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Father Struck It Rich

by Evalyn Walsh Mclean Boyden Sparkes

Thomas Walsh discovered fabulous golden wealth in the historic Camp Bird Mine near Ouray, Colorado. His daughter, Evalyn Walsh McLean, tells an engaging true story of the family that wanted for nothing. They led a life of extravagance. It enabled them to acquire possessions such as the Hope Diamond and the fabulous homes that hosted spectacular social functions and served as retreats for kings and presidents.-Print ed.

Wedemeyer Reports!

by General Albert C. Wedemeyer

As the chief planner for General Marshall, and co-author of the Victory Plan, General Wedemeyer had a truly significant hand in shaping and directing the Allied War effort against the Fascist powers. In these brilliant, excellently written memoirs he reveals the planning and execution of Grand Strategy on a global scale that toppled Hitler, Mussolini and Tojo.""The Second World War," says historian Walter Millis, "was administered."...As a war planner in Washington from 1940 into 1943 I was intimately involved in an attempt to see the war whole--and even after I had moved on to Asia, where I served successively on Lord Louis Mountbatten's staff in India and as U.S. commander in the China Theater, I was still close to the problems of adapting Grand Strategy to a conflict of global dimensions.It was inevitable, then, that the subject of Grand Strategy should predominate in this book. I was not deprived of my own share of war experience from close up, but my most strenuous battles were those of the mind--of trying, as we in Washington's planning echelons saw it, to establish a correct and meaningful Grand Strategy which would have resulted in a fruitful peace and a decent post-war world.There were many obstacles in the way of developing a meaningful strategy, of assuring that our abundant means, material and spiritual, would be used to achieve worthy human ends. First, there was the pervasive influence of the Communists, who had their own plans for utilizing the war as a springboard to world domination. Second, there was the obstinacy of that grand old man, Winston Churchill, who, as we soldiers felt, could never reconcile his own concepts of Grand Strategy with sound military decisions. Because we had to contend with the machinations of Stalin on the one hand and with the bulldog tenacity of Churchill on the other, this book has had to be harsh in some of its personal assessments."-Foreword

THE HASKELL MEMOIRS. The Personal Narrative of a Confederate Officer

by Col. John Cheves Haskell Gilbert E. Govan

A vivid and excellent Confederate memoir from a highly decorated and respected artillery commander."John Cheves Haskell came out of a rich French, Scotch and Scotch-Irish heritage of the Santee river country of South Carolina. The grandson of Langdon Cheves, a prominent South Carolinian, John was brought up on "The Home Place" plantation in the Abbeville district. When the Civil War broke out, he was a student at South Carolina College, but he left his textbooks and joined Beauregard's command at Charleston. His family was well represented in the conflict, for he had six brothers in the Confederate army.Intelligent and enthusiastic, Haskell rose quickly in favor with his superior officers. He served on the staffs of Generals Joseph E. Johnston and G. W. Smith until he lost his right arm at Mechanicsville. After his recovery, he commanded the artillery in North Carolina until the late spring of 1863, when he was at last given an opportunity to display his talents as a field commander of artillery. At Gettysburg Haskell jointly commanded an artillery battalion in Longstreet's corps, himself in the Richmond-Petersburg lines, and was chosen by General Lee to lead the Confederate artillery to the place of surrender at Appomattox. His attitude under fire won the consistent praise of his superiors during the war, especially at Gaines Mill, where he was praised by no less than five generals". - THOMAS LAWRENCE CONNELLY

Getting Through To People

by Jesse S. Nirenberg

If you think you can't reach all the people all the time - think again! Now you can persuade even the most stubborn or hostile audience to see your point of view with these proven techniques from Dr. Jesse S. Nirenberg. Through dozens of anecdotes, you'll learn how to control conversations with emotional people, how to hold other people's attention, and how to decode what people are really trying to tell you. And you'll discover how to reach the most shy and private people and make them want to open up to you. Getting Through to People invites you to join the over 300,000 people using these powerful methods to break through the mental barriers that obstruct true person-to-person communication, and enhance your personal and business success.-Audio ed.

