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Road to Yorktown, The: Jefferson, Lafayette and the British Invasion of Virginia

by John R. Maass

In 1781, Virginia was invaded by formidable British forces that sought to subdue the Old Dominion. Lieutenant General Charles, Lord Cornwallis, led thousands of enemy troops from Norfolk to Charlottesville, burning and pillaging. Many of Virginia's famed Patriots--including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry and Nathanael Greene--struggled to defend the commonwealth. Only by concentrating a small band of troops under energetic French general the Marquis de Lafayette were American forces able to resist British operations. With strained support from Governor Jefferson's administration, Lafayette fought a campaign against the veteran soldiers of Lord Cornwallis that eventually led to the famed showdown at Yorktown. Historian John R. Maass traces this often overlooked Revolutionary struggle for Virginia and details each step on the road to Yorktown.

Chatham Hall: A History of Excellence

by William Black

One of the oldest and most revered prep schools in Virginia, Chatham Hall has been home to hundreds of girls since its establishment in 1894. American artist Georgia O'Keeffe studied and began her career at the school. After a fire badly damaged the school in 1906, Andrew Carnegie aided in the rebuilding process. Later, the widow of Coca-Cola's first bottler, Mrs. Arthur Kelly Evans, and Lynchburg native John Craddock helped save the school from closing in 1928. The school and its students offered a tremendous contribution to the nation during World War II, even inspiring a visit from Eleanor Roosevelt. Join author William Priestley Black on a celebration of the astonishingly rich history of Chatham Hall.

Kenneth & Helen Spencer of Kansas: Champions of Culture & Commerce in the Sunflower State

by Kenneth F. Crockett

Born on opposite sides of the Kansas/Missouri border in 1902, Kenneth Aldred Spencer and his wife, Helen Foresman Spencer, were transformative figures in the Midwest during the twentieth century. Kenneth grew up in the small town of Pittsburg, Kansas, but by the 1950s, his innovation in the chemical and coal industries had earned him mention in "Forbes" magazine for his role as one of the nation's great industrialists. But it is the couple's remarkable philanthropic work that stands as their true legacy, preserved in places like the Kenneth Spencer Research Library and the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art..

Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, The

by Daniel J. Vermilya

In the summer of 1864, Georgia was the scene of one of the most important campaigns of the Civil War. William Tecumseh Sherman's push southward toward Atlanta threatened the heart of the Confederacy, and Joseph E. Johnston and the Army of Tennessee were the Confederacy's best hope to defend it. In June, Johnston managed to grind Sherman's advance to a halt northwest of Atlanta at Kennesaw Mountain. After weeks of maneuvering, on June 27, Sherman launched a bold attack on Johnston's lines. The Confederate victory was one of the bloodiest days of the entire campaign. And while Sherman's assaults had a frightful cost, Union forces learned important lessons at Kennesaw Mountain that enabled the fall of Atlanta several months later.

Connecticut Witch Trials: The First Panic in the New World

by Cynthia Wolfe Boynton

Connecticut's witch hunt was the first and most ferocious in New England, occurring almost fifty years before the infamous Salem witch trials. Between 1647 and 1697, at least thirty-four men and women from across the state were formally charged with witchcraft. Eleven were hanged. In New Haven, William Meeker was accused of cutting off and burning his pig's ears and tail as he cast a bewitching spell. After the hanging of Fairfield's Goody Knapp, magistrates cut down and searched her body for the marks of the devil. Through newspaper clippings, court records, letters and diaries, author Cynthia Wolfe Boynton uncovers the dark history of the Connecticut witch trials.

Italian Louisiana: History, Heritage & Tradition

by D. G. Hippensteel Alan G. Gauthreaux

At the close of the nineteenth century, Louisiana's ports hosted an influx of Italian immigrants. Like so many immigrant communities before, acclimating to their new home was not easy. Though the Italian contribution to Louisiana's culture is palpable and celebrated, at one time ethnic Italians were constantly embroiled in scandal, sometimes deserved and sometimes as scapegoats. The new immigrants hoped that they would be welcomed and see for themselves the "streets paved with gold." Their new lives, however, were difficult. Italians in Louisiana faced prejudice, violence and political exile for their refusal to accept the southern racial mores. Author and historian Alan Gauthreaux" "documents the experience of those Italians who arrived in Louisiana over one hundred years ago..

