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How to Find the Work You Love

by Boldt Laurence G.

Technological advances and the global marketplace are changing the way we live and work. Doing the work you love is the critical factor to personal fulfillment and economic success. No one understands this more than Laurence G. Boldt, whose Zen and the Art of Making a Living helped many carve out new and rewarding career paths. But how do you find the courage to start the search for a new career? And how do you tap into your own best resources to discover what you want to do and what you're good at? This remarkable guide offers simple yet profound strategies to help you answer those questions by focusing on four key elements to be sought in any life's work: Integrity, Service, Enjoyment, and Excellence. Boldt has reduced the quest for meaningful work to its essence and will lead you to an understanding of what you could and should be doing with your life. .

Hip Logic

by Terrance Hayes

Terrance Hayes is a dazzlingly original poet, interested in adventurous explorations of subject and form. His new work, Hip Logic, is full of poetic tributes to the likes of Paul Robeson, Big Bird, Balthus, and Mr. T, as well as poems based on the anagram principle of words within a word. Throughout, Hayes's verse dances in a kind of homemade music box, with notes that range from tender to erudite, associative to narrative, humorous to political. Hip Logic does much to capture the nuances of contemporary male African American identity and confirms Hayes's reputation as one of the most compelling new voices in American poetry. .

Practical Gods

by Carl Dennis

Winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Practical Gods is the eighth collection by Carl Dennis, a critically acclaimed poet and recent winner of one of the most prestigious poetry awards, the Ruth Lilly Prize. Carl Dennis has won acclaim for "wise, original, and often deeply moving" poems that "ease the reader out of accustomed modes of seeing and perceiving" (The New York Times). Many of the poems in this new book involve an attempt to enter into dialogue with pagan and biblical perspectives, to throw light on ordinary experience through metaphor borrowed from religious myth and to translate religious myth into secular terms. While making no claims to put us in touch with some ultimate reality, these clear, precise, sensitive poems help us to pay homage to the everyday household gods that are easy to ignore, the gods that sustain life and make it rewarding. .

The Sonnets

by Ted Berrigan

Originally published in 1964, The Sonnets by Ted Berrigan is considered by many to be his most important and influential book. This new annotated edition, with an introduction by Alice Notley, includes seven previously uncollected works. Like Shakespeare's sonnets, Berrigan's poems involve friendship and love triangles, but while the former happen chronologically, Berrigan's happen in the moment, with the story buried beneath a surface of names, repetitions, and fragmented experience. Reflecting the new American sensibilities of the 1960's as well as timeless poetic themes, The Sonnets is both eclectic and classical - the poems are monumental riddles worth contemplating. .

Memoirs

by Michael Fellman William Tecumseh Sherman

Before his spectacular career as General of the Union forces, William Tecumseh Sherman experienced decades of failure and depression. Drifting between the Old South and new West, Sherman witnessed firsthand many of the critical events of early nineteenth-century America: the Mexican War, the gold rush, the banking panics, and the battles with the Plains Indians. It wasn't until his victory at Shiloh, in 1862, that Sherman assumed his legendary place in American history. After Shiloh, Sherman sacked Atlanta and proceeded to burn a trail of destruction that split the Confederacy and ended the war. His strategy forever changed the nature of warfare and earned him eternal infamy throughout the South. Sherman's Memoirs evoke the uncompromising and deeply complex general as well as the turbulent times that transformed America into a world power. This Penguin Classics edition includes a fascinating introduction and notes by Sherman biographer Michael Fellman.

