Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 9,376 through 9,400 of 9,656 results

The praier and complaynte of the ploweman unto Christe

by Douglas H. Parker

Sixteenth-century English Protestant reformers were hard-pressed to establish a historical pedigree that would provide their ideas with weight and legitimacy. Many of those reformers turned back to early fifteenth-century Lollard texts, recycling and reprinting them to serve the needs, both political and spiritual, of the burgeoning English Protestant reform movement. The anti-clerical and reformist Lollard text, The praier and complaynte of the ploweman vnto Christe, was one of the works used by sixteenth century English Protestants in their struggle for religious reform. This is an old-spelling, critical edition of the version of The praier and complaynte of the ploweman vnto Christe that resurfaced in the 1530s. Demonstrating the continuity of ideas between the Lollards and the Reformists, Douglas Parker situates The praier and complaynte firmly in the tradition of English Reformist borrowing of texts, and argues for William Tyndale as editor of the sixteenth-century version of The praier and complaynte. Parker examines the two extant copies of the manuscript, and comments on the work's structure and reformist content. He presents full historical, literary, and biographical information in his introduction, and a full line-by-line commentary on the text.This careful, meticulous work is a revealing look at the ideology of Protestant religious struggles in England from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century.

Hopkins Self and God

by Walter J. Ong

In these studies Professor Ong explores some previously unexamined reasons for Hopkins' uniqueness, including unsuspected connections between nineteenth-century sensibility and certain substructures of Christian belief.General Manley Hopkins was not alone among Victorians in his attention to the human self and to the particularities of things in the world around him, where he savoured the 'selving or 'inscape' of each individual existent. But the intensity of his interest in the self, as a focus of exuberant joy as well as sometimes of anguish, both in his poetry and his prose, marks him out as unique even among his contemporaries. In these studies Professor Ong explores some previously unexamined reasons for Hopkins' uniqueness, including unsuspected connections between nineteenth-century sensibility and certain substructures of Christian belief.Hopkins was less interested in self-discovery or self-concept than in what might be called the confrontational or obtrusive self - the 'I,' ultimately nameless, that each person wakes up to in the morning to find simply there, directly or indirectly present in every moment of consciousness. Hopkins' concern with the self grew out of a nineteenth-century sensibility which was to give birth to modernity and postmodernity, and which in his case as a Jesuit was especially nourished by the Spiritual Exercises of St Ignatius Loyola, concerned at root with the self, free choice, and free self-giving. It was also nourished by the Christian belief in the Three Persons in One God, central to Hopkins' theology courses and personal speculation, and very notable in the Special Exercises. Hopkins appropriated and intensified his Christian beliefs with new nineteenth-century awareness: he writes of the 'selving' in God of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Hopkins' pastoral work, particularly in the confessional, dealing directly with other selves in terms of their free decisions, also gave further force to his preoccupation with the self and freedom. 'What I do,' he writes, 'is me.'Besides being concerned with the self, the most particular of particulars and the paradigm of all sense of 'presence,' the Spiritual Exercises in many ways attend to other particularities with an insistence that has drawn lengthy and rather impassioned commentary from the postmodern literary theorist Roland Barthes.Hopkins' distinctive and often precocious attention to the self and freedom puts him theologically far ahead of many of his fellow Catholics and other fellow Victorians, and gives him his permanent relevance to the modern and postmodern world.

Workplace Democracy

by Donald V. Nightingale

This book begins with a historical review of how authority in the Canadian workplace has changed over the past century. It proceeds to outline a theory of organization which provides a broad conceptual framework for the empirical analysis which follows. This theory is based on five concepts: the values of organizational members; the administrative structure of the organization; the interpersonal and intergroup processes; the reactions and adjustments of organization members; the social, political, economic, and cultural environments of the organization.A sample of 20 industrial organizations was selected to examine the effects of significant employee participation and to test the theory. They are matched pairs: ten permit some form of participation, and ten--similar in size, location, industry, union/non-union status, and work technology--follow conventional hierarchical design.The resulting data demonstrate that greater productivity results from employee participation in decisions relating to their work, in productivity bonuses, and in profit sharing and employee share-ownership plans.