Growing up in San Francisco's Western Neighborhoods: Boomer Memories from Kezar Stadium to Zim's Hamburgers

by Frank Dunnigan

From football games at Kezar Stadium to a perfectly broiled Zim burger, San Franciscans have fond memories of the decades after World War II. Dressing up for a movie at the Fox Theatre on Market Street, catching the train at the old S.P. Station on Third and Townsend, taking the streetcar downtown to see magnificent displays in the Emporium's windows or spending a day at Golden Gate Park, the "outside lands" of San Francisco were teeming with youngsters and the young-at-heart alike. Western Neighborhoods Project columnist and San Francisco native Frank Dunnigan offers a charming collection of nostalgic vignettes about the thriving Western communities of unforgettable people and places that defined generations.

A Bouquet for Adam

by A. J. Marcus K. T. Spence

Adam Stephens's simple life working in Denver as a computer programmer is turned upside down when his mother suddenly dies. His crazy relatives in Virginia want him to move in with them because they believe his autism makes it impossible for him to care for himself. But life improves, at least for a time. One day while wandering through the botanical gardens, he runs into struggling wildlife photographer Trent Osborn. As a hesitant love blossoms between the two, Adam's aunt and uncle push for him to live with them. Adam again refuses. The struggles between his desires and what everyone else wants collide. Adam disappears, and Trent is unsure if he's run off to escape life's pressures made worse by his autism, or if something far more sinister has happened. Trent embarks on a cross-country journey in search of Adam. What he discovers changes the course of his and Adam's lives and the lives of everyone connected to them.

Farm Worker Futurism: Speculative Technologies of Resistance

by Curtis Marez

When we think of literature and film about farm workers, The Grapes of Wrath may come to mind, but Farm Worker Futurism reveals that the historical role of technology, especially new media, has in fact had much more to do with depicting the lives of farm laborers--Mexican migrants in particular--in the United States. From the late 1940s, when Ernesto Galarza led a strike in the San Joaquin Valley, to the early 1990s, when the United Farm Workers (UFW) helped organize a fast in solidarity with janitors at Apple Computers in the Santa Clara Valley, this book explores the friction between agribusiness and farm workers through the lens of visual culture.Marez looks at how the appropriation of photography, film, video, and other media technologies expressed a "farm worker futurism," a set of farm worker social formations that faced off against corporate capitalism and government policies. In addition to drawing fascinating links between the worlds envisioned in UFW videos on the one hand and visions of Cold War geopolitics on the other, he demonstrates how union cameras and computer screens put the farm worker movement in dialogue with futurist thinking and speculative fictions of all sorts, including the films of George Lucas and the art of Ester Hernandez. Finally Marez examines the legacy of farm worker futurism in recent cinema and literature, contemporary struggles for immigrant rights, management-labor conflicts in computer hardware production, and the antiprison movement.In contrast with cultural histories of technology that take a top-down perspective, Farm Worker Futurism tells the story from below, showing how working-class people of color have often been early adopters and imaginative users of new media. In doing so, it presents a completely novel analysis of speculative fiction's engagements with the farm worker movement in ways that illuminate both.

Looking Back on the Vietnam War: Twenty-first-Century Perspectives

by Robert Mason Heonik Kwon Leonie Jones Viet Thanh Nguyen Cathy J. Schlund-Vials Vinh Nguyen Jeehyun Lim Professor Yen Le Espiritu Brenda M. Boyle Diane Niblack Fox Lan Duong Quan Tue Tran

More than forty years have passed since the official end of the Vietnam War, yet the war's legacies endure. Its history and iconography still provide fodder for film and fiction, communities of war refugees have spawned a wide Vietnamese diaspora, and the United States military remains embroiled in unwinnable wars with eerie echoes of Vietnam. Looking Back on the Vietnam War brings together scholars from a broad variety of disciplines, who offer fresh insights on the war's psychological, economic, artistic, political, and environmental impacts. Each essay examines a different facet of the war, from its representation in Marvel comic books to the experiences of Vietnamese soldiers exposed to Agent Orange. By putting these pieces together, the contributors assemble an expansive yet nuanced composite portrait of the war and its global legacies. Though they come from diverse scholarly backgrounds, ranging from anthropology to film studies, the contributors are united in their commitment to original research. Whether exploring rare archives or engaging in extensive interviews, they voice perspectives that have been excluded from standard historical accounts. Looking Back on the Vietnam War thus embarks on an interdisciplinary and international investigation to discover what we remember about the war, how we remember it, and why.

