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A History and Guide to the Monuments of Chickamauga National Military Park

by Stacy W. Reaves

The Battle of Chickamauga was the most significant Union defeat in the western theater of the Civil War and the second-deadliest battle of the war behind only Gettysburg. Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park was established in 1890, the first of America's national military parks. Immediately after the battle, both Union and Confederate soldiers sought to honor those who gave their lives, and now Chickamauga and Chattanooga are home to more than seven hundred monuments, markers and tablets commemorating those who sacrificed. And much like the soldiers who bravely fought, each monument has its own history. Join Stacy W. Reaves and photographer Jane D. Beal as they recount the history of Chickamauga Battlefield and the monuments that memorialize its history.

Chattooga River, The: A Natural and Cultural History

by Laura Ann Garren

The Chattooga River has run through the American consciousness since the movie "Deliverance" thrust it into the national spotlight. But this National Wild and Scenic River is much more than the make-believe set of a suburbanite nightmare. People travel from all over the country to run its rapids, cast into its current for trout and hike the miles of trails that meander through thousands of acres of woods in the Chattooga watershed. One of the last free-flowing rivers in the Southeast, the river muscles fifty-seven miles through a southern deciduous forest with one of the highest levels of biodiversity in the country and is home to many species of rare wildflowers. Join author Laura Ann Garren as she describes the history and wonder of the real Chattooga River.

Haunted Graveyards of the Ozarks

by David E. Harkins

From the neatly tended urban necropolis to the long-forgotten family plot at the end of a winding gravel road, these "quiet cities" of the Ozarks have the power to send chills up and down the spine of the most hardened skeptic. Be it the restless Civil War soldiers of Greenbrier, the mass murderer who stalks Peace Church or the red eyes that persecute visitors to Robinson, tales of ghostly activity abound in every burial ground carved out of the ancient Ozark hills. Follow Dave Harkins as he explores the fascinating history and unsettling lore clinging to these haunted graveyards.

Sacred Havens of Brooklyn: Spiritual Places and Peaceful Grounds

by Terri Cook

During the nineteenth century, Brooklyn earned the nickname "Borough of Churches" as thousands settled here and brought their beliefs with them. Spirituality has always been a major part of life for Brooklynites. Peter Stuyvesant established the Flatbush Dutch Church in 1654, and freed slaves worshipped in their sanctuaries since 1766. Fatih Mosque calls Moslems to prayer five times a day, Dorje Ling Buddhist temple fills visitors with peace, and more than 150 temples minister to many branches of Judaism. Spirituality is also visible in historic sites and monuments, from Fort Greene Park's Revolutionary War memorial to a Japanese shrine in Botanic Gardens. Discover some of the more than two thousand havens that have overflowed with people who were determined to prevail in faith and hope in New York's most populous borough.

Old Country Stores of New Hampshire

by Bruce D. Heald

Often hidden on the back roads and byways of the Granite State, country stores are an essential and beloved part of the state's character. Developed from trading posts as travelers settled throughout the state, they are recognizable for their vast array of merchandise and a fragrant blend of tobacco, spices and coffee. The country store became the center of the community, where residents could play checkers, mail letters, attend town meetings and shop. They are still fixtures in many towns today, including the Brick Country Store in Bath, considered to be the oldest in the United States, dating back to 1790; Fadden's General Store and Sugarhouse in North Woodstock, which produces award-winning maple syrup; and the Old Country Store in Moultonborough, which had its beginnings as a tavern. Historian Bruce D. Heald, PhD, chronicles New Hampshire's historic country stores and the keepers behind these unique local landmarks.

A Savory History of Arkansas Delta Food: Potlikker, Coon Suppers and Chocolate Gravy

by Cindy Grisham

Up and down the Arkansas Delta, food tells a story. Whether the time Bill Clinton nearly died on the way to a coon dinner or the connections made over biscuits and gravy or the more common chicken and dumpling feuds, the area is no stranger to history. One of America's last frontiers, it was settled in the late nineteenth century by a rough-and-tumble collection of timber men, sharecroppers and entrepreneurs from all over the world who embraced the traditional foodways and added their own twists. Today, the Arkansas Delta is the nation's largest producer of rice and adds other crops like catfish and sweet potatoes. Join author Cindy Grisham for this delicious look into Delta cuisine.

