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Plastic Reason: An Anthropology of Brain Science in Embryogenetic Terms

by Tobias Rees

Throughout the twentieth century, neuronal researchers knew the adult human brain to be a thoroughly fixed and immutable cellular structure, devoid of any developmental potential. Plastic Reason is a study of the efforts of a few Parisian neurobiologists to overturn this rigid conception of the central nervous system by showing that basic embryogenetic processes--most spectacularly the emergence of new cellular tissue in the form of new neurons, axons, dendrites, and synapses--continue in the mature brain. Furthermore, these researchers sought to demonstrate that the new tissues are still unspecific and hence literally plastic, and that this cellular plasticity is constitutive of the possibility of the human. Plastic Reason, grounded in years of fieldwork and historical research, is an anthropologist's account of what has arguably been one of the most sweeping events in the history of brain research--the highly contested effort to consider the adult brain in embryogenetic terms. A careful analysis of the disproving of an established truth, it reveals the turmoil that such a disruption brings about and the emergence of new possibilities of thinking and knowing.

The Kerner Report

by Julian E. Zelizer The National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

The Kerner Report is a powerful window into the roots of racism and inequality in the United States. Hailed by Martin Luther King Jr. as a "physician's warning of approaching death, with a prescription for life," this historic study was produced by a presidential commission established by Lyndon Johnson, chaired by former Illinois governor Otto Kerner, and provides a riveting account of the riots that shook 1960s America. The commission pointed to the polarization of American society, white racism, economic inopportunity, and other factors, arguing that only "a compassionate, massive, and sustained" effort could reverse the troubling reality of a racially divided, separate, and unequal society. Conservatives criticized the report as a justification of lawless violence while leftist radicals complained that Kerner didn't go far enough. But for most Americans, this report was an eye-opening account of what was wrong in race relations. Drawing together decades of scholarship showing the widespread and ingrained nature of racism, The Kerner Report provided an important set of arguments about what the nation needs to do to achieve racial justice, one that is familiar in today's climate. Presented here with an introduction by historian Julian Zelizer, The Kerner Report deserves renewed attention in America's continuing struggle to achieve true parity in race relations, income, employment, education, and other critical areas.

The King's Two Bodies: A Study in Medieval Political Theology

by William Chester Jordan Conrad Leyser Ernst Kantorowicz

Originally published in 1957, this classic work has guided generations of scholars through the arcane mysteries of medieval political theology. Throughout history, the notion of two bodies has permitted the post mortem continuity of monarch and monarchy, as epitomized by the statement, "The king is dead. Long live the king." In The King's Two Bodies, Ernst Kantorowicz traces the historical problem posed by the "King's two bodies"--the body natural and the body politic--back to the Middle Ages and demonstrates, by placing the concept in its proper setting of medieval thought and political theory, how the early-modern Western monarchies gradually began to develop a "political theology." The king's natural body has physical attributes, suffers, and dies, naturally, as do all humans; but the king's other body, the spiritual body, transcends the earthly and serves as a symbol of his office as majesty with the divine right to rule. The notion of the two bodies allowed for the continuity of monarchy even when the monarch died, as summed up in the formulation "The king is dead. Long live the king." Bringing together liturgical works, images, and polemical material, The King's Two Bodies explores the long Christian past behind this "political theology." It provides a subtle history of how commonwealths developed symbolic means for establishing their sovereignty and, with such means, began to establish early forms of the nation-state. Kantorowicz fled Nazi Germany in 1938, after refusing to sign a Nazi loyalty oath, and settled in the United States. While teaching at the University of California, Berkeley, he once again refused to sign an oath of allegiance, this one designed to identify Communist Party sympathizers. He resigned as a result of the controversy and moved to the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, where he remained for the rest of his life, and where he wrote The King's Two Bodies.Featuring a new introduction, The King's Two Bodies is a subtle history of how commonwealths developed symbolic means for establishing their sovereignty and, with such means, began to establish early forms of the nation-state.