Narrative of Sojourner Truth

by Sojourner Truth

A symbol of the strength of African-American women, and a champion of the rights of all women, Sojourner Truth was an illiterate former slave in New York State who transformed herself into a vastly powerful orator. Dictating to a neighbor, she began her celebrated life story, in which she chronicles her youth, her 1827 emancipation, and her religious experiences, one year after the extremely successful publication in 1846 of Frederick Douglass's narrative. Truth's magnetism as an abolitionist speaker brought her fame in her own time, and her narrative gives today's readers a vivid picture of nineteenth-century life in the north, where blacks, enslaved or free, lived in relative isolation from one another. Based on the 1884 edition of the Narrative, this volume contains Book of Life, a contemporary collection of letters and biographical sketches about Truth's public appearances, including the controversial Arn't I a Woman speech and Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1863 essay, Sojourner Truth, The Libyan Sibyl as well as A Memorial Chapter about her death.

A Tramp Abroad

by Mark Twain Hamlin Hill Robert Gray Bruce

Cast in the form of a walking tour through Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy, A Tramp Abroad sparkles with the author's shrewd observations and highly opinionated comments on Old World culture, and showcases his unparalleled ability to integrate humorous sketches, autobiographical tidbit, and historical anecdotes in consistently entertaining narrative.

Early American Drama

by Various Jeffrey H. Richards

This unique volume includes eight early dramas that mirror American literary, social, and cultural history: Royall Tylers The Contrast (1789); William Dunlap'sAndre (1798); James Nelson Barker's The Indian Princess (1808); Robert Montgomery Bird's The Gladiator (1831); William Henry Smith's The Drunkard(1844); Anna Cora Mowatt's Fashion (1845); George Aiken's Uncle Tom's Cabin(1852); and Dion Boucicault's The Octoroon (1859).

The Wayward Bus

by John Steinbeck

Today, nearly forty years after his death, Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck remains one of Americas greatest writers and cultural figures. Over the next year, his many works, beginning with the six shown here, will be published as black-spine Penguin Classics for the first time and will feature eye-catching, newly commissioned art. Of this initial group of six titles, "The Wayward Bus" is in a new edition. An imaginative and unsentimental chronicle of a bus traveling Californias back roads. This allegorical novel of pilgrimage includes a new introduction by Gary Scharnhorst. Penguin Classics is proud to present these seminal works to a new generation of readersand to the many who revisit them again and again.

Pinocchio

by Carlo Collodi

Pinocchio is a fairy tale novel about the mischievous adventures of an animated marionette, and his poor father, a woodcarver named Geppetto. A classic of children's literature spawning many derivative works of art, and commonplace ideas such as a liar's long nose.

Generations

by Pattiann Rogers

Pattiann Rogers, one of America's finest contemporary poets, has won a reputation for densely detailed, thickly textured poems describing the natural world and one's place in it that are informed by a broad knowledge of science. In the tradition of Emerson, Whitman, and A. R. Ammons, Rogers's wise and complex poems read like a series of witty but deeply felt explorations of the physical world and the presence of the divine, exuding much observational care and descriptive panache. Her new collection, Generations, consists of fifty-four poems that concern themselves not just with the notion of the generations of life, but "generations" in the sense of energy, change, replication, and continuity--the entire process of coming or bringing into being. .

Lives of the Animals

by Robert Wrigley

Lives of the Animals takes us to that place where the boundaries between predator and prey, the observer and the observed, merge, reverse, become re-imagined. We find ourselves inside a story of death and life, witness to acts of survival so primal they seem less instinctive than passionate. And it is passion that most informs these poems: the bond between lovers, between parent and child, between humans and other animals, both wild and domestic, that populate our shared world of hunger and need. .

Visible Signs

by Lawrence Raab

A poem by Lawrence Raab is a carefully chosen and precisely rendered moment--a poised and elegant meditation on the nature of memory. This new collection includes a selection from each of Raab's five previous books of poetry, as well as twenty-one new poems. Readers will delight in their wide-ranging subjects, from "Miles Davis on Art" to "Saint Augustine's Dog," from the inventions of Rube Goldberg to the recklessness of dreams. .

