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Mastering Slavery

by Jennifer B. Fleischner

In Mastering Slavery, Fleischner draws upon a range of disciplines, including psychoanalysis, African-American studies, literary theory, social history, and gender studies, to analyze how the slave narratives--in their engagement with one another and with white women's antislavery fiction--yield a far more amplified and complicated notion of familial dynamics and identity than they have generally been thought to reveal. Her study exposes the impact of the entangled relations among master, mistress, slave adults and slave children on the sense of identity of individual slave narrators. She explores the ways in which our of the social, psychological, biological--and literary--crossings and disruptions slavery engendered, these autobiographers created mixed, dynamic narrative selves.

Please Don't Wish Me a Merry Christmas

by Stephen M. Feldman

Whether in the form of Christmas trees in town squares or prayer in school, fierce disputes over the separation of church and state have long bedeviled this country. Both decried and celebrated, this principle is considered by many, for right or wrong, a defining aspect of American national identity. Nearly all discussions regarding the role of religion in American life build on two dominant assumptions: first, the separation of church and state is a constitutional principle that promotes democracy and equally protects the religious freedom of all Americans, especially religious outgroups; and second, this principle emerges as a uniquely American contribution to political theory. In Please Don't Wish Me a Merry Christmas, Stephen M. Feldman challenges both these assumptions. He argues that the separation of church and state primarily manifests and reinforces Christian domination in American society. Furthermore, Feldman reveals that the separation of church and state did not first arise in the United States. Rather, it has slowly evolved as a political and religious development through western history, beginning with the initial appearance of Christianity as it contentiously separated from Judaism.In tracing the historical roots of the separation of church and state within the Western world, Feldman begins with the Roman Empire and names Augustine as the first political theorist to suggest the idea. Feldman next examines how the roles of church and state variously merged and divided throughout history, during the Crusades, the Italian Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the British Civil War and Restoration, the early North American colonies, nineteenth-century America, and up to the present day. In challenging the dominant story of the separation of church and state, Feldman interprets the development of Christian social power vis--vis the state and religious minorities, particularly the prototypical religious outgroup, Jews.

Notes of a Racial Caste Baby

by Bryan K. Fair

The Constitution of the United States, writes Bryan Fair, was a series of compromises between white male propertyholders: Southern planters and Northern merchants. At the heart of their deals was a clear race-conscious intent to place the interests of whites above those of blacks. In this provocative and important book, Fair, the eighth of ten children born to a single mother on public assistance in an Ohio ghetto, combines two histories--America's and his own- -to offer a compelling defense of affirmative action. How can it be, Fair asks, that, after hundreds of years of racial apartheid during which whites were granted 100% quotas to almost all professions, we have now convinced ourselves that, after a few decades of remedial affirmative action, the playing field is now level? Centuries of racial caste, he argues, cannot be swept aside in a few short years. Fair ambitiously surveys the most common arguments for and against affirmative action. He argues that we must distinguish between America in the pre-Civil Rights Movement era--when the law of the land was explicitly anti-black--and today's affirmative action policies--which are decidedly not anti- white. He concludes that the only just and effective way in which to account for America's racial past and to negotiate current racial quagmires is to embrace a remedial affirmative action that relies neither on quotas nor fiery rhetoric, but one which takes race into account alongside other pertinent factors. Championing the model of diversity on which the United States was purportedly founded, Fair serves up a personal and persuasive account of why race-conscious policies are the most effective way to end de facto segregation and eliminate racial caste. Table of Contents A Note to the Reader Acknowledgments Preface: Telling Stories Recasting Remedies as Diseases Color-Blind Justice The Design of This Book Pt. 1. A Personal Narrative Not White Enough Dee Black Columbus Racial Poverty Man-Child Colored Matters Coded Schools Busing Going Home Equal Opportunity The Character of Color Diversity as One Factor The Deception of Color Blindness Pt. 2. White Privilege and Black Despair: The Origins of Racial Caste in America The Declaration of Inferiority Marginal Americans Inventing American Slavery The Road to Constitutional Caste Losing Second-Class Citizenship Reconstruction and Sacrifice Separate and Unequal The Color Line Critiquing Color Blindness Pt. 3. The Constitutionality of Remedial Affirmative Action The Origins of Remedial Affirmative Action The Court of Last Resort The Invention of Reverse Discrimination The Politics of Affirmative Action: Myth or Reality? Racial Realism Eliminating Caste Afterword Notes Index