Stranger in the Mirror: The Scientific Search for the Self

by Robert V. Levine

In Stranger in the Mirror, Robert Levine offers a provocative and entertaining scientific exploration of the most personal and important of all landscapes: the physical and psychological entity we call our self. Who are we? Where is the boundary between us and everything else? Are we all multiple personalities? And how can we control who we become?Levine tackles these and other questions with a combination of surprising stories, case studies, and cutting-edge research--from psychology, biology, neuroscience, virtual reality, and many other fields. The result challenges cherished beliefs about the unity and stability of the self--but also suggests that we are more capable of change than we know.Transformation, Levine shows, is the human condition at virtually every level. Physically, our cells are unrecognizable from one moment to the next. Cognitively, our self-perceptions are equally changeable: A single glitch can make us lose track of a body part or our entire body--or to confuse our very self with that of another person. Psychologically, we switch back and forth like quicksilver between incongruent, sometimes adversarial subselves. Socially, we appear to be little more than an ever-changing troupe of actors. And, culturally, the boundaries of the self vary wildly around the world--from the confines of one's body to an entire village.The self, in short, is a fiction--vague, arbitrary, and utterly intangible. But it is also interminably fluid. And this, Levine argues, unleashes a world of potential. Fluidity creates malleability. And malleability creates possibilities.Engaging, informative, and ultimately liberating, Stranger in the Mirror will change forever how you think about your self--and what you might become.

The Sign in the Smoke

by Carolyn Keene

Nancy and her friends are faced with another chilling mystery in this twelfth book of the Nancy Drew Diaries, a fresh approach to the classic mystery series.When Bess asks Nancy and George to be counselors at her old camp, they're a little wary. After all, running around after a bunch of little kids doesn't exactly sound like fun! But Bess promises that the girls will get to enjoy nature, relax by the lake, and play some sports. Plus, it will give Nancy a much-needed break from solving mysteries. But trouble always finds Nancy Drew! After hearing the disturbing tale about a camper who had drowned in the lake years ago, Nancy dismisses it as a ghost story. But then something pulls her under water during a swim lesson--something eerily human, with long, silvery hair. And the next night her entire cabin's sleeping bags disappear--only to show up at the lake, soaked. Now Nancy isn't so sure if she believes in ghosts! All she knows is she has to do everything within her power to make sure her campers--and her friends--are safe. Which means she'd better get to the bottom of what's happening at Camp Cedarbark.

Love Blind

by C. Desir Jolene Perry

Shy high schooler Kyle Jamieson and Hailey Bosler, a musician with degenerative blindness, team up to tackle a bucket list of greatest fears in this compelling novel that explores what it means to take risks.It starts with a list of fears. Stupid things really. Things that Hailey shouldn't worry about, wouldn't worry about if she didn't wake up every morning with the world a little more blurry. Unable to see her two moms clearly. Unable to read the music for her guitar. One step closer to losing the things she cares about the most. For a while, the only thing that keeps Hailey moving forward is the feeling she gets when she crosses something off the list. Then she meets Kyle. He mumbles--when he talks at all--and listens to music to drown out his thoughts. He's loaded down with fears, too. So Hailey talks him into making his own list. Together, they stumble into an odd friendship, helping each other tackle one after another of their biggest fears. But fate and timing can change everything. And sometimes facing your worst fear makes you realize you had nothing to lose after all.

The One True Barbecue: Fire, Smoke, and the Pitmasters Who Cook the Whole Hog

by Rien Fertel

In the spirit of the oral historians who tracked down and told the stories of America's original bluesmen, this is a journey into the southern heartland (the Pork Belt) to discover the last of the great roadside whole hog pitmasters who hold onto the heritage and the secrets of America's traditional barbecue.Whole hog barbecue is a culinary art form that is both disappearing and experiencing a renaissance. In The One True Barbecue, Rien Fertel chronicles the uniquely southern art of whole hog barbecue--America's original barbecue--through the professional pitmasters who make a living firing, smoking, flipping, and cooking 200-plus pound pigs. More than one hundred years have passed since a small group of families in the Carolinas and Tennessee started roasting a whole pig over a smoky, fiery pit. Descendants of these original pitmasters are still cooking, passing down the recipes and traditions across generations to those willing to take on the grueling, dangerous task. This isn't your typical backyard pig roast, and it's definitely not for the faint of heart. This is barbecue at its most primitive and tasty. Fertel finds the gatekeepers of real southern barbecue to tell their stories and pays homage to the diversity and beauty of this culinary tradition. For anyone who has enjoyed the heavenly taste of tender, smoky, tangy whole hog, The One True Barbecue illuminates the origins and nuances of America's one true cuisine, and is an eye-opening and deeply enjoyable look at the fascinating and complex makeup of southern heritage and tradition.

