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Showing 8,801 through 8,825 of 27,291 results

Hattiesburg, Mississippi: A History of the Hub City

by Benjamin Morris

Founded by William Hardy at the confluence of rivers and rail lines, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, is today a capital of education, healthcare, commerce and the armed forces in the Gulf South. In this new biography of the Hub City, experience its story as you never have before. Hunt and forage alongside Native American tribes centuries before European settlement. Build a cabin with pioneer lumbermen on the edge of the forest, jostling for profit in the cavernous Piney Woods. Train with soldiers at Camp Shelby on the eve of deployment in World War II, and march alongside civil rights activists during Freedom Summer in 1964. In this narrative history, author and Hattiesburg native Benjamin Morris offers a captivating account of the Hub City from its prehistory to the present day, from its darkest hours to its brightest futures.

Classic Eateries of the Ozarks and Arkansas River Valley

by Kat Robinson Grav Weldon

If life is a highway, food is the fuel. The restaurant cuisine of Arkansas was crafted by transportation--and by family heritage. From century-old soda fountains to heritage candy makers, Arkansas wine country and the birthplace of fried pickles, discover the delicious nooks of the Ozarks and scrumptious crannies of the Arkansas River Valley through this tasty travelogue. Learn how fried chicken came to a tiny burg called Tontitown. Discover a restaurant atop a gristmill with a history predating the Civil War. Dine where Bill Clinton, Sam Walton and Elvis Presley caught a bite to eat. Join author Kat Robinson and photographer Grav Weldon on this exploration of over one hundred of the state's classic and iconic restaurants.

Hidden History of Portland, Oregon

by Jd Chandler

In this engaging narrative, author JD Chandler crafts a people's history of Portland, Oregon, sharing the lesser-known stories of individuals who stood against the tide and fought for liberty and representation: C.E.S. Wood, who documented the conflict between Native Americans and the United States Army; Beatrice Morrow Cannady, founding member of the Portland NAACP and first African American woman to practice law in Oregon; women's rights advocate Dr. Marie Equi, who performed abortions and was an open lesbian; and student athlete Jack Yoshihara, who, in the wake of Pearl Harbor, was barred from participating in the 1942 Rose Bowl. From scandal and oppression to injustice and the brink of revolution, join Chandler as he gives voice to the Rose City's quiet radicals and outspoken activists.

French and Indian War in North Carolina, The: The Spreading Flames of War

by John R. Maass

Though most of the events in the French and Indian War took place hundreds of miles away, North Carolina was not exempt from its impact. As the European forces of France, Spain, Great Britain and their American Indian allies brought war to the New World, the colony mobilized troops, raised money, built forts and participated in several arduous military campaigns. The war had a huge influence on the colony, including a dramatic conflict between the colonial Governor Arthur Dobbs and the colonial legislature over how many troops to raise and how it would be funded. This led to an increasing sense of independence from Britain that would continue to build after the war was over. Join historian and author John R. Maass as he chronicles a significant yet often overlooked North Carolina history..

Explosion on the Potomac: The 1844 Calamity Aboard the USS Princeton

by Kerry Walters

In 1844, the USS "Princeton" was the most technologically sophisticated warship in the world. Its captain, Robert Stockton, and President John Tyler were both zealous expansionists, and they hoped that it would be the forerunner in a formidable steam-powered fleet. On a Potomac cruise intended to impress power brokers, the ship's main gun--the Peacemaker--exploded as the vessel neared Mount Vernon. Eight died horribly, while twenty others were injured. Two of Tyler's most important cabinet members were instantly lost, and the president himself had a near miss--making it the worst physical disaster to befall a presidential administration. The tragedy set off an unpredictable wave of events that cost Tyler a second term, nearly scuttled plans to add Texas to the Union and stirred up sectional rancor that drove the nation closer to civil war. Author Kerry Walters chronicles this little-known disaster that altered the course of the nation's history.

Urban Legends & Historic Lore of Washington, D.C.

by Robert S. Pohl

A carving of General Lee on the back of the Lincoln monument, the birth of lobbying at the Willard Hotel, a romantic gesture that built the distinctive homes of Capitol Hill--these are legends of Washington, D.C. The capital is home to all manner of colorful rumors and tall tales. According to local lore, the missing J Street was L'Enfant's snub to Supreme Court justice John Jay, and the course of history could have been changed if only a young baseball player named Fidel Castro had accepted a contract with the Washington Senators. In search of the truth behind these legends and more, local guide and writer Robert S. Pohl takes readers on a tour of the historic lore and urban legends that surround the monuments, neighborhood streets and even the Metro stations of Washington, D.C.