Concepts of Earth Science & Chemistry Parent Lesson Plan

by John Hudson Tiner

Concepts of Earth and Chemistry Course Description This is the suggested course sequence that allows one core area of science to be studied per semester. You can change the sequence of the semesters per the needs or interests of your student; materials for each semester are independent of one another to allow flexibility. Semester 1: Earth Blending a creationism perspective of history with definitions of terms and identification of famous explorers, scientists, etc., this book gives students an excellent initial knowledge of people and places, encouraging them to continue their studies in-depth. Semester 2: Chemistry Chemistry is an amazing branch of science that affects us every day, yet few people realize it, or even give it much thought. Without chemistry, there would be nothing made of plastic, there would be no rubber tires, no tin cans, no televisions, no microwave ovens, or something as simple as wax paper. This book presents an exciting and intriguing tour through the realm of chemistry as each chapter unfolds with facts and stories about the discoveries of discoverers. Find out why pure gold is not used for jewelry or coins. Join Humphry Davy as he made many chemical discoveries, and learn how they shortened his life. See how people in the 1870s could jump over the top of the Washington Monument. Exploring the World of Chemistry brings science to life and is a wonderful learning tool with many illustrations and biographical information.

Exploring the World of Astronomy

by John Hudson Tiner

Discover how to find constellations like the Royal Family group or those near Orion the Hunter from season to season throughout the year How to use the Sea of Crises as your guidepost for further explorations on the moon's surface Investigate deep sky wonders, extra solar planets, and beyond as God's creation comes alive! Think you know all there is to know about our solar system? You might be surprised at some of the amazing details that you find when you begin Exploring the World of Astronomy! From the rugged surface of the moon to the distant and mysterious constellations, this book provides an exciting educational tour for students of different ages and skill levels. Learn about a blue moon, the 400-year storm on Jupiter, and what is meant by "the zone of life." Discussion ideas, questions, and research opportunities help expand this great resource on observational astronomy into an unforgettable educational course for middle school to high school students!

Still More Church Chuckles

by Dick Hafer

From all over the country, members of all church denominations are clamoring for more Christian cartoons from award-winning artist Dick Hafer. This, then , by popular demand, is the third offering from the "Cartoon Commando." Be prepared to hold your sides as you enjoy over 100 cartoons aimed at the big balloons of pride, greed, infighting, elitism and unidentifiable potluck casseroles.

More Church Chuckles

by Dick Hafer

The enthusiastic response to Church Chuckles has paved the way for More Church Chuckles, another hilarious installment of Christian cartoons by award-winning cartoonist Dick Hafer. From the uptightness of those lovable fundamentalists, to the sidesplitting antics of our more liberal brethren, Hafer's keen eye and artistic fingers combine for a send-up of the more humorous aspects of today's Christian community. Get one for a friend, then get one for yourself.

Lose the Weight of the World

by Charles Blair

Medical science tells us stress is a killer. Our daily routines tell us the same thing. For the burned-out and weary comes a book that highlights the modern person's spiritual malnourishment. Aimed at developing the spiritually and emotionally fit man and woman, this timely book focuses on purifying our thoughts, firming up Bible knowledge, and shedding a harmful self-image. An uncompromising look at the things that nag all of us, Lose the Weight of the World promises to trim the fat of our souls.

Don't Miss the Boat

by Paul F. Taylor

Here is your comprehensive guide to creationist thinking on the Flood in an easy-to-understand style!Get your facts and misunderstandings about the Flood straightened out!Study the history of the immediate post-Flood world, as well as modern considerations of the histories of earth sciencesRead four fictional short stories that place the reader back in time just before the Flood-showing a world filled with non-belief and the few who reached out to save other with God's truth.Don't Miss the Boat provides various perspectives on the biblical account of the Great Flood that speak to both the technical and scientific evidence we see around the world today. This book contains information for the layman who wants to know the basics, as well as the solid evidence that can be shared with anyone. Theological considerations, historical essays, and scientific implications are included, as well as fictional representations that convey the emotional power of God's judgement on a wicked pre-Flood world, rounding out this unique resource.

Get On With Living

by Simon Schrock

Are you ready to risk living by your own directions and convictions instead of imitating someone else's? Be obedient to God and the call He has on your life and get started! When dealing with negativism or any other "hang-up", people searching for direction and purpose in life are often frustrated by the over-whelming amount of available advice. Instead of facing the real issues of life and becoming persons of deep simplicity, individuals get sidetracked into the complexities of imitating someone else's ideas. Instead of apologizing for and defending yourself, let Get On with Living challenge you into action and faithfulness to the vision God has given you. Here is solid advice on how to stop "fussing" and start "building".

