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Showing 9,376 through 9,400 of 15,742 results

The National Geographic Society (A) (Abridged)

by David A. Garvin Annelena Lobb

In January 2010, John Fahey, president, CEO, and chairman of the board of trustees' executive committee of the Washington, D.C.-based National Geographic Society (NGS), must decide how best to organize the 121-year old mission-driven organization for a world of accelerating digital convergence and decreasing magazine sales. Historically a proponent of evolutionary change, he is considering a radical move: creating a senior management position responsible for e-commerce to coordinate web-based offerings and outreach across the Society's various departments, transition NGS from its many disparate and independent direct mail efforts to a more integrated and strategic e-commerce strategy, and leverage the NGS relationship with its members-currently defined as magazine subscribers, since a subscription comes with Society membership. Putting the final touches on the position and its reporting arrangements has led to significant debate within the organization, and Fahey is torn about how to proceed.

Nike in Transition (A): The Ascendancy of Bob Woodell

by Christopher A. Bartlett Robert W. Lightfoot

Explores Bob Woodell's tenure as Nike's first COO. Describes development of Woodell's management style, his attempts to develop the organization, and his responses to unforeseen business problems. Changing market forces, new competitors, a build-up of low-end inventory, and the absence of Phil Knight, the company's founder, in daily operations, make this a difficult time for Nike. Against the backdrop of disappointing financial results and an upcoming shareholders' meeting, students are asked to assess Woodell's performance, whether management is truly in control of the organization and the company's business, and what role Knight should be playing in the organization.

Note on Human Behavior: Differences at Work: The Leadership Challenge

by Sandra J. Sucher

This note reviews research findings on the leadership challenges of diversity, including the social psychology of similarity and difference, the value of multiple perspectives to problem-solving, the relationship between diversity and firm performance, and management paradigms for diversity.

Metro Cash & Carry

by Tarun Khanna Krishna G. Palepu

Analyzes the globalization of Metro Cash & Carry, a German wholesaler, which has flourished in many foreign markets but struggled to gain traction in India. Considers Metro's experience in Russia and China to put the company's challenges in India in comparative perspective. Pays particular attention to the institutional obstacles for a multinational to tap into the opportunities offered by emerging markets.

MontGras: Export Strategy for a Chilean Winery

by Howard H. Stevenson David J. Arnold

MontGras, a medium-sized Chilean winery, has to formulate an export strategy. It has to decide whether to emphasize the U.S. or U.K. markets, which also offer different positioning and pricing proposals. It has twice failed to penetrate the U.S. market because distributor relationships fell through and is deciding between two new potential partners. In the United Kingdom, it is offered participation in a supermarket promotion that will boost volumes, but at the expense of price maintenance. Includes color exhibits.

The National Geographic Society (A)

by David A. Garvin Carin-Isabel Knoop

In January 2010, John Fahey, president, CEO, and chairman of the board of trustees' executive committee of the Washington, D.C.-based National Geographic Society (NGS), must decide how best to organize the 121-year old mission-driven organization for a world of accelerating digital convergence and decreasing magazine sales. Historically a proponent of evolutionary change, he is considering a radical move: creating a senior management position responsible for e-commerce to coordinate web-based offerings and outreach across the Society's various departments, transition NGS from its many disparate and independent direct mail efforts to a more integrated and strategic e-commerce strategy, and leverage the NGS relationship with its members-currently defined as magazine subscribers, since a subscription comes with Society membership. Putting the final touches on the position and its reporting arrangements has led to significant debate within the organization, and Fahey is torn about how to proceed.

Nike in China

by James E. Austin Francis J. Aguilar

Nike is reviewing its strategy for producing shoes in China for the U.S. market. Compares the experience in China with that in other countries.

Monterrey Manufacturing Co.

by William J. Bruns Jr.

A small manufacturing company plans and budgets sales and expenses to ensure that its strategy is feasible. It must trace costs of manufacturing through work-in-process to finished goods and cost of goods sold, and project cash flows and income.

