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Never Seduce a Scot

by Maya Banks

Maya Banks, the New York Times bestselling author of romance and romantic suspense has captivated readers with her steamy Scottish historical novels, perfect for fans of Julie Garwood. Never Seduce a Scot features a remarkable woman whose rare gift teaches a gruff Scottish warrior how to listen with his heart. Eveline Armstrong is fiercely loved and protected by her powerful clan, but outsiders consider her "touched." Beautiful, fey, with a level, intent gaze, she doesn't speak. No one, not even her family, knows that she cannot hear. Content with her life of seclusion, Eveline has taught herself to read lips and allows the outside world to view her as daft. But when an arranged marriage into a rival clan makes Graeme Montgomery her husband, Eveline accepts her duty--unprepared for the delights to come. Graeme is a rugged warrior with a voice so deep and powerful that his new bride can hear it, and hands and kisses so tender and skilled that he stirs her deepest passions. Graeme is intrigued by the mysterious Eveline, whose silent lips are ripe with temptation and whose bright, intelligent eyes can see into his soul. As intimacy deepens, he learns her secret. But when clan rivalries and dark deeds threaten the wife he has only begun to cherish, the Scottish warrior will move heaven and earth to save the woman who has awakened his heart to the beautiful song of a rare and magical love.From the Paperback edition.

The McKettricks of Texas: Tate, Garrett and Austin

by Linda Lael Miller

Another unforgettable series from #1 New York Times bestselling author Linda Lael Miller. Find out why she's called the First Lady of the West! Tate. He's running the family's Silver Spur Ranch near Blue River, Texas. He's also a divorced dad of six-year-old twins. Libby Remington was his high school girlfriend and she's the woman he still loves. He just needs to convince her of that! Nothing--not cattle rustlers, a killer stallion or a vindictive ex-wife--can keep him from the attempt. Garrett. He was on a fast track up the political ladder--until a scandal slowed him down and brought him home to Blue River, Texas. He doesn't think he has the land in his blood the way his brothers do. But Blue River has other charms, like Julie Remington, a woman with deep ties to the community--not to mention a four-year-old son and a three-legged beagle. Good thing he and Julie have nothing in common except their undeniable attraction--or do they? Austin. He's a lone maverick--and he was a champion rodeo star until finally he got bested by an angry bull. With his career over and his love life a mess, he returns home to the Silver Spur. But his brothers won't allow him to brood about his losses in peace; over his protests, they've even hired a nurse to speed his recovery. None other than the beautiful Paige Remington... Meet these three men of the West--and the women they love!

The McKettricks: Meg and Lizzie

by Linda Lael Miller

Let #1 New York Times bestselling author Linda Lael Miller--the First Lady of the West!--introduce you to Meg and Lizzie McKettrick. The McKettrick Way. For Meg, the Circle M ranch in Indian Rock, Arizona, is home. And cowboy Brad O'Ballivan is the man she once loved. The man she still loves. Now they're picking up where they left off, and Brad wants it all. Marriage, babies, a lifetime together. But Meg's as stubborn as any of her McKettrick ancestors and she refuses to give up her name or the ranch. It's the McKettrick way. And so begins a battle of wills Brad intends to win--the O'Ballivan way! The McKettrick Christmas. It's 1896, and Lizzie McKettrick, Indian Rock's new schoolteacher, is coming home for Christmas. She has a surprise for her family; she's engaged to Whitley Carson. But fate has a surprise for Lizzie in the form of Dr. Morgan Shane. When their homebound train is halted by a massive avalanche and passengers are injured, the doctor takes charge--with Lizzie by his side. This Christmas Eve changes everything. For both of them...

