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Showing 5,551 through 5,575 of 8,522 results

Bonaparte

by Patrice Gueniffey

Patrice Gueniffey, the leading French historian of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic age, takes up the epic narrative at the heart of this turbulent period: the life of Napoleon himself, from his boyhood in Corsica, to his meteoric rise during the Italian and Egyptian campaigns, to his proclamation as Consul for Life in 1802.

Environment in the Balance

by Jonathan Z. Cannon

Does the green movement remain a transformative force in American life? In Environment in the Balance Jonathan Cannon interprets a wide range of U.S. Supreme Court decisions over four decades and explores the current ferment among activists, to gauge the practical and cultural impact of environmentalism and its future prospects.

Redesigning America's Community Colleges

by Thomas R. Bailey

Community colleges enroll half of the nation's undergraduates. Yet only 40 percent of entrants complete an undergraduate degree in six years. Redesigning America's Community Colleges explains how two-year colleges can increase their students' success rate quickly and at less cost, through a program of guided pathways to completion.

Indians in Kenya

by Sana Aiyar

Sana Aiyar chronicles the strategies by which Indians sought a political voice in Kenya, from the beginning of colonial rule to independence. She examines how the strands of Indians' diasporic identity influenced Kenya's leadership--from partnering with Europeans to colonize East Africa, to collaborating with Africans to battle racial inequality.

Daughters of Alchemy

by Meredith K. Ray

Meredith Ray shows that women were at the vanguard of empirical culture during the Scientific Revolution. They experimented with medicine and alchemy at home and in court, debated cosmological discoveries in salons and academies, and in their writings used their knowledge of natural philosophy to argue for women's intellectual equality to men.

Miniature Metropolis

by Andreas Huyssen

Andreas Huyssen explores the history and theory of metropolitan miniatures--short prose pieces about urban life written for European newspapers. His fine-grained readings open vistas into German critical theory and the visual arts, revealing the miniature to be one of the few genuinely innovative modes of spatialized writing created by modernism.

Peiresc's Mediterranean World

by Peter N. Miller

Nicolas Fabri de Peiresc was the most gifted French intellectual in the generation between Montaigne and Descartes. His insatiable curiosity poured forth in thousands of letters that traveled the Mediterranean, seeking knowledge. Mining his 70,000-page archive, Peter N. Miller recovers a lost Mediterranean world of the early seventeenth century.

Piano Duet Repertoire, Second Edition: Music Originally Written for One Piano, Four Hands

by Greg Anderson Katherine Fisher Elizabeth Joy Roe Christopher Fisher Cameron Mcgraw

Since the 1981 publication of the first edition, Cameron McGraw's Piano Duet Repertoire has been a trusted guide for duet performers. This second edition, edited and substantially expanded by Christopher and Katherine Fisher, brings the volume into the 21st century, adding over 500 new or updated composer entries and nearly 1,000 new work entries to the volume, a testament to the renewed interest in piano duet playing. Entries are arranged alphabetically by composer and include both pedagogical and concert repertoire. The annotations and the grade-level indications provide piano teachers a wealth of instructional guidance. The book also contains updated appendices listing collections and duet works with voice and other instruments. This new edition features a title index and a list of composers by nationality, making it a convenient and indispensable resource.

The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar

by Helen Vendler

One of our foremost commentators examines the work of a broad range of English, Irish, and American poets. Helen Vendler's essays, book reviews, and occasional prose from the past two decades, taken together, are an eloquent plea for the centrality--in humanistic study and modern culture--of poetry's subversive, sustaining, and demanding legacy.

Border Law

by Deborah A. Rosen

The First Seminole War shaped how the United States demarcated its spatial and legal boundaries. Rooted in exceptionalism, manifest destiny, and racism, the legal framework that emerged from Andrew Jackson's invasion of Florida laid the groundwork for the Monroe Doctrine, the Dred Scott decision, and westward expansion, as Deborah Rosen shows.

Season of Infamy: A Diary of War and Occupation, 1939-1945

by Robert O. Paxton Michele Mckay Aynesworth Charles Rist

In 1939, the 65-year old French political economist Charles Rist was serving as advisor to the French government and consultant to the international banking and business world. As France anxiously awaited a German invasion, Rist traveled to America to negotiate embargo policy. Days after his return to Paris, the German offensive began and with it the infamous season of occupation. Retreating to his villa in Versailles, Rist turned his energies to the welfare of those closest to him, while in his diary he began to observe the unfolding of the war. Here the deeply learned Rist investigates the causes of the disaster and reflects on his country's fate, placing the behavior of the "people" and the "elite" in historical perspective. Though well-connected, Rist and his family and friends were not exempt from the perils and tragedies of war, as the diary makes clear. Season of Infamy presents a distinctive, closely-observed view of life in France under the occupation.