The Meaning Of Anxiety

by Rollo May

When this important work was originally published in 1950--the first book in this country on anxiety--it was hailed as a work ahead of its time.This book is the result of several years of exploration, research, and thought on one of the most urgent problems of our day. Clinical experience has proved to psychologists and psychiatrists generally that the central problem in psychotherapy is the nature of anxiety. To the extent that we have been able to solve that problem, we have made a beginning in understanding the causes of integration and disintegration of personality.But if anxiety were merely a phenomenon of maladjustment, it might well be consigned to the consulting room and the clinic and this book to the professional library. The evidence is overwhelming, however, that men and women of today live in an "age of anxiety." If one penetrates below the surface of political, economic, business, professional, or domestic crises to discover their psychological causes, or if one seeks to understand modern art or poetry or philosophy or religion, one runs athwart the problem of anxiety at almost every turn. There is reason to believe that the ordinary stresses and strains of life in the changing world of today are such that few if any escape the need to confront anxiety and to deal with it in some manner.This study seeks to bring together in one volume the theories of anxiety offered by modern explorers in different areas of our culture, to discover the common elements in these theories, and to formulate these concepts so that we shall have some common ground for further inquiry. If the synthesis of anxiety theory presented here serves the purpose of producing some coherence and order in this field, a good part of the writer's goal will have been achieved.

Wyoming

by Zane Gray

A certified classic by the master of Western fiction Zane Grey.With cattle rustling on the rise in the cattle town of Randall, Wyoming, newcomers Martha Ann Dixon and Andrew Bonning join the ranchers in their fight to protect their livestock."Take this hombre's gun, Tenderfoot," the foreman snapped while keeping the rustler covered. Young Andy yanked the weapon out from under the man's belt. "Now tie his hands behind his back." The excitement made Andy clumsy, but he finally got the job done."Now take yore saddle rope and toss it over that there branch." Andy was about to obey when he stopped, staring in disbelief."You're not going to hang this poor devil?""Shore am," the foreman drawled. "I'm gonna stop this rustlin' once and fer all!"

“Yellowstone Kelly” - The Memoirs Of Luther S. Kelly

by Luther S. Kelly Milo S. Quaife

'In the narrative of "Yellowstone Kelly" we have a rare story of adventure and service. General Miles, who knew him long and intimately, fitly compares him with such heroes of the American wilderness as Daniel Boone and David Crocket...His story is at once an important contribution to the history of the western frontier in the decades to which it pertains and a thrilling tale of sustained adventure' - M. M. Quaife.'What old 'Yellowstone' has to say is extremely interesting, and he tells it in simple, straightforward fashion, with a wealth of absorbing detail' - "New York Times". 'Mr. Kelly writes not as a novelist, but as a historian, and his work is rich in the best qualities of both' - "Outlook".'His memoirs [are] written with a rare skill in narration...It is a part of the story of the West and particularly of the Yellowstone region that we could ill afford to lose' - "Review of Reviews".'Here is history in a most entertaining form' - "Boston Transcript".

At Close Quarters; PT Boats In The United States Navy [Illustrated Edition]

by Rear Admiral Earnest McNeill Eller President John F. Kennedy Captain Robert J. Bulkley Jr.

Includes over 110 illustrations charting the history of the US Navy PT Boats."The destiny of our country has been inextricably interwoven with the sea. This was never more true than in the giant World War II that involved all seas and most of mankind. To fight the sea war we needed many types of ships, large and small, from aircraft carriers and battleships to PT boats."Small though they were, the PT boats played a key role. Like most naval ships, they could carry out numerous tasks with dispatch and versatility. In narrow waters or in-fighting close to land they could deliver a powerful punch with torpedo or gun. On occasion they could lay mines or drop depth charges. They could speed through reefs and shark infested waters to rescue downed pilots or secretly close the shore to make contacts with coast watchers and guerrilla forces. PT boats were an embodiment of John Paul Jones' words:"I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast for I intend to go in harm's way.""Naval strength must function from shore to shore and on inland waters where the mobility and flexibility provided by ships can be employed to support land operations. PT boats filled an important need in World War II in shallow waters, complementing the achievements of greater ships in greater seas. This need for small, fast, versatile, strongly armed vessels does not wane. In fact it may increase in these troubled times when operations requiring just these capabilities are the most likely of those which may confront us."The thorough and competent account herein of over-all PT boat operations in World War II, compiled by Captain Robert Bulkley, a distinguished PT boat commander, should therefore prove of wide interest. The widest use of the sea, integrated fully into our national strength, is as important to America in the age of nuclear power and space travel as in those stirring days of the birth of the Republic."-President John F Kennedy.

