Creek Woman, one of Arsenal's all-time bestsellers, includes a new preface by author Bridget Moran, and new photographs.Shortlisted for the Roderick Haig-Brown Regional PrizeNow in its 14th printing.

Resistance and Renewal

by Celia Haig-Brown

One of the first books published to deal with the phenomenon of residential schools in Canada, Resistance and Renewal is a disturbing collection of Native perspectives on the Kamloops Indian Residential School(KIRS) in the British Columbia interior. Interviews with thirteen Natives, all former residents of KIRS, form the nucleus of the book, a frank depiction of school life, and a telling account of the system's oppressive environment which sought to stifle Native culture.

O-bon in Chimunesu

by Catherine Lang

O-Bon in Chimunesu: A Community Remembered is a moving tribute to a community of Japanese-Canadians and the way they lived their lives.Prior to the Second World War, when Canada's official policy of internment changed the lives of Japanese-Canadians forever, the Vancouver Island town of Chemainus ("Chimunesu") was home to a thriving Japanese-Canadian community, whose members struggled to adapt to the difficulties of life in a new country, while at the same time keeping their own traditions alive. During the war, Japanese-Canadians on the west coast were shunted off to internment camps in the British Columbia interior, and were not permitted to return until 1949. Most decided to take up new roots elsewhere, and what had been a significant community in Chemainus was relegated to memory.Catherine Lang was a freelance reporter working on a story when she attended a 1991 reunion of Chemainus' former Japanese-Canadian community. The reunion occurred during O-bon, the annual Buddhist festival for the dead, in which burning candles light the way for the souls of ancestors. Lang couldn't resist such a meaningful encounter with living history.O-Bon in Chimunesu consists of poignant personal narratives of former residents of Chemainus' Japanese-Canadian community. They include the stories of Shige Yoshida, who after being refused entry into the Boy Scouts, formed his own troop, made up entirely of Japanese boys; Matsue Taniwa, who moved to Chemainus after an arranged marriage to raise children and tend a store; and Kaname Izumi, who remembers as a boy throwing candy from his boat to the children at the Native residential school on Kuper Island.Winner of the Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize

National Dreams

by Daniel Francis

As Canadians, we remember the stories told to us in high-school history class as condensed images of the past--the glorious Mountie, the fearsome Native, the Last Spike. National Dreams is an incisive study of the most persistent icons and stories in Canadian history, and how they inform our sense of national identity: the fundamental beliefs that we Canadians hold about ourselves. National Dreams is the story of our stories; the myths and truths of our collective past that we first learned in school, and which we carry throughout our adult lives as tangible evidence of what separates us from other nationalities. Francis examines various aspects of this national mythology, in which history is as much storytelling as fact. Textbooks were an important resource for Francis. "For me, these books are interesting not because they explain what actually happened to us, but because they explain what we think happened to us."For example, Francis documents how the legend of the CPR as a country-sustaining, national affirming monolity was created by the company itself--a group of capitalists celebrating the privately-owned railway, albeit one which was generously supported with public land and cash--and reiterated by most historians ever since.Similarly, we learn how the Mounties were transformed from historical police force to mythic heroes by a vast army of autobiographers, historians, novelists, and Hollywood filmmakers, with little attention paid to the true role of the force in such incidents as the Bolshevik rebellion, in which a secret conspiracy by the Government against its people was conducted through the RNWMP.Also revealed in National Dreams are the stories surrounding the formation and celebration of Canadian heroes such as Louis Riel and Billy Bishop.

