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Exciting Philippines

by Elizabeth Reyes

Exciting Philippines explores many corners of this exotic country, from its bustling metro areas to the coastal beaches and mountain towns.

Gecko's Complaint

by Ann Martin Bowler

This colorfully illustrated multicultural children's book presents a classic Balinese fairy tale--providing an entertaining look into a rich oral tradition. Featured as a "Top Pick" on TravelForKids. com,Gecko's Complaint tells the story of a Gecko who once lived on the island we now call Bali, in a jungle dense with flowers and vines. After hundreds of fireflies disturb Gecko's sleep, he complains to kindly Raden, the jungle's lion leader. In his efforts to get to the bottom of Gecko's troubles, Raden discovers all too much complaining and far too many irritable animals. Can Raden help the animals with their troubles? Can peace and happiness return to the jungles of Bali? A simple yet absolutely delightful Balinese folktale for kids, this bilingual edition, which features both English and Indonesian text, is a perfect introduction to the true spirit of Bali. The Indonesian island of Bali has a strong art and storytelling tradition--folktales that have been passed down from generation to generation. As a nation with over 18,000 islands, Indonesia has hundreds of traditional languages and cultures, each with myths and legends to tell. With its backdrop ofvolcanoes, earthquakes, dense jungles, diverse wildlife and people, it is not surprising that Indonesia is rich with fabulous, imaginative tales.

Legends of the Martial Arts Masters

by Susan Lynn Peterson

Whether you're an inspiring black belt or just a fan of martial arts action, you'll enjoy this collection of twenty exciting stories about the great heroes of the martial arts.The stories include dramatic victories, wily strategies, and triumphs over long odds--from the great Tsukahara Bokuden's cunning defeat of a troublemaking samurai to Wing Chun's brave self-defense against a brutish warlord. Children can read about Robert Trias, known as the "father of American karate" and Miyamoto Musashi, known as the "greatest sword fighter in history" and the author of the bestselling Book of Five Rings.Filled with action and amazing feats of martial arts wizardry, Legends of the Martial Arts Masters will inspire readers with stories of courage, combat, and self-discovery. Stories include: The General Fights a Bull The Great Wave The Hard Way to Find a Teacher The Three Sons The Style of No Sword A Bully Changes His Ways The Ballad of Mu-lan Twelve Warriors of Burma Wing Chun The Eighteen Hands And many more...ayGreat Power, Great ControlThe Strange Disappearance of Morihei UeshibaWhy Has Oyama Shaved His Head TwiceThe Bright Young ManA Tea Master Faces DeathThe CatHow Loyalty Saved Korean Martial ArtsA Kyudo Master Makes a BetFifty Thousand High Blocks

Other People's Money

by John Kay

The finance sector of Western economies is too large and attracts too many of the smartest college graduates. Financialization over the past three decades has created a structure that lacks resilience and supports absurd volumes of trading. The finance sector devotes too little attention to the search for new investment opportunities and the stewardship of existing ones, and far too much to secondary-market dealing in existing assets. Regulation has contributed more to the problems than the solutions. Why? What is finance for? John Kay, with wide practical and academic experience in the world of finance, understands the operation of the financial sector better than most. He believes in good banks and effective asset managers, but good banks and effective asset managers are not what he sees. In a dazzling and revelatory tour of the financial world as it has emerged from the wreckage of the 2008 crisis, Kay does not flinch in his criticism: we do need some of the things that Citigroup and Goldman Sachs do, but we do not need Citigroup and Goldman to do them. And many of the things done by Citigroup and Goldman do not need to be done at all. The finance sector needs to be reminded of its primary purpose: to manage other people's money for the benefit of businesses and households. It is an aberration when the some of the finest mathematical and scientific minds are tasked with devising algorithms for the sole purpose of exploiting the weakness of other algorithms for computerized trading in securities. To travel further down that road leads to ruin.