The Amphibians Came to Conquer: The Story of Richmond Kelly Turner Vol. II

by Vice Admiral George C. Dyer Rear Admiral Earnest McNeill Eller

Includes over 110 maps, charts and illustrations.His nickname was "Terrible Turner." He was, according to one ensign who served with him prior to World War II, "the meanest man I ever saw, and the most competent naval officer I ever served with." He led the successful amphibious attacks on Guadalcanal, Makin, Kwajalein, Roi-Namur, Saipan, Tinian, and Guam. He was Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner, one of the key figures in America's defeat of Japan. In this fascinating and comprehensive biography, Vice Admiral George C. Dyer documents the tough and fearless leadership of Admiral Turner, his astonishing success in meeting some of the toughest challenges in the history of amphibious warfare, and detailed descriptions of the ships and men who fought under him. More than just a biography, The Amphibians Came to Conquer is a carefully documented history, both strategic and tactical, of the major campaigns in the Pacific from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, providing a wealth of information on how Terrible Turner and the men he commanded conquered island after island against a tough and determined foe. In an astonishing tribute to the tenacity of Turner and his men, a February 21, 1945 Japanese broadcast said: "The true nature of an alligator is that once he bites into something, he will not let go. Turner's nature is also like this." This remarkable book belongs in the library of any serious student of the war in the Pacific.

The Amphibians Came to Conquer: The Story of Richmond Kelly Turner Vol. I

by Vice Admiral George C. Dyer Rear Admiral Earnest McNeill Eller

Includes over 90 maps, charts and illustrations.His nickname was "Terrible Turner." He was, according to one ensign who served with him prior to World War II, "the meanest man I ever saw, and the most competent naval officer I ever served with." He led the successful amphibious attacks on Guadalcanal, Makin, Kwajalein, Roi-Namur, Saipan, Tinian, and Guam. He was Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner, one of the key figures in America's defeat of Japan. In this fascinating and comprehensive biography, Vice Admiral George C. Dyer documents the tough and fearless leadership of Admiral Turner, his astonishing success in meeting some of the toughest challenges in the history of amphibious warfare, and detailed descriptions of the ships and men who fought under him. More than just a biography, The Amphibians Came to Conquer is a carefully documented history, both strategic and tactical, of the major campaigns in the Pacific from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, providing a wealth of information on how Terrible Turner and the men he commanded conquered island after island against a tough and determined foe. In an astonishing tribute to the tenacity of Turner and his men, a February 21, 1945 Japanese broadcast said: "The true nature of an alligator is that once he bites into something, he will not let go. Turner's nature is also like this." This remarkable book belongs in the library of any serious student of the war in the Pacific

Helmet For My Pillow [Illustrated Edition]

by Robert Leckie

Includes over 220 photos, maps and plans following Robert "Lucky" Leckie's Pacific War with the 1st Marine Division"Here is one of the most riveting first-person accounts ever to come out of World War II. Robert Leckie enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in January 1942, shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. In Helmet for My Pillow we follow his odyssey, from basic training on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. Recounting his service with the 1st Marine Division and the brutal action on Guadalcanal, New Britain, and Peleliu, Leckie spares no detail of the horrors and sacrifices of war, painting an unvarnished portrait of how real warriors are made, fight, and often die in the defense of their country. From the live-for-today rowdiness of marines on leave to the terrors of jungle warfare against an enemy determined to fight to the last man, Leckie describes what war is really like when victory can only be measured inch by bloody inch. Woven throughout are Leckie's hard-won, eloquent, and thoroughly unsentimental meditations on the meaning of war and why we fight. Unparalleled in its immediacy and accuracy, Helmet for My Pillow will leave no reader untouched. This is a book that brings you as close to the mud, the blood, and the experience of war as it is safe to come."-Print Ed.

From Cadet To Colonel: The Record Of A Life Of Active Service Vol. II

by Major-Gen. Sir Thomas Seaton K.C.B.