Namely Vancouver

by Jennifer O'Rourke Tom Snyders

Namely Vancouver traces the fascinating origins and history of Greater Vancouver's place names--its streets, neighbourhoods, waterways, mountains, boroughs, and buildings, among others, in an illustrated historical glossary that takes you behind the ubiquitous signs and symbols, and provides a unique vantage point on the city.For instance, Commercial Drive was originally named Park Drive, as it abutted Clark Park in East Vancouver. As part of the route of the Vancouver-New Westminster interurban railway, Park Drive attracted a lot of new businesses; so much so, that in 1912 it was renamed Commercial Drive.There seems to be no truth to the rumour that Gassy Jack Deighton was so named for his frequent passing of wind. Rather, this instrumental figure in Vancouver's early history--the original site of his pub still forms the division between east and west streets in the city--was named for his windbag tendencies, and the legacy of this saloon keeper lives on in the name of historic Gastown.While many of Vancouver's early surveyors, mayors, and even saloon keepers had the honour of having streets or neighbourhoods named after them, John Morton had a slightly more dubious distinction. As one of the "three greenhorns," Morton went down in history as one of Vancouver's earliest settlers. In return, one of Vancouver's shortest streets is named after him.Lulu Island is named after Lulu Sweet, an actress with a travelling theatre company. Colonel Moody (of Port Moody fame) was smitten with Miss Lulu, and named the island, now known as Richmond, after her.An unorthodox and revealing guide, Namely Vancouver is an ideal book for tourists and Vancouverites alike.Includes numerous historical and contemporary B&W photographs.

Luck of the Draw

by Chris Gudgeon Barbara Stewart

Money. Gobs of it. In the blink of an eye - or the drop of a ball-- it's all yours.Everyone dreams about striking it rich by winning a lottery. We all feverishly line up to purchase our tickets, and watch TV or scan the newspapers to see if we have won, even though the odds are better that we will be struck by lightning. Still, we perservere, because no matter what else happens this week, you can be sure that someone, somewhere, will win the big one.Lotteries are an unparalleled popular phenomenon. But what happens after the winners are revealed, and the checks have been issued? How does winning a lottery change one's life?Luck of the Draw profiles past winners of big lotteries, and how their windfall impacted their lives, mostly for the better, but interestingly sometimes for the worse, such was the case of a Florida widow who won $5 million in 1984; three years later, she lost her mansion and fancy cars, and owed the IRS $500,000 for back taxes. Eventually she was arrested for trying to hire a contract killer to take out her daughter-in-law, whom she blamed for her lottery misfortune. The book also depicts the past, present and future of lotteries in North America and the world over, and includes a special chapter on the revived phenomenon of big-time TV game show winners. Who wants to be a millionaire? Seemingly, everyone.In a country where eighty percent of adults have played a lottery, creating a multi-billion dollar industry, Luck of the Draw is an insightful inside look at lotteries, its winners, and its losers.

A Little Rebellion

by Bridget Moran

In 1964, social worker Bridget Moran attracted widespread attention and the wrath of the BC government with her open letter to Premier W.A.C. Bennett, charging the welfare department with gross neglect in addressing the problems of the province's needy. This very public dispute formed a small part of Bridget Moran's "little rebellion" against a system she felt did not, and does not, respond to the needs of those it was designed to help. A Little Rebellion is a moving portrait of a fiery and outspoken woman whose ongoing activism is inspired by a deeply-felt desire for social and political justice.Now in its 4th printing.

LD

by Daniel Francis

LD is the colourful biography of Louis Taylor, the longest-serving mayor in Vancouver's history; he was first elected mayor in 1910, and served off and on until 1934, for a total of eleven years. Taylor's story is also the story of Vancouver in the early decades of the 20th century, a young city experiencing a turbulent adolescence.Louis Taylor, or LD as he was known, arrived in Vancouver from Chicago in 1896 at the age of 39. He got involved in the newspaper business, first as an executive with The Daily Province, then as proprietor of The World, during which time he built the World Tower, which remains one of Vancouver's landmark buildings (now better known as the Sun Tower).He launched his political career in 1902 when he ran successfully for licence commissioner; it was the first of 26 civic elections in which he ran, including 20 for mayor. In his early political life he was considered "the workers' friend" and was opposed by the city's business elite, who portrayed him as corrupt. He also had a reputation for being soft on crime, and was implicated in a 1928 police investigation that lost him an election. But his achievements included the establishment of the airport, a town planning commission, and the water board.His private life, however, was another story, a virtual soap opera that mirrored the ups and downs of his political career; his wife was addicted to opium, and he found himself mired in bigamy and divorce scandals.As Vancouver grew from small frontier town to a major international port city, LD saw the city through the Depression, and in a sense Vancouver grew up under his tutelage.LD: Mayor Louis Taylor and The Rise of Vancouver vividly documents the life of a man who dominated the city for years.

