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Natural Law in Court

by R. H. Helmholz

Natural-law theory grounds human laws in universal truths of God's creation. The task of the judicial system was to build an edifice of positive law on natural law's foundations. R. H. Helmholz shows how lawyers and judges made and interpreted natural law arguments in the West, and concludes that historically it has advanced the cause of justice.

Bee Time: Lessons from the Hive

by Mark L. Winston

Being among bees is a full-body experience, Mark Winston writes. Bee Time presents his reflections on three decades spent studying these remarkable creatures, and on the lessons they can teach about how humans might better interact with one another and the natural world, from the boardroom to urban design to agricultural ecosystems.

Black Silent Majority: The Rockefeller Drug Laws and the Politics of Punishment

by Michael Javen Fortner

Aggressive policing and draconian sentencing have disproportionately imprisoned millions of African Americans for drug-related offenses. Michael Javen Fortner shows that in the 1970s these punitive policies toward addicts and pushers enjoyed the support of many working-class and middle-class blacks, angry about the chaos in their own neighborhoods.

Women, Islam, and Abbasid Identity

by Nadia Maria El Cheikh

When the Abbasids overthrew the Umayyads in 750 CE and ushered in Islam's Golden Age, ideas about gender and sexuality were central to the process by which the caliphate achieved self-definition and articulated its systems of power and thought. Nadia Maria El Cheikh's study reveals the importance of women to the writing of early Islamic history.

Self and Soul: A Defense of Ideals

by Mark Edmundson

In a culture of the Self that has become progressively more skeptical and materialistic, we spare little thought for the great ideals--courage, contemplation, and compassion--that once gave life meaning. Here, Mark Edmundson makes an impassioned attempt to defend the value of these ancient ideals and to resurrect Soul in the modern world.

Persophilia: Persian Culture on the Global Scene

by Hamid Dabashi

From antiquity to the Enlightenment, Persian culture has been integral to European history. Interest in all things Persian shaped not just Western views but the self-image of Iranians to the present day. Hamid Dabashi maps the changing geography of these connections, showing that traffic in ideas about Persia did not travel on a one-way street.

Afghan Modern: The History of a Global Nation

by Robert D. Crews

Rugged, remote, riven by tribal rivalries and religious violence, Afghanistan seems to many a forsaken country frozen in time. Robert Crews presents a bold challenge to this misperception. During their long history, Afghans have engaged and connected with a wider world, occupying a pivotal position in the Cold War and the decades that followed.

The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix it

by Leonard Cassuto

American graduate education is in disarray. Graduate study in the humanities takes too long and those who succeed face a dismal academic job market. Leonard Cassuto gives practical advice about how faculty can teach and advise students so that they are prepared for the demands of the working worlds they will join, inside and outside the academy.

How the Other Half Banks: Exclusion, Exploitation, and the Threat to Democracy

by Mehrsa Baradaran

The United States has two separate banking systems--one serving the well-to-do and another exploiting everyone else. Deserted by banks and lacking credit, many people are forced to wander through a Wild West of payday lenders and check-cashing services thanks to the effects of deregulation in the 1970s that continue today, Mehrsa Baradaran shows.

Coyote Valley: Deep History in the High Rockies

by Thomas G. Andrews

Thomas Andrews drills deep into the many pressures that have reshaped a small stretch of North America, from the ice age to the advent of the Anthropocene and controversies over climate change. He brings to the surface lessons about the critical relationships to land, climate, and species that only seemingly unimportant places on Earth can teach.

Slavish Shore: The Odyssey of Richard Henry Dana Jr.

by Jeffrey L. Amestoy

In 1834 Harvard dropout Richard Henry Dana Jr. became a common seaman, and soon his Two Years Before the Mast became a classic. Literary acclaim did not erase the young lawyer's memory of floggings he witnessed aboard ship or undermine his vow to combat injustice. Jeffrey Amestoy tells the story of Dana's determination to keep that vow.

Hitler's Shadow Empire

by Pierpaolo Barbieri

The Nazis provided Franco's Nationalists with planes, armaments, and tanks in their civil war against the Communists but behind this largesse was a Faustian bargain. Pierpaolo Barbieri makes a convincing case that the Nazis hoped to establish an economic empire in Europe, and in Spain they tested the tactics intended for future subject territories.