At the tender age of 16 Thomas Seaton took up a cadestship in the East India Company in 1822, and waved farewell to his native London for a career of soldiering in India. He was to spend most of his life in the Indian sub-continent and its border regions, at the sharp end of the expansion of the British Empire.Plunged into a new world of sights and scenes of India Lieutenant Seaton of the 35th Native Infantry had little time to adjust before beginning his first major campaign at the bloody siege of the siege of Bhurtpore. A few years later, he was part of the very unsuccessful British incursion into Afghanistan in 1842, his memoirs as one of the besieged in Jalalabad are among the best that have ever been written. A decade later, as the first signs of Great Mutiny among were noticed among the native troops, Seaton's superiors ordered him from his sick bed to take command of the 60th Native Infantry, a regiment that was known to be close to open revolt, despite Seaton's dest efforts the 60th mutinied and their British officers barely escaped with their lives. Seaton served with distinction at the siege of Delhi and after the fall of the city was sent with reinforcements to the beleagured Fatehgarh. In command of the forces that would soon be outnumbered, Colonel Seaton determined on a brave course of action; a night march followed by a surprize attack on the rebels. Colonel Seaton smashed the rebel troops leaving the entire area free from their influence. In this brilliant action he and his men "had marched, out and home, forty-four miles, had fought an action, defeating the enemy with considerable loss, and capturing their guns, ammunition, tents, stores, and baggage, and they had returned home safely with the captured guns, without leaving behind a single straggler, and, in spite of the tremendous heat, doing all in a little over twenty-two hours.". A fine action packed memoir filled with vignettes and anecdotes of the British Raj.

From Cadet To Colonel: The Record Of A Life Of Active Service Vol. I

by Major-Gen. Sir Thomas Seaton K.C.B.

At the tender age of 16 Thomas Seaton took up a cadestship in the East India Company in 1822, and waved farewell to his native London for a career of soldiering in India. He was to spend most of his life in the Indian sub-continent and its border regions, at the sharp end of the expansion of the British Empire.Plunged into a new world of sights and scenes of India Lieutenant Seaton of the 35th Native Infantry had little time to adjust before beginning his first major campaign at the bloody siege of the siege of Bhurtpore. A few years later, he was part of the very unsuccessful British incursion into Afghanistan in 1842, his memoirs as one of the besieged in Jalalabad are among the best that have ever been written. A decade later, as the first signs of Great Mutiny among were noticed among the native troops, Seaton's superiors ordered him from his sick bed to take command of the 60th Native Infantry, a regiment that was known to be close to open revolt, despite Seaton's dest efforts the 60th mutinied and their British officers barely escaped with their lives. Seaton served with distinction at the siege of Delhi and after the fall of the city was sent with reinforcements to the beleagured Fatehgarh. In command of the forces that would soon be outnumbered, Colonel Seaton determined on a brave course of action; a night march followed by a surprize attack on the rebels. Colonel Seaton smashed the rebel troops leaving the entire area free from their influence. In this brilliant action he and his men "had marched, out and home, forty-four miles, had fought an action, defeating the enemy with considerable loss, and capturing their guns, ammunition, tents, stores, and baggage, and they had returned home safely with the captured guns, without leaving behind a single straggler, and, in spite of the tremendous heat, doing all in a little over twenty-two hours.". A fine action packed memoir filled with vignettes and anecdotes of the British Raj.

Night Comes To The Cumberlands: A Biography Of A Depressed Area

by Harry M. Claudill

"At the time it was first published in 1962, it framed such an urgent appeal to the American conscience that it actually prompted the creation of the Appalachian Regional Commission, an agency that has pumped millions of dollars into Appalachia.Caudill's study begins in the violence of the Indian wars and ends in the economic despair of the 1950s and 1960s. Two hundred years ago, the Cumberland Plateau was a land of great promise. Its deep, twisting valleys contained rich bottomlands. The surrounding mountains were teeming with game and covered with valuable timber. The people who came into this land scratched out a living by farming, hunting, and making all the things they need-including whiskey.The quality of life in Appalachia declined during the Civil War and Appalachia remained "in a bad way" for the next century. By the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, Appalachia had become an island of poverty in a national sea of plenty and prosperity. Caudill's book alerted the mainstream world to our problems and their causes. Since then the ARC has provided millions of dollars to strengthen the brick and mortar infrastructure of Appalachia and to help us recover from a century of economic problems that had greatly undermined our quality of life."-Print ed.

