Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 4,876 through 4,900 of 4,911 results
Previous   Page: Go to first page 195 196 197   Next

A Father for Poppy

by Abigail Gordon

From no-strings fling to family man! It might have been a brief fling, but Tessa Gilroy fell hard for gorgeous surgeon Drake Melford and was devastated when he left to pursue his hotshot career abroad. Now he's back-and even more irresistible than ever! But Tessa's life has changed drastically in the past four years. She's a mother now, to her adorable adopted daughter Poppy, and she needs more than a fleeting affair-she needs someone who can be a father... Dare she dream that Drake's the one for her and for Poppy?

The Family She Needs

by Sue Mackay

And doctor makes three... Nurse Karina Brown only has room in her heart for one guy: four-year-old Mickey. Running a small-town surgery and looking after a little boy with Down syndrome isn't easy, but Katrina wouldn't have it any other way. Until Mickey's co-guardian, gorgeous Dr. Logan Pascale, moves into their home-determined to sell up! His heart is on lockdown but soon, united in their love for Mickey, Logan and Karina are falling for each other, too! Can Karina persuade Logan that everything he needs is right under her roof...already?

It Happened in Vegas

by Amy Ruttan

The hero she never forgot... Keeping out of the spotlight isn't easy for senator's daughter Dr. Jennifer Mills...especially after being jilted at the altar by her ex-fiancé! Arriving in Las Vegas, she's just hoping to blend in... But then she meets ER surgeon Nick Rousseau-the same man she spent an unforgettable night with three years earlier! Now returned from Afghanistan, ex-army medic Nick is struggling to come to terms with his time on the front line. Rekindling his romance with Jennifer reminds this brooding doctor that some things in life are still worth fighting for...

Baby Twins to Bind Them

by Carol Marinelli

The ultimate baby bombshell! For delicious Dr. Guy Steele, life is all about flirting and never about forever! It's the only way to avoid discussing the painful issue of his infertility. So a fling with Candy Anastasi, the sexiest nurse in the hospital, is the perfect solution...right? Candy's desperate to take her mind off her good-for-nothing ex-and six weeks of the best sex of her life is the ideal distraction! Until she realizes that she's fallen for Guy...and that she's pregnant-with twins! Could her double baby bombshell ultimately bind her to Guy forever?

The Best Laid Plans

by Amy Vastine

She planned on falling in love. Just not with him! Emma Everhart's life is going according to plan. Finish nursing school with flying colours... Check. Get a great job in the ER... Check. Marry a handsome doctor and have two babies, three years apart... Not quite yet. But with a dreamy new doctor joining the hospital staff, she's so close she can almost taste the wedding cake. Now is not the time to let the tall, dark and flirtatious paramedic Charlie Fletcher distract her! He may be the best date and best kiss she's ever had, but he's definitely not part of her plan. No matter how he makes her feel...

The Bluebird Bet

by Cheryl Harper

Winning isn't everything...to other people Dr. Elaine Watson never loses. Period. So she won't miss out on a chance to restore the Bluebird Bed-and-Breakfast. The owner's son, Dean Collins, seems just as determined as she is. A famous photojournalist, he hasn't been home in years, so why does he want to turn the Bluebird, a charming old B and B, into a fishing camp? With just a few weeks to create the winning plan, Elaine has no choice but to spend time with the guy. She's drawn to the handsome, wounded man, but being with Dean would mean giving up the future she's been dreaming of... And Dr. Elaine Watson never gives up.

Dangerous Inheritance

by Barbara Warren

SHADOWS OF THE PAST Though Macy Douglas remembers nothing from the night of her mother's murder, she's determined to prove her father's innocence in the crime. But she soon finds that returning to her childhood home and digging up her family's past is a surefire way to attract enemies-and a killer that's still at large. Now only handsome local cop Nick Baldwin can safeguard her-even if that means disobeying direct orders and risking his job. His boss might not think Macy's in harm's way, but Nick's suspicions are soon confirmed when an assailant breaks into her house. Nick tries to trigger Macy's memories for clues...but someone will do anything to ensure that the past remains forgotten.

The Daddy List

by Dewanna Pace

A Substitute Husband Discovering her daughter is holding bank patrons hostage to interview daddy candidates sends widow Daisy Trumbo running to intervene. But when real bank robbers take advantage of the fake stickup, the hero of the day is Bass Parker-the man Daisy blames for her husband's death. Yet duty compels her to care for him as he recovwers from his injuries. Bass is determined to make amends to the widow and child of the fallen soldier who took his place on the battlefield. But he slowly finds himself feeling more than obligation to this independent woman and her spirited little girl. Their happiness hinges on Daisy's forgiveness, but can she let go of the past?