No Ordinary Disruption

by Richard Dobbs James Manyika Jonathan Woetzel

The dramatic fall of Blackberry and the stunning rise of What'sApp; the almost overnight emergence of "Single's Day" (Nov. 11), a contrived holiday in China, as the biggest online shopping day in the world, and the similarly from-out-of-nowhere rise of the U. S. as the world's newest petro-power: Are there common threads running through these big, important, stories? Yes. Ours is an era of near constant discontinuity. Today and even more so in the years ahead, speed, surprise, and sudden shifts in direction in huge global markets will routinely shape the destinies of established companies and provide opportunities for new entrants. Business models can be up-ended in months. Competitors can rise in almost complete stealth and burst upon the scene. Businesses that were protected by large and deep moats now find their defenses are easily breached. New markets are conjured seemingly from nothing. Technology and globalization have put the natural forces of market competition on steroids. This isn't just how the world now feels; it's also what the data tell us. Chart the plot points on most long-term trends and they no longer look like smooth upward slopes; they look like sawtooth mountain ridges, or like hockey sticks, breaking up sharply and to the right, or like the silhouette of Mt. Fuji, rising steadily only to start falling off. We live, increasingly, in an age of trend breaks. In No Ordinary Disruption, the directors of the McKinsey Global Institute, the flagship think tank of the world's leading consulting firm, McKinsey & Company, dive deeply behind current headlines to analyze the key forces transforming the global economy over the next two decades-and most importantly, to explain what business and government leaders need to do to reset their intuitions and take advantage of the disruptions ahead. Free of jargon and gimmicks, filled with anecdotes, data, and graphics, informed by deep experience, No Ordinary Disruption is aimed at a broad audience of middle and senior level managers, investors, and policy makers.

The Test

by Anya Kamenetz

No sooner is a child walking and talking than the ABCs and 1-2-3s give way to the full-on alphabet soup: the ERBs, the OLSAT, the IQ, the NCLB for AYP, the IEP for ELLs, the CHAT and PDDST for ASD or LD and G&T or ADD and ADHD, the PSATs, then the ACTs and SATs-all designed to assess and monitor a child's readiness for education. In many public schools, students are spending up to 28% of instructional time on testing and test prep. Starting this year, the introduction of the Common Core State Standards Initiative in 45 states will bring an unprecedented level of new, more difficult, and longer mandatory tests to nearly every classroom in the nation up to five times a year-forcing our national testing obsession to a crisis point. Taxpayers are spending extravagant money on these tests-up to $1. 4 billion per year-and excessive tests are stunting children's spirits, adding stress to family life, and slowly killing our country's future competitiveness. Yet even so, we still want our kids to score off the charts on every test they take, in elementary school and beyond. And there will be a lot of them. How do we preserve space for self-directed learning and development, while also asking our children to make the score and make a mark? This book is an exploration of that dilemma, and a strategy for how to solve it. The Test explores all sides of this problem-where these tests came from, why they're here to stay, and ultimately what you as a parent or teacher can do. It introduces a set of strategies borrowed from fields as diverse as games, neuroscience, social psychology, and ancient philosophy to help children do as well as they can on tests, and, just as important, how to use the experience of test-taking to do better in life. Like Paul Tough's bestseller How Children Succeed, it illuminates the emerging science of grit, curiosity and motivation, but takes a step further to explore innovations in education-emerging solutions to the over-testing crisis-that are not widely known but that you can adapt today, at home and at school. And it presents the stories of families of all kinds who are maneuvering within and beyond the existing educational system, playing and winning the testing game. You'll learn, for example, what Bill Gates, a strong public proponent of testing, does to stoke self-directed curiosity in his children, and how Mackenzie Bezos, wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and mother of three, creates individualized learning experiences for each of her children. All parents want their children to be successful, and their schools to deliver true opportunities. Yet these goals are often as likely to result in stress and arguments as actual progress. The Test is a book to help us think about these problems, and ultimately, move our own children towards the future we want for them, from elementary to high school and beyond.