Borrowed Love Poems

by John Yau

If the "I" cannot be representative, what or who can it represent? In John Yau's new collection, Borrowed Love Poems, the reader encounters artists (Hiroshige and Eva Hesse), poets (Marina Tsvetayeva and Georg Trakl), actors (Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre), and memorable figures (a retired wrestler and a private eye named Genghis Chan). Each becomes a spectral, sonorous presence inhabiting the polymorphic body of the page, a shadow of a shadow lit from within. Yau's poems are dazzling explorations of the multiple, shifting sands of identity, of the fictional, fake, factual, and autobiographical selves that pass like ghosts through the empty space known as "I. " Able to seamlessly merge a strict yet eccentric methodology with wild flights of the imagination, Yau moves into a rich, complex realm, where the flickering edges of consciousness-the dream state-become poetry.

Medicine

by Amy Gerstler

Amy Gerstler has won acclaim for complex yet accessible poetry that is by turns extravagant, subversive, surreal, and playful. In her new collection, Medicine, she deploys a variety of dramatic voices, spoken by such disparate characters as Cinderella's wicked sisters, the wife of a nineteenth-century naturalist, a homicide detective, and a woman who is happily married to a bear. Their elusive collectivity suggests, but never quite defines, the floating authorial presence that haunts them. Gerstler's abiding interests -- in love and mourning, in science and pseudo-science, in the idea of an afterlife -- are strongly evident in these new poems, which are full of strong emotion, language play, surprising twists, and a wicked sense of black humor.

Overtime: Selected Poems

by Philip Whalen

A selection of poems written over the course of Whalen's long career, OVERTIME brings many poems back into print after long--unaccountably long, to many minds--hiatuses. Often associated with the Beats, several of whom he had close friendships with, Whalen is distinct in his cultivation of a verse that combines Zen concentration and avuncular humor.

God

by Debora Greger

God has retired to Florida, like everyone else. He can't sleep. He watches TV. In the long poem that opens Debora Greger's sixth book, God, he has retreated to the swamps, where, in the lush particulars of the subtropics, a singular moral world is discovered. Wherever Greger is, she has a traveler's eye; her poetry finds the past beneath the present-where the "Eden of Florida," as the last poem ironically calls it, is an Eden with alligators. This is the work of a powerful, meditative poet, whose God is deceptively quiet, perfectly timed, and seriously amused. .

In the Language of Love

by Diane Schoemperlen

In this astonishingly inventive novel, Diane Schoemperlen uses the 100 stimulus words from the Standard Word Association Test as a narrative framework for exploring her heroine's growing understanding of the meaning of love. A tour de force of wit and wordplay, In the Language of Love is a wise and compassionate collage of one woman's coming of emotional age. .

The Prisoner of Zenda and Rupert of Hentzau

by Anthony Hope

Sir Anthony Hope Hawkins (1863-1933) was training to become a lawyer and barrister when he wrote his sixth novel, "The Prisoner of Zenda", in 1894. It took one month to finish the first draft, and it quickly achieved such great success that Hope turned to full-time writing. The story is set in the fictional country of Ruritania, on the eve of the new king's coronation. When the king is suddenly abducted, an Englishman who bears a striking resemblance to him is brought in as a political decoy. Like most of Hope's stories, the novel is full of plot twists, complications, villains, forbidden love, and an ultimate sense of duty. Included in this edition is the sequel to "Zenda", "Rupert of Hentzau", which deals with the same fictional country, and many of the same characters. These two works are classics of English literature, whose themes and attraction transcend time, and have inspired many stage, film and television adaptations.