Brenda Joyce The de Warenne Dynasty Series Books 4-7

by Brenda Joyce

Recapture the adventure and romance of New York Times bestselling author Brenda Joyce's beloved de Warenne DynastyTHE PRIZE: Orphaned Virginia Hughes is determined to rebuild her beloved childhood home, Sweet Briar. That is, until she is kidnapped by infamous sea captain Devlin O'Neill and finds her plans thwarted by a passion that threatens to seal both their fates forever...THE MASQUERADE: Tyrell de Warenne is shocked when Elizabeth Anne Fitzgerald--a girl he remembers as shy and bookish--shows up on his doorstep with a child she claims is his. And although he knows it's impossible that he is the boy's father, Tyrell is curious and plays along. But he hasn't counted on the love that blossoms between him and Lizzie, a love too grand to be denied...THE STOLEN BRIDE: Eleanor de Warenne has all but given up on finding Sean O'Neill, the love of her life, who disappeared from his ancestral home years ago. But just days before her wedding to another man, Sean reappears, drastically changed from the man he once was. Eleanor must choose either her betrothal to a man of honor or the passion that Sean's return has rekindled.A LADY AT LAST: Raised as a pirate's daughter, Amanda Carre is alone in the world and has never been tutored in the finer social graces. Bound for England in search of her long-lost mother, she has only her chaperone, Cliff de Warenne, to instruct her in the ways of London society. But with every passing moment, it becomes harder to deny the explosive attraction between them...The de Warenne Dynasty, Volume Two, Books Four to SevenThe PrizeThe MasqueradeThe Stolen BrideA Lady At Last

Holly and Mistletoe

by Susan Mallery

Revisit this heartwarming fan-favorite holiday story from #1 New York Times bestselling author Susan Mallery When firefighter Jordan Haynes rescues Holly Garrett's mischievous cat, Mistletoe, from her burning apartment, he winds up in the hospital. Holly, a shy, innocent 28-year-old, feels so bad about Jordan's injuries that she stops by his hospital bed and begins visiting him at home, as well. Soon she's not only preparing his evening meals but also giving him sponge baths, and she definitely isn't prepared for the sexy glances Jordan throws her way or the feelings that he awakens in her. Jordan knows that Holly is awkward and inexperienced, but there's something so bewitching about her, and he just can't let her be alone for Christmas. No, he can play the needy patient for as long as it takes to convince Holly to keep him company through the holidays--if not longer.

Full-Time Father

by Susan Mallery

A reader-favorite story of love, loss and finding family from #1 New York Times bestselling author Susan Mallery Computer consultant Parker Hamilton's life is thrown into a tailspin when a woman named Erin Ridgway suddenly shows up on his doorstep, claiming that he is the father of her four-year-old niece, Christie. But how can Parker be a father? What will he say to his long-lost daughter? And why is the beautiful Erin suddenly giving him a chance to be part of Christie's life? After Erin Ridgway's sister dies in childbirth, Erin promises herself she'll do everything she can for her sister's baby, and that includes finding the baby's father. When she finally meets the reclusive Parker, she wants to give him the chance to know his daughter, but what could a lonely millionaire know about raising a little girl? And is she just imagining the chemistry between her and Parker?

An Honorable Man

by Lori Foster

AN HONORABLE MANIn this sizzling fan-favorite tale from New York Times bestselling author Lori Foster, Lieutenant Colonel Hamilton Wulf's career ambitions cost him the one woman he ever wanted--elementary school teacher Liv Avery. When tragedy strikes, he's determined to win back her love...even if it means risking his life.

The Market and Other Orders

by F. A. Hayek edited by Bruce Caldwell

In addition to his groundbreaking contributions to pure economic theory, F. A. Hayek also closely examined the ways in which the knowledge of many individual market participants could culminate in an overall order of economic activity. His attempts to come to terms with the "knowledge problem" thread through his career and comprise the writings collected in the fifteenth volume of the University of Chicago Press's Collected Works of F. A. Hayek series. The Market and Other Orders brings together more than twenty works spanning almost forty years that consider this question. Consisting of speeches, essays, and lectures, including Hayek's 1974 Nobel lecture, "The Pretense of Knowledge," the works in this volume draw on a broad range of perspectives, including the philosophy of science, the physiology of the brain, legal theory, and political philosophy. Taking readers from Hayek's early development of the idea of spontaneous order in economics through his integration of this insight into political theory and other disciplines, the book culminates with Hayek's integration of his work on these topics into an overarching social theory that accounts for spontaneous order in the variety of complex systems that Hayek studied throughout his career. Edited by renowned Hayek scholar Bruce Caldwell, who also contributes a masterly introduction that provides biographical and historical context, The Market and Other Orders forms the definitive compilation of Hayek's work on spontaneous order.