By Great Waters

by Patrick O'Flaherty

p>This anthology offers readers a selection of Newfoundland writing which will illuminate the unfolding of the province's history and culture and at the same time command respect as literature. It is comprised of 65 selections from literary and historical sources, which range in time from an extract from the Vinland sagas to a poem written in 1968 by a Newfoundlander. The selections are arranged in four parts: Discovery and Exploration; Transatlantic Outpost; Colonial Era; Breakers Ahead (contemporary). Each selection is prefaced by a brief introduction.

Manliness and Militarism

by Mark Moss

Euphoria swept Canada, and especially Ontario, with the outbreak of World War I. Young men rushed to volunteer for the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and close to 50 per cent of the half-million Canadian volunteers came from the province of Ontario. Why were people excited by the prospect of war? What popular attitudes about war had become ingrained in the society? And how had such values become so deeply rooted in a generation of young men that they would be eager to join this 'great adventure'?Historian Mark Moss seeks to answer these questions in Manliness and Militarism: Educating Young Boys in Ontario for War. By examining the cult of manliness as it developed in Victorian and Edwardian Ontario, Moss reveals a number of factors that made young men eager to prove their mettle on the battlefields of Europe. Popular juvenile literature ? the books of Henty, Haggard, and Kipling, for example, and numerous magazines for boys, such as the Boy's Own Paper and Chums ? glorified the military conquests of the British Empire, the bravery of military men, especially Englishmen, and the values of courage and unquestioning patriotism. Those same values were taught in the schools, on the playing fields, in cadet military drill, in the wilderness and Boy Scout movements, and even through the toys and games of young children.The lessons were taught, and learned, well. As Moss concludes: 'Even after the horrors became known, the conflict ended, and the survivors came home, manliness and militarism remained central elements of English-speaking Ontario's culture. For those too young to have served, the idea of the Great War became steeped in adventure, and many dreamed of another chance to serve. For some, the dream would become a reality.'

The Law Society of Upper Canada and Ontario's Lawyers, 1797-1997

by Christopher Moore

At the end of the eighteenth century, when ten lawyers gathered in what is now Niagara-on-the-Lake to form the Law Society of Upper Canada, they were creating something new in the world: a professional organization with statutory authority to control its membership and govern its own affairs. Today's Law Society of Upper Canada, with more than 25,000 members, still wields these powers. Marking the bicentennial of the society's foundation, Christopher Moore's history begins by exploring the unprecedented step taken in 1797 and follows the evolution of lawyers' work and the idea of professional autonomy through two hundred years of growth and change.The Law Society of Upper Canada and Ontario's Lawyers is a broad-ranging story of the growth and development of the Law Society and the legal profession, from the days when horseback barristers travelled the backwoods by horseback, through the reforms of the late nineteenth century to the period of reaction between the two world wars and the long struggle of women and minorities for access to and equity in the legal profession. Writing in a style that is scholarly as well as entertaining, Moore traces to the present a story rich in personalities, and shows how, after a period of tremendous growth and change, questions of governance, legal aid, and practice insurance triggered a series of crises that rocked the society to its foundations.This is the first study to be based on full access to the society's two hundred years of historical records. Moore, who has organized his research into themes and periods to illuminate the story, also includes new material on the lives and careers of Ontario lawyers and on the place of the Law Society in professional and public life. Readable and extensively illustrated, The Law Society of Upper Canada and Ontario's Lawyers shows that such issues as professional autonomy and the internal organization, at the forefront of debate at the society's inception, continue to dominiate discussions today.

Social Working

by Gerald A.J. Montigny

In this unique work directed at social workers, Gerald A.J. de Montigny maintains that they, along with other professionals, create an `institutional' reality through their day-to-day practices. He traces the practical ways that social workers, when involved in child protection, struggle to produce a world which can be ordered, systematized, and subjected to their powers. It is a penetrating and sensitive analysis of how social workers in their everyday practice make sense from a confusing collection of case details to create organizationally defined problems and cases. De Montigny uses the tension between his experience of growing up 'working class' and the difficult process of becoming a social worker to explore the practical activities professionals use to secure organizational power and authority over clients. This tension has forced him to confront the dilemma of how to stand on the side of clients when standing inside professional and organizational realities.In the first half of the book, de Montigny focuses on the practices social workers use to produce a universalized professional form of knowledge. He examines social workers' use of ideological practices; fetishization of the social work profession; insertion of details from clients' lives into discursive order; accounting for front-line practice as a problem solving scientific practice; and naming of their own frustrations, conflicts, tensions, and pain as professionally manageable phenomena. In the second half of the book, based on his own work in child protection, he systematically examines how such reality-producing practices come to be expressed as child protection. He develops a synthetic account of his social work interventions on cases of child abuse and neglect. This book should be read by all practitioners and students of social work. It is an original and practical application of theoretical arguments to the everyday reality of social work.