Historic Haunts of Savannah

by Michael Harris Linda Sickler

As one of America's most haunted cities, Savannah, Georgia, has a long list of stories of the supernatural, such as the story of the first two people hanged in colonial Savannah for the murder of their abusive master. Or James Stark, a tempestuous planter, and Dr. Philip Minis, who settled their dispute with a duel and still hang around the old building at Moon River Brewing Co. Or the terrifying "boy-giant," Rene Rhondolia, who preys on young girls and animals. Join authors Michael Harris and Linda Sickler as they navigate the chilling world of those who refuse to leave their Savannah homes.

Orlando, Florida: A Brief History

by James C. Clark

Orlando is known internationally as a tourist destination, attracting fifty million visitors each year to its numerous resorts and parks. In all that excitement, it's easy to overlook the city's interesting past. In the 1800s, the area was embroiled in the Seminole Wars, and Fort Gatlin was constructed to shield citizens from attacks. Soon, a city grew around the fort. During the cowboy era, thousands of cattle, ranchers and cowboys crossed the central Florida terrain moving livestock. Those pioneers soon moved to farming, and Orlando became the center of the Florida citrus industry. Join author and historian James C. Clark as he reveals the remarkable history of one of the world's most popular destinations.

Gangsters and Organized Crime in Jewish Chicago

by Alex Garel-Frantzen

Al Capone. The Untouchables. The Valentine's Day massacre. You may think you know everything about the Roaring Twenties in the Windy City, but in the early twentieth century, the harsh environment of the Maxwell Street ghetto produced a proliferation of Jewish gangsters involved in everything from labor racketeering to white slavery. Their illegal activity offended their own community's value system and sparked rifts between Reform and Orthodox Jews. It also ignited tensions between city officials and Jewish leaders, indelibly marked the gentile population's perception of Chicago's Jews and shaped the city's West Side for years to come.

Arkansas Civil War Heritage: A Legacy of Honor

by Dr W. Towns

The American Civil War shaped the course of the country's history and its national identity. This is no less true for the state of Arkansas. Throughout the Natural State, people have paid homage and remembrance to those who fought and what was fought for in memorial celebrations and rituals. The memory of the war has been kept alive by reunions and preservationists, continuing to shape the way the War Between the States affects Arkansas and its people. Historian W. Stuart Towns expertly tells the story of Arkansas's Civil War heritage through its rituals of memorial, commemoration and celebration that continue today.

A History of Pacific Northwest Cuisine: Mastodons to Molecular Gastronomy

by Pamela Heiligenthal Marc Hinton

With a dash of humor and a sprinkling of recipes, culinarian Marc Hinton chronicles the bounty of the Pacific Northwest from the mastodon meals of the earliest inhabitants to the gastronomic revolution of today. In this lively narrative, learn how Oregon's and Washington's chefs have used the region's natural abundance to create a sumptuous cuisine that is stylish yet simple and how winemakers and brewers have crafted their own rich beverage traditions. From potlatches to Prohibition, seafood to sustainability and Lewis and Clark to James Beard, Hinton traces the events and influences that have shaped the Pacific Northwest's edible past and created a delectable fare that has foodies and enophiles from around the world clamoring for a taste.

St. Augustine and the Civil War

by Robert Redd

When Florida seceded from the Union in 1861, St. Augustine followed much of the South and widely supported the Confederacy. Many residents rushed to join the Confederate army. Union forces, however, quickly seized the lightly protected town and used it as a rest area for battle-weary troops. Seven Union regiments called the city home during the war. While no major engagement took place in St. Augustine, the city is filled with Civil War history, from supporting the Confederacy to accepting Union generals as respected residents. Join author Robert Redd as he details St. Augustine's rich history during the Civil War and in the postwar years.