Improvement by Design: The Promise of Better Schools

by David K. Cohen Donald J. Peurach Joshua L. Glazer Karen E. Gates Simona Goldin

One of the great challenges now facing education reformers in the United States is how to devise a consistent and intelligent framework for instruction that will work across the nation s notoriously fragmented and politically conflicted school systems. Various programs have tried to do that, but only a few have succeeded. "Improvement by Design"looks at three different programs, seeking to understand why two of them America s Choice and Success for All worked, and why the third Accelerated Schools Project did not. The authors identify four critical puzzles that the successful programs were able to solve: design, implementation, improvement, and sustainability. Pinpointing the specific solutions that clearly improved instruction, they identify the key elements that all successful reform programs share. Offering urgently needed guidance for state and local school systems as they attempt to respond to future reform proposals, "Improvement by Design"gets America one step closer to truly successful education systems. "

Don't Look, Don't Touch, Don't Eat: The Science Behind Revulsion

by Valerie Curtis

Every flu season, sneezing, coughing, and graphic throat-clearing become the day-to-day background noise in every workplace. And coworkers tend to move as far--and as quickly--away from the source of these bodily eruptions as possible. Instinctively, humans recoil from objects that they view as dirty and even struggle to overcome feelings of discomfort once the offending item has been cleaned. These reactions are universal, and although there are cultural and individual variations, by and large we are all disgusted by the same things. In Don't Look, Don't Touch, Don't Eat, Valerie Curtis builds a strong case for disgust as a "shadow emotion"--less familiar than love or sadness, it nevertheless affects our day-to-day lives. In disgust, biological and sociocultural factors meet in dynamic ways to shape human and animal behavior. Curtis traces the evolutionary role of disgust in disease prevention and hygiene, but also shows that it is much more than a biological mechanism. Human social norms, from good manners to moral behavior, are deeply rooted in our sense of disgust. The disgust reaction informs both our political opinions and our darkest tendencies, such as misogyny and racism. Through a deeper understanding of disgust, Curtis argues, we can take this ubiquitous human emotion and direct it towards useful ends, from combating prejudice to reducing disease in the poorest parts of the world by raising standards of hygiene. Don't Look, Don't Touch, Don't Eat reveals disgust to be a vital part of what it means to be human and explores how this deep-seated response can be harnessed to improve the world.

The Public School Advantage: Why Public Schools Outperform Private Schools

by Christopher A. Lubienski Sarah Theule Lubienski

Nearly the whole of America's partisan politics centers on a single question: Can markets solve our social problems? And for years this question has played out ferociously in the debates about how we should educate our children. From the growth of vouchers and charter schools to the implementation of No Child Left Behind, policy makers have increasingly turned to market-based models to help improve our schools, believing that private institutions--because they are competitively driven--are better than public ones. With The Public School Advantage, Christopher A. and Sarah Theule Lubienski offer powerful evidence to undercut this belief, showing that public schools in fact outperform private ones. For decades research showing that students at private schools perform better than students at public ones has been used to promote the benefits of the private sector in education, including vouchers and charter schools--but much of these data are now nearly half a century old. Drawing on two recent, large-scale, and nationally representative databases, the Lubienskis show that any benefit seen in private school performance now is more than explained by demographics. Private schools have higher scores not because they are better institutions but because their students largely come from more privileged backgrounds that offer greater educational support. After correcting for demographics, the Lubienskis go on to show that gains in student achievement at public schools are at least as great and often greater than those at private ones. Even more surprising, they show that the very mechanism that market-based reformers champion--autonomy--may be the crucial factor that prevents private schools from performing better. Alternatively, those practices that these reformers castigate, such as teacher certification and professional reforms of curriculum and instruction, turn out to have a significant effect on school improvement. Despite our politics, we all agree on the fundamental fact: education deserves our utmost care. The Public School Advantage offers exactly that. By examining schools within the diversity of populations in which they actually operate, it provides not ideologies but facts. And the facts say it clearly: education is better off when provided for the public by the public.

