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Showing 6,651 through 6,675 of 16,291 results

Five Children and It

by Edith Nesbit

The last thing Cyril, Anthea, Robert, Jane, and their baby brother expect to find while digging in the sand is a Psammead--an ancient Sand-fairy! Having a Sand-fairy for a pet means having one wish granted each day. But the fivesome doesn't realize all of the trouble that wishes can cause.

Father and Son

by Edmund Gosse

Edmund Gosse wrote of his account of his life, "This book is the record of a struggle between two temperaments, two consciences and almost two epochs." Father and Son remains one of English literature's seminal autobiographies. In it, Edmund Gosse recounts, with humor and pathos, his childhood as a member of a Victorian Protestant sect and his struggles to forge his own identity despite the loving control of his father. His work is a key document of the crisis of faith and doubt and a penetrating exploration of the impact of evolutionary science. An astute, well-observed, and moving portrait of the tensions of family life, Father and Son remains a classic of twentieth-century literature.

Eugénie Grandet

by Honore Balzac

This is the question that fills the minds of the inhabitants of Saumur, the setting for Eugénie Grandet (1833), one of the earliest and most famous novels in Balzac's Comédie humaine. The Grandet household, oppressed by the exacting miserliness of Grandet himself, is jerked violently out of routine by the sudden arrival of Eugénie's cousin Charles, recently orphaned and penniless. Eugénie's emotional awakening, stimulated by her love for her cousin, brings her into direct conflict with her father, whose cunning and financial success are matched against her determination to rebel. Eugénie's moving story is set against the backdrop of provincial oppression, the vicissitudes of the wine trade, and the workings of the financial system in the aftermath of the French Revolution. It is both a poignant portrayal of private life and a vigorous fictional document of its age.

Ethan Frome

by Edith Wharton

Enriched Classics offer readers accessible editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and commentary. Each book includes educational tools alongside the text, enabling students and readers alike to gain a deeper and more developed understanding of the writer and their work.An entrancing but sad story of a poverty-stricken Massachusetts farmer caught in a loveless marriage. The main characters are Ethan Frome, his wife Zenobia, called Zeena, and her young cousin Mattie Silver. Frome and Zeena marry after she nurses his mother in her last illness. Although Frome seems ambitious and intelligent, Zeena holds him back. When her young cousin Mattie comes to stay on their New England farm, Frome falls in love with her. But the social conventions of the day doom their love and their hopes. Ethan's love for his young cousin leads to one day of explosive emotions with tragic consequences. The story forcefully conveys Wharton's abhorrence of society's unbending standards of loyalty. Enriched Classics enhance your engagement by introducing and explaining the historical and cultural significance of the work, the author's personal history, and what impact this book had on subsequent scholarship. Each book includes discussion questions that help clarify and reinforce major themes and reading recommendations for further research. Read with confidence.

English As She Is Spoke

by Jose de Fonseca & Carolino

In 1855, when Jose da Fonseca and Pedro Carolino wrote an English phrasebook for Portuguese students, they faced just one problem: they didn't know any English. Even worse, they didn't own an English-to-Portuguese dictionary. What they did have, though, was a Portuguese-to-French dictionary, and a French-to-English dictionary. The linguistic train wreck that ensued is a classic of unintentional humor, now revived in the first newly selected edition in a century. Armed with Fonseca and Carolino's guide, a Portuguese traveler can insult a barber ("What news tell me? All hairs dresser are newsmonger"), complain about the orchestra ("It is a noise which to cleve the head"), go hunting ("let aim it! let make fire him"), and consult a handy selection of truly mystifying "Idiotisms and Proverbs."

The End of the Tether

by Joseph Conrad

Conrad's aim was 'by the power of the written word, to make you hear, to make you feel . . . before all, to make you see' Heart of Darkness, his exploration of European colonialism in Africa and of elusive human values, embodies more profoundly than almost any other modern fiction the difficulty of 'seeing,' its relativity and shifting compromise. Portraying a young man's first sea-voyage to the East in Youth, an unenlightened maturity in Heart of Darkness, and the blind old age of Captain Whalley in The End of the Tether

Enchiridion

by Saint Augustine

Written by St. Augustine late in his life with the intention of supplying the Roamn layman with a comprehensive exposition of the basic teachings of Christianity.

Eminent Victorians

by Lytton Strachey

When Lytton Strachey published Emininent Victorians, he took the general perception of the Victorian age among English-speaking readers and turned it upside-down. Four of the most eminent and idealized heroic figures of the Victorian age came under his witty and unsparing gaze and emerged, astonishingly enough, as human beings.

Education: How Old the New

by James J. Walsh

James Joseph Walsh, M.D., LL.D., Litt.D., Sc.D. (1865-1942) was an American physician and author, born in New York City. He graduated from Fordham College in 1884 and from the University of Pennsylvania (M.D.) in 1895. After postgraduate work in Paris, Vienna and Berlin he settled in New York.

Edgar Huntly, or, Memoirs of a Sleepwalker

by Charles Brockden Brown

One of the first American Gothic novels, Edgar Huntly mirrors the social and political temperaments of the postrevolutionary United States.

The Lost Princess: A Double Tale

by George Macdonald

A wise woman kidnaps a spoiled Princess. As a result the Princess and her parents learn what is truly important. A story that asks whose fault is it when a child grows up to be selfish adult.

Discourse on the Method

by Rene Descartes

Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One's Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Rene Descartes is in the English language, and may not include graphics or images from the original edition. If you enjoy the works of Rene Descartes then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection.