Haunted History of Old San Antonio

by Lauren M. Swartz James A. Swartz

As the saying goes, "dead men tell no tales." Or do they? From its humble beginnings as a Spanish settlement in 1691 to the bloody battle at the Alamo, San Antonio's history is rich in haunting tales. Discover Old San Antonio's most haunted places and uncover the history that lies waiting for those who dare to enter their doorways. Take a peek inside the Menger Hotel, the "Most Haunted Hotel in Texas," and just a block away, peer into the Emily Morgan Hotel, one of the city's first hospitals and where many men and women lost their lives. Explore the San Fernando Cathedral, where people are buried within the walls and visitors claim to see faces mysteriously appear. Uncover the legends behind Bexar County Jail. Join authors James and Lauren Swartz and decide for yourself what truly lurks behind the Alamo City's fabled past.

Evelina: or, The History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World

by Fanny Burney

Good-looking, kind-hearted Evelina Anville has grown up in rural obscurity as the ward of a country parson. At the age of seventeen, she begins her progress from provincial life to fashionable London - a transition that's complicated by vulgar relatives and her own naiveté. Evelina's shrewd intelligence, however, perceives the hypocrisy behind the refined façades as she learns to balance the honesty and simplicity of her upbringing with the sophisticated etiquette of high society.Written in the form of letters, this 1778 novel offers an intimate look at coming-of-age among England's eighteenth-century upper crust. Evelina's comic misadventures provide a subtle commentary on some of the problems faced by her contemporaries, from women's limited roles to class snobbery and prejudice. Fanny Burney's witty approach to manners and mores was a significant influence on Jane Austen, and her deft combination of satire, sentimentality, and farce provides sparkling entertainment.

The Zombie Stories of H. P. Lovecraft: Featuring Herbert West--Reanimator and More!

by H. P. Lovecraft

"A fantastic anthology by the true master of horror fiction. Highly recommended." -- Book Nutter's Book Reviews"This is an excellent collection of Lovecraft's 'zombie' stories, which serves both as a treat to old fans and a sampler to people who haven't read Lovecraft before. I would highly recommend this collection." -- Of Stacks and CupsJoyce Carol Oates, Stephen King, and other experts on horror fiction deem H. P. Lovecraft the master teller of weird tales. These six chilling stories - all published between 1921 and 1933 - offer compelling journeys into the land of the undead.The collection begins with "The Outsider," the tale of a recluse whose overwhelming loneliness emboldens him to seek out human contact. Subsequent stories include "Herbert West-Reanimator," written as a satire of Frankenstein and used as the source for a popular horror film; "In the Vault," in which an undertaker experiences supernatural revenge; "Cool Air," an account of a doctor's fanatical obsession with defying death; and "Pickman's Model," focusing on an artist's gallery of nightmares. "The Thing on the Doorstep" concludes the compilation with the compelling tale of a man whose body is preyed upon by a spirit that refuses to die.

A Decade of French Fashion, 1929-1938: From the Depression to the Brink of War

by Mary Carolyn Waldrep

"A well-illustrated survey of style. Chock full of detailed, quality illustrations accompanied by brief descriptions. A worthy offering. Nostalgic types who enjoy perusing vintage catalogs and clip art books will find much to savor here. This practical resource is sure to provide inspiration for artists and fashion designers. Five stars." -- biblio-filerIn addition to a world-wide depression and the rise of Fascism throughout Europe, the years between 1929 and 1938 witnessed dramatic changes in women's fashion. With the turning of the decade, the free and easy fashions of the Roaring Twenties shifted to a softer, more conservative look, with an emphasis on curves rather than angles. Hemlines plummeted almost overnight and did not begin to rise until mid-decade.These selections from full-color French catalogs produced for the international market from 1929 through 1938 document the changes in fashion from the time of the stock market crash to the dawn of World War II. More than 100 images of day and evening wear illustrate the movement from flapper fashions to a more austere look. Fashion designers, costume historians, costumers, and anyone who loves fashion will treasure this richly illustrated survey."A must for anyone interested in fashion and costume, this book offers exactly what the title suggests -- a decade of French fashion, portrayed in beautiful illustrations from contemporary catalogues. A joy to read and savor." -- newbooks magazine"This is a book to read and time and time again, each new viewing helping further details --from button placements to hemline shapes -- to present themselves to you, the reader, as you soak up and savor the supreme elegance that was 1930s fashion for those with the means to buy from the best that France had to offer." -- Chronically Vintage

Hip Hop in Houston: The Origin and the Legacy

by Julie Grub Maco L. Faniel Steve Fournier

Rap-A-Lot Records, U.G.K. (Pimp C and Bun B), Paul Wall, Beyonce, Chamillionaire and Scarface are all names synonymous with contemporary hip-hop. And they have one thing in common: Houston. Long before the country came to know the chopped and screwed style of rap from the Bayou City in the late 1990s, hip-hop in Houston grew steadily and produced some of the most prolific independent artists in the industry. With early roots in jazz, blues, R&B and zydeco, Houston hip-hop evolved not only as a musical form but also as a cultural movement. Join Maco L. Faniel as he uncovers the early years of Houston hip-hop from the music to the culture it inspired.