Catching Nature in the Act: Réaumur and the Practice of Natural History in the Eighteenth Century

by Mary Terrall

Natural history in the eighteenth century was many things to many people--diversion, obsession, medically or economically useful knowledge, spectacle, evidence for God's providence and wisdom, or even the foundation of all natural knowledge. Because natural history was pursued by such a variety of people around the globe, with practitioners sharing neither methods nor training, it has been characterized as a science of straightforward description, devoted to amassing observations as the raw material for classification and thus fundamentally distinct from experimental physical science. In Catching Nature in the Act, Mary Terrall revises this picture, revealing how eighteenth-century natural historians incorporated various experimental techniques and strategies into their practice. At the center of Terrall's study is René-Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur (1683-1757)--the definitive authority on natural history in the middle decades of the eighteenth century--and his many correspondents, assistants, and collaborators. Through a close examination of Réaumur's publications, papers, and letters, Terrall reconstructs the working relationships among these naturalists and shows how observing, collecting, and experimenting fit into their daily lives. Essential reading for historians of science and early modern Europe, Catching Nature in the Act defines and excavates a dynamic field of francophone natural history that has been inadequately mined and understood to date.

The Chinese Love Pavilion: A Novel

by Paul Scott

Paul Scott is most famous for his much-beloved tetralogy The Raj Quartet, an epic that chronicles the end of the British rule in India with a cast of vividly and memorably drawn characters. Inspired by Scott's own time spent in India and Malaya during World War II, this two powerful novel provides valuable insight into how foreign lands changed the British who worked and fought in them, hated and loved them. The Chinese Love Pavilion follows a young British clerk, Tom Brent, who must track down a former friend-now suspected of murder-in Malaya. Tom faces great danger, both from the mysterious Malayan jungles and the political tensions between British officers, but the novel is perhaps most memorable for the strange, beautiful romance between Tom and a protean Eurasian beauty whom he meets in the eponymous Chinese Love Pavilion.

Deconstructing Dignity: A Critique of the Right-to-Die Debate

by Scott Cutler Shershow

The right-to-die debate has gone on for centuries, playing out most recently as a spectacle of protest surrounding figures such as Terry Schiavo. Ina"Deconstructing Dignity," Scott Cutler Shershow offers a powerful new way of thinking about it philosophically. Focusing on the concepts of human dignity and the sanctity of life, he employs Derridean deconstruction to uncover self-contradictory and damaging assumptions that underlie both sides of the debate. Shershow examines texts from CiceroOCOsa"De Officiis"ato KantOCOsa"Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals"ato court decisions and religious declarations. Through them he reveals how arguments both supporting and denying the right to die undermine their own unconditional concepts of human dignity and the sanctity of life with a hidden conditional logic, one often tied to practical economic concerns and the scarcity or unequal distribution of medical resources. He goes on to examine the exceptional case of self-sacrifice, closing with a vision of a societyOCoone whose conditions we are far from meetingOCoin which the debate can finally be resolved. A sophisticated analysis of a heated topic, a"Deconstructing Dignitya"is also a masterful example of deconstructionist methods at work. a"

The Birds of Paradise: A Novel

by Paul Scott

Paul Scott is most famous for his much-beloved tetralogy The Raj Quartet, an epic that chronicles the end of the British rule in India with a cast of vividly and memorably drawn characters. Inspired by Scott's own time spent in India during World War II, this powerful novel provides valuable insight into how foreign lands changed the British who worked and fought in them, hated and loved them. A coming of age tale, The Birds of Paradise is the story of a boy and his childhood friendship with the daughter of a British diplomat and the son of the Raja. Scott artfully brings his young narrator's voice to life with evocative language and an eye for detail, capturing the pangs of childhood and the bittersweet fog of memory with nostalgic yet immediate prose