Smoother Journey, A

by Simon Schrock

Biblical advice for Fulfilling Relationships Most folks going on any kind of trip plan well in advance. They do all the necessary things to make sure their travels come off without a hitch. But there is one journey so many neglect to plan for: The journey of life. The pathway to healthy friendships. Simon Schrock has accumulated a lifetime's worth of practical and profound advice grounded in God's Word, sharing this "roadmap for the trip" in A Smoother Journey. Schrock points out plain lessons for those wrestling with matters of conscience ("stop stealing!"), friends cultivating right relationships ("Johnathan and David had a beautiful relationship") and every situation in between. Schrock explains in brilliant clarity what our Heavenly Father expects from us in our daily walk. The lessons are there if the reader cares to apply them. After reading this book, you'll have no doubt as to the smoother path for life's journey.

For You They Signed

by Marilyn Boyer

In 1776, 56 men signed their names on a document that they knew might well mean their certain deaths as traitors to England. Standing on principles of faith and liberty, these men forged a powerful call for freedom and human dignity still resonating today in America. Yet, historical revisionists have distorted or attempted to wipe away every trace of this nation's Christian heritage, including the heartfelt faith of these founding fathers. More than simply facts and figures, For You They Signed provides an abundance of resources within one volume, including: * A full year of life-changing, challenging family or group devotional character studies * Over 90 illustrations, biographical summaries, and insightful quotes* Character quality definitions, Patrick Henry's speech delivered to the signers, the Christian nature of state constitutions, and the Christian nature of America's universities. The Declaration of Independence remains one of history's most enduring achievements, and this text will help you value those freedoms these men fought for in an insightfully fresh way. It will also assist you in catching the God-given vision of these faithful new Americans, igniting a fire for your family, community, and the generations to come. Here is a volume that should be found in every private and public library in America... a meticulously documented look back to the true birth of our nation. They pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor so that we could be free! "This is certainly a work for 'such a time a this'... It is my prayer that this resource will find a way into every home so that this generation can know the sacrifice required to establish the God-inspired design of our nation." -Stanley John, Senior Vice President, Focus on the Family

Christian Education for the Real World

by Dr Henry M. Morris

Such topics as class size and a brief history of the two world wars are just a small part of this framework for educators in home schools, Christian schools, and public schools. Addressing the needs of each of these areas, Dr. Morris implores today's teachers to provide wholesome and well-rounded instruction for tomorrow's generation.

Jews, Slaves, and the Slave Trade

by Eli Faber

In the wake of the civil rights movement, a great divide has opened up between African American and Jewish communities. What was historically a harmonious and supportive relationship has suffered from a powerful and oft-repeated legend, that Jews controlled and masterminded the slave trade and owned slaves on a large scale, well in excess of their own proportion in the population. In this groundbreaking book, likely to stand as the definitive word on the subject, Eli Faber cuts through this cloud of mystification to recapture an important chapter in both Jewish and African diasporic history.Focusing on the British empire, Faber assesses the extent to which Jews participated in the institution of slavery through investment in slave trading companies, ownership of slave ships, commercial activity as merchants who sold slaves upon their arrival from Africa, and direct ownership of slaves. His unprecedented original research utilizing shipping and tax records, stock-transfer ledgers, censuses, slave registers, and synagogue records reveals, once and for all, the minimal nature of Jews' involvement in the subjugation of Africans in the Americas. A crucial corrective, Jews, Slaves, and the Slave Trade lays to rest one of the most contested historical controversies of our time.

Law and Religion

by Stephen M. Feldman

Few issues arouse as much passionate debate as the relationship between church and state. Political parties and coalitions have long jockeyed for position in the battle to either keep the two separate, or to unify them in one nation indivisible from God. While the battle has been raging in the political arena, figures from academia, the media, and myriad other vantage points, have commented on the context and constitutionality of laws governing religious expression. In Law and Religion, Stephen M. Feldman brings together the many perspectives that have shaped policy on this important national issue. In giving voice to the political left and right, as well as to cultural, philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives, the book serves as an even-handed treatment of an issue all too often clouded by biases. Contributors ranging from Stanley Fish to Richard John Neuhaus explore issues extending from religious morality and religious freedom, to fundamentalism, the separation of church and state, religion and public schooling, and liberal political theory. Comprehensive in scope, Law and Religion will stand as an important reference for anyone seeking to further understand this complex and highly emotional topic.