Early Poems

by Millay Edna St. Vincent

One of the most successful poets in America and a fascinating literary figure of the early twentieth century, Edna St. Vincent Millay found her voice in a national poetry contest at the age of twenty. Her poems received critical praise and became the first step toward receiving the Pulitzer Award years later. An acclaimed poet of the Jazz Age, this liberated, often rebellious, woman enchanted us with her beautiful sonnets and lyrics, even as she surprised us with her unconventional personal life. This vibrant volume includes the complete selection of poems from Millay's first three books. Each gem reflects a different facet of the author's versatility. Renascence and Other Poems was Millay's first collection of poetry, a literary sensation when it was published in 1912. Acclaimed by critics for its remarkable use of compelling language and imagery, it is a deeply personal work that reflects the poet's spiritual awakening, using the themes of death and resurrection. In contrast, the poetry in A Few Figs from Thistles represents a cynical stage, a time of rebellion, and a search for personal freedom, as depicted in her famous line, "My candle burns at both ends. " Part beauty, part despair, the free verse and heartfelt sonnets of Second April are an expression of Millay's feelings about love and disillusionment. Eloquent, daring, and sometimes bittersweet, these masterful lyrics exemplify the best work of a complex, passionate, and gifted poet. Includes a selection from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: "Afternoon on a Hill. "

Complete Poems

by Johnson James Weldon

2000 marks the centenary of "Lift Every Voice and Sing," James Weldon Johnson's most famous lyric, which is now embraced as the Negro National Anthem. In celebration, this Penguin original collects all the poems from Johnson's published works-Fifty Years and Other Poems (1917), God's Trombones (1927), and Saint Peter Relates an Incident of the Resurrection Day (1935)-along with a number of previously unpublished poems. Sondra Kathryn Wilson, the foremost authority on Johnson and his work, provides an introduction that sheds light on Johnson's many achievements and his pioneering contributions to recording and celebrating the African American experience. .

Unrelated Individuals Forming a Group Waiting to Cross

by Mark Yakich

Mark Yakich is an original... In the unabashedly unwieldy title and in each poem, there are no borders drawn between the commonplace and the metaphysical. There are journeys, crossings, and departures--all evocative of the loneliness, alienation, and desire for identity with another (person or place), which, formalized, makes this work recognizable as art of a very high order." --James Galvin, Guggenheim Foundation and National Endowment of the Arts Fellow

Stuck in the 70's

by D. L. Garfinkle

One night in 1978, Tyler Gray wakes up to find a beautiful girl named Shay lying in his bathtub. For inexperienced, nerdy Tyler, this is not a common occurrence, but it's even stranger because Shay insists that she's from 2006. Of course Tyler doesn't believe her, but once she proves it, they strike a deal: Tyler will try to help get Shay back to 2006 if Shay helps him become more popular. But the more time Shay spends in 1978, the more she likes it. And while she helps Tyler with the popular crowd, she also wreaks havoc by going out with his worst enemy, making over his sister and helping his mother get a job as a cafeteria worker'at his school! Can Tyler get Shay home before his life is completely turned upside down?Publishers Weeklygave D. L. Garfinkle a Flying Start for Storky, praising its ?wry outlook? and ?lovable hero? in a starred review. With Stuck in the 70?s,Garfinkle creates another funny look at teen life with just a touch of magic. It's far-out, man!

Forever and Ever, Amen

by Karol Jackowski

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

God is No Laughing Matter

by Julia Cameron

In her national bestseller, The Right to Write, Julia Cameron took to task the mythology surrounding the writing life in our culture. Now, in God Is No Laughing Matter, Cameron delivers spiritual straight-talk that helps readers to refocus their spiritual experience and to recognize true inspiration. With her trademark "sparkling prose" (Publishers Weekly), combined with anecdotes and techniques presented in God Is No Laughing Matter, Cameron offers thought-provoking, humorous essays that paint the spiritual journey in a refreshingly clear light. Addressing the way spiritual "experts" have clouded the message, the book shows readers how instead they can better focus and make conscious choices that inform life, and enrich oneself and the community. Sharing firsthand observations on the influences of spiritual life on her work, Cameron asserts that, "for every step we take toward God, a thousand are taken toward us. " Today, with the prevalent paradoxes and contradictions one often finds in the spiritual trek, God Is No Laughing Matter will give readers a respite and the energy to begin anew.

Showing 51 through 75 of 9,711 results

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