Engaged to the Single Mom

by Lee Tobin Mcclain

The Millionaire and the Mechanic Single mom Angelica Camden's determined to fulfill her sick son's every wish. At the top of the list is moving back to her hometown to be near family. His second request? Lots of dogs! Gathering her courage, Angelica asks her former fiancé, a veterinarian with a dog rescue farm, for a job. Though they're growing close again, Angelica can't bear to tell handsome, honorable Troy Hinton the painful truth about why she fled town and broke his heart. Yet when he discovers her son's biggest wish is for a father, Troy's shocking suggestion of marriage may just make all their dreams come true. inful truth about why she fled town and broke his heart. Yet when he discovers her son's biggest wish is for a father, Troy's shocking suggestion of marriage may just make all their dreams come true.

Mother by Fate

by Tara Taylor Quinn

To trust a stranger... Sara Havens helps others. Mothers. Children. Those who seek to escape from violence. Her work with The Lemonade Stand-a unique women's shelter-also lets her forget the loss of the child who should have been hers. And when a handsome stranger strikes up a poolside conversation, it's no coincidence. Bounty hunter Michael Edison is tracking a former resident of the shelter. Fearing for the missing woman's safety, Sara joins the pursuit. But nothing is what it appears to be-including Michael. As they grow closer, Sara risks losing her carefully constructed control...

A Recipe for Reunion

by Vicki Essex

Second time's the charm! Nothing about working with his former high school crush, Stephanie Stephens, is ideal. Still, if Aaron Caruthers intends to save his grandmother's bakery, he must. Good thing he has a lot of ideas he can't wait to implement. He never imagines Stephanie would have her own ideas for the business. Or that they would clash with his! It doesn't take working with her long for Aaron to realize his impression of Stephanie as a helpless ex-cheerleader is way off. And the more of her kindness and strength he sees, the more attracted he is! Now to convince her...

Falling for the New Guy

by Nicole Helm

She needs a distraction One of Bluff City's finest, Tess Camden always follows the rules. That means a romp with the strong and silent new guy on the force would be out of the question. Besides, no matter how deliciously sexy Marc Santino is, she's his boss. So she'll stick with her keeping-to-herself routine. Still, Marc has Tess aching to be all kinds of wrong. And all those reasons they have to stay away don't seem important...especially if their sexy arrangement remains their secret. Suddenly, their hot affair becomes more than just a distraction. Can they let it turn into something more?

The Comeback of Roy Walker

by Stephanie Doyle

She's the key to his career-and his heart Roy Walker never did like the taste of humble pie. Too bad he's getting his share of it now that he needs to pitch one more season of pro baseball. Worse, he can't achieve it without the help of physiotherapist Lane Baker-the one woman who won't have anything to do with him. Somehow he has to make amends for the past. But his intentions to be a better man get sidelined by the combustible connection between him and Lane. Ego aside, it's time to admit he never stopped wanting her...and his greatest comeback will be winning her!

Forgetting

by Douwe Draaisma

In his highly praised book The Nostalgia Factory, renowned memory scholar Douwe Draaisma explored the puzzling logic of memory in later life with humor and deep insight. In this compelling new book he turns to the "miracle" of forgetting. Far from being a defect that may indicate Alzheimer's or another form of dementia, Draaisma claims, forgetting is one of memory's crucial capacities. In fact, forgetting is essential. Weaving together an engaging array of literary, historical, and scientific sources, the author considers forgetting from every angle. He pierces false clichés and asks important questions: Is a forgotten memory lost forever? What makes a colleague remember an idea but forget that it was yours? Draaisma explores "first memories" of young children, how experiences are translated into memory, the controversies over repression and "recovered" memories, and weird examples of memory dysfunction. He movingly examines the impact on personal memories when a hidden truth comes to light. In a persuasive conclusion the author advocates the undervalued practice of "the art of forgetting"--a set of techniques that assist in erasing memories, thereby preserving valuable relationships and encouraging personal contentment.

The Paradox of Liberation

by Michael Walzer

Many of the successful campaigns for national liberation in the years following World War II were initially based on democratic and secular ideals. Once established, however, the newly independent nations had to deal with entirely unexpected religious fierceness. Michael Walzer, one of America's foremost political thinkers, examines this perplexing trend by studying India, Israel, and Algeria, three nations whose founding principles and institutions have been sharply attacked by three completely different groups of religious revivalists: Hindu militants, ultra-Orthodox Jews and messianic Zionists, and Islamic radicals. In his provocative, well-reasoned discussion, Walzer asks why these secular democratic movements have failed to sustain their hegemony: Why have they been unable to reproduce their political culture beyond one or two generations? In a postscript, he compares the difficulties of contemporary secularism to the successful establishment of secular politics in the early American republic--thereby making an argument for American exceptionalism but gravely noting that we may be less exceptional today.