Southwest Asia: The Transpacific Geographies of Chicana/o Literature

by Jayson Gonzales Sae-Saue

Chicana/o literature is justly acclaimed for the ways it voices opposition to the dominant Anglo culture, speaking for communities ignored by mainstream American media. Yet the world depicted in these texts is not solely inhabited by Anglos and Chicanos; as this groundbreaking new book shows, Asian characters are cast in peripheral but nonetheless pivotal roles. Southwest Asia investigates why key Chicana/o writers, including Américo Paredes, Rolando Hinojosa, Oscar Acosta, Miguel Méndez, and Virginia Grise, from the 1950s to the present day, have persistently referenced Asian people and places in the course of articulating their political ideas. Jayson Gonzales Sae-Saue takes our conception of Chicana/o literature as a transnational movement in a new direction, showing that it is not only interested in North-South migrations within the Americas, but is also deeply engaged with East-West interactions across the Pacific. He also raises serious concerns about how these texts invariably marginalize their Asian characters, suggesting that darker legacies of imperialism and exclusion might lurk beneath their utopian visions of a Chicana/o nation. Southwest Asia provides a fresh take on the Chicana/o literary canon, analyzing how these writers have depicted everything from interracial romances to the wars Americans fought in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. As it examines novels, plays, poems, and short stories, the book makes a compelling case that Chicana/o writers have long been at the forefront of theorizing U.S.-Asian relations.

The Corporate Commonwealth: Pluralism and Political Fictions in England, 1516-1651

by Henry S. Turner

The Corporate Commonwealth traces the evolution of corporations during the English Renaissance and explores the many types of corporations that once flourished. Along the way, the book offers important insights into our own definitions of fiction, politics, and value. Henry S. Turner uses the resources of economic and political history, literary analysis, and political philosophy to demonstrate how a number of English institutions with corporate associations--including universities, guilds, towns and cities, and religious groups--were gradually narrowed to the commercial, for-profit corporation we know today, and how the joint-stock corporation, in turn, became both a template for the modern state and a political force that the state could no longer contain. Through innovative readings of works by Thomas More, William Shakespeare, Francis Bacon, and Thomas Hobbes, among others, Turner tracks the corporation from the courts to the stage, from commonwealth to colony, and from the object of utopian fiction to the subject of tragic violence. A provocative look at the corporation's peculiar character as both an institution and a person, The Corporate Commonwealth uses the past to suggest ways in which today's corporations might be refashioned into a source of progressive and collective public action.

Policing Immigrants: Local Law Enforcement on the Front Lines

by Doris Marie Provine Scott H. Decker Monica W. Varsanyi Paul G. Lewis

The United States deported nearly two million illegal immigrants during the first five years of the Obama presidency--more than during any previous administration. President Obama stands accused by activists of being "deporter in chief." Yet despite efforts to rebuild what many see as a broken system, the president has not yet been able to convince Congress to pass new immigration legislation, and his record remains rooted in a political landscape that was created long before his election. Deportation numbers have actually been on the rise since 1996, when two federal statutes sought to delegate a portion of the responsibilities for immigration enforcement to local authorities. Policing Immigrants traces the transition of immigration enforcement from a traditionally federal power exercised primarily near the US borders to a patchwork system of local policing that extends throughout the country's interior. Since federal authorities set local law enforcement to the task of bringing suspected illegal immigrants to the federal government's attention, local responses have varied. While some localities have resisted the work, others have aggressively sought out unauthorized immigrants, often seeking to further their own objectives by putting their own stamp on immigration policing. Tellingly, how a community responds can best be predicted not by conditions like crime rates or the state of the local economy but rather by the level of conservatism among local voters. What has resulted, the authors argue, is a system that is neither just nor effective--one that threatens the core crime-fighting mission of policing by promoting racial profiling, creating fear in immigrant communities, and undermining the critical community-based function of local policing.