Columbus Neighborhoods: A Guide to the Landmarks of Franklinton, German Village, King-Lincoln, Olde Town East, Short North and the University District

by Tom Betti Doreen Uhas Sauer Ed Lentz

Discover the stories behind Columbus neighborhoods and their landmarks. The community centers that locals call home aren't just points of interest but places that have shaped history beyond their communities and even Ohio. This encyclopedia of Columbus neighborhoods gives voice to the rich heritage residing in the bell towers, parks and streetscapes of Franklinton, German Village, King-Lincoln, Olde Town East, Short North and the University District. Along with WOSU's award-winning Columbus Neighborhoods series, Tom Betti, Doreen Uhas Sauer and Ed Lentz curate the stories tracing the lines from your neighborhood to the Manhattan Project, the Underground Railroad, Abraham Lincoln and the Tuskegee Airmen.

Haunted Dalton, Georgia

by Connie Hall-Scott

Nestled in the foothills of the picturesque North Georgia mountains, Dalton is a city steeped in history and legend. The Cherokees called it their "Enchanted Land" before they were driven out through an American tragedy remembered as the Trail of Tears. As the gateway to the Civil War, Whitfield County hosted bloody battles and sacrificed many of its own. It is home to an array of spirits that, for reasons of their own, refuse to leave. The laughter of ghost children still echoes through the halls of the historic Wink Theatre. From the weeping girl of the former Hotel Dalton to long-dead marching ghost soldiers and beyond, Dalton abounds in paranormal activity. Join author Connie Hall-Scott on a journey through a host of spectral things that go bump in the night.

Hollywood of the Rockies: Colorado, the West and America's Film Pioneers

by Michael J. Spencer

In the early days of the twentieth century, movies weren't made in California. As America's film pioneers traveled westward, Colorado became a beacon to them, contributing to the early motion picture business with all the relish and gusto of a western saga. The gorgeous natural scenery was perfect for the country's (and the world's) growing infatuation with the West, turning Colorado itself into a bigger star of the early cinema than any particular actor. Using rare photos and contemporary accounts, writer and filmmaker Michael J. Spencer explores the little-known filmmaking industry that flourished in the Rocky Mountains between 1895 and 1915--west of New York but east of Hollywood.

Grand Rapids Food: A Culinary Revolution

by Lisa Rose Starner

Grand Rapids' food scene is bursting with local flavor. Farmers, teachers, chefs and activists are taking back their foodways and serving up the fresh, healthful fruits of their labor. Author Lisa Rose Starner captures the essence of the growing food movement in Grand Rapids and the rugged individuals who are tilling the soil, growing food and launching successful food businesses while powering community change--one garden, one backyard, one block, one store, one plate of food, cup of coffee and mug of beer at a time.

Battle of Fisher's Hill, The: Breaking the Shenandoah Valley's Gibraltar

by Jonathan A. Noyalas

The Battle of Fisher's Hill created a greater opportunity to destroy harvests from the "Breadbasket of the Confederacy" than any other Union victory in the hotly contested Shenandoah Valley. Union major general Philip Sheridan's men forced Confederate lieutenant general Jubal A. Early's smaller force to retreat, leading to the burning of barns and mills across the region. In this first-ever book focused on this engagement, Civil War historian Jonathan A. Noyalas explains the battle, its effect on area civilians and its meaning to both sides, as well as the battlefield's important role in postwar reunion and reconciliation.

Civil War Ghosts of Central Georgia and Savannah

by Jim Miles

The Heartland of Georgia, a vast region stretching from Columbus to Savannah and from the edge of Atlanta to Florida, is home to historic sites of Sherman's March to the Sea and Andersonville Civil War Prison. Because of this history, the area is one of the most haunted in the United States. All manner of paranormal phenomena haunt the battlefields, houses, prison sites and forts throughout this region. Spirits even stalk the streets of Savannah, one of the most haunted cities in the world. Join author and historian Jim Miles as he details the past and present of the ghosts that haunt central Georgia and Savannah.

Civil War Ghosts of Atlanta

by Jim Miles

The Atlanta metropolis is one of America's most modern and progressive cities, and it is easy to forget that 150 years ago it was the scene of a long and deadly campaign. Union general William T. Sherman hammered relentlessly against Atlanta at Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Ezra Church and Jonesboro. Months later, as he began his infamous March to the Sea, much of Atlanta was destroyed by fire. Thousands died in the fighting, and thousands more succumbed to wounds and disease in the large hospitals constructed around the city. Today, the ghosts of Atlanta's Civil War actions haunt battlefields, hospital sites, cemeteries, homes and commercial structures, all a testament to the tragic history of the city. Join author Jim Miles as he details the Civil War spirits that still haunt Atlanta.