The Culture Map

by Erin Meyer

As today's business world becomes ever-more global and virtual, executives and managers are expected to work harmoniously together with counterparts from a broad array dramatically different cultures and backgrounds, often without leaving their desks. But when you throw people together who come from starkly different backgrounds and cultures- from Americans who precede anything negative with three nice comments to French, Dutch, Israelis and Germans who get straight to the point ("your presentation was simply awful"); from Latin Americans and Asians who are steeped in hierarchy to the Scandinavians who think the best boss is just one of the crowd- the result can sometimes be disastrous. Even with English as a global language, it's easy to fall into cultural traps that endanger careers and sink deals.In Culture Map, renowned expert Erin Meyer offers highly practical and timely perspective on one of today's most pressing business issues: how do different cultures influence the way to do business when working globally? And she explains how to dramatically increase business success by improving one's ability to understand the cultural drivers of colleagues, clients, and suppliers from different countries. With the rapid increase in global call centers, outsourcing, supply chains, and project teams, cultural diversity touches almost everyone. Globalization has led to the rapid connection of internationally based employes from all levels of multinational companies. The advent of information and communication technology means that work itself has globalized. Where once you might have been expected to collaborate with colleagues from one or two foreign territories, today many people are part of global networks connected with people scattered around the world. Yet most managers have little understanding of how local culture impacts global interaction. Even those who are culturally informed, travel extensively, and have lived abroad often have few strategies for dealing with the cross-cultural complexity that affects their team's day-to-day effectiveness. Culture Map provides a new way forward, with vital insights for working effectively and sensitively with one's counterparts in the new global marketplace.

Rise of the Warrior Cop

by Radley Balko

The last days of colonialism taught America's revolutionaries that soldiers in the streets bring conflict and tyranny. As a result, our country has generally worked to keep the military out of law enforcement. But according to investigative reporter Radley Balko, over the last several decades, America's cops have increasingly come to resemble ground troops. The consequences have been dire: the home is no longer a place of sanctuary, the Fourth Amendment has been gutted, and police today have been conditioned to see the citizens they serve as an other-an enemy.Today's armored-up policemen are a far cry from the constables of early America. The unrest of the 1960s brought about the invention of the SWAT unit-which in turn led to the debut of military tactics in the ranks of police officers. Nixon's War on Drugs, Reagan's War on Poverty, Clinton's COPS program, the post-9/11 security state under Bush and Obama: by degrees, each of these innovations expanded and empowered police forces, always at the expense of civil liberties. And these are just four among a slew of reckless programs.In Rise of the Warrior Cop, Balko shows how politicians' ill-considered policies and relentless declarations of war against vague enemies like crime, drugs, and terror have blurred the distinction between cop and soldier. His fascinating, frightening narrative shows how over a generation, a creeping battlefield mentality has isolated and alienated American police officers and put them on a collision course with the values of a free society.

The Ancient art of Tea

by John T. Kirby Warren Peltier

"It is my hope that this book will encourage others in the West to pick up where the ancients and the author left off and go out and search for sources of sweet water here in North America. ... It is time for us to pick up the mantle and spread the word, Tea."--Dr. Eric Messersmith, Institute for Asian Studies, Florida International UniversityThe health benefits of tea, from green teas to white, oolong and black teas, are well known in our world today. How to create the perfect, healthy cup of tea is a process few people truly understand, making The Ancient Art of Tea a needed guide for tea lovers.Making a perfect cup of tea is a dynamic process that requires the right environment, good spring water, a suitable fire to boil water, skill in steeping tea, and deep understanding of tea connoisseurship. The Ancient Art of Tea teaches the two fundamental secrets to tea as practiced in ancient China--technique and taste. With this beautiful volume, you will be able to enhance and thoroughly immerse yourself in the tea experience.

The Innovator's Dilemma

by Clayton M. Christensen

An innovation classic. From Steve Jobs to Jeff Bezos, Clay Christensen's work continues to underpin today's most innovative leaders and organizations.The bestselling classic on disruptive innovation, by renowned author Clayton M. Christensen.His work is cited by the world's best-known thought leaders, from Steve Jobs to Malcolm Gladwell. In this classic bestseller-one of the most influential business books of all time-innovation expert Clayton Christensen shows how even the most outstanding companies can do everything right-yet still lose market leadership.Christensen explains why most companies miss out on new waves of innovation. No matter the industry, he says, a successful company with established products will get pushed aside unless managers know how and when to abandon traditional business practices.Offering both successes and failures from leading companies as a guide, The Innovator's Dilemma gives you a set of rules for capitalizing on the phenomenon of disruptive innovation.Sharp, cogent, and provocative-and consistently noted as one of the most valuable business ideas of all time-The Innovator's Dilemma is the book no manager, leader, or entrepreneur should be without.

