Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 5,276 through 5,300 of 16,291 results

On the State of Lunacy and the Legal Provision

by John T. Arlidge

"On the State of Lunacy and the Legal Provision for the Insane, with Observations on the Construction and Organization of Asylum" is an essay concerning the law and the insane by John T. Arlidge.

Think and Grow Rich

by Napoleon Hill

Think and Grow Rich is a motivational personal development and self-help book written by Napoleon Hill and inspired by a suggestion from Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie. While the title implies that this book deals only with how to get rich, the author explains that the philosophy taught in the book can be used to help people succeed in all lines of work and to do or be almost anything they want

Corleone

by F. Marion Crawford

Originally Published in 1897, one of Crawford's many novels to revolve aournd his hom country of Italy.

Christian Science

by Mark Twain

Christian Science is Mark Twain's razor-sharp attack on a popular movement which was sweeping the country at the turn of the 20th century. One of the tenets of Christian Science is the healing of physical illness through prayer. Having recently lost a daughter to meningitis, Twain responded angrily to the notion that pain and sickness were easily surmounted. His deep-seated iconoclasm also caused him to take aim at Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science, who he saw as self-promoting and fraudulent. Using all of the satire and wit for which he is famous, Twain pokes fun at a movement he feared would become a powerful force in the country.

A Tramp Abroad: (With Illustrations taken from an 1880 First Edition)

by Mark Twain

An unconventional and entertaining account of travels through German, the Alps and Italy

Life on the Mississippi: (With Original Illustrations)

by Mark Twain

A stirring account of America's vanished past... The book that earned Mark Twain his first recognition as a serious writer... Discover the magic of life on the Mississippi. At once a romantic history of a mighty river, an autobiographical account of Mark Twain's early steamboat days, and a storehouse of humorous anecdotes and sketches, Life on the Mississippi is the raw material from which Twain wrote his finest novel: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn .

The Innocents Abroad: (With Original Illustrations

by Mark Twain

In 1867, Mark Twain and a group fellow-Americans toured Europe and the Holy Land, aboard a retired Civil War ship known as "Quaker City." Throughout the journey, Twain kept a written record of his experiences. "The Innocents Abroad" is both a travelogue and a critique of clashing cultures--but more importantly, it is an entertaining and insightful work written by one of the great masters of American prose.

China and Pottery Marks

by Anonymous

A reference of the marks seen on pottery and china from around the world.

The Entire Original Maupassant Short

by Guy De Maupassant

"I entered literary life as a meteor, and I shall leave it like a thunderbolt." These words of Maupassant to Jose Maria de Heredia on the occasion of a memorable meeting are, in spite of their morbid solemnity, not an inexact summing up of the brief career during which, for ten years, the writer, by turns undaunted and sorrowful, with the fertility of a master hand produced poetry, novels, romances and travels, only to sink prematurely into the abyss of madness and death. . . . . This book contains all thirteen volumes of his original short stories.

The Gentlemen's Book of Etiquette, an

by Cecil B. Hartley

This book provides RULES FOR THE ETIQUETTE TO BE OBSERVED IN THE STREET, AT TABLE, IN THE BALL ROOM, EVENING PARTY, AND MORNING CALL; WITH FULL DIRECTIONS FOR POLITE OR RESPONDENCE, DRESS, CONVERSATION, MANLY EXERCISES, AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS. Man was not intended to live like a bear or a hermit, apart from others of his own nature, and, philosophy and reason will each agree with me, that man was born for sociability and finds his true delight in society. Society is a word capable of many meanings, and used here in each and all of them. Society, par excellence; the world at large; the little clique to which he is bound by early ties; the companionship of friends or relatives; even society tete a tete with one dear sympathizing soul, are pleasant states for a man to be in. All in all this is a great book on etiquette. A great place to learn the rules of etiquette.