Economy of Words: Communicative Imperatives in Central Banks

by Douglas R. Holmes

Markets are artifacts of language--so Douglas R. Holmes argues in this deeply researched look at central banks and the people who run them. Working at the intersection of anthropology, linguistics, and economics, he shows how central bankers have been engaging in communicative experiments that predate the financial crisis and continue to be refined amid its unfolding turmoil--experiments that do not merely describe the economy, but actually create its distinctive features. Holmes examines the New York District Branch of the Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank, Deutsche Bundesbank, and the Bank of England, among others, and shows how officials there have created a new monetary regime that relies on collaboration with the public to achieve the ends of monetary policy. Central bankers, Holmes argues, have shifted the conceptual anchor of monetary affairs away from standards such as gold or fixed exchange rates and toward an evolving relationship with the public, one rooted in sentiments and expectations. Going behind closed doors to reveal the intellectual world of central banks,Economy of Words offers provocative new insights into the way our economic circumstances are conceptualized and ultimately managed.

Tocqueville in Arabia: Dilemmas in a Democratic Age

by Joshua Mitchell

The Arab Spring, with its calls for sweeping political change, marked the most profound popular uprising in the Middle East for generations. But if the nascent democracies born of these protests are to succeed in the absence of a strong democratic tradition, their success will depend in part on an understanding of how Middle Easterners view themselves, their allegiances to family and religion, and their relationship with the wider world in which they are increasingly integrated. Many of these same questions were raised by Alexis de Tocqueville during his 1831 tour of America, itself then a rising democracy. Joshua Mitchell spent years teaching Tocqueville's classic account, Democracy in America, in America and the Arab Gulf and, with Tocqueville in Arabia, he offers a profound personal take. One of the reasons for the book's widespread popularity in the region is that its commentary on the challenges of democracy and the seemingly contradictory concepts of equality and individuality continue to speak to current debates. While Mitchell's American students tended to value the individualism of commercial self-interest, his Middle Eastern students had grave doubts about individualism and a deep suspicion for capitalism, which they saw as risking the destruction of long-held loyalties and obligations. When asked about suffering, American students answered in psychological or sociological terms, while Middle Eastern students understood it in terms of religion. Mitchell describes modern democratic man as becoming what Tocqueville predicted: a "distinct kind of humanity" that would be increasingly isolated and alone. Whatever their differences, students in both worlds were grappling with a sense of disconnectedness that social media does little to remedy. We live in a time rife with mutual misunderstandings between America and the Middle East, and Tocqueville in Arabia offers a guide to the present, troubled times, leavened by the author's hopes about the future.


by Phillippe Diederich

"In this entertaining debut novel, Frank Delgado tries to save his failing restaurant by returning to Cuba, his dead father's homeland, to get ahold of a top-secret chicken recipe. But there is more than delicious chicken at stake here. Food is the road home--geographically, emotionally, metaphorically. Peppered with cooking advice from chefs, ordinary folks, and celebrities including Fidel Castro himself (an advocate of pork), Phillipe Diederich's Sofrito is a love letter to the deepest recesses of nostalgia's heart."--Cristina Garcia, author of Dreaming in Cuban and King of CubaFrank Delgado is no thief. He co-owns a failing Cuban restaurant in Manhattan's Upper East Side. The restaurant, like Frank, is rudderless. Lost. He decides he'll save the restaurant by traveling to Cuba to steal the legendary chicken recipe from the famed El Ajillo restaurant in Havana. The recipe is a state secret, so prized that no cook knows the whole recipe. But Frank's rationale is ironclad--Fidel stole the secret from his family, so he will steal it back. He will triumphantly bring that recipe back to Manhattan and turn his fortunes around.Frank has no interest in Cuba. His parents fled after the Revolution. His dead father spent his life erasing all traces of Cuba from his heart with barbeques, television, lawn mowing and alcohol. So Frank is not prepared for the real Cuba. Sure, he gets beat up and almost killed, the secret service threatens him, but in the midst of the chaos, he falls in love with a prostitute and the city, and he unwraps the heroic story of his parents' life. Cuba begins to bind Frank together, the way a good sofrito binds the flavors of a Cuban dish.Phillippe Diederich is a Haitian American writer and photojournalist raised in Mexico City and Miami, Florida. The dictator Papa Doc kicked his parents out of Haiti in the 1960s. Phillippe grew up listening to stories of nostalgia, revolution, and exile. His friends were the sons and daughters of parents who had fled oppressive regimes throughout Latin America.