A Self-Made Man: The Political Life of Abraham Lincoln Vol. I, 1809 – 1849

by Sidney Blumenthal

"A breathtaking new view of Abraham Lincoln." --The National Memo "Engrossing" --Library Journal The first of a multi-volume history of Lincoln as a political genius--from his obscure beginnings to his presidency, assassination, and the overthrow of his post-Civil War dreams of Reconstruction. This first volume traces Lincoln from his painful youth, describing himself as "a slave," to his emergence as the man we recognize as Abraham Lincoln.From his youth as a "newsboy," a voracious newspaper reader, Lincoln became a free thinker, reading Tom Paine, as well as Shakespeare and the Bible, and studying Euclid to sharpen his arguments as a lawyer. Lincoln's anti-slavery thinking began in his childhood amidst the Primitive Baptist antislavery dissidents in backwoods Kentucky and Indiana, the roots of his repudiation of Southern Christian pro-slavery theology. Intensely ambitious, he held political aspirations from his earliest years. Obsessed with Stephen Douglas, his political rival, he battled him for decades. Successful as a circuit lawyer, Lincoln built his team of loyalists. Blumenthal reveals how Douglas and Jefferson Davis acting together made possible Lincoln's rise. Blumenthal describes a socially awkward suitor who had a nervous breakdown over his inability to deal with the opposite sex. His marriage to the upper class Mary Todd was crucial to his social aspirations and his political career. Blumenthal portrays Mary as an asset to her husband, a rare woman of her day with strong political opinions. Blumenthal's robust portrayal is based on prodigious research of Lincoln's record and of the period and its main players. It reflects both Lincoln's time and the struggle that consumes our own political debate.

Prayers the Devil Answers: A Novel

by Sharyn Mccrumb

Sharyn McCrumb, New York Times bestselling author of the acclaimed Ballad series set in Appalachia, explores the ties between a reluctant female sheriff and a condemned man in this stunning and powerfully written Depression-era novel.Years later, after the tragedy, someone remembered the Dumb Supper and what had happened there. That was the cause of it, they said, because the ritual wasn't a game after all. It really was magic, but magic has rules, and she broke them. Suddenly thrust into the role of primary caretaker for her family following the tragic death of her husband, Ellie Robbins is appointed to serve out his term as sheriff of their rural Tennessee mountain town. The year is 1936, and her role is largely symbolic, except for the one task that only a sheriff can do: execute a convicted prisoner. Ellie has long proven she can handle herself. But becoming sheriff is altogether different, and the demands of the role are even more challenging when she is forced to combat society's expectations for a woman. Soon enough, dark secrets come to light, and Ellie must grapple with small town superstitions and the tenuous ties she shares with a condemned killer as she carves out a place for herself in an uncertain future. "There is no one quite like Sharyn McCrumb. No one better either" (San Diego Union-Tribune), and her luscious narrative brings her unforgettable characters to life with the "pure poetry" (The New York Times Book Review) that defines her astounding novels. Prayers the Devil Answers combines masterful historical research and captivating folklore to make an atmospheric and suspenseful tour de force.