Nike Football: World Cup 2010 South Africa

by Ryan Johnson Elie Ofek

Nike's Football division needs to devise a strategy to excel at the 2010 World Cup games in South Africa. Nike has gone from a niche player in the market for football apparel and footwear in 1994 to a formidable competitor to Adidas in 2008 (with revenues of over $1 billion for the sport). The case traces how Nike has gone about making this transformation and its activities at each of the World Cups since 1994. For the upcoming World Cup in South Africa, Nike has decided to change its target market focus and to use digital and social media platforms to connect more extensively with consumers. In addition, Nike plans to launch innovative new boots and engage in corporate responsibility and sustainability initiatives. The company has to do so in light of competition from archrival Adidas and the pressure of succeeding on the biggest stage in football, with billions of people around the world watching. The case allows students to analyze how a company can best integrate several value propositions into a cohesive plan and how it can best communicate with its chosen target market. It also allows for a rich discussion of the brand image the company needs to portray to leverage success beyond the World Cup event.

Montefiore Medical Center

by Robert S. Kaplan Noorein Inamdar

A large urban medical center implements the Balanced Scorecard management tool. Elaine Brennan, senior VP of operations, has reorganized a highly functional health care organization into decentralized patient care centers and support units. Having recently endured the pain of a major downsizing, she wants the various constituents--senior managers, physicians, nurses, technicians, and the work force--to explore implementing a new strategy focused on growth and patient care. But the existing measurement and management system reports only on costs and financial results. She introduces the Balanced Scorecard as a mechanism to increase attention to and accountability for quality, service, work environment, and employee outcomes, as well as revenues and costs.

The National Football League and Brain Injuries

by Matthew Preble Richard G. Hamermesh

The National Football League (NFL) was both the most popular spectator sport in the U.S. and a major economic entity, taking in roughly $10 billion a year in revenue. However through the early twenty-first century, an increased understanding of the long-term effects of head injuries on NFL players indicated a serious threat to the long-term viability of the game. Particularly concerning was the indication that some deceased professional football players had developed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)-a neurodegenerative disease which had a strong influence on a person's mental and physical health-most likely as a result of repetitive hits sustained during their football careers and which may have contributed to their deaths. Over 4,000 retired players had jointly sued the NFL over the head injuries they had sustained during their time in the NFL and the resulting health problems they attributed to these injuries. In part, the lawsuit alleged that the NFL had not been forthcoming with players about the health risks of head injuries. The two sides had reached a tentative $765 million settlement in 2013, the bulk of which would go to compensating retired players suffering from such diseases as Alzheimer's or dementia. While this settlement compensated retired players, it was not applicable to current or future players. Could the NFL preserve the sport by making it safer through new rules or equipment changes, or was football an inherently physical game that no amount of new rules or equipment could make completely safe? Were current and future players, now knowing full well the potential long-term health implications of football, tacitly accepting the risks involved? As a team owner, is now the time to sell while franchise value and fan support are at their peaks, or will the business of the NFL be viable for years to come?

MBA In Jeopardy (A)

by Lynn Sharp Paine

The Community Standards Panel of Harvard Business School must determine whether two students have violated the school's community standards, and if so, what sanction would be appropriate. Concerns allegations of plagiarism. In a second-year elective course, two students submitted a joint paper, substantial portions of which were taken nearly verbatim from their sources. The material was not footnoted. However, the sources were listed in the bibliography provided at the end of the paper. The students, who are not from the United States, claim that they followed the citation practices customary in their home country.

Metreke Cards

by Steven C. Wheelwright

Used to introduce the assembly line process to first-year MBA students. Three different variations of an assembly line process for packing greeting cards are presented for analysis. To choose among the three, the students must address issues of time standards, capacity, supervision and training. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

Nike (E)

by Michael J. Roberts David C. Rikert C. Roland Christensen

Provides the background for a discussion of Nike (E1), (E2), and (E3). Outlines Nike's senior management group's early program to deal with the company's increasingly difficult competitive circumstance.

Method for Valuing High-Risk, Long-Term Investments: The "Venture Capital Method"

by William A. Sahlman Daniel R. Scherlis

Describes a method for valuing high-risk, long-term investments such as those confronting venture capitalists. The method entails forecasting a future value (e.g., five years from the present) and discounting that terminal value back to the present by applying a high discount rate (e.g., 50%). Provides an explanation of this method, including a detailed discussion of the determinants of the key factors ranging from the discount rate to the terminal value. The pedagogic objective is to make students aware of the issues involved in valuing such "futures" investments. A model is provided that further elucidates the determinants of value.

