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You Want Women to Vote, Lizzie Stanton?

by Jean Fritz

Who says women shouldn't speak in public? And why can't they vote? These are questions Elizabeth Cady Stanton grew up asking herself. Her father believed that girls didn't count as much as boys, and her own husband once got so embarrassed when she spoke at a convention that he left town. Luckily Lizzie wasn't one to let society stop her from fighting for equality for everyone. And though she didn't live long enough to see women get to vote, our entire country benefited from her fight for women's rights. "Fritz?imparts not just a sense of Stanton's accomplishments but a picture of the greater society Stanton strove to change?. Highly entertaining and enlightening. " - Publishers Weekly (starred review) "This objective depiction of AStanton's? life and times?makes readers feel invested in her struggle. " - School Library Journal (starred review) "An accessible, fascinating portrait. " - The Horn Book .

Yoga for Wellness

by Gary Kraftsow

Mainstream America is finally catching on to what Eastern countries have known for thousands of years--that yoga is not only a great, low-impact way to increase flexibility and reduce stress, it is also useful in healing any number of afflictions, from common aches and pains to chronic diseases and emotional setbacks. In this easy to follow guide for practitioners at all levels, America's leading teacher of Viniyoga emphasizes the physical as well as the spiritual components of healing through yoga. Beginning with a general introduction, he then includes case studies and specific yoga sequences designed to address individual ailments. Best of all, each step of each posture in a sequence is clearly illustrated with its own photograph. The exercises in this book are truly transformative and certain to help those searching for alternatives to mainstream medicine and those looking for a way of becoming more involved in their own physical well-being.

Women In Love

by Lawrence D. H.

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time With an Introduction by Joyce Carol Oates foreword by the author Commentary by Carl van Doren, Rebecca West, Aldous Huxley, and Henry Miller It is . . . the world of the poets and the preponderance of the poet in [Lawrence] that is the key to his work. He magnified and deepened experience in the manner of a poet," wrote Anaïs Nin in 1934. Privately printed in 1920 and published commercially in 1921, Women in Love is the novel Lawrence himself considered his masterpiece. Set in the English Midlands, the novel traces the lives of two sisters, Ursula and Gudrun, and the men with whom they fall in love. All four yearn for fufillment in their romantic lives, yet struggle in a world that is increasingly violent and destructive. Commenting on the novel, which was composed in the midst of the First World War in 1916, Lawrence wrote, "The bitterness of the war may be taken for granted in the characters. " Rich in symbolism and lyrical prose, Women in Love is a complex meditation on the meaning of love in the modern world. To the critic Alfred Kazin, "No other writer of [Lawrence's] imaginative standing has in our time written books that are so open to life. " D. H. LAWRENCE (1885-1930), the son of a coal miner and a lace worker, completed his formal studies at University College, Nottingham, in 1908 and began teaching at a boys' school. By 1912, he had abandoned teaching to write full-time. His novels include The White Peacock (1911), The Trespasser (1912), Sons and Lovers (1913), The Rainbow (1915), Women in Love (1920), The Plumed Serpent (1926), and Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928), which was banned as pornographic in England until 1960.

Where I Live

by Eileen Spinelli

Diana loves where she lives. She loves the astronomy charts on her walls and the fact that she can wave to her best friend, Rose, from her very own window. And best of all, a wren has recently made its home right by her front door! When her family is forced to move, Diana wonders if she?ll ever find that same grounded and happy feeling again. This gentle and ultimately redeeming story in poems is about those secure and fulfilling friendships that happen naturally and easily when you live right next door, and the struggles of losing the comfort of a familiar place. Matt Phelan's warm and expressive illustrations perfectly complement Eileen Spinelli's tenderhearted and unique tale that reminds us that sometimes a little uprooting and change is necessary for growth.

What Southern Women Know (That Every Woman Should)

by Ronda Rich

The allure of Southern women is undeniable. Men are captivated by them, other women are mystified. Even the South's most treacherous enemy, General William Sherman, fell victim to the fluttery charms of a Georgia belle and loved her to the end of his life. So, what does a Southern woman have that other women do not possess? Simply put, Southern belles survive in a man's world while wrapped in a pouf of flowery femininity and gracious manners. In fact, Southern women often over-emphasize their femininity and use it as one of their most successful tools in business and life. What Southern Women Know is the business book for women who want to be successful without sacrificing their femininity, good manners, and family-centered traditions and life-style.

Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold

by Jean Fritz

Benedict Arnold always carried things too far. As a boy he did crazy things like climbing atop a burning roof and picking a fight with the town constable. As a soldier, he was even more reckless. He was obsessed with being the leader and the hero in every battle, and he never wanted to surrender. He even killed his own horse once rather than give it to the enemy. Where did the extremism lead Arnold? To treason. America's most notorious traitor is brought to life as Jean Fritz relays the engrossing story of Benedict Arnold -- a man whose pride, ambition, and self-righteousness drove him to commit the heinous crime of treason against the United States during the American Revolution. "A highly entertaining biography illuminating the personality of a complex man. " -Horn Book "A gripping story. . . As compelling as a thriller, the book also shines as history. " -Publishers Weekly An ALA Notable Book A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of the Year A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year An ABA Pick of the Lists A Horn Book Fanfare Title .

Tipping the Velvet

by Sarah Waters

Nan is captivated by the music hall phenomenon that is Kitty Butler, a male impersonator extraordinaire treading the boards in Canterbury. Through a friend at the box office, Nan manages to visit all her shows and finally meet her heroine. Soon after, she becomes Kitty's dresser and the two head for the bright lights of Leicester Square where they start an all-singing and dancing double act. At the same time, behind closed doors, they admit their attraction to each other and their affair begins.

Three Day Road

by Joseph Boyden

Set in Canada and the battlefields of France and Belgium, Three-Day Road is a mesmerizing novel told through the eyes of Niska--a Canadian Oji-Cree woman living off the land who is the last of a line of healers and diviners--and her nephew Xavier. At the urging of his friend Elijah, a Cree boy raised in reserve schools, Xavier joins the war effort. Shipped off to Europe when they are nineteen, the boys are marginalized from the Canadian soldiers not only by their native appearance but also by the fine marksmanship that years of hunting in the bush has taught them. Both become snipers renowned for their uncanny accuracy. But while Xavier struggles to understand the purpose of the war and to come to terms with his conscience for the many lives he has ended, Elijah becomes obsessed with killing, taking great risks to become the most accomplished sniper in the army. Eventually the harrowing and bloody truth of war takes its toll on the two friends in different, profound ways. Intertwined with this account is the story of Niska, who herself has borne witness to a lifetime of death--the death of her people. In part inspired by the legend of Francis Pegahmagabow, the great Indian sniper of World War I, Three-Day Road is an impeccably researched and beautifully written story that offers a searing reminder about the cost of war. .

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

by L. Frank Baum Regina Barreca

THE INSPIRATION FOR THE CLASIC FILM "Follow the yellow brick road!" Since it first appeared in 1900, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has brought joy to generations. In it, a girl's dream world comes to life as the cyclone lifts Dorothy from Kansas, depositing her in the enchanted land of the Munchkins. H ere she meets the famous Oz characters: the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodsman, the Cowardly Lion, and the Wicked Witch of the West. Her adventures along the Yellow Brick Road to the Emerald City and the Wizard himself evoke the rich, universal appeal of a classic fairy tale.

The Silver Lake

by Fiona Patton

In Anavatan, the city of the Silver Lake, the gods manifest on a regular basis. But if you are among the unpledged, it is hard to survive, especially during the three-night-long chaos known as Havo's Dance. When Havo's storms sweep through Anavatan, anyone who is unaffiliated had best find a safe place to hide or they risk madness or death. But this year, three young street orphans have been chosen for special attention by Incasa, the god of prophecy. When that God's dice roll during the height of Havo's Dance, these three boys-thieves and con artists-will discover their destinies. One will be bound by a life-or-death pledge that will see him marked as the future Champion of the War God, another forced to walk a perilous road as he seeks to master his talent as a seer, and the last will be cast forth from the city and claimed by the hungry spirits seeking a way into Anavatan and the precious power contained in the Silver Lake. .