Murdering Masculinities

by Gregory Forter

Though American crime novels are often derided for containing misogynistic attitudes and limiting ideas of masculinity, Greg Forter maintains that they are instead psychologically complex and sophisticated works that demand closer attention. Eschewing the synthetic methodologies of earlier work on crime fiction, Murdering Masculinities argues that the crime novel does not provide a consolidated and stable notion of masculinity. Rather, it demands that male readers take responsibility for the desires they project on to these novels. Forter examines the narrative strategies of five novels--Hammett's The Glass Key, Cain's Serenade, Faulkner's Sanctuary, Thompson's Pop. 1280, and Himes's Blind Man with a Pistol--in conjunction with their treatment of bodily metaphors of smell, vision, and voice. In the process, Forter unearths a "generic unconscious" that reveals things Freud both discovered and sought to repress.

An Interracial Movement of the Poor

by Jennifer Frost

Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2002 Community organizing became an integral part of the activist repertoire of the New Left in the 1960s. Students for a Democratic Society, the organization that came to be seen as synonymous with the white New Left, began community organizing in 1963, hoping to build an interracial movement of the poor through which to demand social and political change. SDS sought nothing less than to abolish poverty and extend democratic participation in America. Over the next five years, organizers established a strong presence in numerous low-income, racially diverse urban neighborhoods in Chicago, Cleveland, Newark, and Boston, as well as other cities. Rejecting the strategies of the old left and labor movement and inspired by the Civil Rights Movement, activists sought to combine a number of single issues into a broader, more powerful coalition. Organizers never limited themselves to today's simple dichotomies of race vs. class or of identity politics vs. economic inequality. They actively synthesized emerging identity politics with class and coalition politics and with a drive for a more participatory welfare state, treating these diverse political approaches as inextricably intertwined. While common wisdom holds that the New Left rejected all state involvement as cooptative at best, Jennifer Frost traces the ways in which New Left and community activists did in fact put forward a prescriptive, even visionary, alternative to the welfare state. After Students for a Democratic Society and its community organizing unit, the Economic Research and Action Project, disbanded, New Left and community participants went on to apply their strategies and goals to the welfare rights, women's liberation, and the antiwar movements. In her study of activism before the age of identity politics, Frost has given us the first full-fledged history of what was arguably the most innovative community organizing campaign in post-war American history.

Long Before Stonewall

by Thomas A. Foster

2007 Choice Outstanding Academic TitleAlthough the 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City symbolically mark the start of the gay rights movement, individuals came together long before the modern era to express their same-sex romantic and sexual attraction toward one another, and in a myriad of ways. Some reflected on their desires in quiet solitude, while others endured verbal, physical, and legal harassment for publicly expressing homosexual interest through words or actions.Long Before Stonewall seeks to uncover the many iterations of same-sex desire in colonial America and the early Republic, as well as to expand the scope of how we define and recognize homosocial behavior. Thomas A. Foster has assembled a pathbreaking, interdisciplinary collection of original and classic essays that explore topics ranging from homoerotic imagery of black men to prison reform to the development of sexual orientations. This collection spans a regional and temporal breadth that stretches from the colonial Southwest to Quaker communities in New England. It also includes a challenge to commonly accepted understandings of the Native American berdache. Throughout, connections of race, class, status, and gender are emphasized, exposing the deep foundations on which modern sexual political movements and identities are built.

Getting to the Rule of Law

by James E. Fleming

The rule of law has been celebrated as "an unqualified human good," yet there is considerable disagreement about what the ideal of the rule of law requires. When people clamor for the preservation or extension of the rule of law, are they advocating a substantive conception of the rule of law respecting private property and promoting liberty, a formal conception emphasizing an "inner morality of law," or a procedural conception stressing the right to be heard by an impartial tribunal and to make arguments about what the law is? When are exertions of executive power "outside the law" justified on the ground that they may be necessary to maintain or restore the conditions for the rule of law in emergency circumstances, such as defending against terrorist attacks? In Getting to the Rule of Law a group of contributors from a variety of disciplines address many of the theoretical legal, political, and moral issues raised by such questions and examine practical applications "on the ground" in the United States and around the world. This timely, interdisciplinary volume examines the ideal of the rule of law, questions when, if ever, executive power "outside the law" is justified to maintain or restore the rule of law, and explores the prospects for and perils of building the rule of law after military interventions.