Three Years With Quantrell: A True Story Told By His Scout

by O. S. Barton John Mccorkle

"This famous memoir by John McCorkle, is the best published account by a scout who "rode with Quantrill." John McCorkle was a young Missouri farmer of Southern sympathies. After serving briefly in the pro-Confederate Missouri State Guard, he became a prominent member of William Clarke Quantrill's infamous guerrillas, who took advantage of the turmoil in the Missouri-Kansas borderland to prey on pro-Union people.McCorkle displayed an unflinchingly violent nature while he participated in raids and engagements including the massacres at Lawrence and Baxter Springs, Kansas, and Centralia, Missouri. In 1865 he followed Quantrill into Kentucky, where the notorious leader was killed and his followers, McCorkle among them, surrendered and were paroled by Union authorities. Early in this century, having returned to farming, McCorkle told his remarkable Civil War experiences to O.S. Barton, a lawyer, who wrote this book."-Print ed.

Why The North Won The Civil War

by David Herbert Donald

WHY THE SOUTH LOSTWhat led to the downfall of the Confederacy? The distinguished professors of history represented in this volume examine the following crucial factors in the South's defeat:ECONOMIC--RICHARD N. CURRENT of the University of Wisconsin attributes the victory of the North to fundamental economic superiority so great that the civilian resources of the South were dissipated under the conditions of war.MILITARY--T. HARRY WILLIAMS of Louisiana State University cites the deficiencies of Confederate strategy and military leadership, evaluating the influence on both sides of Baron Jomini, a 19th-century strategist who stressed position warfare and a rapid tactical offensive.DIPLOMATIC--NORMAN A. GRAERNER of the University of Illinois holds that the basic reason England and France decided not to intervene on the side of the South was simply that to have done so would have violated the general principle of non-intervention to which they were committed.SOCIAL--DAVID DONALD of Columbia University offers the intriguing thesis that an excess of Southern democracy killed the Confederacy. From the ordinary man in the ranks to Jefferson Davis himself, too much emphasis was placed on individual freedom and not enough on military discipline.POLITICAL--DAVID M. POTTER of Stanford University suggests that the deficiencies of President Davis as a civil and military leader turner the balance, and that the South suffered from the lack of a second well-organized political party to force its leadership into competence.

Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, USN; A Study In Command

by Fleet Admiral C. W. Nimitz USN Vice Admiral E. P. Forrestel USN Rear Admiral E. M. Eller USN

Although some historians and many newsmen have written many words about Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, U.S. Navy and his brilliant career in the Pacific in World War II, the complete story of this reserved and self-effacing man is now being told for the first time by one of his close friends and wartime associates. The author, Vice Admiral E. P. Forrestel, an important member of Spruance's Staff, was in an ideal position to observe and report on the thought processes of this great and successful naval officer. Spruance's rise to fame came in the Battle of Midway where his sound judgement and wise decisions won a stunning victory over greatly superior enemy forces. That victory reversed the long series of enemy successes and was truly the turning point in the war. From that time on he played an ever increasing part in our naval advance across the Pacific--a task he shared in full measure with another great American naval officer--Admiral W. F. Halsey, U.S. Navy. Tarawa, the Marshall Islands, the Marianas, Iwo Jima and the Ryukyus were important stepping stones along the way that lead to the deck of the U.S.S. MISSOURI in Tokyo Bay where the surrender terms were signed on September 2, 1945. To cap his extraordinarily successful naval career which ended in his Presidency of the Naval War College he accepted an appointment as our Ambassador in the Philippines. Here his wisdom and tact contributed importantly to the satisfactory settlement of a number of troublesome and vexatious problems that disturbed the good relations that should exist between the governments of the Philippines and the United States.It is given to few Americans to serve their country so effectively and at such high levels as did this man. His career will serve as an example and a challenge to service personnel and diplomats alike. His story will be read avidly by those who suffered his blows in war and by those who are hostile to our country.

Manstein’s Campaigns - More Than Tactics

by Major Walter J. Wood

The purpose of this paper is to analyze selected campaigns/operations of Field Marshal Erich von Manstein in order to draw lessons from those campaigns as they relate to command, control, communications (C3) and logistics -- subjects of immediate and relevant interest to those who take up the profession of arms. But all too often, histories of battles, campaigns and entire conflicts neglect the treatment of these areas. And when these factors are dealt with, the treatment they receive is likely to be rather shallow, lacking the depth necessary for the student to analyze these factors/functions as they related to overall success or failure. This analysis will be conducted of specific, delineated functions as they relate to C3, but owing to the far reaching scope of logistics, this paper will be limited to treating a few critical aspects of logistics as they impacted on the campaigns of Manstein and the German Army. The second chapter will introduce Manstein to the reader and highlight his accomplishments. Chapter III will deal with C3 functions as they related, supported or were used by Manstein, and the fourth chapter will deal with key logistics issues as they influenced/impacted the campaigns of Manstein. The final chapter will present some conclusions and broad lessons derived from the German experience in general.

