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Showing 8,851 through 8,875 of 15,336 results

Orientation to the Subarctic Survival Situation

by Linda A. Hill Katherine S. Weber

An orientation to the "Subartic Survival Situation" (designed by and available from Human Synergistics, Inc., Plymouth, MI, tel. 313-459-1030), an experiental exercise that gives students an opportunity to learn about their personal influence style and their effectiveness as a team leader or member. As a simulation, the exercise provides conditions analogous to those managers face every day: They must make critical decisions from incomplete and often ambiguous information and must live with imperfect solutions; the problem is urgent and they have to cope with the stresses and emotions associated with working under pressure; they will have to work with others to solve a common problem (in this regard, this exercise perhaps simulates most closely a newly instituted cross-functional task force). Outlines the rationale for the exercise and gives a brief overview of how the simulation will unfold.

RealNetworks Rhapsody

by Thomas R. Eisenmann Steven Carpenter

Examines RealNetwork's (Real's) strategy for the rapidly emerging online music market. In contrast to rivals who sell individual copies of songs, Real offers online music on a subscription basis. For a $10 monthly fee, subscribers to Real's Rhapsody service have unlimited rights to stream all songs from a 600,000-title library to any PC and can burn CD copies of these songs for 79 cents apiece. Real faces significant marketing challenges in persuading consumers to "rent" rather than own their music. The company must decide which channel partners--broadband access providers, consumer electronics retailers, PC manufacturers, or portals--are best equipped to help sell its services. Finally, Real must determine how to differentiate its services from those soon to be offered by a glut of new competitors poised to enter the online music market, including Wal-Mart, Viacom, Sony, Dell, and Microsoft.

Saxonville Sausage

by Kate Moore

Saxonville Sausage, a $1.5 billion manufacturer of pork sausage products, is experiencing financial stress because its leading product lines have lately produced declining revenues in product categories that are realizing no growth. However, one product line, an Italian sausage brand named Vivio, has recently experienced a significant increase in revenues, as has the entire Italian sausage category nationwide. Unfortunately, Vivio represents only 5% of the company's total revenues. Ann Banks, a seasoned marketing director, has been hired to expand Vivio, currently distributed in a few cities, especially in the northeastern U.S, into a powerful national brand. Depicts the sequence of steps Ann takes to determine the best positioning for the brand. These steps include analyzing and employing specific techniques for researching customers' needs, preferences, and values; using the learning from research to develop a motivation-centered characterization of the target consumer; eliciting tactical ideas from a cross-departmental team of colleagues for product "alterations," packaging, and other contributory elements in the branding program; and finally, choosing between two positionings that seem equally valid.

Savings and Loans and the Mortgage Market

by Robert C. Merton Alberto Moel

Provides a brief overview of the history of the savings and loans, the savings and loans crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, and the creation of the mortgage markets in the United States. Also explains briefly the most common types of mortgage-backed securities available.

Reality, Resistance, and Resolution: How Integrative Thinkers Keep Their Options Open

by Roger L. Martin

This chapter illustrates how some business leaders have explored the tensions between opposing models of reality, and found creative solutions that go beyond trade-offs.

Orientation to the Public Image Assessment Exercise

by Robin J. Ely

The Public Image Assessment exercise acquaints students with the ideal images they hold of themselves, the actions they engage in to convey these images, and the benefits and costs of these behaviors to themselves and to others. Social psychologists call this process impression management. Although managing others' impressions of us is a natural part of life--and there are good, pragmatic reasons for being concerned with the images we present to others--problems arise when people are driven by concerns about others' assessments of them. When the goal of validating one's image becomes more important than others, the task, or a group's mission, it becomes difficult to learn, take risks, and experiment.