Judgement at Stoney Creek

by Bridget Moran

Judgement at Stoney Creek has been released in a new edition of an aboriginal studies classic: an engrossing look at the investigation into the hit-and-run death of Coreen Thomas, a young Native woman in her ninth month of pregnancy, at the wheels of a car driven by a young white man in central BC. The resulting inquest into what might have been just another small-town tragedy turned into an inquiry of racial tensions, both implicit and explicit, that surfaced not only on country backroads but in the courtroom as well, revealing a dual system of justice that treated whites and aboriginals differently. First published in 1990, Judgement at Stoney Creek has been hailed for its moving and deeply personal depiction of a controversial subject that continues to make news today?how the justice system has failed Canada's aboriginal people. This new edition includes a new preface by the author, who returns to the area to discover how much racial relations, and the relationship between Natives and the justice system, have changed.

The Face in the Mirror

by Marion Crook

Being a teenager in today's complex world is a difficult enough task, but adopted teens have a unique struggle: to discover their identity and a sense of belonging and place in the world, which often means coming to terms with their past. The Face in the Mirror, based on numerous interviews with adopted teens, adoptive parents, and birth parents, brings attention to the growing and often controversial phenomenon of teenagers wanting to know where they came from.The book, written for both teenagers and adults, is a frank discussion of the issues surrounding adoption, and in particular what adoptees, adoptive parents, and birth parents should know when adopted teens want to discover their past. The book also addresses the impact of cross-cultural or cross-racial adoption, as well as the legal parameters of adoption in the US and Canada, including the complex emotions involved.As written by Marion Crook, an adoptive parent herself and the author of previous books about teens, The Face in the Mirror articulates the complexity of adoption issues with candor and compassion.

The Company of Others

by John Ralston Saul Sandra Shields David Campion

In the next decade, six million North American families will be caring for someone with a disability. But other disabled people are not so lucky, left to live in isolation and without support in an era of federal and state cutbacks. This extraordinary book is about the transforming power of family and community on "vulnerable" individuals--the mentally challenged, the mentally ill, the elderly--and how these efforts enrich us as a society. The book tells the stories, interwoven with photographs, of five such people, who are surrounded by social "circles--friends and family whose respect, encouragement, and unconditional love give them a sense of purpose and belonging. Featuring beautiful duotone photographs, the stories told here are profoundly inspiring, giving hope to anyone who, because of age, health, or disability, has been excluded from having a full and meaningful life.Co-produced with PLAN (Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network).

Carry Tiger to Mountain

by Stephen Legault

"Stephen Legault's marvelous ability to connect the experiences of the present leaders of social causes with the wisdom of the ancients shows us all that there is a passage through the often-seeming[ly] insurmountable obstacles of the present, a way that enables all who care to be successful in their personal and professional lives."--Brock EvansThis fascinating and useful book is a modern-day interpretation of Lao Tzu's Tao te Ching for social activists and leaders within various activist movements in western civil society. It's a thoughtful examination of how the Tao, and Taoist thought, might be applied to the challenges, conflicts, and obstacles that activists and concerned citizens face as they fight contemporary battles regarding such issues as poverty, workers' rights, environmentalism, freedom of expression, gender and sexual equality, and social justice. The book also includes a verse-by-verse interpretation of the Tao te Ching's 81 "chapters"; the Tao te Ching is one of the most important historical works of Chinese philosophy, and is the basis of Taoism (or Daoism).Carry Tiger to Mountain is a timely book about the role of spirituality in activism in the twenty-first century, and how we--not only activists per se, but those for whom issues of social and political justice are important--can forge new paths in their daily struggles to make the world a better place, and at the same time restore personal balance to their lives.Includes an introduction by Dr. Jim Butler, a political activist for the past 30 years who is also a Buddhist monk.