Woman in Prison

by Caroline H. Woods

While I was waiting, that advertisement returned to my reflections, and urged its cause imperatively as a command. It was a call, to me, resistless as the voice that awoke the young Israelitish Prophet from his slumbers. In another moment the struggle with my pride was over, and my spirit answered,--I will go, even to lust-besotted Sodom if thou leadest, Light of my path! I seated myself in a street car, went to the prison, applied for the place, and obtained it. Day by day I wrote down what I saw and heard, what I said and did. Why? In obedience to the same Voice that called me to the work. The tale is before you. May it touch the heart of every one who reads the story, and melt it into a compassion which will labor for the redemption of the prisoner; into a pity which will echo around the cry--Open the prison doors, not to let the prisoner go free, but to let in, to him, the light of moral knowledge, and the discipline of Christian charity.

My Adventures With Your Money

by George Graham Rice

An Autobigraphical look at the great American Swindler, George Graham Rice.

Mars and Its Mystery

by Edward S. Morse

Inspired by his friend and astronomer Perival Lowell and his visits to the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, Morse published Mars and Its Mystery in defense of Lowell's controversial speculations regarding the possibility of life on Mars.

The Life and Adventures of Ben Hogan,

by Benedict Hogan

Benedict Hagan, whose name has become familiar in the altered form of Hogan, is a native of Würtemberg, Germany. With his parents, he immigrated to this country at the age of eleven years. His father was a cabinet-maker by trade, who had saved up something like a thousand dollars, with which he set forth to better his condition in the New World. Along with his family, he arrived in New York in the summer of 1852. His reception was not of the most encouraging nature, and an incident which occurred almost immediately after the landing of the family will serve to show the character of Hogan at that time. As was customary with all emigrants who had any money to carry, the elder Hogan had secured his fortune, amounting to eight hundred dollars in gold, in a belt fastened about his shoulders. When he walked out of Castle Garden he was forthwith set upon by a Hebrew of the South street order, whose nose resembled his nature, because it was sharp. This enterprising Jew, who spoke German fluently, induced the emigrant to go into a small shop where everything was given away--for four times its value. The unsuspecting Hogan made a small purchase, and when he came to pay for it, disclosed the bag containing his gold. The sight was enough to rouse the Hebrew. Precisely how it happened he did not know; but in an amazingly short time Hogan senior found himself relieved of his eight hundred dollars. Had it not been for the presence of young Ben, it may be safely assumed that the emigrant would never have gone forth from the Jew's place alive. The boy, however, presented an obstacle to the commission of murder, which was undoubtedly intended by the robbers. They determined, therefore, to get rid of their victims by strategy instead of force. One of their "cappers" offered to lead the way to the police station where they might get assistance in recovering the money. He did lead the way, but it is unnecessary to add that there were not a great many police stations in the neighborhood to which he conducted them. The Hebrew perhaps thought that he had made one of the fattest "hauls" in his life; but it turned out to be a very dear job.

Don Juan

by Lord Byron

Don Juan is a long, digressive satiric poem by Lord Byron, based on the legend of Don Juan, which Byron reverses, portraying Juan not as a womaniser but someone easily seduced by women. It is a variation on the epic form. Unlike the more tortured early romantic works by Byron, exemplified by Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Don Juan has a more humorous, satirical bent. Modern critics generally consider it to be Byron's masterpiece. Byron completed 16 cantos, leaving an unfinished 17th canto before his death in 1824. Byron claimed that he had no ideas in his mind as to what would happen in subsequent cantos as he wrote his work.

The Kama Sutra of Vatsayayana

by Vatsayayana

The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana, in seven parts, with preface, introduction, and concluding remarks, is the classic translation of what is arguably the world's oldest sex manual and relationship advice handbook. Much more than just erotic advice, this is a revelation of the social mores and customs of the ancient world and the daily lives of men and women in India, their views of intimacy, love and communication between the sexes -- all filtered through the British Victorian worldview and commentary of the translators. Instructions are given for wives, husbands, lovers, in-laws, courtesans, eunuchs, harems, go-betweens, matchmaking and breakups, compatibility, personal hygiene, and even recipes for potions to increase genital size and pleasure. This edition strives to preserve the quaint charm of the original translation (1883), including uncommon spellings, and includes fifty-eight explicit classic interior illustrations. Translated from the Sanskrit by Richard Burton

The Count of Monte Cristo

by Alexandre Dumas

The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas. Completed in 1844, it is one of the author's most popular works. The story takes place in France, Italy, islands in the Mediterranean, and in the Levant during the historical events of 1815-1838. It begins from just before the Hundred Days period (when Napoleon returned to power after his exile) and spans through to the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. The historical setting is a fundamental element of the book. An adventure story primarily concerned with themes of hope, justice, vengeance, mercy and forgiveness, it focuses on a man who is wrongfully imprisoned, escapes from jail, acquires a fortune and sets about getting revenge on those responsible for his imprisonment. However, his plans have devastating consequences for the innocent as well as the guilty.