The Nazi Hunters

by Andrew Nagorski

More than seven decades after the end of the Second World War, the era of the Nazi Hunters is drawing to a close as they and the hunted die off. Their saga can now be told almost in its entirety.After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Many of the lower-ranking perpetrators quickly blended in with the millions who were seeking to rebuild their lives in a new Europe, while those who felt most at risk fled the continent. The Nazi Hunters focuses on the small band of men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten--and who were determined to track them down to the furthest corners of the earth. The Nazi Hunters reveals the experiences of the young American prosecutors in the Nuremberg and Dachau trials, Benjamin Ferencz and William Denson; the Polish investigating judge Jan Sehn, who handled the case of Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Höss; Germany's judge and prosecutor Fritz Bauer, who repeatedly forced his countrymen to confront their country's record of mass murder; the Mossad agent Rafi Eitan, who was in charge of the Israeli team that nabbed Eichmann; and Eli Rosenbaum, who rose to head the US Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations that belatedly sought to expel war criminals who were living quietly in the United States. But some of the Nazi hunters' most controversial actions involved the more ambiguous cases, such as former UN Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim's attempt to cover up his wartime history. Or the fate of concentration camp guards who have lived into their nineties, long past the time when reliable eyewitnesses could be found to pinpoint their exact roles. The story of the Nazi hunters is coming to a natural end. It was unprecedented in so many ways, especially the degree to which the initial impulse of revenge was transformed into a struggle for justice. The Nazi hunters have transformed our fundamental notions of right and wrong. Andrew Nagorski's book is a richly reconstructed odyssey and an unforgettable tale of gritty determination, at times reckless behavior, and relentless pursuit.

Your Body and the Stars: The Zodiac As Your Wellness Guide

by Rebecca Gordon Stephanie Marango

The first book of its kind, Your Body and the Stars is a fun, practical, and insightful handbook that takes a revolutionary approach to holistic wellness by unlocking the powers of the stars.Do you suffer from neck pains? Go to the chapter on Taurus and the neck. How about sore knees? Learn preventive tips and exercises in the Capricorn chapter. Your Body and the Stars is the first comprehensive reference guide to go deep into the twelve zodiac signs and the specific body region each sign represents--from your head down to your toes. You can utilize this book by identifying your birth or sun sign and by the body region that needs healing attention. Each chapter integrates a self-directed program and holistic approach to health--both your emotional or mental well-being as well as the physical health of your body. Practical end-of-chapter tips, questions, and illustrated step-by-step exercises based on a mix of yoga, stretch and strengthening movements, and Pilates are provided for all levels. Your Body and the Stars brings together a medically trained, holistic physician, Dr. Stephanie Marango, and a talented astrologist, Rebecca Gordon, whose horoscopes have appeared in Elle and on Epicurious.com. They combine their individual expertise to bring the twelve zodiac signs to physical life, providing a lifelong guide that can both prevent and self-heal, illuminating your head-to-toe healing connection to the cosmos.

Herbert Hoover in the White House: The Ordeal of the Presidency

by Charles Rappleye

"A deft, filled-out portrait of the thirty-first president...by far the best, most readable study of Hoover's presidency to date." --Publishers Weekly Rappleye's surprising portrait of a Depression-era president Herbert Hoover reveals a very different figure than the usual Hoover, engaged and active but loathe to experiment and conscious of his inability to convey hope to the country.Herbert Clark Hoover was the thirty-first President of the United States. He served one term, from 1929 to 1933. Often considered placid, passive, unsympathetic, and even paralyzed by national events, Hoover faced an uphill battle in the face of the Great Depression. Many historians dismiss him as merely ineffective. But in Herbert Hoover in the White House, Charles Rappleye draws on rare and intimate sources--memoirs and diaries and thousands of documents kept by members of his cabinet and close advisors--to reveal a very different figure than the one often portrayed. The real Hoover, argues Rappleye, just lacked the tools of leadership. The Hoover presented here will come as a surprise to both his longtime defenders and his many critics. In public Hoover was shy and retiring, but in private he is revealed as a man of passion and sometimes of fury, a man who intrigued against his enemies while fulminating over plots against him. Rappleye describes him as more sophisticated and more active in economic policy than is often acknowledged. We see Hoover watching a sunny (and he thought ignorant) FDR on the horizon. FDR did not "cure" the depression, but he experimented with steps that relieved it. Most importantly he broke the mood of doom almost immediately. The Hoover we see here--bright, well meaning, energetic--lacked the single critical element to succeed as president. He had a first-class mind and a second-class temperament. Herbert Hoover in the White House is an object lesson in the most, perhaps only, talent needed to be a successful president--the temperament of leadership.