Electric Dreams

by Ted Friedman

Electric Dreams turns to the past to trace the cultural history of computers. Ted Friedman charts the struggles to define the meanings of these powerful machines over more than a century, from the failure of Charles Babbage's "difference engine" in the nineteenth century to contemporary struggles over file swapping, open source software, and the future of online journalism. To reveal the hopes and fears inspired by computers, Electric Dreams examines a wide range of texts, including films, advertisements, novels, magazines, computer games, blogs, and even operating systems.Electric Dreams argues that the debates over computers are critically important because they are how Americans talk about the future. In a society that in so many ways has given up on imagining anything better than multinational capitalism, cyberculture offers room to dream of different kinds of tomorrow.

Deeper Shades of Purple

by Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas

Womanist approaches to the study of religion and society have contributed much to our understanding of Black religious life, activism, and women's liberation. Deeper Shades of Purple explores the achievements of this movement over the past two decades and evaluates some of the leading voices and different perspectives within this burgeoning field.Deeper Shades of Purple brings together a who's who of scholars in the study of Black women and religion who view their scholarship through a womanist critical lens. The contributors revisit Alice Walker's definition of womanism for its viability for the approaches to discourses in religion of Black women scholars. Whereas Walker has defined what it means to be womanist, these contributors define what it means to practice womanism, and illuminate how womanism has been used as a vantage point for the theoretical orientations and methodological approaches of Black women scholar-activists.Contributors: Karen Baker-Fletcher, Katie G. Cannon, M. Shawn Copeland, Kelly Brown Douglas, Carol B. Duncan, Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas, Rachel Elizabeth Harding, Rosemarie Freeney Harding, Melanie L. Harris, Diana L. Hayes, Dwight N. Hopkins, Ada María Isasi-Díaz, Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan, Kwok Pui-Lan, Daisy L. Machado, Debra Majeed, Anthony B. Pinn, Rosetta Ross, Letty M. Russell, Shani Settles, Dianne M. Stewart, Raedorah Stewart-Dodd, Emilie M. Townes, Traci C. West, and Nancy Lynne Westfield.

Women of the American South

by Christie Anne Farnham

Among the most prominent icons of the American south is that of the southern belle, immortalized by such figures as Scarlett O'Hara, Dolly Madison, and Lucy Pickens (whose elegant image graced the Confederate $100 bill). And yet the women of America's south iave always defied pat generalization, no more readily forced into facle categories than women in the country's other regions.Never before has a book of southern history so successfully integrated the experiences of white and non-white women. Among the myriad subjects addressed in the book are black women's suffrage, the economic realities of Choctaw women, female kin and female slaves in planters's wills, the northern myth of the rebel girl, second wave feminism in the South, and southern lesbians. Bringing to light the lives of Cherokee women, Appalachian "coal daughters," and Jewish women in the South, the essays all but one published in this book for the first time, ensure that monolithic representations of southern womanhood are a thing of the past.Filling a crucial gap in southern history and women's history, Women of the American South is a valuable reference and pedagogical aid for a wide range of scholars and students.

Church Chuckles

by Dick Hafer

Award-winning cartoonist Dick Hafer has compiled a collection of his best-loved cartoons in one book, Church Chuckles, to remind us of the occasional silliness that creeps into all denominations. Only for people who like to laugh, Church Chuckles is sure to be a comic classic.


by Richard W. Dortch is a potent entity and it has the power to control, change and alter circumstances along life's perilous path. It is an awesome tool is an easy thing to lose when taken for granted. At the core of each individual is a code of values or ethics by which all things are measured, and that is the sum of INTEGRITY. An important and inspiring message on integrity can be found within these pages. This book will serve as an inspiration for all and give insight to those who have wondered. It is a sobering thought when we begin to consider the state of our own integrity. How do you survive and rise above it all? How do you put the pieces of your life back together again? How do you restore your integrity? And where do you go from here? These questions, and many others, are answered in this book.

Skills for Rhetoric (Teacher)

by James P. Stobaugh

Rhetoric is the ancient skill of persuasive speech used by teachers, preachers, politicians, and others to influence, incite, and instruct. This course includes basic grammar and writing composition, and mastering this time-honored skill will set your students apart with distinguished written and oral abilities. This Teacher's Guide accompanies James Stobaugh's Skills for Rhetoric student book. It provides an instruction guide, daily concept builders, and weekly essay questions and tests.

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