The Bostonians

by Henry James

The Bostonians is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Century Magazine in 1885-1886 and then as a book in 1886. This bittersweet tragicomedy centers on an odd triangle of characters: Basil Ransom, a political conservative from Mississippi; Olive Chancellor, Ransom's cousin and a Boston feminist; and Verena Tarrant, a pretty, young protégée of Olive's in the feminist movement. The storyline concerns the struggle between Ransom and Olive for Verena's allegiance and affection, though the novel also includes a wide panorama of political activists, newspaper people, and quirky eccentrics.

The Bostonians

by Henry James

The Bostonians is a novel by Henry James, first published as a serial in The Century Magazine in 1885-1886 and then as a book in 1886. This bittersweet tragicomedy centers on an odd triangle of characters: Basil Ransom, a political conservative from Mississippi; Olive Chancellor, Ransom's cousin and a Boston feminist; and Verena Tarrant, a pretty, young protégée of Olive's in the feminist movement. The storyline concerns the struggle between Ransom and Olive for Verena's allegiance and affection, though the novel also includes a wide panorama of political activists, newspaper people, and quirky eccentrics.

The Wings of the Dove

by Henry James

The Wings of the Dove is a 1902 novel by Henry James. This novel tells the story of Milly Theale, an American heiress stricken with a serious disease, and her effect on the people around her. Some of these people befriend Milly with honorable motives, while others are more self-interested.

Howards End

by E. M. Forster

Howards End is a novel by E. M. Forster, first published in 1910, about social and familial relations in turn-of-the-century England. Howards End is considered by some to be Forster's masterpiece.

The Confessions of Jean Jacques Rouss

by Jean Jacques Rousseau

When it was first published in 1781, The Confessions scandalised Europe with its emotional honesty and frank treatment of the author's sexual and intellectual development. Since then, it has had a more profound impact on European thought. Rousseau left posterity a model of the reflective life - the solitary, uncompromising individual, the enemy of servitude and habit and the selfish egoist who dedicates his life to a particular ideal. The Confessions recreates the world in which he progressed from incompetent engraver to grand success; his enthusiasm for experience, his love of nature, and his uncompromising character make him an ideal guide to eighteenth-century Europe, and he was the author of some of the most profound work ever written on the relation between the individual and the state.

Jurgen: A Comedy of Justice

by James Branch Cabell

James Branch Cabell's career was short-lived - his works fit neatly within the 1920s literary escapist culture and then quickly declined in popularity as the author veered away from the fantasy niche. In his heyday, Cabell garnered praise from several of his contemporaries such as H. L. Mencken and Sinclair Lewis. Lewis even acknowledged Cabell's successful "Jurgen" in his 1930 Nobel Prize address. "Jurgen" is certainly Cabell's most famous novel, published in 1919, and it tells the story of a middle-aged man on a journey through fantastic realms, where he meets and seduces beautiful women of fiction and myth - including the Devil's wife. The book garnered attention as it was charged with obscenity in a case that reached the New York Supreme Court. Cabell and his publisher won the case, and the author was deemed a literary avant garde, who tested conventional social boundaries and opposed the forces of puritanical repression.

The Awakening and Selected Short Stor

by Kate Chopin

This collection includes the following selected works by Kate Chopin: The Awakening, Beyond the Bayou, Ma'ame Pelagie, Desiree's Baby, A Respectable Woman, The Kiss, A Pair of Silk Stockings, The Locket, and A Reflection

The Book of the Thousand Nights and a

by Anonymous

This last of nine volumes accurately translating the wonderful tales of the Arabian nights.

Showing 5,276 through 5,300 of 16,291 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.