Fool For Christ

by Allen Mills

James Shaver Woodsworth (1874-1942) stands as one of the half-dozen most important national political figures in twentieth-century Canadian history. Allen Mills acknowledges his outstanding achievements while providing a critical account of the Woodsworth legacy and revising the received opinion of him as a man of unbending conviction and ever-coherent principle.A product of western Canada's pioneer society and a stern Methodist household, Woodsworth grew up to make his way into social service and politcal action. A member of parliament for over twenty years, he rejected the traditional forms of political activity, seeking a new politics and a new political party. The latter turned out to be the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation founded in 1932. Its first leader was Woodsworth himself.In a crucial period between the World Wars, Woodsworth helped define the character of the modern Canadian, non-Marxist Left and of many of Canada's important economic and social institutions. Among them are the welfare state, the Bank of Canada, and Canada's internationalist role in the contemporary world. Disclaimer: Quotes by T.S. Eliot, F.R. Scott, and Louis MacNeice removed at the request of the rights holder.

Refire! Don't Retire

by Ken Blanchard Morton Shaevitz

Refire! Don't Retire asks readers the all-important question: As you approach the remainder of your life, what are you going to do to make it joyful and meaningful? Ken Blanchard and Morton Shaevitz point out that too many people see their later years as a time to endure rather than as an exciting opportunity. Both research and common sense confirm that people who embrace these years with gusto--rather than withdrawing or waiting for things to happen--consistently make the rest of their lives the best of their lives. In the trademark Ken Blanchard style, the authors tell the compelling story of Larry and Janice Sparks, who discover how to see each day as an opportunity to enhance their relationships, stimulate their minds, revitalize their bodies, and grow spiritually. As they learn to refire and open up to new experiences, Larry and Janice rekindle passion in every area of their lives. Readers will find humor, practical information, and profound wisdom in Refire! Don't Retire. Best of all, they will be inspired to make all the years ahead truly worth living.

The Orbital Perspective

by Muhammad Yunus Astronaut Ron Garan

For astronaut Ron Garan, living on the International Space Station was a powerful, transformative experience--one that he believes holds the key to solving our problems here on Earth. On space walks and through windows, Garan was struck by the stunning beauty of the Earth from space but sobered by knowing how much needed to be done to help this troubled planet. And yet on the International Space Station, Garan, a former fighter pilot, was working work side by side with Russians, who only a few years before were "the enemy." If fifteen nationalities could collaborate on one of the most ambitious, technologically complicated undertakings in history, surely we can apply that kind of cooperation and innovation toward creating a better world. That spirit is what Garan calls the "orbital perspective."Garan vividly conveys what it was like learning to work with a diverse group of people in an environment only a handful of human beings have ever known. But more importantly, he describes how he and others are working to apply the orbital perspective here at home, embracing new partnerships and processes to promote peace and combat hunger, thirst, poverty, and environmental destruction. This book is a call to action for each of us to care for the most important space station of all: planet Earth. You don't need to be an astronaut to have the orbital perspective. Garan's message of elevated empathy is an inspiration to all who seek a better world.

Change the Story, Change the Future

by David C. Korten

We humans live by stories, says David Korten, and the stories that now govern our society set us on a path to certain self-destruction. In this profound new book, Korten shares the results of his search for a story that reflects the fullness of human knowledge and understanding and provides a guide to action adequate to the needs of our time. Korten calls our current story Sacred Money and Markets. Money, it tells us, is the measure of all worth and the source of all happiness. Earth is simply a source of raw materials. Inequality and environmental destruction are unfortunate but unavoidable. Although many recognize that this story promotes bad ethics, bad science, and bad economics, it will remain our guiding story until replaced by one that aligns with our deepest understanding of the universe and our relationship to it. To guide our path to a viable human future, Korten offers a Sacred Life and Living Earth story grounded in a cosmology that affirms we are living beings born of a living Earth itself born of a living universe. Our health and well-being depend on an economy that works in partnership with the processes by which Earth's community of life maintains the conditions of its own existence--and ours. Offering a hopeful vision, Korten lays out the transformative impact adopting this story will have on every aspect of human life and society.