The Red Rose Box

by Brenda Woods

When Leah's aunt Olivia sends her a red rose box all the way from California for her tenth birthday, she and her younger sister Ruth can hardly imagine what could be inside. Living in dusty Sulphur, Louisiana, the arrival of the box, full of magical things-lipstick, nailpolish, and a 100% silk bedjacket-is about the most exciting thing that has ever happened to Leah and Ruth. Aunt Olivia has also sent some train tickets for a trip to Los Angeles and freedom, far away from the Jim Crow laws that keep the Southern blacks down. Leah is enchanted by her rich aunt's lifestyle and the California culture. Like the treasures in the box, California is almost too good to be true. But when tragedy forces Leah and Ruth to make Los Angeles their permanent home, the girls are torn by longing for their roots. Brenda Woods has written an evocative first novel about the importance of remembering your past, even as you move away from it. .

The Prince and the Pauper: A Tale for Young People of All Ages

by Mark Twain

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

The Man Who Loved Clowns

by Wood June Rae

Delrita likes being invisible. If no one notices her, then no one willnotice her uncle Punky either. Punky is a grown man with a child's mind. Delrita loves him dearly and can't stand people making fun of his Down's syndrome. But when tragedy strikes, Delrita's quiet life--and Punky's--are disrupted forever. Can she finally learn to trust others, for her own sake and Punky's? This story captures the joy and sorrow that come when we open our hearts to love. .

The Lobster Coast

by Colin Woodard

For more than four hundred years the people of coastal Maine have clung to their rocky, wind-swept lands, resisting outsiders' attempts to control them while harvesting the astonishing bounty of the Gulf of Maine. Today's independent, self-sufficient lobstermen belong to the communities imbued with a European sense of ties between land and people, but threatened by the forces of homogenization spreading up the eastern seaboard. In the tradition of William Warner's Beautiful Swimmers, veteran journalist Colin Woodard traces the history of the rugged fishing communities that dot the coast of Maine and the prized crustacean that has long provided their livelihood. Through forgotten wars and rebellions, and with a deep tradition of resistance to interference by people "from away," Maine's lobstermen have defended an earlier vision of America while defying the "tragedy of the commons"--the notion that people always overexploit their shared property. Instead, these icons of American individualism represent a rare example of true communal values and collaboration through grit, courage, and hard-won wisdom. .

The Innocents Abroad

by Mark Twain Michael Meyer Leslie Feidler

One of the most famous travel books ever written by an American, here is an irreverent and incisive commentary on the "New Barbarians'" encounter with the Old World. Twain's hilarious satire impales with sharp wit both the chauvinist and the cosmopolitan.

The Gadget War

by Betsy Duffey

Kelly Sparks is the undisputed gadget champ at Danville School. Then Albert Einstein Jones, an alumnus of Young Inventor's Camp, joins her class. Kelly could give up the gadget crown gracefully -but she'd much rather let the spitballs and smelly goo fly! .

The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Tales

by Edgar Allan Poe Stephen Marlowe

Master of the macabre Edgar Allan Poe brings his nightmare visions to vivid, dramatic life in this definitive collection of 14 of his classic stories, including The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, and his only full-length novel, Narrative of A. Gordon Pym.

The Dream Life of Sukhanov

by Olga Grushin

Olga Grushin's astonishing literary debut has won her comparisons with everyone from Gogol to Nabokov. A virtuoso study in betrayal and its consequences, it explores-really, colonizes-the consciousness of Anatoly Sukhanov, who many years before abandoned the precarious existence of an underground artist for the perks of a Soviet apparatchik. But, at the age of 56, his perfect life is suddenly disintegrating. Buried dreams return to haunt him. New political alignments threaten to undo him. Vaulting effortlessly from the real to the surreal and from privilege to paranoia, The Dream Life of Sukhanov is a darkly funny, demonically entertaining novel. .