The Art of the Lathe

by B. H. Fairchild

B.H. Fairchild's The Art of the Lathe is a collection of poems centering on the working-class world of the Midwest, the isolations of small-town life, and the possibilities and occasions of beauty and grace among the machine shops and oil fields of rural Kansas.

US: Women

by Marjorie Fletcher

"At its best, original, flat, urgent, the voice stays with us... an awkward, restless, honest presence, that won't sit down and talk, and won't go away."-Jean Valentine

Tricked (The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book Four)

by Kevin Hearne

Druid Atticus O'Sullivan hasn't stayed alive for more than two millennia without a fair bit of Celtic cunning. So when vengeful thunder gods come Norse by Southwest looking for payback, Atticus, with a little help from the Navajo trickster god Coyote, lets them think that they've chopped up his body in the Arizona desert.But the mischievous Coyote is not above a little sleight of paw, and Atticus soon finds that he's been duped into battling bloodthirsty desert shapeshifters called skinwalkers. Just when the Druid thinks he's got a handle on all the duplicity, betrayal comes from an unlikely source. If Atticus survives this time, he vows he won't be fooled again. Famous last words.

The Moonlit Mind (Novella)

by Dean Koontz

In this chilling original stand-alone novella, available exclusively as an eBook, #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz offers a taste of what's to come in his new novel, 77 Shadow Street, with a mesmerizing tale of a homeless boy at large in a city fraught with threats . . . both human and otherwise.Twelve-year-old Crispin has lived on the streets since he was nine--with only his wits and his daring to sustain him, and only his silent dog, Harley, to call his friend. He is always on the move, never lingering in any one place long enough to risk being discovered. Still, there are certain places he returns to. In the midst of the tumultuous city, they are havens of solitude: like the hushed environs of St. Mary Salome Cemetery, a place where Crispin can feel at peace--safe, at least for a while, from the fearsome memories that plague him . . . and seep into his darkest nightmares. But not only his dreams are haunted. The city he roams with Harley has secrets and mysteries, things unexplainable and maybe unimaginable. Crispin has seen ghosts in the dead of night, and sensed dimensions beyond reason in broad daylight. Hints of things disturbing and strange nibble at the edges of his existence, even as dangers wholly natural and earthbound cast their shadows across his path. Alone, drifting, and scavenging to survive is no life for a boy. But the life Crispin has left behind, and is still running scared from, is an unspeakable alternative . . . that may yet catch up with him.There is more to Crispin's world, and its darkest corners yet to be encountered, in this eBook's special bonus: a spine-tingling excerpt from Dean Koontz's forthcoming novel, 77 Shadow Street.

The Silent Girl (Rizzoli and Isles #9)

by Tess Gerritsen

No one takes readers to the dark side and back with more razor-sharp jolts and sheer suspense than the storytelling master behind Ice Cold and The Keepsake. When New York Times bestselling author Tess Gerritsen has a tale to tell, put yourself in her expert hands--and prepare for the shocks and thrills that are certain to follow.Every crime scene tells a story. Some keep you awake at night. Others haunt your dreams. The grisly display homicide cop Jane Rizzoli finds in Boston's Chinatown will do both.In the murky shadows of an alley lies a female's severed hand. On the tenement rooftop above is the corpse belonging to that hand, a red-haired woman dressed all in black, her head nearly severed. Two strands of silver hair--not human--cling to her body. They are Rizzoli's only clues, but they're enough for her and medical examiner Maura Isles to make the startling discovery: that this violent death had a chilling prequel.Nineteen years earlier, a horrifying murder-suicide in a Chinatown restaurant left five people dead. But one woman connected to that massacre is still alive: a mysterious martial arts master who knows a secret she dares not tell, a secret that lives and breathes in the shadows of Chinatown. A secret that may not even be human. Now she's the target of someone, or something, deeply and relentlessly evil.Cracking a crime resonating with bone-chilling echoes of an ancient Chinese legend, Rizzoli and Isles must outwit an unseen enemy with centuries of cunning--and a swift, avenging blade.BONUS: This edition contains script pages from TNT's hit show Rizzoli & Isles.