The Motorcycle Diaries

by Ernesto Che Guevara Aleida Guevara

The book of the popular movie STARRING GAEL GARCIA BERNALNOW A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERThe young Che Guevara's lively and highly entertaining travel diary, now a popular movie and a New York Times bestseller. This new, expanded edition features exclusive, unpublished photos taken by the 23-year-old Ernesto on his journey across a continent, and a tender preface by Aleida Guevara, offering an insightful perspective on the man and the icon."A journey, a number of journeys. Ernesto Guevara in search of adventure, Ernesto Guevara in search of America, Ernesto Guevara in search of Che. On this journey of journeys, solitude found solidarity, 'I' turned into 'we'."--Eduardo Galeano"When I read these notes for the first time, I was quite young myself and I immediately identified with this man who narrated his adventures in such a spontaneous manner... To tell you the truth, the more I read, the more I was in love with the boy my father had been."--Aleida Guevara"Our film is about a young man, Che, falling in love with a continent and finding his place in it." --Walter Salles, director of "The Motorcycle Diaries.""As his journey progresses, Guevara's voice seems to deepen, to darken, colored by what he witnesses in his travels. He is still poetic, but now he comments on what he sees, though still poetically, with a new awareness of the social and political ramifications of what's going on around him."--January MagazineAlso available in Spanish: DIARIOS DE MOTOCICLETA (978-1-920888-11-4)Features of this edition include:--A preface by Che Guevara's daughter Aleida--Introduction by Cintio Vintier, well-known Latin American poet--Photos & maps from the original journey--Che's personal reflections on his formative years: "A child of my environment."Published in association with the Che Guevara Studies Center, Havana

The Orange Eats Creeps

by Steve Erickson Grace Krilanovich

"The exhilaration of such a novel is nearly beyond calculation. If a new literature is at hand then it might as well begin here." --Steve Erickson, from his Introduction "Like something you read on the underside of a freeway overpass in a fever dream. The Orange Eats Creeps is visionary, pervy, unhinged. It will mess you up." -Shelley Jackson "Reads like the foster child of Charles Burns' Black Hole and William Burroughs' Soft Machine. A deeply strange and deeply successful debut." -Brian Evenson Refreshingly piquant and playful, reminiscent of postmodern Euro fiction and full of poison pill observations." -Publishers Weekly It's the '90s Pacific Northwest refracted through a dark mirror, where meth and madness hash it out in the woods. . . . A band of hobo vampire junkies roam the blighted landscape--trashing supermarket breakrooms, praying to the altar of Poison Idea and GG Allin at basement rock shows, crashing senior center pancake breakfasts--locked in the thrall of Robitussin trips and their own wild dreams. A girl with drug-induced ESP and an eerie connection to Patty Reed (a young member of the Donner Party who credited her survival to her relationship with a hidden wooden doll), searches for her disappeared foster sister along "The Highway That Eats People," stalked by a conflation of Twin Peaks' "Bob" and the Green River Killer, known as Dactyl. With a scathing voice and penetrating delivery, Grace Krilanovich's The Orange Eats Creeps is one of the most ferocious debut novels in memory.

The Other

by Matthew Hughes

Meet Luff Imbry, an insidiously clever confidence man . . . He likes good wine, good food, and good stolen goods, and he always maintains the upper hand. When a business rival gets the drop on him, he finds himself abandoned on Fulda-a far-off, isolated world with a history of its own. Unable to blend in and furious for revenge, Imbry has to rely on his infamous criminal wit to survive Fulda's crusade to extinguish The Other.Hailed as the heir apparent to Jack Vance, Matthew Hughes brings us this speculative, richly imagined exploration of society on the far edges of extreme. A central character in Black Brillion, Luff Imbry is at last front and center in Hughes's latest rollercoaster adventure through a far-future universe.

Narcissistic Lovers

by M.S. Kevin Dibble Cynthia Zayn

In a revealing study of relationships where partners love themselves first, last, and always, Cynthia Zayn and Kevin Dibble help readers determine whether their partner is over the line and has narcissistic personality disorder. The book draws on the authors' research and interviews with a variety of men and women who've been narcissized. Featuring compelling stories and scenarios, Narcissistic Lovers helps victims understand the pain brought on by their abusers, shows why these self-loathers can't change, and offer hope for healing from their "N-fliction."