Comfort Food for Breakups

by Marusya Bociurkiw

An elegiac memoir about food, family, and the thorns of personal history written by a Ukrainian Canadian lesbian, whose family recipes connect intimate vignettes in which food nourishes, comforts, and heals the wounds of the past, including those of a father haunted by memories of time spent in a concentration camp during World War II. The author, both at home and in her travels through North America and Europe, also reconciles her family life with her queer identity; food becomes her salvation and a way to engage with the world. Thoughtful, sensual, and passionate, Comfort Food for Breakups muses on the ways in which food intersects with a nexus of hungers: for intimacy, for family, for home. Marusya Bociurkiw is a filmmaker and the author of three previous books.

Roy & Al

by Ralf König

Roy & Al is the first English-language book by Europe's most popular gay cartoonist, Germany's Ralf König, whose collections have sold over 250,000 copies and have been translated into five languages. Roy & Al is a hilarious, erotically charged series of gay comics starring two dogs whose owners are dating. Al, a purebred, is rather fey, and treats the unsophisticated with disdain, while Roy, a mongrel, is coarser and more down-to-earth (and a tad overweight). Any similarities between masters and dogs are strictly intentional. Roy & Al is an uproarious vision of contemporary gay life through the eyes of man's best friend.

Vegan à Go-Go!

by Sarah Kramer

Sarah Kramer is a vegan superstar; she was named "The World's Coolest Vegan" by Herbivore Magazine, and her first three cookbooks have sold a combined total of over two hundred thousand copies. Vegan a Go-Go! represents a change of pace for Sarah: it is a cookbook and more for vegan travelers, many of whom are daunted by the idea of going on the road and being able to locate and/or prepare the kind of nutritious animal-free meals they enjoy at home.The new book includes 150 recipes, many of them new, and others that have been adapted from her earlier books. All of the recipes are easy to prepare with a minimum of ingredients and are guaranteed to deliver energy, nutrition, and great flavor. The rest of the book contains information and advice pertinent to vegan travelers, from how to deconstruct a restaurant menu to what food items are best suited to carry around in your luggage or handbag. There's even a section on "How to Say 'I Am Vegan'" in numerous languages.The book is also designed with the traveler in mind: it is small enough to slip into one's pocket or purse, yet has a reinforced cover to ensure durability under the harshest conditions. Full of Sarah's high-energy wit and verve, Vegan a Go-Go! makes life for vegan travelers a lot less stressful and a lot more fun.

Song of the Loon

by Michael Bronski Richard Amory

"More completely than any author before him, Richard Amory explores the tormented world of love for man by man . . . a happy amalgam of James Fenimore Cooper, Jean Genet and Hudson's Green Mansions."--from the cover copy of the 1969 editionPublished well ahead of its time, in 1966 by Greenleaf Classics, Song of the Loon is a romantic novel that tells the story of Ephraim MacIver and his travels through the wilderness. Along his journey, he meets a number of characters who share with him stories, wisdom and homosexual encounters. The most popular erotic gay book of the 1960s and 1970s, Song of the Loon was the inspiration for two sequels, a 1970 film of the same name, at least one porn movie and a parody novel called Fruit of the Loon. Unique among pulp novels of the time, the gay characters in Song of the Loon are strong and romantically drawn, which has earned the book a place in the canon of gay American literature.With an introduction by Michael Bronski, editor of Pulp Friction and author of The Pleasure Principle.Little Sister's Classics is a new series of books from Arsenal Pulp Press, reviving lost and out-of-print gay and lesbian classic books, both fiction and nonfiction. The books in the series are produced in conjunction with Little Sister's Book and Art Emporium, the heroic Vancouver bookstore well-known for its anti-censorship efforts.