Reflections on Native-Newcomer Relations

by J. R. Miller

The twelve essays that make up Reflections on Native-Newcomer Relations illustrate the development in thought by one of Canada's leading scholars in the field of Native history - J.R. Miller. The collection, comprising pieces that were written over a period spanning nearly two decades, deals with the evolution of historical writing on First Nations and Métis, methodological issues in the writing of Native-newcomer history, policy matters including residential schools, and linkages between the study of Native-newcomer relations and academic governance and curricular matters. Half of the essays appear here in print for the first time, and all use archival, published, and oral history evidence to throw light on Native-Newcomer relations.Miller argues that the nature of the relationship between Native peoples and newcomers in Canada has varied over time, based on the reasons the two parties have had for interacting. The relationship deteriorates into attempts to control and coerce Natives during periods in which newcomers do not perceive them as directly useful, and it improves when the two parties have positive reasons for cooperation. Reflections on Native-Newcomer Relations opens up for discussion a series of issues in Native-newcomer history. It addresses all the trends in the discipline of the past two decades and never shies from showing their contradictions, as well as those in the author's own thinking as he matured as a scholar.

An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy

by Alan Ryan John Stuart Mill John Robson

Appearing just before his successful parliamentary candidature, the Examination, with its deliberate and explicit onslaught on the intuitionists who were, in Mill's view, allied with anti-progressive political and religious forces, brought his beliefs into the public arena in a new way. Some of those who supported him politically found themselves viciously attacked because they had associated themselves with one who assailed settled religious beliefs. Other religionists who rejected many of Mill's attitudes strong expressed their admiration of the Examination because of its exposure to what they, with him, saw as dangerous theological and moral positions.Alan Ryan's analytical and historial introduction dwells on the most significant philosophical elements in the work, placing them in perspective and showing their relations to other aspects of Mill's thought. The textual introduction, by John M. Robson, examines the treatise in context of Mill's life in the 1860s, outlines its composition, and discusses, among other matters, the importance of the extensive revisions Mill made, mostly in response to critics. These revisions appear in full in the textual apparatus. Also provided are a bibliographical index, which gives a guide to the literature on the subject, and a collation of Mill's quotations, an analytical index, and appendices giving the reading of manuscript fragments and listing textual emendations.

Miscellaneous Writings

by John Stuart Mill John Robson

The interests and activities of John Stuart Mill (1806-73) were so wide-ranging that even the varied subjects of thirty previously published volumes of Collected Works cannot encompass them all. In this volume are brought together diverse and interesting instances of his polymathic career, none before republished and some previously unpublished.Neatly framing Mill's writing career are his editorial prefaces and extensive notes to Jeremy Bentham;s Rationale of Judicial Evidence (1827) and James Mill's Analysis of the Phenomena of the Human Mind (1869). Both demonstrate his extraordinary powers of mind and diligence as well as his fealty. His constant avocation, field botany, is shown in his botanical writings, which open a window on an almost unknown activity that sustained and delighted him. Brief comments on two medical works hint at another interest. Two articles of which he was co-author demonstrate his work as editor of the London and Westminster Review, and a calendar of his contributions to the Political Economy Club provides yet another glimpse into his chosen activities and concerns. Published for the first time are Mill's English and French wills, providing still further biographical detail.

Inroads

by Murray Miles

This unique introduction to philosophy is designed as a companion volume to a number of classic philosophical texts widely used in first- and upper-year philosophy courses. While remaining clear and readable, Inroads provides detailed analyses of fundamental issues in metaphysics and morals: the existence of God, the meaning of death, and the elements and definitions of the 'good life' for humankind.Combining a historical with a systematic approach, Murray Miles's work straddles the customary divisions between ancient and modern, and Anglo-American and continental European philosophy. In each of its five main parts - in turn, focusing on Socrates, Plato, Descartes, Hume, and Sartre - Inroads discusses, from a philosophical rather than a religious or scientific perspective, those questions that make up the common inheritance of academic philosophy and ethico-religious thought. Other features include a detailed glossary of philosophical terms, suggestions for further reading, and questions for reflection and review. Inroads is a useful text for first-year undergraduate courses or, equally, a sound resource for the general reader looking for a good grounding in philosophy and its history.