Gun Culture in Early Modern England

by Lois G. Schwoerer

Guns had an enormous impact on the social, economic, cultural, and political lives of civilian men, women, and children of all social strata in early modern England. In this study, Lois Schwoerer identifies and analyzes England's domestic gun culture from 1500 to 1740, uncovering how guns became available, what effects they had on society, and how different sectors of the population contributed to gun culture. The rise of guns made for recreational use followed the development of a robust gun industry intended by King Henry VIII to produce artillery and handguns for war. Located first in London, the gun industry brought the city new sounds, smells, street names, shops, sights, and communities of gun workers, many of whom were immigrants. Elite men used guns for hunting, target shooting, and protection. They collected beautifully decorated guns, gave them as gifts, and included them in portraits and coats-of-arms, regarding firearms as a mark of status, power, and sophistication. With statutes and proclamations, the government legally denied firearms to subjects with an annual income under £100--about 98 percent of the population--whose reactions ranged from grudging acceptance to willful disobedience. Schwoerer shows how this domestic gun culture influenced England's Bill of Rights in 1689, a document often cited to support the claim that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution conveys the right to have arms as an Anglo-American legacy. Schwoerer shows that the Bill of Rights did not grant a universal right to have arms, but rather a right restricted by religion, law, and economic standing, terms that reflected the nation's gun culture. Examining everything from gunmakers' records to wills, and from period portraits to toy guns, Gun Culture in Early Modern England offers new data and fresh insights on the place of the gun in English society.

Wichita State Baseball Comes Back: Gene Stephenson and the Making of a Shocker Championship Tradition

by John E. Brown

There were no bats or balls on the campus of Wichita State University in the spring of 1977. Five years later, the resurrected varsity baseball program was in the final game of the College World Series, fulfilling the seemingly impossible promise made by Gene Stephenson when he began recruiting players to a place that didn't even have a practice field. Stephenson would lead the Shockers for over three decades, but those first five years with the team set him on the course that put him among the winningest coaches in college baseball history..

Wisconsin's Flying Trees in World War II: A Victory for American Forest Products and Allied Aviation

by Sara Witter Connor

Wisconsin's trees heard "Timber " during World War II, as the forest products industry of the Badger State played a key role in the Allied aerial campaign. It was Wisconsin that provided the material for the De Havilland Mosquito, known as the "Timber Terror," while the CG-4A battle-ready gliders, cloaked in stealthy silence, carried the 82nd and 101st Airborne into fierce fighting throughout Europe and the Pacific. Sara Witter Connor follows a forgotten thread of the American war effort, celebrating the factory workers, lumberjacks, pilots and innovative thinkers of the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory who helped win a world war with paper, wood and glue.

Minnesota Twins Baseball: Hardball History on the Prairie

by Stew Thornley

For more than half a century, Minnesotans have been treated to the memorable players and teams of the Minnesota Twins. From the Ruthian blasts of Harmon Killebrew and Kirby Puckett to a successful brand of "small ball," the Twins have fielded competitive teams at Metropolitan Stadium, the Metrodome and Target Field. But prior to its arrival in 1961, the team also had a storied past in Washington that included Walter Johnson, the greatest pitcher of the Deadball Era, if not all time. Sports historian Stew Thornley highlights the lesser-known events in the club's history, from the area's attempts to lure a major-league team to town in the 1950s to then-owner Calvin Griffith's campaign to regionally rename the team. He also pays tribute to the rich heritage of baseball before the Twins, marked by minor-league teams such as the St. Paul Saints and Minneapolis Millers, which produced future Hall of Famers Willie Mays, Duke Snider, Ted Williams and Roy Campanella.

A Stake in West Texas: Pulling a Chain and Raising a Family across Big Oil Country

by Rebecca D. Henderson

In 1950, Ann was eighteen and Bob D twenty when he asked her to marry him and hit the road for West Texas. They packed their station wagon, left home and began a life of adventure together on Conoco's West Texas survey crew during the 1950s oil boom. Five kids, twenty-one towns and thirteen years on the road--Bob D and Ann's travels along the highways of West Texas are a portrait in a landscape of oilfields, railroads and ranches. Layering local history with family memoir, author Rebecca D. Henderson reveals a glimpse of mid-century West Texas through her grandparents' adventures as a young couple raising children on the road..