The Fortunes of Francis Barber

by Michael Bundock

This compelling book chronicles a young boy's journey from the horrors of Jamaican slavery to the heart of London's literary world, and reveals the unlikely friendship that changed his life. Francis Barber, born in Jamaica, was brought to London by his owner in 1750 and became a servant in the household of the renowned Dr. Samuel Johnson. Although Barber left London for a time and served in the British navy during the Seven Years' War, he later returned to Johnson's employ. A fascinating reversal took place in the relationship between the two men as Johnson's health declined and the older man came to rely more and more upon his now educated and devoted companion. When Johnson died he left the bulk of his estate to Barber, a generous (and at the time scandalous) legacy, and a testament to the depth of their friendship. There were thousands of black Britons in the eighteenth century, but few accounts of their lives exist. In uncovering Francis Barber's story, this book not only provides insights into his life and Samuel Johnson's but also opens a window onto London when slaves had yet to win their freedom.

The Hearing-Loss Guide

by Robert L. Daniels John M. Burkey

Although millions of people could use good advice about hearing loss, it turns out that asking is difficult, and accurate advice is hard to come by. This book directly addresses the problem: it provides useful, first-hand advice from people who have experienced hearing loss themselves, along with accurate treatment information from a highly experienced audiologist. Prompted to write this book by a patient who thought the reality of hearing loss and its associated problems could only be truly understood by someone with personal experience, audiologist John M. Burkey gathered information from his own patients and their spouses. The Hearing-Loss Guide presents their candid recommendations for anyone who suffers hearing loss, as well as families, friends, and co-workers. The author opens with chapters on the basics of hearing loss, hearing aids and other devices, and treatments. He then turns to his patients, who discuss coping with hearing loss, the real-life consequences of losing hearing, how to get help, adapting to a hearing aid, and other useful topics. Family members also offer valuable advice. A resource guide completes this indispensable volume.

Revolutions without Borders

by Janet Polasky

Nation-based histories cannot do justice to the rowdy, radical interchange of ideas around the Atlantic world during the tumultuous years from 1776 to 1804. National borders were powerless to restrict the flow of enticing new visions of human rights and universal freedom. This expansive history explores how the revolutionary ideas that spurred the American and French revolutions reverberated far and wide, connecting European, North American, African, and Caribbean peoples more closely than ever before. Historian Janet Polasky focuses on the eighteenth-century travelers who spread new notions of liberty and equality. It was an age of itinerant revolutionaries, she shows, who ignored borders and found allies with whom to imagine a borderless world. As paths crossed, ideas entangled. The author investigates these ideas and how they were disseminated long before the days of instant communications and social media or even an international postal system. Polasky analyzes the paper records--books, broadsides, journals, newspapers, novels, letters, and more--to follow the far-reaching trails of revolutionary zeal. What emerges clearly from rich historic records is that the dream of liberty among America's founders was part of a much larger picture. It was a dream embraced throughout the far-flung regions of the Atlantic world.

Those Who Write for Immortality

by H. J. Jackson

Great writers of the past whose works we still read and love will be read forever. They will survive the test of time. We remember authors of true genius because their writings are simply the best. Or . . . might there be other reasons that account for an author's literary fate? This original book takes a fresh look at our beliefs about literary fame by examining how it actually comes about. H. J. Jackson wrestles with entrenched notions about recognizing genius and the test of time by comparing the reputations of a dozen writers of the Romantic period--some famous, some forgotten. Why are we still reading Jane Austen but not Mary Brunton, when readers in their own day sometimes couldn't tell their works apart? Why Keats and not Barry Cornwall, who came from the same circle of writers and had the same mentor? Why not that mentor, Leigh Hunt, himself? Jackson offers new and unorthodox accounts of the coming-to-fame of some of Britain's most revered authors and compares their reputations and afterlives with those of their contemporary rivals. What she discovers about trends, champions, institutional power, and writers' conscious efforts to position themselves for posterity casts fresh light on the actual processes that lead to literary fame.

The War That Used Up Words

by Dr Hazel Hutchison

In this provocative study, Hazel Hutchison takes a fresh look at the roles of American writers in helping to shape national opinion and policy during the First World War. From the war's opening salvos in Europe, American writers recognized the impact the war would have on their society and sought out new strategies to express their horror, support, or resignation. By focusing on the writings of Henry James, Edith Wharton, Grace Fallow Norton, Mary Borden, Ellen La Motte, E. E. Cummings, and John Dos Passos, Hutchison examines what it means to be a writer in wartime, particularly in the midst of a conflict characterized by censorship and propaganda. Drawing on original letters and manuscripts, some never before seen by researchers, this book explores how the essays, poetry, and novels of these seven literary figures influenced America's public view of events, from August 1914 through the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, and ultimately set the literary agenda for later, more celebrated texts about the war.