The Double Life of Pocahontas

by Jean Fritz

Pocahontas was the special favorite of her father, the great chief Pawhatan. And when the English settlers came to Virginia, she became a "sister" to Captain John Smith, who was "adopted" into her tribe. She was permitted to move freely between the Indian and white worlds, and her life seemed perfect. But soon there was trouble. Pocahontas was kidnapped by the settlers, who forced her to live like a white woman. She yearned for her father to meet the colonists' demands so all would be well again. But before Pocahontas made peace, she would be asked to turn her back on everything she loved-and to leave her Indian world behind forever. Highly acclaimed and winner of multiple awards, this book is recommended for Grades 4 and up.

The Dark Stairs R/I

by Betsy Byars

Mystery is in Herculeah Jones's blood. How could it not be, with a father on the police force and a mother who's a private eye? So when Herculeah notices a man hanging around the "Dead Oaks" mansion, she can't resist doing some investigating of her own. Legend has it the old estate was the site of a murder, and now it looks like there's something even more nefarious going on. Can Herculeah crack the case before the mystery man closes in on her?

The Cabin Faced West

by Jean Fritz

Ann Hamilton's family has moved to the western frontier of Pennsylvania, and she misses her old home in Gettysburg. There are no girls her age on Hamilton Hill, and life is hard. But when the Hamiltons survive a terrible storm and receive a surprise visit from George Washington, Ann realizes that pioneer life is exciting and special. .

The Boxer and the Spy

by Robert B. Parker

Another teen thriller from the New York Times bestselling author of the Spenser mysteries. When a shy high school student?s body is found washed up on the shore of a quiet New England beach town?an apparent suicide?fifteen-year-old Terry Novak doesn?t know what to think. Something just doesn?t add up, so he decides to do some investigating of his own with the help of his best friend, Abby. It doesn?t take long before they learn that asking questions puts them in grave danger, and surviving is going to be a fight. Fortunately, Terry has been learning a thing or two about fighting, thanks to a retired boxer named George, who teaches the boy to use his head and always keep his feet set beneath him?lessons Terry takes to heart in more ways than one. He will need to. Robert B. Parker, New York Times bestselling author of the Spenser novels, delivers a taut, empowering mystery for young readers. .

The Blood-Dimmed Tide

by Rennie Airth

It is 1932 and John Madden, former Scotland Yard Inspector, is now a farmer in the peaceful Surrey countryside. However his peace is about to be shattered, for when a young girl goes missing, it is he who discovers her disfigured body hidden in a wood. Disturbed by what he has seen he is convinced the killer has struck before . . . When a second body is found, Madden's instinct is proved right - there is a multiple killer at large. Allying himself with his old colleagues, and against the wishes of his anxious wife, he immerses himself in one more case, and his insights into the personality of the man they are seeking are soon borne out. Self-taught in a world of secret agents, this psychopath is a master of reinvention who has been covering his tracks for many years. The investigation leads to Germany, where the Nazis are on the brink of power. The killer has so far eluded the German police. And the mutilated bodies he has left in his wake are just a shocking foretaste of the horrors to come . . . 'If only every golden age crime novel could be as good as this' Independent on Sunday 'Rennie Airth has an emotional and sensual precision' Times Literary Supplement

The Big Rock Candy Mountain

by Wallace Stegner

A restless, violent adventurer lured by golden dreams, roaming the frontier from Nevada to Saskatchewan... crony of banker, broker, bootlegger, and pimp... man of towering rages and warmth, with visions of sudden wealth... above all a man, even in humiliation and defeat!

The Age of Spiritual Machines

by Ray Kurzweil

Ray Kurzweil is the inventor of the most innovative and compelling technology of our era, an international authority on artificial intelligence, and one of our greatest living visionaries. Now he offers a framework for envisioning the twenty-first century--an age in which the marriage of human sensitivity and artificial intelligence fundamentally alters and improves the way we live. Kurzweil's prophetic blueprint for the future takes us through the advances that inexorably result in computers exceeding the memory capacity and computational ability of the human brain by the year 2020 (with human-level capabilities not far behind); in relationships with automated personalities who will be our teachers, companions, and lovers; and in information fed straight into our brains along direct neural pathways. Optimistic and challenging, thought-provoking and engaging, The Age of Spiritual Machines is the ultimate guide on our road into the next century.

Showing 51 through 75 of 7,929 results

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