The Dictionary of Homophobia

by Louis-Georges Tin Marek Redburn

"Tin's Dictionary of Homophobia is so sweeping in its scope that one can dip into it again and again and learn something, or confront an idea in which even the most well-read queer will find fresh intellectual nourishment and historical illumination."--Gay City NewsBased on the work of seventy researchers in fifteen countries, The Dictionary of Homophobia is a mammoth, encyclopedic book that documents the history of homosexuality, and various cultural responses to it, in all regions of the world: a masterful, engaged, and wholly relevant study that traces the political and social emancipation of a culture.The book is the first English translation of Dictionnaire de L'Homophobie, published in France in 2003 to worldwide acclaim; its editor, Louis-Georges Tin, launched the first International Day Against Homophobia in 2005, now celebrated in more than fifty countries around the world. The Dictionary of Homophobia includes over 175 essays on various aspects of gay rights and homophobia as experienced in all regions in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and the South Pacific, from the earliest epochs to present day.Subjects include religious and ideological forces such as the Bible, Communism, Judaism, Hinduism, and Islam; historical subjects, events, and personalities such as AIDS, Stonewall, J. Edgar Hoover, Matthew Shepard, Oscar Wilde, Pat Buchanan, Joseph McCarthy, Pope John Paul II, and Anita Bryant; and other topics such as coming out, adoption, deportation, ex-gays, lesbiphobia, and bi-phobia. In a world where gay marriage remains a hot-button political issue, and where adults and even teens are still being executed by authorities for the "crime" of homosexuality, The Dictionary of Homophobia is a both a revealing and necessary history lesson for us all.

Out of the Darkness

by Marion Crook

Teen suicide has long been considered one of society's darkest secrets; the idea of troubled young people driven to take their own lives was a tragedy too horrible to contemplate, let alone talk about openly. But the fact remains that teen suicide is an issue that refuses to go away so long as young people in crisis have nowhere to turn. But now, in this age of frank discussions about bullying, peer pressure, and issues of "difference," there is a growing sense that teen suicide is no longer a taboo subject, and that talking about it can help us to identify and acknowledge the kind of problems that lead teens to make such drastic and tragic decisions.Based on interviews with teen suicide survivors, -parents, and professionals, Marion Crook sensitively explores all aspects of teen suicide, in particular the -reasons why certain young people are driven to it. The motives are far-ranging, but central to all is a sense of desperation. Despite their dire circumstances, however, many found a way out of the darkness and into adult lives of meaning and worth.Marion Crook also examines the history of teen suicide in Western and other cultures, as well as what roles parents and schools can play in suicide prevention, and coping strategies for teens in crisis. Out of the Darkness is a book for both teens and adults that breaks the silence surrounding teen suicide, offering hope for those who think there is none.Marion Crook has spent the last fifteen years actively researching the difficulties teens face, relying on the expertise of the teens themselves. This is her twenty-third published book. She teaches at the university in Surrey, B.C. while continuing to research and write.

Where Fire Speaks

by Hugh Brody Sandra Shields David Campion

On the wild river that divides Namibia from Angola, members of the Himba tribe herd cattle as they have done for hundreds of years.But the world of the Himba sits in the shadow of third-world development and the inevitability of change that threatens their way of life; now, they are more likely to attend evangelical church services, congregate around the liquor trader's truck, and pose for tourists' photographs.Sandra Shields and David Campion spent two months living with the Himba, and this book, a provocative melding of photography and narrative, tells of the profound changes in the lives of the Himba--both gradual and immediate--which echo those effecting indigenous people around the world.Includes more than one hundred black and white -photographs.David Campion and Sandra Shields met in South Africa, married a year later, and have collaborated for over a decade. Sandra has written for publications including Geist and The Globe and Mail, and David's photographs have appeared in publications and exhibitions in Canada, Europe, and Africa.PHOTOGRAPHY + TEXT = PARALLAXParallax, a new series of books from Arsenal Pulp Press, explore the far reaches of the modern world, proposing new perspectives on how we see ourselves through the eyes and the words of our most intriguing photographers and writers.