Our Own Master Race

by Angus Mclaren

Was Canada immune to the racist currents of thought that swept central Europe in the 1920's and 1930's? In this landmark book Angus McLaren, co-author of The Bedroom and the State, examines the pervasiveness in Canada of the eugenic notion of "race betterment" and demonstrates that many Canadians believed that radical measures were justified to protect the community from the "degenerate." The sterilization of the feeble-minded in Alberta and British Columbia was merely the most dramatic attempt to limit the numbers of the "unfit." But in the decades prior to World War Two, eugenic preoccupations were to colour discussions of immigration restriction, birth control, mental testing, family allowances, and a host of similar social policies. Doctors, psychiatrists, geneticists, social workers, and mental hygienists provided an anxious Canadian middle class with the reassuring argument that poverty, crime, prostitution, and mental retardation were primarily the products of defective genes, not a defective social system. In explaining why biological solutions were sought for social problems McLaren not only provides a provocative reappraisal of the ideas and activities of a generation of feminists, political progressives, and public health propagandists but he also explores some of the roots of our not-so-latent racist tendencies.

Contours of Canadian Thought

by A. B. Mckillop

The leaps of knowledge in nineteenth-century science shook the foundations of religious and humanistic values throughout much of the world. The Darwinian Revolution and similar developments presented enormous philosophical challenges to Canadian scientists, philosophers, and men of letters. Their responses, many and varied, form a central theme in this collection of essays by one of Canada's leading intellectual historians.McKillop explores the thought of a number of English-Canadian thinkers from the 1860s to the 1920s, decades that saw Canada's entry into the modern age. We meet Daniel Wilson, an educator and ethnologist for whom the pursuit of science was a form of poetic engagement, requiring the poet's sensibilities; John Watson, one of the world's leading exponents of objective idealism, whose philosophical premises helped to undermine the very religious tradition he sought to bolster; and William Dawson LeSueur, an apostle of Positivism, whose spirited defence of critical inquiry and evolutionary social ethics led him towards an entirely contradictory position.In addition to profiles of individuals, McKillop considers the ways in which their ideas operated in the context of Canadian institutions including the universities and the press. From these prospectives emerges a detailed analysis of the life of the mind of English Canada in an age of questioning, of doubt, and of struggle to reorient the intellectual and philosophical positions of a quickly changing society.

A True Novel

by Juliet Winters Carpenter Minae Mizumura

A remaking of Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights set in postwar Japan A True Novel begins in New York in the 1960s, where we meet Taro, a relentlessly ambitious Japanese immigrant trying to make his fortune. Flashbacks and multilayered stories reveal his life: an impoverished upbringing as an orphan, his eventual rise to wealth and success--despite racial and class prejudice--and an obsession with a girl from an affluent family that has haunted him all his life. A True Novel then widens into an examination of Japan's westernization and the emergence of a middle class. The winner of Japan's prestigious Yomiuri Literature Prize, Mizumura has written a beautiful novel, with love at its core, that reveals, above all, the power of storytelling.

No Idle Hands

by Anne Macdonald

Examines the history of the nation from the perspective of women and knitting, tracing the changes in day-to-day life and in women's roles in society from colonial times to the present.

Introduction To Social Work And Social Welfare

by Charles Zastrow

The bestselling introductory Social Work book on the market, Zastrow's INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE: EMPOWERING PEOPLE, 11th Edition, is also lauded for being the most comprehensive. In addition to giving readers a thorough overview of the social work profession, this text offers a realistic view of social problems in contemporary society, equipping students with real-world insight that they can apply in practice. By presenting positive strategies in the context of the core values, ethics, skills, and knowledge base of today's professional social worker, Zastrow encourages readers to think critically about new, workable methods for problem-solving and empowering clients. Contemporary social problems case studies, exhibits, and tables help users apply concepts and compare and contrast issues. The Eleventh Edition has been thoroughly updated to include the latest NASW Standards, as well as new and emerging issues from the field. Packed with cutting-edge coverage and comprehensive CSWE core content, INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK AND SOCIAL WELFARE: EMPOWERING PEOPLE, 11th Edition, continues to inspire readers while giving them insight into real-world practice.

Fairness in Taxation

by Allan M. Maslove

The papers in this volume explore the idea of distributive justice and fairness in taxation. The collection begins with Head's excellent presentation and analysis of equity in the public finance literature. The other authors, starting from this point, critique and amplify the concept from various philosophical perspectives and academic disciplines.