Reagan's Legacy in a World Transformed

by Jeffrey L. Chidester

Reagan's Legacy in a World Transformed offers a timely retrospective on the fortieth president's policies and impact on today's world, from the influence of free market ideas on economic globalization, to the role of an assertive military in U.S. foreign policy, to reduction of nuclear arsenals in the interest of stability.

After Appomattox

by Gregory P. Downs

The Civil War did not end with Confederate capitulation in 1865. A second phase commenced which lasted until 1871--not Reconstruction but genuine belligerency whose mission was to crush slavery and create civil and political rights for freed people. But as Gregory Downs shows, military occupation posed its own dilemmas, including near-anarchy.

Fateful Ties

by Gordon H. Chang

Americans look to China with fascination and fear, unsure whether it is friend or foe but certain it will play a crucial role in their future. This is nothing new, Gordon Chang says. Fateful Ties draws on literature, art, biography, popular culture, and politics to trace America's long and varied preoccupation with China.

Scientists at War

by Sarah Bridger

Sarah Bridger examines the ethical debates that tested the U.S. scientific community during the Cold War, and scientists' contributions to military technologies and strategic policymaking, from the dawning atomic age through the Strategic Defense Initiative (Star Wars) in the 1980s, which sparked cross-generational opposition among scientists.

Violence All Around

by John Sifton

A human rights lawyer travels to hot zones around the globe before and after 9/11 to document abuses by warlords, terrorists, and counterterrorism forces. John Sifton reminds us that human rights advocates can only shame the world into better behavior; to invoke rights is to invoke the force to uphold them, including the very violence they deplore.

The Baltic

by Michael North

From the Vikings to the EU the Baltic has been a Nordic Mediterranean, a shared maritime zone with distinct patterns of trade, cultural exchange, and conflict. Covering a thousand years in a part of the globe where seas are more connective than land, Michael North's overview transforms the way we think about one of the world's great waterways.

Bonaparte

by Patrice Gueniffey

Patrice Gueniffey, the leading French historian of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic age, takes up the epic narrative at the heart of this turbulent period: the life of Napoleon himself, from his boyhood in Corsica, to his meteoric rise during the Italian and Egyptian campaigns, to his proclamation as Consul for Life in 1802.

Environment in the Balance

by Jonathan Z. Cannon

Does the green movement remain a transformative force in American life? In Environment in the Balance Jonathan Cannon interprets a wide range of U.S. Supreme Court decisions over four decades and explores the current ferment among activists, to gauge the practical and cultural impact of environmentalism and its future prospects.

Redesigning America's Community Colleges

by Thomas R. Bailey

Community colleges enroll half of the nation's undergraduates. Yet only 40 percent of entrants complete an undergraduate degree in six years. Redesigning America's Community Colleges explains how two-year colleges can increase their students' success rate quickly and at less cost, through a program of guided pathways to completion.

Indians in Kenya

by Sana Aiyar

Sana Aiyar chronicles the strategies by which Indians sought a political voice in Kenya, from the beginning of colonial rule to independence. She examines how the strands of Indians' diasporic identity influenced Kenya's leadership--from partnering with Europeans to colonize East Africa, to collaborating with Africans to battle racial inequality.

Daughters of Alchemy

by Meredith K. Ray

Meredith Ray shows that women were at the vanguard of empirical culture during the Scientific Revolution. They experimented with medicine and alchemy at home and in court, debated cosmological discoveries in salons and academies, and in their writings used their knowledge of natural philosophy to argue for women's intellectual equality to men.

Miniature Metropolis

by Andreas Huyssen

Andreas Huyssen explores the history and theory of metropolitan miniatures--short prose pieces about urban life written for European newspapers. His fine-grained readings open vistas into German critical theory and the visual arts, revealing the miniature to be one of the few genuinely innovative modes of spatialized writing created by modernism.

Peiresc's Mediterranean World

by Peter N. Miller

Nicolas Fabri de Peiresc was the most gifted French intellectual in the generation between Montaigne and Descartes. His insatiable curiosity poured forth in thousands of letters that traveled the Mediterranean, seeking knowledge. Mining his 70,000-page archive, Peter N. Miller recovers a lost Mediterranean world of the early seventeenth century.

Showing 4,976 through 5,000 of 8,658 results

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