Standing Fast: German Defensive Doctrine on the Russian Front During World War II — Prewar to March 1943: [Illustrated Edition]

by Major Timothy A. Wray

Includes over 50 maps plans and illustrations.In this Research Survey, Major Timothy A. Wray provides an excellent survey of the intricacies of employing defensive tactics against a powerful opponent. Using after-action reports, unit war diaries, and other primary materials, Major Wray analyzes the doctrine and tactics that the Germans used on the Eastern Front during World War II.At the end of World War I, the Germans adopted the elastic defense in depth and continued to use it as their basic doctrine through the end of World War II. However, because of limitations caused by difficult terrain, severe weather, manpower and supply shortages, Soviet tactics, and Hitler's order to stand fast, German commanders were unable to implement the Elastic Defense in its true form. Even so, innovative and resourceful unit commanders were able to adapt to the harsh realities of combat and improvise defensive methods that saved the German armies from complete annihilation.U.S. Army unit commanders on the future battlefield, while battling a motivated and aggressive force, will also face hard battlefield conditions. Therefore, these commanders, in applying the AirLand Battle tenets of initiative, depth, agility, and synchronization, will have to demonstrate the same type of innovativeness and resourcefulness as the Germans did in Russia. To operate on the AirLand Battlefield, U.S. soldiers must depend on sound doctrine and the ability to execute it intelligently. All Army officers will benefit from Major Wray's new and vital assessment of how German doctrine was modified by the test of war.

A Study Of The Aerial Interdiction of Railways During The Korean War

by Major Frank J. Merrill USAF

This study undertakes to examine the aerial interdiction activities conducted against the enemy railway system by United Nations' forces during the Korean War, June 1950-July 1953. It has three major goals: (1) to compile a concise history of these interdiction activities; (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts as it might relate to the conduct of the total war effort; and (3) to make recommendations pertaining to the future conduct of aerial interdiction.

Engineer Battlefield Functions At Chancellorsville

by Major James R. Weber

This study investigates the significant effect of mobility, counter-mobility, survivability, and topographic engineering on the American Civil War Campaign of Chancellorsville. The operations occurred near Fredericksburg, Virginia, in April and May of 1863. In the battle, the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia decisively defeated the Union Army of the Potomac. Engineer-related considerations contributed immensely to the Confederate victory.Engineer battlefield functions influenced the operations of both armies. The Union Engineer Brigade constructed numerous pontoon bridges to overcome the river obstacles prior to and following the battle. This capability allowed the Union Army to initially surprise and envelop the Confederate Army. The natural obstacles of the rivers and forests and manmade obstacles of abatis hindered maneuver. Survivability was a significant factor during the fighting. At Chancellorsville, the Confederates used entrenchments for the first time in open operations. This strengthened their economy of force in front of the Union Army and gave "Stonewall" Jackson mass during his successful enveloping attack. Finally, topographic engineering was important through map production and reconnaissance by engineers.This study concludes that the Confederate Army integrated the engineer battlefield functions more effectively than the Union Army. In part, this explains the decisive Confederate victory.

General Lewis Walt: Operational Art in Vietnam, 1965-1967

by Major Jeremy G. Swenddal

This study investigates the significant effect of mobility, counter-mobility, survivability, and topographic engineering on the American Civil War Campaign of Chancellorsville. The operations occurred near Fredericksburg, Virginia, in April and May of 1863. In the battle, the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia decisively defeated the Union Army of the Potomac. Engineer-related considerations contributed immensely to the Confederate victory.Engineer battlefield functions influenced the operations of both armies. The Union Engineer Brigade constructed numerous pontoon bridges to overcome the river obstacles prior to and following the battle. This capability allowed the Union Army to initially surprise and envelop the Confederate Army. The natural obstacles of the rivers and forests and manmade obstacles of abatis hindered maneuver. Survivability was a significant factor during the fighting. At Chancellorsville, the Confederates used entrenchments for the first time in open operations. This strengthened their economy of force in front of the Union Army and gave "Stonewall" Jackson mass during his successful enveloping attack. Finally, topographic engineering was important through map production and reconnaissance by engineers.This study concludes that the Confederate Army integrated the engineer battlefield functions more effectively than the Union Army. In part, this explains the decisive Confederate victory.