Wide Awake

by Carol Volk Robert Bober

Coming of age in 1960s Paris, Bernard Appelbaum exists in the hazy shadow of the Holocaust and on the electric cusp of the French New Wave. We find the narrator of Wide Awake as he wanders the city streets in search of signs of his father, who was deported by the Nazis in 1942. Bernard's chance encounter with a former acquaintance who has become filmmaker François Truffaut's assistant leads to a spot as an extra on the set of Jules and Jim-setting into motion a series of discoveries and lost memories that crack open a hidden past.On seeing Jules and Jim, Bernard's mother is moved to divulge the secrets of her own past as a Jewish-Polish immigrant to France, which curiously mirrors that of the film's heroine. When revelations about his mother's two loves lead Bernard on a fateful journey through Paris, to Germany, and back to Poland and Auschwitz itself, he must plumb haunting depths in order to recover his own identity.A beautiful and mysterious fictional memoir with echoes of W.G. Sebald's Austerlitz, this riveting new work by one of France's celebrated directors and writers will be a major new contribution to the literature of memory, loss, and how we grapple with the legacy of the Holocaust.

The Political Brain

by Drew Westen

The Political Brain is a groundbreaking investigation into the role of emotion in determining the political life of the nation. For two decades Drew Westen, professor of psychology and psychiatry at Emory University, has explored a theory of the mind that differs substantially from the more "dispassionate" notions held by most cognitive psychologists, political scientists, and economists-and Democratic campaign strategists. The idea of the mind as a cool calculator that makes decisions by weighing the evidence bears no relation to how the brain actually works. When political candidates assume voters dispassionately make decisions based on "the issues," they lose. That's why only one Democrat has been re-elected to the presidency since Franklin Roosevelt-and only one Republican has failed in that quest. In politics, when reason and emotion collide, emotion invariably wins. Elections are decided in the marketplace of emotions, a marketplace filled with values, images, analogies, moral sentiments, and moving oratory, in which logic plays only a supporting role. Westen shows, through a whistle-stop journey through the evolution of the passionate brain and a bravura tour through fifty years of American presidential and national elections, why campaigns succeed and fail. The evidence is overwhelming that three things determine how people vote, in this order: their feelings toward the parties and their principles, their feelings toward the candidates, and, if they haven't decided by then, their feelings toward the candidates' policy positions. Westen turns conventional political analyses on their head, suggesting that the question for Democratic politics isn't so much about moving to the right or the left but about moving the electorate. He shows how it can be done through examples of what candidates have said-or could have said-in debates, speeches, and ads. Westen's discoveries could utterly transform electoral arithmetic, showing how a different view of the mind and brain leads to a different way of talking with voters about issues that have tied the tongues of Democrats for much of forty years-such as abortion, guns, taxes, and race. You can't change the structure of the brain. But you can change the way you appeal to it. And here's how...

Unstoppable

by Ralph Nader

Ralph Nader has fought for over fifty years on behalf of American citizens against the reckless influence of corporations on our society. At this pivotal political moment, Americans are more disillusioned with their political leaders than ever. Large majorities tell pollsters that big corporations have too much political power. The ever tightening influence of big business on the mainstream media, elections and our local, state and federal governments, have caused many Americans to believe they have no political voice.In Unstoppable, Nader ramps up the fight and makes a hugely persuasive case that American citizens are not powerless. Unstoppable is about the emerging political re-alignment that is combining the Left and the Right against converging corporate-government tyranny. Large segments from the progressive, conservative, and libertarian political camps find themselves aligned in opposition to the destruction of civil liberties, the bloated and economically draining corporate welfare state, the relentless perpetuation of America's wars, sovereignty-shredding free trade agreements, and the unpunished crimes of Wall Street against Main Street. These are all issues that can be traced back to the growing influence of corporate goliaths and their ability to combine forces with indentured government against the interests of the broader public.Nader draws on half a century of his own experience working with the grassroots and Congress and tells of many surprising victories that have united progressive and conservative forces. As a participator in and keen observer of these budding alliances, he breaks new ground in showing how these coalitions can overcome specific obstacles that divide and rule them and expand their power on Capitol Hill, in the courts, and in the arena of public opinion. Nader provides a blueprint for how Americans on both sides of the aisle can fight against the corporate state and crony capitalism. Nader shows how they can reclaim their right to consume safe foods and drugs, breathe clean air, receive fair rewards for their work, regain control of taxpayer assets, and achieve a more self-reliant economy.Far from espousing 'let's meet half-way' type compromises, Nader argues that it is in the interest of citizens of different political labels to join in the struggle against the corporate state that will, if left unchecked, ruin the Republic, shred our constitution, and stampede over the rights of the American people.