The Old Boys

by David Turner

To many in the United Kingdom, the British public school remains the disliked and mistrusted embodiment of privilege and elitism. They have educated many of the country's top bankers and politicians over the centuries right up to the present, including the present Prime Minister. David Turner's vibrant history of Great Britain's public schools, from the foundation of Winchester College in 1382 to the modern day, offers a fresh reappraisal of the controversial educational system. Turner argues that public schools are, in fact, good for the nation and are presently enjoying their true "Golden Age," countering the long-held belief that these institutions achieved their greatest glory during Great Britain's Victorian Era. Turner's engrossing and enlightening work is rife with colorful stories of schoolboy revolts, eccentric heads, shocking corruption, and financial collapse. His thoughtful appreciation of these learning establishments follows the progression of public schools from their sometimes brutal and inglorious pasts through their present incarnations as vital contributors to the economic, scientific, and political future of the country.

Browned Off and Bloody-Minded

by Alan Allport

More than three-and-a-half million men served in the British Army during the Second World War, the vast majority of them civilians who had never expected to become soldiers and had little idea what military life, with all its strange rituals, discomforts, and dangers, was going to be like. Alan Allport's rich and luminous social history examines the experience of the greatest and most terrible war in history from the perspective of these ordinary, extraordinary men, who were plucked from their peacetime families and workplaces and sent to fight for King and Country. Allport chronicles the huge diversity of their wartime trajectories, tracing how soldiers responded to and were shaped by their years with the British Army, and how that army, however reluctantly, had to accommodate itself to them. Touching on issues of class, sex, crime, trauma, and national identity, through a colorful multitude of fresh individual perspectives, the book provides an enlightening, deeply moving perspective on how a generation of very modern-minded young men responded to the challenges of a brutal and disorienting conflict.

The Rise of Thomas Cromwell

by Michael Everett

How much does the Thomas Cromwell of popular novels and television series resemble the real Cromwell? This meticulous study of Cromwell's early political career expands and revises what has been understood concerning the life and talents of Henry VIII's chief minister. Michael Everett provides a new and enlightening account of Cromwell's rise to power, his influence on the king, his role in the Reformation, and his impact on the future of the nation. Controversially, Everett depicts Cromwell not as the fervent evangelical, Machiavellian politician, or the revolutionary administrator that earlier historians have perceived. Instead he reveals Cromwell as a highly capable and efficient servant of the Crown, rising to power not by masterminding Henry VIII's split with Rome but rather by dint of exceptional skills as an administrator.

The Heroic Slave

by Frederick Douglass Robert S. Levine John R. Mckivigan Professor John Stauffer

First published nearly a decade prior to the Civil War, The Heroic Slave is the only fictional work by abolitionist, orator, author, and social reformer Frederick Douglass, himself a former slave. It is inspired by the true story of Madison Washington, who, along with eighteen others, took control of the slave ship Creole in November 1841 and sailed it to Nassau in the British colony of the Bahamas, where they could live free. This new critical edition, ideal for classroom use, includes the full text of Douglass's fictional recounting of the most successful slave revolt in American history, as well as an interpretive introduction; excerpts from Douglass's correspondence, speeches, and editorials; short selections by other writers on the Creole rebellion; and recent criticism on the novella.

France 1940

by Philip Nord

In this revisionist account of France's crushing defeat in 1940, a world authority on French history argues that the nation's downfall has long been misunderstood. Philip Nord assesses France's diplomatic and military preparations for war with Germany, its conduct of the war once the fighting began, and the political consequences of defeat on the battlefield. He also tracks attitudes among French leaders once defeat seemed a likelihood, identifying who among them took advantage of the nation's misfortunes to sabotage democratic institutions and plot an authoritarian way forward. Nord finds that the longstanding view that France's collapse was due to military unpreparedeness and a decadent national character is unsupported by fact. Instead, he reveals that the Third Republic was no worse prepared and its military failings no less dramatic than those of the United States and other Allies in the early years of the war. What was unique in France was the betrayal by military and political elites who abandoned the Republic and supported the reprehensible Vichy takeover. Why then have historians and politicians ever since interpreted the defeat as a judgment on the nation as a whole? Why has the focus been on the failings of the Third Republic and not on elite betrayal? The author examines these questions in a fascinating conclusion.

Showing 4,876 through 4,900 of 4,911 results
Previous   Page: Go to first page 195 196 197   Next

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.