The Prime of Life

by Steven Mintz

Steven Mintz reconstructs the emotional interior of a life stage too often relegated to self-help books and domestic melodramas. He describes the challenges of adulthood today and puts them into perspective by exploring how past generations achieved intimacy and connection, raised children, sought meaning in work, and responded to loss.

Masters of the Universe, Slaves of the Market

by Stephen Bell

Stephen Bell and Andrew Hindmoor compare banking systems in the U.S. and UK to those of Canada and Australia and explain why the system imploded in the former but not the latter. Canadian and Australian banks were able to make profits through traditional lending practices, unlike their competition-driven, risk-taking U.S. and UK counterparts.

China's War Reporters

by Parks M. Coble

When Japan invaded China in 1937, Chinese journalists greeted the news with euphoria, convinced their countrymen, led by Chiang Kai-shek, would triumph. Parks Coble shows that correspondents underplayed China's defeats for fear of undercutting morale and then saw their writings disappear and themselves denounced after the Communists came to power.

Educating a Diverse Nation

by Clifton Conrad

Educating a Diverse Nation turns a spotlight on colleges and universities dedicated to serving minority and low-income students of all ages. It highlights innovative programs that are advancing persistence and learning, and it identifies specific strategies for empowering nontraditional students to succeed despite many obstacles.

Empire of Chance

by Anders Engberg-Pedersen

Anders Engberg-Pedersen shows how the Napoleonic Wars inspired a new discourse on knowledge in the West. Soldiers returning from battle were forced to reconsider what it is possible to know and how decisions are made in a fog of imperfect knowledge. Chance no longer appeared exceptional but normative--a prism for understanding the modern world.

The Hungry Mind

by Susan Engel

Despite American education's mania for standardized tests, testing misses what matters most about learning: the desire to learn in the first place. Susan Engel offers a highly readable exploration of what curiosity is, how it can be measured, how it develops in childhood, and how educators can put curiosity at the center of the classroom.

American Vandal

by Roy Morris

Unintimidated by Old World sophistication or travel to undeveloped parts of the globe, Mark Twain spent a surprising amount of time outside the continental United States. Roy Morris, Jr. focuses on the dozen years he lived overseas and the books he wrote encouraging middle-class Americans to follow him around the world, at the dawn of mass tourism.

Grounds for Difference

by Rogers Brubaker

Offering fresh perspectives on perennial questions of ethnicity, race, nationalism, and religion, Rogers Brubaker analyzes three forces that shape the politics of diversity and multiculturalism today: inequality as a public concern, biology as an asserted basis of racial and ethnic difference, and religion as a key terrain of public contestation.

Boswell's Enlightenment

by Robert Zaretsky

Throughout his life James Boswell struggled to fashion a clear account of himself, but try as he might he could not reconcile the truths of his era with those of his religious upbringing. Few periods better crystallize this turmoil than 1763-1765, the years of his Grand Tour and the focus of Robert Zaretsky's thrilling intellectual adventure.

Machiavelli

by Christopher Celenza

The man whose name is shorthand for all that is ugly in politics was more nuanced than his reputation suggests. Christopher Celenza's portrait of Machiavelli removes the varnish to reveal not just the hardnosed philosopher but the skilled diplomat, learned commentator on ancient history, comic playwright, tireless letter writer, and thwarted lover.

Beyond Freedom's Reach

by Adam Rothman

After Union forces captured New Orleans in 1862, Rose Herera's owners fled to Havana, taking her three children with them. Adam Rothman tells the story of Herera's quest to rescue her children from bondage after the war. As the kidnapping case made its way through the courts, it revealed the prospects and limits of justice during Reconstruction.

Utopia, Limited

by Anahid Nersessian

What is utopia if not a perfect impossible world? Anahid Nersessian reveals the basic misunderstanding of that ideal. Applying the lessons of art to the rigors of life on an imperiled planet, she enlists the Romantics to redefine utopia as an investment in limitation--not a perfect world but one where we get less than we hoped but more than we had.

Maoism at the Grassroots: Everyday Life in China's Era of High Socialism

by Jeremy Brown

Maoism at the Grassroots challenges state-centered views of China under Mao, providing insights into the lives of citizens across social strata, ethnicities, and regions. It reveals how ordinary people risked persecution and imprisonment in order to assert personal beliefs and identities, despite political repression and surveillance.

Industrial Eden

by Brett Sheehan

This study of the evolution of Chinese capitalism chronicles the Song family of North China under five successive authoritarian governments. Brett Sheehan shows both foreign and Chinese influences on private business, which, although closely linked to the state, was neither a handmaiden to authoritarianism nor a natural ally of democracy.

Showing 5,551 through 5,575 of 8,522 results

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