One Man's Trash

by Ivan E. Coyote

In Close to Spider Man--which won a Danuta Gleed Literary Award--readers were introduced to the crystalline storytelling voice of Ivan Coyote. The talent evident in that first collection is confirmed with One Man's Trash, a series of connected stories about being queer, searching out new frontiers, and being on the road.The characters in One Man's Trash make evident the child in all of us, when heroes and superheroes won the day.Including the hilarious account of an attempted lesbian wedding in a Las Vegas chapel, and a touching tale of being beguiled by an uncle's independent-minded girlfriend, these are stories about being on the road: to the northern tundra or the southern desert, through cities and towns, on horses, in trucks and vans, with friends, family, and lovers. In achingly personal tones, Ivan Coyote paints beautiful and honest portraits of life, the road, and the spirits within.Praise for Close to Spider Man:"Blissfully rich . . . [a] thoroughly entertaining . . . surefooted, humorous take on misfit love and familial solidarity."--Publishers Weekly"Coyote's debut short story collection is powerful. . . . These stories consistently detail the pain of being mis-understood, of living and trying to love where one doesn't fit in, and doesn't want to. Their beauty is in the sheer emotion they provoke."--Lambda Book ReportIvan E. Coyote is a Vancouver writer and performer who first came to attention as a member of Taste This, who collaborated on the award-winning book Boys Like Her.

I Am a Red Dress

by Anna Camilleri

A woman in a red dress conjures particular images, emotions and stereotypes. Eroticism. Lust. Passion. With I Am a Red Dress, acclaimed writer and performer Anna Camilleri confronts these images and stereotypes in essays, stories, and poetry.Combining the political with the intensely personal, Camilleri's intimate writings are premised on a search for selfhood--strong, queer, female--within and outside of her bonds to other women in her family. She says, "My work is motivated by a deep desire to understand, and in the words of Dorothy Allison, to 'remake the world.'"Despite the perception that we live in a progressive society, Camilleri is not convinced that we live in a world that is necessarily better for women, indigenous people and people of color, queer people, or the poor and the working class. But she recognizes that the imagination is a powerful force that can lead to better lives, and a better world.I Am A Red Dress is Camilleri conjuring her imagination, as she seeks to find her rightful place in the world. Like a flashing red light, this collection of stories and essays signal a changing of consciousness. It's also Camilleri attempting to unravel memory, a trace that is inextricably tied to her culture and class, and the imaginations of women in her family.Her voice is the sound the status quo makes as it crashes to the ground.Anna Camilleri is a Toronto-based writer and performance poet. She was co-editor of Brazen Femme, shortlisted for a Lambda Award, and co-founded Taste This, with whom she collaborated to publish Boys Like Her, winner of a ForeWord Magazine Literary Award.