Maytag in 1984

by David J. Collis Nancy Donohue

Highlights Maytag's unique position in the industry in 1984. Maytag, a much smaller player than its competitors has prior to 1984 been successful in producing high quality merchandise and charging a premium for it. By 1984 Maytag is also attempting expansion. Traditionally a producer of laundry equipment, Maytag has made two key acquisitions--expanding its product line to include kitchen appliances. Reviews this situation an also discusses its two closest competitors, GE and Whirlpool. Provides a follow-up to Major Home Appliance Industry in 1984 (Revised) and its Supplement, Major Home Appliance Industry in 1988.

National Economic Accounting: Past, Present, and Future

by David A. Moss Sarah Brennan

Presents the fundamentals of GDP accounting (including definitions, etc.), examines the history of national accounting, and surveys the international debate over "Green GDP." The first section explains the basic rules and definitions of national economic accounting and the meaning of GDP versus NDP. The second section provides historical context for the development of national income estimates, 1886 to 1940, culminating in the creation of GNP by the U.S. Department of Commerce in the 1940s. The third and final section discusses the standard imputations currently made to reflect nonprice economic activity (e.g., for owner-occupied housing and government services) and explores the debate over imputations for natural resources and environmental quality.

Nike (C)

by David C. Rikert C. Roland Christensen

Explores the president of Nike's leadership, and focuses on his general management style, his personal philosophy, and his pattern of working with key members of management.

Metalcraft Supplier Scorecard

by V. G. Narayanan Susan Kulp Ronald L. Verkleeren

An automotive components company uses a supplier scorecard to make sourcing decisions and review its supplier performance.

Nike (B)

by David C. Rikert C. Roland Christensen

Describes Nike's corporate culture and looks closely at individual key senior and middle managers, outlining the processes by which the management group conducts its business and noting the values which bind the management group together. The teaching objective is to help the student understand how Nike "works" given current circumstances and to predict what problems and opportunities may develop as Nike grows.

Nike (A) (Condensed)

by David B. Yoffie

Describes the history of Nike, its strategy, and the industry in which it competes. The teaching objective is to ask the student to identify and evaluate Nike's economic/technical strategy.

Mayo Clinic: The 2020 Initiative

by Robert S. Huckman Regina E. Herzlinger Jenny Lesser

Describes the challenges facing Dr. John Noseworthy, President and CEO, in implementing a long-term strategy for the growth of the Mayo Clinic-a leading academic medical center with a reputation for excellence in tertiary and quaternary health care. The case highlights the concurrent forces of regional and national competition and federal health care reform as factors complicating the plans of Mayo Clinic to grow through several channels. Students must ultimately decide whether Mayo Clinic should focus its future growth on its current areas of expertise (regional provision of integrated medical care and international provision of tertiary and quaternary care), new opportunities in a broader range of services and treatment channels (e.g., telemedicine, mobile health, enterprise learning and training for other health care systems), or some combination of these opportunities.

Metadata Processes: What They Are and How to Use Them

by Thomas C. Redman

Metadata processes are those processes through which data about data are developed and kept current. This appendix provides an overview of three metadata processes: data cataloging, data modeling, and data standards.

Monte-Carlo Weddings

by Anat Keinan Sandrine Crener

Monte-Carlo Weddings, established by Frank Damgaard in 2005, is the most respectable and exclusive wedding planning business in the South of France. Frank has organized the largest, most expensive and luxurious weddings in Europe, serving celebrities, CEOs, and other high-net-worth individuals from around the world. After 10 years in operation, constantly innovating and pushing the bar higher, Frank is wondering what is next for him and his company. Could he further elevate a wedding experience and exceed his demanding clients' expectations? Is it possible or even desirable to grow his high-touch, fully customized service provider business? How can he leverage his brand, reputation, and success in the French Riviera to build a larger business and stronger brand? What should he do next? Is he ready for another change?

Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting for a New Weight-Loss Drug

by John A. Quelch Heather Beckham

Metabical is a new weight loss drug from Cambridge Sciences Pharmaceuticals intended for moderately overweight individuals. In anticipation of final FDA approval, the senior director of marketing, Barbara Printup, prepares for the product launch and must make several critical decisions. First, she must select the optimal packaging size for the drug which typically requires a 12-week course of treatment. Next, she must determine the appropriate pricing. Since most insurance companies do not cover weight-loss medications, price has a direct impact on the sales forecast. To establish the initial demand forecast, Printup considers three approaches based on different assumptions. Her final recommendations must consider long term profitability and meet the company's desired return on investment.The case includes a quantitative assignment for students.

Showing 9,376 through 9,400 of 15,742 results

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