Meditation on First Philosophy

by Rene Descartes

The book is made up of six meditations, in which Descartes first discards all belief in things which are not absolutely certain, and then tries to establish what can be known for sure. The meditations were written as if he were meditating for 6 days: each meditation refers to the last one as "yesterday"

Democracy, An American Novel

by Henry Adams

Her world is filled with "man's work," with tough loves and passionate hates, with seasons of cultivating land other than her own, despair, disappointment, and fulfillment in the eleventh hour. All throughout, Kate makes the best of things and "takes the wings of morning" until she can truly fly.

Democracy and Social Ethics

by Jane Addams

Jane Addams was a pioneer settlement worker, public philosopher, sociologist, author, and leader in woman suffrage and world peace. Beside presidents such as Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, she was the most prominent reformer of the Progressive Era and helped turn the nation to issues of concern to mothers, such as the needs of children, public health, and world peace. In 1931 she became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Democracy and Education

by John Dewey

John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" addresses the challenge of providing quality public education in a democratic society. In this classic work Dewey calls for the complete renewal of public education, arguing for the fusion of vocational and contemplative studies in education and for the necessity of universal education for the advancement of self and society. First published in 1916, "Democracy and Education" is regarded as the seminal work on public education by one of the most important scholars of the century.

David and the Phoenix

by David Ormondroyd

David has no greater wish than to explore the mountains behind his new home in North Carolina and as he does he finds a wonder never dreamed of, the Phoenix. The Phoenix introduces David to an endless list of his friends from mythology and in the process opens David's eyes to the wide world both the unseen world and seen world. In the unseen world David and the Phoenix share many adventures all the while a scientist is trying to capture the Phoenix to prove to the world that the bird is real. The phoenix takes David on "educational field trips" to meet sea monsters, fauns and other creatures. Plus they hatch a hysterical plot to scare off an over eager scientist from the phoenix's trail. David learns some valuable lessons about life, one is that nothing remains the same as one grows up. The other is... well perhaps you should read the book yourself and find your own lessons within the pages. A well written story, "David and the Phoenix" has no particular time setting so that it could very well be placed in current time. It brings back to me memories of times when life was much simpler, more pleasant and without the problems we as adults face. It's a story of childhood and the dreams that children of every age share and which we all to soon leave behind. Of course, there is the traditional fiery death of the phoenix in the story.

A Daughter of the Land

by Gene Stratton Porter

A Daughter of the Land (1918) by Gene Stratton Porter is, above all, a love song of a woman and the land from which she sprung.

Curious, If True Strange Tales

by Elizabeth Gaskell

Here is a collection of five spooky Victorian stories by Elizabeth Gaskell. Included are The Old Nurse's Story, The Poor Clare, Lois the Witch, The Grey Woman, and Curious, if True.

Culture and Anarchy

by Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold's famous series of essays, which were first published in book form under the title Culture and Anarchy in 1869, debate important questions about the nature of culture and society. Arnold seeks to find out what culture really is, what good it can do, and if it is really necessary. He contrasts culture, which he calls the study of perfection, with anarchy, the mood of unrest and uncertainty that pervaded mid-Victorian England. This edition reproduces the original book version, revealing the immediate historical context and controversy of the piece. The introduction and notes broaden out the interpretative approach to Arnold's text, elaborating on the complexities of the religious context. The book also reinforces the continued importance of Arnold's ideas its influences in the face of the challenges of multi-culturalism and post-modernism.

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

One of the world's greatest novels, Crime and Punishment is the story of a murder and its consequences--an unparalleled tale of suspense set in the midst of nineteenth-century Russia's troubled transition to the modern age. In the slums of czarist St. Petersburg lives young Raskolnikov, a sensitive, intellectual student. The poverty he has always known drives him to believe that he is exempt from moral law. But when he puts this belief to the test and commits murder, there results unbearable suffering. Crime and punishment, the novel reminds us, "grow from the same seed."

Cranford

by Elizabeth Gaskell

Mary Smith and her friends live in Cranford, a town predominantly inhabited by women. The return of a long-lost brother named Peter is the most dramatic event to occur over the course of the sixteen tales that comprise the novel. Elizabeth Gaskell s Cranford is an ironic portrayal of female life in a secluded English village.

Clotel

by William Wells Brown

First published in December 1853, Clotel was written amid then unconfirmed rumors that Thomas Jefferson had fathered children with one of his slaves. The story begins with the auction of his mistress, here called Currer, and their two daughters, Clotel and Althesa. The Virginian who buys Clotel falls in love with her, gets her pregnant, seems to promise marriage--then sells her. Escaping from the slave dealer, Clotel returns to Virginia disguised as a white man in order to rescue her daughter, Mary, a slave in her father's house. A fast-paced and harrowing tale of slavery and freedom, of the hypocrisies of a nation founded on democratic principles, Clotel is more than a sensationalist novel. It is a founding text of the African American novelistic tradition, a brilliantly composed and richly detailed exploration of human relations in a new world in which race is a cultural construct.

Bartleby, The Scrivener: A Story of Wall-Street

by Herman Melville

Bartleby the Scrivener (1853), by Herman Melville, tells the story of a quiet, hardworking legal copyist who works in an office in the Wall Street area of New York City. One day Bartleby declines the assignment his employer gives him with the inscrutable "I would prefer not." The utterance of this remark sets off a confounding set of actions and behavior, making the unsettling character of Bartleby one of Melville's most enigmatic and unforgettable creations.

The Champions of the Round Table

by Howard Pyle

Sir Launcelot of the Lake dwelt within a magic lake which was the enchanted habitation of the Lady Nymue of the Lake. He was there trained in all the most excellent arts of chivalry by Sir Pellias, the Gentle Knight. All of this was told in this book and many other things concerning Sir Launcelot and several other worthies who were Companions of the Round Table and who were very noble and excellent knights both in battle and in court.

Showing 6,651 through 6,675 of 16,291 results

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