Haunted Chippewa Valley

by Devon Bell

The Chippewa Valley is nestled snugly in a vast tract of Wisconsin farmland that offered early settlers a secure place to settle into the American dream. But the valley also harbors a strange and sometimes confusing past. From the boisterous activity of the lumber boom to the lingering stillness of the Eau Claire Asylum, this northwestern corner of the Badger State is filled with tragic stories and tall tales. Cast off with the ghost ferries of Caryville or stand vigil in the small, secluded cemetery where the spirits of children come out to play. Join Devon Bell on a journey into the eerie history of the Chippewa Valley.

San Diego Yesterday

by Richard W. Crawford

San Diego today is a vibrant and bustling coastal city, but it wasn't always so. The city's transformation from a rough-hewn border town and frontier port to a vital military center was marked by growing pains and political clashes. Civic highs and criminal lows have defined San Diego's rise through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries into a preeminent Sun Belt city. Historian Richard W. Crawford recalls the significant events and one-of-a-kind characters like benefactor Frank "Booze" Beyer, baseball hero Albert Spalding and novelist Scott O'Dell. Join Crawford for a collection that recounts how San Diego yesterday laid the foundation for the city's bright future.

Reimagining Greenville: Building the Best Downtown in America

by John Boyanoski Knox White

Greenville's downtown is widely recognized as one of the best in America, earning praise from sources including Oprah, Ben Stein, "Esquire" and "Southern Living." This proud achievement is a credit to the community that banded together to build something special from a decaying city center. The story of this careful, deliberate effort by city and community leaders has long been overshadowed by its success. Join authors John Boyanoski and Mayor Knox White as they detail the toil and tribulations that produced a world-class city.

Lost Restaurants of Sacramento and Their Recipes

by Maryellen Burns Keith Burns

From saloons and tamale vendors to greasy spoons and neon-lit drive-ins, Sacramento natives Maryellen Burns and Keith Burns trace the trends of California's capital city through 150 years of dining out. Share in the delicious anecdotes and recipes gathered from restaurant owners, employees and patrons as they recall Sacramento's favorite places to eat--a century of Hangtown Fry served at the Saddle Rock, crispy won ton dunked in red sauce at the Hong Kong Cafe, pineapple spare ribs with Mai Tais at Maleville's Coral Reef and burgers and sundaes devoured at Stan's Drive-In. Savor these stories of the ambiance, the service and the grub that created lasting memories and drew crowds, decade after decade, to Sacramento's iconic restaurants.

Prohibition in Dallas and Fort Worth: Blind Tigers, Bootleggers and Bathtub Gin

by Jason Kosmas Rita Cook Kevin Marple Jeffrey Yarbrough

A place with "wild men and wilder women," 1920s Dallas boasted one bar for every one hundred people, and a thirsty Texan could find a drink nearly anywhere. Although home to the Texas Anti-Saloon League, drinks never stopped pouring in Dallas and Fort Worth, fueled by the likes of Jack Ruby, Benny Binion, saloons and dance halls. Homegrown moonshine and bathtub gin yielded specialty recipes that today's barkeeps have honed into tasty concoctions for a contemporary palate. Join Rita Cook as she explores prohibition in Dallas and Fort Worth and learn from Jeffrey Yarbrough and his band of local mixologists about their modern takes on classic drinks so readers can step back in time, drink in hand.

Trailer Food Diaries Cookbook: Portland Edition, Volume One

by Tiffany Harelik

Portland's celebrated food cart chefs create artisan meals by combining world influences and the finest local ingredients. Tiffany Harelik brings her Trailer Food Diaries Cookbook series to Oregon to capture the histories and recipes of these creative and passionate entrepreneurs. Meet the local chefs, explore the food cart scene and sample from a savory array of gourmet dishes. From Alligator and Chicken Jambalaya to Pendleton Pie, and from Breakfast Gnocchi to Wild Mushroom and Kale Pate, this mouthwatering collection of recipes offers something for both the food cart novice and the tried-and-true cart-ivore.

That's the Way it Was: Stories of Struggle, Survival and Self-Respect in Twentieth-Century Black St. Louis

by Vida 'Sister' Prince

Segregation was a way of life in St. Louis, aptly called "the most southern city in the North." These thirteen oral histories describe the daily struggle that pervasive racism demanded but also share the tradition of self-respect that the African American community of St. Louis sought to build on its own terms.