Hexed (The Iron Druid Chronicles #2)

by Kevin Hearne

Atticus O'Sullivan, last of the Druids, doesn't care much for witches. Still, he's about to make nice with the local coven by signing a mutually beneficial nonaggression treaty--when suddenly the witch population in modern-day Tempe, Arizona, quadruples overnight. And the new girls are not just bad, they're badasses with a dark history on the German side of World War II. With a fallen angel feasting on local high school students, a horde of Bacchants blowing in from Vegas with their special brand of deadly decadence, and a dangerously sexy Celtic goddess of fire vying for his attention, Atticus is having trouble scheduling the witch hunt. But aided by his magical sword, his neighbor's rocket-propelled grenade launcher, and his vampire attorney, Atticus is ready to sweep the town and show the witchy women they picked the wrong Druid to hex. (From the Paperback edition.)

Songs of Willow Frost

by Jamie Ford

From Jamie Ford, the New York Times bestselling author of the beloved Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, comes a much-anticipated second novel. Set against the backdrop of Depression-era Seattle, Songs of Willow Frost is a powerful tale of two souls--a boy with dreams for his future and a woman escaping her haunted past--both seeking love, hope, and forgiveness. Twelve-year-old William Eng, a Chinese American boy, has lived at Seattle's Sacred Heart Orphanage ever since his mother's listless body was carried away from their small apartment five years ago. On his birthday--or rather, the day the nuns designate as his birthday--William and the other orphans are taken to the historical Moore Theatre, where William glimpses an actress on the silver screen who goes by the name of Willow Frost. Struck by her features, William is convinced that the movie star is his mother, Liu Song. Determined to find Willow and prove that his mother is still alive, William escapes from Sacred Heart with his friend Charlotte. The pair navigate the streets of Seattle, where they must not only survive but confront the mysteries of William's past and his connection to the exotic film star. The story of Willow Frost, however, is far more complicated than the Hollywood fantasy William sees onscreen. Shifting between the Great Depression and the 1920s, Songs of Willow Frost takes readers on an emotional journey of discovery. Jamie Ford's sweeping novel will resonate with anyone who has ever longed for the comforts of family and a place to call home.Advance praise for Songs of Willow Frost "Ford is a first-rate novelist whose bestselling debut, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, was a joy to read. With his new book, he takes a great leap forward and demonstrates the uncanny ability to move me to tears."--Pat Conroy, author of South of Broad "This is a tender, powerful, and deeply satisfying story about the universal quest for love, forgiveness, belonging, and family. If you liked Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, you're going to love Songs of Willow Frost."--Lisa Genova, author of Still Alice "I could not turn away from the haunting story or the stunning historical details that bring Depression-era Seattle to cinematic life. Ford's boundless compassion for the human spirit, in all its strengths and weaknesses, makes him one of our most unique and compelling storytellers."--Helen Simonson, author of Major Pettigrew's Last Stand "A beautiful novel . . . William's journey is one you'll savor, and then think about long after the book is closed. I loved it."--Susan Wiggs, author of The Apple Orchard "One of those rare books that move right into your heart and stay there. Ford's new--and long-awaited--book is a delight to read, and is destined to become a book-club favorite."--Anne Fortier, author of Juliet "Ford has done it again, creating characters so full of passion and courage that we cannot help but follow them into the pages of history."--Jean Kwok, author of Girl in Translation "Ford weaves another rich tapestry of history and family drama in this cliff-hanging tale of an abandoned boy and the Chinese American singer he is convinced is his missing mother. Hope and fate, laughs and tears: Songs of Willow Frost has it all."--Ivan Doig, author of The Bartender's Tale

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