Idaho Beer: From Grain to Glass in the Gem State

by Greg Koch Steven J. Koonce

In a state famous for producing great potatoes, it's easy to forget about Idaho's barley and hops. Few states can boast the quality barley grown in southern and eastern Idaho or the aromatic hops grown in Treasure Valley. These crops combine to create a beer that is distinctly Idaho--a taste of home. Join author Steve Koonce as he surveys the best brewers from across the state. Koonce tracks the state's storied brewing heritage and offers an in-depth look at Idaho's vibrant modern beer scene. With more than twenty breweries statewide, there's so much to see, and taste, in Idaho. Enjoy a refreshing guide to the best brew the state has on tap.

Civil Rights Activism in Milwaukee: South Side Struggles in the '60s and '70s

by Paul H. Geenen

In the early 1960s, as members of Milwaukee's growing African American population looked beyond their segregated community for better jobs and housing, they faced bitter opposition from the real estate industry and union leadership. In an era marked by the friction of racial tension, the south side of Milwaukee earned a reputation as a flashpoint for prejudice, but it also served as a staging ground for cooperative activism between members of Father Groppi's parish, representatives from the NAACP Youth Council, students at Alverno College and a group of Latino families. Paul Geenen chronicles the challenges faced by this coalition in the fight for open housing and better working conditions for Milwaukee's minority community.

Kentucky Sweets: Bourbon Balls, Spoonbread & Mile High Pie

by Sarah C. Baird

Kentuckians from frontiersmen to modern-day pastry chefs have put their marks on the state's baking history. Residents of the commonwealth have plenty of rich recipes and time-honored traditions, like pulling parties, where folks would gather to make taffy. Stack cakes originated from Appalachian weddings, where guests would each offer a layer of cake to the bride and groom, who then added the jam to hold the creation together. The decadent Modjeska confection gets its name from a Victorian-era candy maker's crush on a popular Polish actress. Join author Sarah Baird on a whirlwind trip--complete with recipes--that examines the delectable history of unique Kentucky treats from pawpaws to chocolate gravy..

Martha's Vineyard: A History

by Thomas Dresser

Martha's Vineyard is cherished by many as a summer paradise, but few know of its rich past. Descendants of the first Native American inhabitants still reside on the Vineyard. Once a critical whaling hub, the island's success drew in newcomers from around the world. Following the Civil War, land developers set their sights on attracting tourists to the island's scenic beaches, and soon thereafter, a visit from President Grant established Martha's Vineyard as a vacation haven. From a movement to secede from Massachusetts to the making of the summer blockbuster Jaws, author Thomas Dresser weaves together the threads of the Vineyard's fascinating history. Discover how this remarkable island adapted to the times and came to be one of the most sought-out vacation destinations on the East Coast.

Kansas University Basketball Legends

by Kenneth N. Johnson Bill Mayer

The University of Kansas's men's basketball team is one of the oldest and most successful in the history of college basketball; the very inventor of the sport, Dr. James Naismith, was KU's first coach. Its long and illustrious history began in 1898 and includes some of the biggest names in the game, from legends like Wilt Chamberlain to "secret weapons" like Andrea Hudy, the only female strength and conditioning coach in the division. Longtime Jayhawk enthusiast Kenn Johnson offers up a unique and in-depth look at the players, coaches and other personalities who helped make the University of Kansas basketball program the unparalleled tradition it is today.

Rutherford: A Brief History

by William Neumann

It was a homeland for the Leni-Lenape Indians before it was settled by tenacious Dutch immigrants. Two centuries later, in 1881, Rutherford, New Jersey, became an independent borough the first in Bergen County. Author William Neumann narrates Rutherford's remarkable transition from a rural retreat popular for its abundant springs to a bustling New York City suburb. Along the way he introduces some of the town's extraordinary citizens, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet William Carlos Williams, who led the life of a small-town doctor at 9 Ridge Road, and the local husband and wife team who founded Fairleigh Dickinson University- a love story as much as a historical achievement.

A Brief History of James Island: Jewel of the Sea Islands

by Douglas W. Bostick

In this engaging volume, local historian Douglas Bostick reveals the unacknowledged history of the second community in South Carolina, settled in 1671. Whether investigating prehistoric clues about Native American life before European settlement, detailing the history of agriculture and the reign of King Cotton, following armies from multiple wars or chronicling the triumph of equality on the greens of Charleston's Municipal Golf Course, Bostick tells the story of James Island as only a native son can. Join Bostick as he brings this small jewel of an island out of Charleston's shadow and into the light of its own rich, historic assets.

Showing 7,701 through 7,725 of 26,406 results

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