The Realignment Challenge: A Leader's Guide to Navigating this Important Career Transition

by Michael D. Watkins

On the surface, turnaround and realignment scenarios can look remarkably similar. But there are important differences between them--differences that have a significant impact on the strategy a new leader will adopt to address the transition challenge at hand. In realignments, the first order of business is education: as the new leader you must create a sense of urgency among people, many of whom won't even recognize that a problem exists. In this chapter, transition acceleration expert Michael Watkins describes the fundamental differences between turnaround and realignment challenges and outlines a process for creating a realignment strategy that focuses on raising awareness of problems and changing the attitudes and behaviors of a critical mass of people in the organization. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 7 of "Your Next Move: The Leader's Guide to Navigating Major Career Transitions."

Revamping Your IT Funding Model: Extract More Value from Your IT Investments

by Jeanne W. Ross Peter Weill

With the average firm spending over two thirds of its IT budget just on maintaining operating systems, it's vital that companies begin rethinking how they track and manage their IT funds. In this chapter, Weil and Ross provide extensive guidelines on how companies can compose an effective IT funding model. They stress the importance of establishing IT priorities and monitoring the risks and rewards of current and past investments. This chapter was originally published as chapter 3 of "IT Savvy: What Top Executives Must Know to Go from Pain to Gain."

Plan Operations: Sales Forecasts, Resource Capacity, and Dynamic Budgets

by Robert S. Kaplan David P. Norton

This chapter presents an integrated approach for linking the strategic plan to forecasts for spending on operating and capital resources, which accounts for the vast majority of overall corporate spending. This process ensures that resource capacity, operational plans, and budgets reflect the direction and needs of the strategy.

Savage Beast (B)

by Noam Wasserman Lp Maurice

For several months, things had been spiraling downwards at Savage Beast, the music-recommendation company started three years before by Tim Westergren. The company's founder-CEO recently left due to pressures both at home and within the venture. Dozens of investors turned thumbs-down on the venture; salaries had been cut; and, tensions had risen within the founding team. Now Westergren, the founder who has taken over as CEO, is facing even deeper pressures as he finds out about a lawsuit filed by former employees, and he is wondering if it is time to give up on ever achieving his vision.

Orient-Express Hotels

by Frances X. Frei Corey Hajim

Describes how a hotel and leisure company provides high-end service through its distinctive hotels and trains. Provides an opportunity to learn about the company's unusual quality practices and puts into doubt the unquestioned use of well-known practices, such as managing for consistency, offering incentives based on nonfinancial measures, and creating a unified message for a high-end brand. The main dilemma is whether the company should develop a loyalty program across its collection of hotels.

Real Options: Valuing Managerial Flexibility

by Michael E. Edleson

Provides a basic understanding of real options in corporate finance. Traditional discounted cash flow techniques (NPV) do not deal well with managerial flexibility or future response to uncertainty. The value of this flexibility can be significant and is handled well by option-pricing techniques. A description and taxonomy of real options is followed by several examples of valuing and using real options to make better value-enhancing decisions.

Real Options Exercises

by Timothy A. Luehrman

Introduces students to simple forms and solution techniques for real options found in corporate settings. Revised versions of problems appearing in an older problem set (293-095). The basic differences are that the new set is shorter, but also a bit more demanding.

Savage Beast (A1)

by Noam Wasserman Lp Maurice

For several months, things had been spiraling downwards at Savage Beast, the music-recommendation company started three years before by Tim Westergren. The company's founder-CEO recently left due to pressures both at home and within the venture. Dozens of investors turned thumbs-down on the venture; salaries had been cut, and tensions had risen within the founding team. Now Westergren, the founder who has taken over as CEO, is facing even deeper pressures as he finds out about a lawsuit filed by former employees, and he is wondering if it is time to give up on ever achieving his vision. Note: The content of this version is the same as the content in the Savage Beast (A) case (809-069) but includes two directives in the text to students. At the end of page 8, the student is asked to pause and complete a one-question poll. The "page-8" poll asks, "At this point, should Tim persist in trying to build Savage Beast?" Yes or No, and why. At the end of the case, the student is asked to complete a second poll. The "end-of-case" poll asks, "Should Tim persist in trying to build Savage Beast?" Yes or No, and why. If you do not have polling capabilities, you should use the Savage Beast (A) case.