To The Bitter End

by Hans Bernd Gisevius Richard Wilson

"When on July 20, 1944, a bomb--boldly placed inside the Wolf's Lair (Hitler's headquarters in East Prussia) by the German Anti-Nazi Resistance--exploded without killing the Führer, the subsequent coup d'état against the Third Reich collapsed. Most of the conspirators were summarily shot or condemned in show trials and sadistically hanged. The conspiracy involved a wide circle of former politicians, diplomats, and government officials as well as senior military men. The Resistance had started as early as 1933 and involved several planned putsches and assassination attempts. Hans B. Gisevius knew or met the major figures--including Beck, Canaris, Oster, Goerdeler, and von Stauffenberg--and barely escaped after the coup's failure. One of the few survivors of the German Anti-Nazi Resistance, Gisevius traces its history, from the 1933 Reichstag fire to Germany's defeat in 1945, in a book as riveting as it is exceptional."-Print ed.

The Letters of Sir Augustus Frazer K.C.B. Commanding The Royal Horse Artillery: In The Army Under The Duke Of Wellington [Illustrated Edition]

by Colonel Sir Augustus Simon Frazer K.C.B. General Edward Sabine K.C.B.

Includes over 100 maps of the actions, engagements and battles of the entire Peninsular War."A full and vivid account of the Peninsula War and the Waterloo campaign as they happened in some 180 letters to his family written by Col. Frazer, commander of the Horse Artillery in both conflicts.The writer of these letters, Colonel Sir Augustus Simon Frazer, K.C.B, was born in September 1776 and a month before his fourteenth birthday he was admitted as a Gentleman Cadet into the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich...Promoted Major in June 1811 he went to the Peninsula in November 1812, and it is from this date that the letters begin. In April 1813 Frazer was appointed to command the Horse Artillery of the army and as such saw action at Salamanca, Osma, Vitoria, St Sebastian, the crossings of the Bidassoa, Nive and Adour. He was severely wounded at the siege of Bayonne on 27 February 1814 but was back for the final battle of Toulouse in April which brought hostilities against the French to a close.When war with France broke out again on Napoleon's escape from Elba Sir Augustus joined the allied army in Flanders, under the Duke of Wellington, in March 1815 and resumed command of the Horse Artillery, the post he held during the battle of Waterloo. On return to England he was appointed commander HQ RHA, Woolwich until promoted Colonel in January 1825. Frazer was a prolific letter writer and the letters contained in this book were written to his wife, Lady Emma Frazer (whom he married in 1809) and to his wife's sister and her husband, Major and Mrs Moore. They give a fascinating account of the stirring events of the time. 140 of them were written during the Peninsular campaign and a further 41 during the Waterloo campaign. They describe events literally as they occurred."-Print ed.

Blücher And The Uprising Of Prussia Against Napoleon, 1806-1815

by Dr Ernest F. Henderson

Includes 32 Illustrations and 6 maps.BLÜCHER is chiefly known to English readers as the man who came to Wellington's aid at Waterloo. The object of the present volume is to show that he had a separate existence of his own and performed other great deeds in the cause that are equally deserving of praise. Strange that he has never been made the subject of an English biography and that of his German lives none have been translated into English! The present work cannot pretend altogether to fill the gap, as the plan of the series, if I have understood it rightly, is to treat the movement as fully as the man.I shall feel a certain satisfaction if I can succeed in establishing Blücher in his rightful position, as the peer of Wellington in all that concerns the overthrow of Napoleon. "You forget Wellington's Spanish campaigns," I shall be told. "You in turn forget," I shall answer, "that Blücher was the one progressive, inspiring element among the leaders of the allied armies from the year 1813 on." Without Blücher's decision to cross the Elbe at Wartenburg there would have been no battle of Leipzig; without his cutting loose from Schwarzenberg in March, 1814, there would have been no closing in of the allies on Paris; without his brave endurance at Ligny in spite of the non-arrival of the promised reinforcements, Wellington would have been overwhelmed at Quatre-Bras and there would have been no Waterloo.

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  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.