Beside Still Waters: Jews, Christians, and the Way of the Buddha

by Jack Miles Harold Kasimow Keenan P. John Linda Klepinger Keenan

A compelling question for people of faith today is how to remain committed to one's own religious tradition while being open to the beauty and truth of other religions. For example, some fear that Buddhism is a threat to Western faith traditions and express grave doubts about interreligious and cross-cultural encounters. Yet, many who have actually broadened their experience profess to have developed a deeper understanding of and a deeper commitment to their tradition of origin. This is what makes Beside Still Waters: Jews, Christians, and the Way of the Buddha such a new and meaningful contribution. Rather than offering research or lectures, Beside Still Waters takes a deeply personal approach, allowing the reader to delve into the individual experiences of fourteen Jews and Christians whose encounters with Buddhism have truly impacted their sense of religious identity. As Jack Miles, author of God: A Biography, says in the book's foreword, "The Buddhist presence in the religious world is far larger than a head-count of Buddhists can reveal." Beside Still Waters upholds this point by way of the diverse and eloquent authors who lend their perspective in its pages; these include Sylvia Boorstein, John B. Cobb, Norman Fischer, Ruben Habito, and other important members of the Jewish, Christian, Buddhist, and scholarly communities. Their collected anecdotes and interviews amount to an unprecedented and enduring work, sure to deepen our ability to understand each other, and therefore, ourselves.

Chaos Choreography

by Seanan Mcguire

Verity Price is back on the West Coast and getting back into the swing of the family business: cryptozoology. She's rescuing cryptids from bad situations, protecting them from monster-hunters, and generally risking life and limb for the greater good, with her ex-Covenant partner/husband, Dominic, by her side. Her ballroom dance career is behind her...or so she thinks. When Verity gets the call from the producers of Dance or Die, the reality show she almost won several years before, she finds the lure of a comeback impossible to resist, and she and Dominic are off to L.A. for one last shot at the big time. Of course, nothing is that simple. When two of her fellow contestants turn up dead, Verity will need every ally she can find--and a couple she wasn't looking for--in order to navigate the complicated steps of both the tango and a murder investigation without blowing her cover. It doesn't help that her official family backup is her grandmother, Alice Price-Healy, who thinks "subtle" is something that happens to other people.Winning this competition may have just become a matter of life and death.

Skirting the Grave

by Annette Blair

Maddie Cutler thought she was taking on a new design intern for her boutique. But instead she finds her dead at the train station under suspicious circumstances. Now, Maddie is determined to iron out the wrinkles of this mystery.

What Alice Forgot

by Liane Moriarty

From the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, THE HUSBAND'S SECRET... A "cheerfully engaging"* novel for anyone who's ever asked herself, "How did I get here?" Alice Love is twenty-nine, crazy about her husband, and pregnant with her first child. So imagine Alice's surprise when she comes to on the floor of a gym (a gym! She HATES the gym) and is whisked off to the hospital where she discovers the honeymoon is truly over -- she's getting divorced, she has three kids, and she's actually 39 years old. Alice must reconstruct the events of a lost decade, and find out whether it's possible to reconstruct her life at the same time. She has to figure out why her sister hardly talks to her, and how is it that she's become one of those super skinny moms with really expensive clothes. Ultimately, Alice must discover whether forgetting is a blessing or a curse, and whether it's possible to start over... *Kirkus ReviewsFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

Daybreak Zero

by John Barnes

A year has passed since the catastrophic event known as "Daybreak" began. Seven billion people have died. Washington, D.C., has been vaporized. The United States barely avoided a second civil war between two rival governments that rose from Washington's ashes. And "Daybreak" isn't over...

Four Queens: The Provencal Sisters Who Ruled Europe

by Nancy Goldstone

For fans of Alison Weir and Antonia Fraser,acclaimed author Nancy Goldstone's thrilling history of the royal daughters who succeeded in ruling--and shaping--thirteenth-century Europe Set against the backdrop of the thirteenth century, a time of chivalry and crusades, troubadors, knights and monarchs, Four Queens is the story of four provocative sisters--Marguerite, Eleanor, Sanchia, and Beatrice of Provence--who rose from near obscurity to become the most coveted and powerful women in Europe. Each sister in this extraordinary family was beautiful, cultured, and accomplished but what made these women so remarkable was that each became queen of a principal European power--France, England, Germany and Sicily. During their reigns, they exercised considerable political authority, raised armies, intervened diplomatically and helped redraw the map of Europe. Theirs is a drama of courage, sagacity and ambition that re-examines the concept of leadership in the Middle Ages.