Organizing to Innovate: Building Your Innovation Capability

by Steven C. Wheelwright Scott D. Anthony Mark W. Johnson Joseph V. Sinfield Elizabeth J. Altman Afarin Bellisario

Success requires going beyond winning once to developing deep capabilities that allow a company repeatedly to disarm disruptive threats and seize new opportunities. This chapter describes how companies can build innovation structures that help them address specific innovation challenges and surround those structures with the appropriate systems and culture.

The Return on Talent Management Investments: How to Maximize the Value of Internal Development

by Peter Cappelli

If you can find different and better ways to recoup your investments in development, you can dramatically improve your talent management options as well as expand your investments in employees. There are several ways to lower the cost of development: using opportunities outside the organization, getting employees to share the cost, and training before hiring, among others.

Real Madrid Club de Futbol in 2007: Beyond the Galacticos

by John A. Quelch Anita Elberse

On June 17, 2007, Real Madrid sealed its first Spanish league championship under new president Ramon Calderon, ending an unprecedented title drought. Real Madrid had seen a significant growth in revenues and now was the world's biggest soccer club and among the largest and most profitable sports franchises globally. Although Calderon signed several new stars in his first year, he also rejuvenated the team by acquiring the promising youngsters, thereby moving away from what had been dubbed the "Galacticos Strategy" introduced by former president Florentino Perez. Would the move away form this strategy bring continued successes on the field? And how would it impact real Madrid's business performance?

Savage Beast (A)

by Noam Wasserman Lp Maurice

For several months, things had been spiraling downwards at Savage Beast, the music-recommendation company started three years before by Tim Westergren. The company's founder-CEO recently left due to pressures both at home and within the venture. Dozens of investors turned thumbs-down on the venture; salaries had been cut; and, tensions had risen within the founding team. Now Westergren, the founder who has taken over as CEO, is facing even deeper pressures as he finds out about a lawsuit filed by former employees, and he is wondering if it is time to give up on ever achieving his vision.

Return Logic, Inc, (A)

by Richard G. Hamermesh Michele Lutz

Follows three graduating HBS students as they build a business-to-business Internet venture and highlights the challenges they confront in structuring financing terms with venture capitalists. Requires students to carefully read a six-page term sheet to identify which provisions should and should not be accepted.

Reto S.A.

by William J. Bruns Jr.

A company must decide whether to acquire new equipment to offer a new product line. The question is whether equipment will meet return on investment targets considering depreciation and taxation of profits. The equipment is acquired, but one year later better equipment becomes available. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

Saudi Arabia: Modern Reform, Enduring Stability

by Richard H.K. Vietor Nicole Forrest

This case, along with Dubai: Global Economy (709-043) provides an opportunity to discuss Saudi Arabia's efforts to modernize, without really Westernizing, in sharp contrast to Dubai, a nearby Arab Emirate. As Saudi Arabia's development strategy unfolds in the past six years, it is contrasted to social and political pressures within the country, volatility in global oil markets and severe political problems in the Middle East.

Organizing the Enterprise: Which Form Is Best for You?

by Richard Luecke

One key issue every entrepreneur must address when starting a new business is the legal form the enterprise will adopt. This chapter covers the various legal forms of organization available to U.S. businesses, the advantages and disadvantages of each, and determining which form is best for you.

Rethinking What We Do: Finding Balance--A Simple System for Dealing with Difficult Conversations

by Holly Weeks

Difficult conversations themselves may be complicated, but we can't use a complicated system to bring them into balance. We need a simple system to call on when the conversation heats up and its basis is a three-way respect for yourself, your counterpart, and the conversation itself. The key to good practice is a combination of all three facets of respect working together. This chapter will help you do the work.

Showing 8,851 through 8,875 of 15,336 results

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