Now It Can Be Told

by General Leslie Groves

General Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer were the two men chiefly responsible for the building of the first atomic bomb at Los Alamos, code name "The Manhattan Project." As the ranking military officer in charge of marshalling men and material for what was to be the most ambitious, expensive engineering feat in history, it was General Groves who hired Oppenheimer (with knowledge of his left-wing past), planned facilities that would extract the necessary enriched uranium, and saw to it that nothing interfered with the accelerated research and swift assembly of the weapon.This is his story of the political, logistical, and personal problems of this enormous undertaking which involved foreign governments, sensitive issues of press censorship, the construction of huge plants at Hanford and Oak Ridge, and a race to build the bomb before the Nazis got wind of it. The role of groves in the Manhattan Project has always been controversial. In his new introduction the noted physicist Edward Teller, who was there at Los Alamos, candidly assesses the general's contributions-and Oppenheimer's-while reflecting on the awesome legacy of their work.

How Children Learn

by John Holt

This enduring classic of educational thought offers teachers and parents deep, original insight into the nature of early learning. John Holt was the first to make clear that, for small children, "learning is as natural as breathing." In this delightful yet profound book, he looks at how we learn to talk, to read, to count, and to reason, and how we can nurture and encourage these natural abilities in our children."

Sea and Smoke

by Blaine Wetzel Joe Ray

Sea and Smoke is as much a culinary adventure as it is a serious restaurant book, chronicling the plucky ambition of a young chef who was determined to create a world-class dining destination on Lummi Island (pronounced like "yummy"). <P><P> After working at Noma in Copenhagen, Chef Blaine Wetzel took the principles of hyperlocalism stateside to celebrate what was good and nearby and tasty, off the rugged coast of Seattle. The "sea" and "smoke" from the Pacific Ocean and the restaurant's own smokehouse, plus foraged ingredients and a local farm, yield a colorful playground of ingredients for the restaurant's nightly 20-course prix fixe. Recipes include Smoked Mussels, Herring Roe on Kelp with Charred Dandelions, Aged Venison Legs and Wild Lettuce with Seeded Bread, Warm Blueberries and An Ice Cream Made from Sweet Woodruff, and more, all of it mirroring the verdant, sea-salty, foggy surroundings of the coastal Pacific Northwest. If you can't hop the ferry or charter a plane to Lummi, this book is the next-best thing.

The Island of Knowledge

by Marcelo Gleiser

Why discovering the limits to science may be the most powerful discovery of allHow much can we know about the world? In this book, physicist Marcelo Gleiser traces our search for answers to the most fundamental questions of existence, the origin of the universe, the nature of reality, and the limits of knowledge. In so doing, he reaches a provocative conclusion: science, like religion, is fundamentally limited as a tool for understanding the world. As science and its philosophical interpretations advance, we face the unsettling recognition of how much we don't know. Gleiser shows that by abandoning the dualistic model that divides reality into the known and the unknown, we can embark on a third way based on the acceptance of our limitations. Only then, he argues, will we be truly able to experience freedom; for to be free in an age of science we cannot turn science into a god. Gleiser ultimately offers an uplifting exploration of humanity's longing to conquer the unknown, and of science's power to transform and inspire.

The Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited

by Richard Florida

Initially published in 2002, The Rise of the Creative Class quickly achieved classic status for its identification of forces then only beginning to reshape our economy, geography, and workplace. Weaving story-telling with original research, Richard Florida identified a fundamental shift linking a host of seemingly unrelated changes in American society: the growing importance of creativity in people's work lives and the emergence of a class of people unified by their engagement in creative work. Millions of us were beginning to work and live much as creative types like artists and scientists always had, Florida observed, and this Creative Class was determining how the workplace was organized, what companies would prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities would thrive.In The Rise of the Creative Class Revisited, Florida further refines his occupational, demographic, psychological, and economic profile of the Creative Class, incorporates a decade of research, and adds five new chapters covering the global effects of the Creative Class and exploring the factors that shape "quality of place" in our changing cities and suburbs.

Where There's a Will (Mystery and The Minister's Wife #8)

by Beth Pattillo

Escape to the charming town of Copper Mill, Tennessee. Nestled in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, Copper Mill is a place of tradition and tranquillity. But when Kate Hanlon and her husband Paul move in, they discover that small town life is anything but boring. The mysteries Kate uncovers are puzzling, but she always uses her quick mind and the help of her dear friends to figure out the answer. See how faith can solve life's mysteries in the Mystery and the Minister's Wife series. When Paul's old flame enlists Kate's help in finding her grandmother's missing will, Kate has to face her toughest adversary yet: jealousy in Where There's a Will. When Kate enrols in an art course at a community college, she discovers that her teacher, Ellen Carruthers, was Paul's college sweetheart. Kate is wary of the woman, but soon Ellen has enlisted Kate's help to solve an old family squabble. Ellen's family owns an abandoned mining town on High Hoot Ridge, but unless she can prove her claim on the land, it will be sold to a paper company, and the region's rich history -- along with her family memories -- will be lost. A series of old paintings holds clues to Ellen's grandfather's missing will, but can Kate track down the paintings and decipher the clues in time? As Kate wrestles with these mysteries, Ellen's relationship with Paul raises questions of a whole different kind. And Paul has been invited to join the Chamber of Commerce, but his plans to revitalise the local economy only lead to frustration. Can he find a way to preserve the town's history and still make sure it has a future? Can they all find a way to make sense of the past?

The Good Provider (Nicholson Quartet #1)

by Jessica Stirling

The Good Provider is the first novel in an exciting new trilogy by Jessica Stirling. Set in Glasgow, Scotland, at the turn of the century, it tells the story of Kirsty Barnes and Craig Nicholson as they struggle to find security and happiness in the cruel world of Glasgow's back streets. Kirsty--an "orphan brat"--escapes from her life as a servant on a remote Scottish farm to be with her childhood sweetheart, Craig Nicholson. Defying Craig's possessive mother, they travel to Glasgow; with little money, and still strangers to each other, they set up together in a "marriage" that is never made legal. Befriended by Mrs. Frew, a prim widow who keeps a boardinghouse for clergymen, Craig and Kirsty soon find work in the city. But Craig is impatient for success, and his ambition gets the best of him as he falls in with a gang of thieves led by the vicious Danny Malone. As Craig sinks into a life of drink and crime, Kirsty blossoms through her friendship with Nessie Frew--and a meeting with a handsome young medical missionary named David Lockhart. Kirsty feels bound by loyalty to Craig, despite his failings as a husband, but she cannot control her growing love for David. With the police hot on Malone's trail, Craig is offered one last chance to free himself from the web of deceit he has spun; in the balance hang both his own future--and Kirsty's hopes for a better life. In this compelling novel Jessica Stirling takes us behind the stately facade of Edwardian Scotland into a bleak and impoverished world--and finds the origins of a marriage that even tragedy cannot quite destroy. There are several brilliantly rendered historical romances by Jessica Stirling set primarily in rural and metropolitan Ireland, Scotland, England and France. They abound with well researched, lavish detail and complex characters. They illuminate the industries, occupations and lifestyles of the rich and poor including sheep and cattle farming, housekeeping, fishing, mining, carting, performance arts, law, antique dealing, domestic service, banking and medicine

Total Recall

by Arnold Schwarzenegger

Total Recall is the unbelievably true story of Arnold Schwarzenegger's life. Born in the small city of Thal, Austria, in 1947, he moved to Los Angeles at the age of 21. Within ten years, he was a millionaire business man. After twenty years, he was the world's biggest movie star. In 2003, he was Governor of California and a household name around the world.

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