The Shadow Matrix

by Marion Zimmer Bradley

After spending her youth in the Terran Empire, Margaret Alton returns to Darkover, the planet of her birth. There she discovers she has the Alton Gift--forced rapport and compulsion--one of the strongest and most dangerous of the inherited Laran gifts of the telepathic Comyn--the ruling families of Darkover. And even as she struggles to control her newfound powers, Margaret finds herself falling in love with the Regent to the royal Elhalyn Domain, a man she has been forbidden to marry, for their alliance would irrevocably alter the power balance of their planet!

Forbidden Forest

by Michael Cadnum

Little John lives a lifetime of adventure--from humble ferryman to legendary outlaw John Little is strong enough to be a knight, but he knows he is destined to life as a thief. He spends his days on the river, poling nobles back and forth on a wooden ferry, the master of which robs the passengers blind. When an arrogant knight draws his sword to protect his purse, John defends his unscrupulous boss. The struggle leaves the knight dead, and John becomes an outlaw who must flee into the forest to hide from the king's justice. John thinks his life is over, but his adventure has just begun. In shadowy Sherwood Forest, John meets a mysterious bandit dressed in green, who goes by the name Robin Hood. At Robin Hood's side, John Little becomes "Little John"--friend of the poor, defender of the weak, and scourge of evil men across Nottinghamshire.

Shade of Pale

by Greg Kihn

When the banshee wails, you must listen . . . Manhattan psychiatrist Jukes Wahler first spies her through a deli window: a stunning redheaded beauty who turns to look at him before she vanishes down the street. Then a patient tells him about a woman who's been stalking him, convinced that she's the banshee, the Irish angel of death. She's young, beautiful . . . and has red hair. It must be a coincidence, right? After all, the patient is dangerously delusional. But Wahler soon has other things to worry about. His sister, Cathy, and her abusive boyfriend are missing, and his only lead is Padraic O'Connor, an ex-IRA commando and the leader of one of Northern Ireland's most radical terrorist groups, who will offer his help--for a price. Filled with larger-than-life characters, including a jaded cop with no patience for the paranormal, a beautiful professor who specializes in Irish mythology, and a centuries-old protector of the innocent, Shade of Pale tells a fast-paced story of fate, vengeance, and love.

Rockets' Red Glare

by Greg Dinallo

Combining the narrative drive of the best of Clive Cussler with the knowledge of Tom Clancy, Rockets' Red Glare is the techno-thriller of the year about an ingenious coup that would change the balance in the world's arsenal foreverOn October 22, 1962, President Kennedy orders the US Navy to search all ships en route to Cuba. For six tense days, a frightened world watches as the two most powerful nations on Earth edge toward war. On October 28, under intense pressure, the Soviet Union agrees to dismantle its bases. The Cuban missile crisis is over.Or is it?Pensacola, Florida, 1987. Two naval officers of the Satellite Surveillance Group who have been tracking a Soviet Foxtrot class submarine suddenly come upon a mysterious VLCC supertanker--identity unknown. Hundreds of miles away in Houston, handsome millionaire industrialist Theodor Churcher takes off in his private helicopter for a clandestine rendezvous with the Soviet submarine in the Gulf of Mexico. Several days later, children playing on a beach in Louisiana find a severed arm floating in the surf--the fingerprints are those of Theodor Churcher. The final ominous moves in a brilliant Soviet strategy that began with the Cuban missile crisis are set in motion.Devastated by his father's death, young Andrew Churcher undertakes a dangerous mission to the Soviet Union to recover stolen blueprints that would not only avert the unfolding nightmare, but might cleanse his father's honor of the suspicion of treason. As he tracks a complex trail of move and countermove, Churcher is embroiled in a violent power struggle between two arms of Soviet intelligence. What Churcher doesn't know is that he is to be the bait in a deadly Soviet trap. From the cockpits of US fighters to the decks of Soviet navy vessels, from the back streets of Moscow to the oilrigs of Texas, Rockets' Red Glare is the ultimate techno-thriller.