Ku Klux Klan in Minnesota, The

by Elizabeth Dorsey Hatle

Minnesota might not seem like an obvious place to look for traces of Ku Klux Klan parade grounds, but this northern state was once home to fifty-one chapters of the KKK. Elizabeth Hatle tracks down the history of the Klan in Minnesota, beginning with the racially charged atmosphere that produced the tragic 1920 Duluth lynchings. She measures the influence the organization wielded at the peak of its prominence within state politics and tenaciously follows the careers of the Klansmen who continued life in the public sphere after the Hooded Order lost its foothold in the Land of Ten Thousand Lakes.

Columbus Indiana's Historic Crump Theatre

by David Sechrest Mayor Kristen Brown

Not since the construction of the Columbus courthouse had one man and his vision received as much publicity from local newspapers as John Crump and his theater, designed and built by architect Charles Sparrell in 1889. This is the story of the passion, struggles and triumphs that created the first true cultural arts center in this small town and the legacy that continues to inspire the community over a century later to protect this local landmark. It is a journey marked by first-class opera performances, flickering silent films, police intervention and arrests and, ultimately, decay and closure. A portion of the proceeds from sales of this book will go to the Heritage Fund in support of the Crump Theatre building--an architectural treasure in a city that boasts many.

Homestead, Florida: From Railroad Boom to Sonic Boom

by Seth H. Bramson Bob Jensen

Originally settled prior to the coming of the Florida East Coast Railway in 1904, Homestead became only the second incorporated municipality in Dade County in 1913. A land of rich soil steeped in agricultural heritage, the area soon grew into a marvelously diverse city of more than sixty thousand residents. The foundation laid by the railroad gave way to the aviation industry when the city became home to Homestead Air Force Base, now Homestead Air Reserve Base. The city has also dealt with adversity, rebuilding itself from the devastation of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. Homestead is now the gateway to two national parks and is home to Homestead-Miami Speedway, a unique winery and a thriving business community. Join authors Seth H. Bramson and Bob Jensen as they detail the rich history of this South Florida gem.

Sacramento's Historic Japantown: Legacy of a Lost Neighborhood

by Kevin Wildie

By 1910, Japanese pioneers had created a vibrant community in the heart of Sacramento--one of the largest in California. Spilling out from Fourth Street, J Town offered sumo tournaments, authentic Japanese meals and eastern medicine to a generation of Delta field laborers. Then, in 1942 following Pearl Harbor, orders for Japanese American incarceration forced residents to abandon their homes and their livelihoods. Even in the face of anti-Japanese sentiment, the neighborhood businesses and cultural centers endured, and it wasn't until the 1950s, when the Capitol Mall Redevelopment Project reshaped the city center, that J Town was truly lost. Drawing on oral histories and previously unpublished photographs, author Kevin Wildie traces stories of immigration, incarceration and community solidarity, crafting an unparalleled account of Japantown's legacy.

Trussville, Alabama: A Brief History

by Gary Lloyd

Long before Trussville became the commercial hub of northeastern Jefferson County, settlers fell in love with the area's fertile land and proximity to Alabama's longest free-flowing river, the Cahaba. In the late 1930s, a New Deal initiative known as the Cahaba Project established nearly three hundred new homes in the city, a community that became a historic treasure. The Trussville Academy opened its doors in 1869 and is the area's first educational institution. Camp Gertrude Coleman, which opened in 1925, is the third-longest-operating Girl Scouts camp in the nation, remaining open even during the Great Depression and World War II. Join author Gary Lloyd as he recounts the people and events that make Trussville one of the most desirable places to live in Alabama.

Civil War Ghosts of North Georgia

by Jim Miles

Though Georgia was spared the hard hand of war for two years, combat arrived with a vengeance in September 1863 with the Battle of Chickamauga in north Georgia. It was the second-largest battle of the Civil War and has become one of America's most haunted battlefields, producing a long history of bizarre paranormal events that continue today. From Sherman's notorious march to Confederate general James Longstreet's continued inhabitance of his postwar home, Georgia is haunted by many of those who fought in America's deadliest war. Join author Jim Miles as he details the ghosts that still roam Georgia's Civil War battlefields, hospitals and antebellum homes.

Showing 8,801 through 8,825 of 27,291 results

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