Hopeful Monsters

by Hiromi Goto

"Hopeful monsters" are genetically abnormal organisms that, nonetheless, adapt and survive in their environments. In these devastating stories, the hopeful monsters in question are those who will not be tethered by familial duty nor bound by the ghosts of their past.Home becomes fraught, reality a nightmare as Hiromi Goto weaves her characters through tales of domestic crises and cultural dissonance. They are the walking wounded--a mother who is terrified by a newborn daughter who bears a tail; a "stinky girl" who studies the human condition in a shopping mall; a family on holiday wih a visiting grandfather who cannot abide their "foreign" nature. But wills are a force unto themselves, and Goto's characters are imbued with the light of myth and magic-realism. With humor and keen insight, Goto makes the familiar seem strange, and deciphers those moments when the idyllic skews into the absurd and the sublime.From "Stinky Girl":The unbearable voices of mythic manatees, the cry of the phoenix, the whispers of kappa lovers beside a gurgling stream. The voice of the moon that is ever turned away from our gaze, the song of suns colliding. The sounds which permeate from my skin on such a level of intensity that mortal senses recoil, deflect beauty into ugliness as a way of coping. And my joy. Such incredible joy. The hairs on my arms stand electric, the static energy and the heat amplifies my smell/sound with such exponential dizzying intensity, that the plastic which surrounds me bursts apart, falls away from my being like an artificial cocoon.I hover, twenty feet in the air.Hiromi Goto is the author of the novels Chorus of Mushrooms (winner of a Commonwealth Writers Prize and co-winner of the Canada-Japan Book Award) and The Kappa Child (winner of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award). She lives in Burnaby, British Columbia.

Dreaming in the Rain

by David Spaner

Vancouver is now North America's third largest center for film and television production, recently witnessing the filming of Halle Berry's Catwoman and Will Smith's I, Robot, among others. But Vancouver has been hosting filmmakers for years, coming into its own in the early 1970s when Robert Altman, Warren Beatty and Julie Christie made McCabe and Mrs. Miller and Mike Nichols, Jack Nicholson and Candice Bergen filmed Carnal Knowlege.Dreaming in the Rain tells the story of how Vancouver became North by Northwest, from its early days as a Hollywood studio backlot to its becoming home to a vibrant indigenous scene that is among the most acclaimed, provocative, independent filmmaking communities anywhere.But with Hollywood's growing concern over "runaway" productions, Vancouver's growing filmmaking scene is wrought with controversy. The city's American-based film industry is powerful enough to inspire loathing and threats from Hollywood.Along with tracing the art and commerce of Vancouver filmmaking, Vancouver Province movie critic David Spaner brings to life the flamboyant film personalities who left their marks. From visitors like Errol Flynn and Robert Altman, to local heroes such as The Matrix's Carrie Anne Moss, who grew up in Vancouver, and Kissed star Molly Parker and director Lynne Stopkewich, vital players in the groundbreaking Vancouver indie scene.Includes more than 40 black and white photographs.". . . [Spaner] has . . . scrupulous attention to detail and an obvious curiosity and passion for both Vancouver and its film industry."--Entertainment TodayDavid Spaner is a movie critic for the Vancouver Province.

The Greenpeace to Amchitka

by Robert Keziere Robert Hunter

Greenpeace is known around the world for its activism and education surrounding environmental and biodiversity issues. With a presence in more than 40 countries across Europe, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific, Greenpeace is undoubtedly a dominant force in the realm of environmental activism.This is the story of how Greenpeace came to be.In September 1971, a small group of activists boarded a small fishing boat in Vancouver, Canada, and headed north towards Amchitka, a tiny island west of Alaska in the Aleutian Islands, where the US government was conducting underground nuclear tests.At that time, protests against nuclear testing were not common, yet the US tests raised genuine concerns: Amchitka is not only the last refuge for endangered wildlife, but is also located in a geologically unstable region, one of the most earthquake-prone areas in the world. The threat of a nuclear-triggered earthquake or tsunami was real.Among the people sardined in the fishing boat were Robert Hunter and Robert Keziere.The boat, named the Greenpeace by the small group of men aboard, raced against time as it crashed through the Gulf of Alaska, braving the oncoming winter storms. Three weeks was all they had to reach Amchitka in an attempt to halt the nuclear test. Ultimately, the voyage--beset by bad weather, interpersonal tensions and conflicts with US officials--was doomed. And yet the legacy of that journey lives on.In this visceral memoir, based on a manuscript originally written over 30 years ago, Robert Hunter vividly depicts the peculiar odyssey that led to the formation of the most powerful environmental organization in the world.Features 40 black and white photographs taken during the voyage by Robert Keziere.

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