Sunglasses After Dark

by Nancy A. Collins

Sunglasses After Dark, by award-winning author Nancy A. Collins, tells the story of a punk female vampire/vampire-hunter searching for the man responsible turning her into one of the undeadOne spring night in London, heiress Denise Thorne disappears while partying at a nightclub, never to be seen again. That very same night, Sonja Blue, a tough-as-nails punk vampire/vampire-slayer, conceived in terror and blood, is borne from the city's gutters. Saved by modern medicine before she could die, she is a living vampire who still possesses a soul and is determined to fight for what remains of her humanity. In the years since her bizarre resurrection, Sonja Blue travels the globe, hunting down and disposing of those creatures that prey on the innocent while searching for the vampire Noble who created her. But when she investigates a sleazy televangelist named Catherine Wheele, who is exploiting Denise Thorne's parents, Sonja finds herself up against a powerful inhuman adversary. But as dangerous as Catherine Wheele proves to be, Sonja's greatest foe remains the Other, the demonic personality with whom she is locked in a constant battle for control of their shared body. Can Sonja Blue overcome her inner demon in time to rescue an innocent man from Catherine Wheele's unholy clutches? Acknowledged as one of the first Urban Fantasy novels, Sunglasses After Dark burst onto the fantasy/horror scene in 1989, garnering widespread critical praise and winning the Horror Writers Association's coveted Bram Stoker Award, as well as the British Fantasy Society's Icarus Award. Out of print for several years, this edition of Sunglasses After Dark has been extensively revised and edited by the author, and is now considered the preferred text.

Sister of the Sun

by Clare Coleman

From Jean M. Auel's THE CLAN OF THE CAVE BEAR to Linda Lay Shuler's SHE WHO REMEMBERS, novels set among pre-historic cultures have shown a very strong appeal to readers of all types from fans of genre fantasy to historical to romance. E-Reads is pleased to offer a three-volume series--An Epic of Ancient Tahiti.In the first volume, DAUGHTER OF THE REEF, Tepua, the daughter of an atoll chief is stranded on an unknown island called Tahiti. Despite adversity and peril, she has made a life and found passion. In the second volume, SISTER OF THE SUN, years after she first landed on Tahiti, she returns to her home island to care for her dying father--and discovers that home can change. She faces challenges both brutal and overwhelming as a band of foreigners ruins the mystical beauty of her island and unleashes the savagery at the heart of her homeland.But Tepua is possessed of a passion all her own--one that could lead her people to war and destruction, one over which only she can possibly hold control, as the fate of all her people rests in her hands.Look for the third volume in the series, CHILD OF THE DAWN.

Child of the Dawn

by Clare Coleman

From Jean M. Auel's THE CLAN OF THE CAVE BEAR to Linda Lay Shuler's SHE WHO REMEMBERS, novels set among pre-historic cultures have shown a very strong appeal to readers of all types from fans of genre fantasy to historical to romance. E-Reads is pleased to offer a three-volume series--An Epic of Ancient Tahiti.In the first volume, DAUGHTER OF THE REEF, Tepua, the daughter of an atoll chief is stranded in an unknown island called Tahiti. Despite adversity and peril, she has made a life and found passion. In the second volume, SISTER OF THE SUN, she returns to her home atoll to find trouble brewing. She faces challenges both brutal and overwhelming as a band of foreigners ruins the mystical beauty of her island and unleashes the savagery at the heart of her homeland.In the third volume, CHILD OF THE DAWN, Tepua returns to her heart's home, Tahiti, only to discover that a stranger has come, overthrowing traditions and deposing the high chief. All who would oppose him have been driven away or killed and war has found a home in Tahiti. Tepua, though, is carrying the seed of a new beginning, a child she has been forbidden to bear--and she will do whatever she must to protect the child and the future of her people.Follows DAUGHTER OF THE REEF and SISTER OF THE SUN in An Epic of Ancient Tahiti series.

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