Senator Hattie Caraway: An Arkansas Legacy

by Nancy Hendricks

Hattie Caraway unexpectedly became the first female U.S. senator in 1931 by filling the seat of her late husband. What her colleagues viewed as an honorary position was in fact the start of a distinguished career. Despite strong male opposition, Hattie won reelection and loyally and effectively served her constituency for twelve years through the difficult times of the Great Depression and World War II. Join Caraway scholar and historian Dr. Nancy Hendricks to witness Caraway's historic career through previously unseen letters and photos and see how Caraway effected change in the U.S. political landscape.

Ghosts of Pocatello: Haunted History from the Gate City

by John Brian

From the Native American tribes who first inhabited the land to the gold rush prospectors who flocked to the burgeoning town in the 1860s, Pocatello's legacy is defined by fascinating historical figures and colorful characters. But many restless souls from the city's past refuse to fade quietly into history. Join author John Brian as he records the voices and visions that haunt Pocatello today. Whether it's the long-dead theater devotee who still attends shows at Frazier Hall, the specter of a woman who evaded a judge at the Bannock County Courthouse or the many spirits that haunt a farm built on sacred Shoshoni tribal land, this collection proves that the Gate City is flooded with ghosts.

Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent

by Donald A. Ritchie John Muller Donald T. Bliss

When young Samuel Clemens first visited the nation's capital in 1854, both were rough around the edges and of dubious potential. Returning as Mark Twain in 1867, he brought his sharp eye and acerbic pen to the task of covering the capital for nearly a half-dozen newspapers. He fit in perfectly among the other hard-drinking and irreverent correspondents. His bohemian sojourn in Washington, D.C., has been largely overlooked, but his time in the capital city was catalytic to Twain's rise as America's foremost man of letters. While in Washington City, Twain received a publishing offer from the American Publishing Company that would jumpstart his fame. Through original research unearthing never-before-seen material, author John Muller explores how Mark Twain's adventures as a capital correspondent proved to be a critical turning point in his career.

Fort Martin Scott: Guardian of the Treaty

by Joseph Luther

Fort Martin Scott still stands guard in the heart of Texas 150 years after its construction, which was prompted by a peace treaty between Germans and the Penateka Comanches. The first frontier fort in Texas, the original complex of twenty-one buildings allowed soldiers to patrol the Upper Immigrant Trail through Comanche and Apache territory. The old fort was a hub for military patrols during the Texas Indian Wars. Famous army units, including the First and Eighth Infantries, as well as the Second Dragoons and Fourth Cavalry, were all stationed at this post at one time or another. Fort Martin Scott was the locality of much partisan conflict during the Civil War. Author and historian Joseph Luther tells the full story of this historic Texas icon.

University Park, Los Angeles: A Brief History

by Charles Epting

University Park is one of Los Angeles's most diverse and historic neighborhoods. Beginning with the founding of the University of Southern California in 1880, the area has hosted two Olympic Games and numerous presidents and been featured as a backdrop for dozens of movies, along with countless other events of cultural and historical significance. Few areas in Southern California boast such a wide variety of historic buildings--residential, educational and commercial--dating to LA's earliest days. With USC as its anchor, University Park thrives as a microcosm of LA's culture, architecture and development from an outpost accumulating settlers into one of the world's great cosmopolitan metropolises. Join author Charles Epting on this historical inventory of University Park's significant moments and lasting legacy.

Chronicles of Historic Brooklyn

by John B. Manbeck

Diversity and distinctiveness are part of the historic fabric of Brooklyn--they are part of its people, landmarks, favorite events and more. Borough Historian John Manbeck has collected the stories that reveal the history and spirit of this ever-growing metropolis. Brooklyn Bridge Park and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden beautify the borough, which is returning to its roots with a vibrant "urban farming" movement. From stories of murderous pirates who once besieged Sheepshead Bay to tales of the still-beloved Brooklyn Dodgers who played at Ebbets Field, Manbeck traces the long and colorful history. Explore the forgotten neighborhoods, vanishing waterfront and other attractions that show how and why Brooklyn has endured.

A Brief History of Smyrna, Georgia

by William P. Marchione

The dynamic city of Smyrna, Georgia, situated a scant fifteen miles northwest of Atlanta, has a fascinating history. In July 1864, two significant battles were fought within the confines of present-day Smyrna as General Sherman's Federal juggernaut converged on the "Gateway City" of Atlanta. The town was incorporated in 1872 with a population of fewer than three hundred residents and high expectations that rapid suburban development would ensue. It was the coming to the area of the aeronautics industry in the post-World War II period that finally generated sustained growth. Then, in the 1990s, the city reinvented itself through an aggressive urban renewal program spearheaded by its dynamic mayor, Max Bacon, and a progressive-minded city council. Join author William P. Marchione, PhD, as he recounts the fascinating history that created Smyrna.

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