Encyclopedia of Canada's Peoples

by Paul Robert Magocsi

All peoples living in Canada deserve to have a voice in its history. How and why did each people come to Canada? Where did the immigrants and their descendants settle? What kind of lives did they build for themselves and how did they contribute to the country as a whole? These are the kinds of questions addressed in the Encyclopedia of Canada's Peoples. Whether a First Nation, founding people, or subsequent arrival, all Canada's peoples are described in 119 individual entries that range from Acadians to Ukrainians, Hyderabadis to Vietnamese. In each instance an entry covers the origin of the group, the process of migration, arrival and settlement, economic and community life, family and kinship patterns, language and culture, education, religion, politics, intergroup relations, and the dynamics of group maintenance. Entries are cross-referenced and include tables, graphs, and suggestions for further reading. Several thematic essays are also included to illuminate the complex issues related to immigration, assimilation, multiculturalism, and Canadian culture and identity. This is a truly national encyclopedia that has taken almost a decade to produce and has involved over 300 scholars and researchers from all parts of Canada and abroad. Exacting standards for research, content, and the readability of entries have been strictly maintained by an advisory board of senior academics from a wide range of disciplines.The Encyclopedia of Canada's Peoples is designed to excite all Canadians about their extraordinary past and the potential of their future. This volume will reward both casual browsing and serious reading by everyone from school-age students to university academics.

Revitalizing Liberal Values in a Globali

by Ruud Lubbers

The longest serving Dutch Prime Minister (1982-94), Professor Lubbers is known for his support of liberal values, social equity, human rights, democratic governments, and spirituality. In this book he explores ways to conciliate these values with global economization.Dr. Lubbers argues that the global economy created by new information technologies has led to a competitive world atmosphere that works against social equity, local movements, and national interests. In this context he urges that steps be taken to ensure that the new era evolves in the interests of justice, peace, and fairness. Such steps may include combining the governance of nation states; providing development assistance; supporting initiatives in legislation and jurisprudence, such as an international criminal court, and initiating a global dialogue on values. For Dr. Lubbers, liberal values mean a "just, sustainable, and participatory society."This volume presents the third in a series of lectures that offer reflections by well-known figures on topical, liberal-oriented themes. This particular lecture has the distinction of never having been delivered, since Toronto was in the midst of a crippling snowstorm on the afternoon of 14 January 1999, when Lubbers was scheduled to speak at Victoria University. The two earlier volumes in the series present lectures by John Kenneth Galbraith and Michael Ignatieff.

Foregrounded Description in Prose Fictio

by J. M. Lopes

In this wide-ranging study, José Manuel Lopes proposes a theoretical framework for analysing the role of description in prose fiction. He offers readings of texts drawn from four national literatures--French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Brazilian--testing his model across a cultural and temporal spectrum. This critical breadth also illustrates the significance of description in disparate contexts: the postmodern novel, which implicitly challenges conventional notions of foreground and background, as well as the naturalist and realist fiction of the nineteenth century.Lopes applies his model to detailed readings of Emile Zola's Une Page d'amour, Claude Simon's Histoire, Benito Pérez Galdós' La de Bringas, Cornélio Penna's A Menina Morta, and Carlos de Oliveira's Finisterra. In addition to exploring the interplay of description and narration, these readings pay particular attention to spatial descriptions, and analyse the diverse roles of description in different contexts. After subjecting each fictional text to a detailed analysis which seeks to bring out the crucial aspects that contribute towards the foregrounding of descriptive passages (e.g., mise en abyme, parody, modes of representation), and which establishes, on occasion, certain relations that literary description may entertain with the other arts, he attempts to isolate the primary functions of foregrounding descriptions. What he seeks to demonstrate is that description constitutes a major textual component necessary for the analysis and understanding of both nineteenth- and twentieth-century fictional texts.

A Second Collection

by Bernard Lonergan William F.J. Ryan Bernard J. Tyrrell

This collection of essays, addresses, and one interview come from the years 1966-73, a period during most of which Bernard Lonergan was at work completing his Method in Theology. The eighteen chapters cover a wide spectrum of interest, dealing with such general topics as 'The Absence of God in Modern Culture' and 'The Future of Christianity,' narrowing down through items such as 'Belief: Today's Issue' and more specialized theological and philosophical studies, to one on his own community in the church ('The Response of the Jesuit ...') and the illuminating comment on his great work Insight ('Insight Revisited').This book is a reprint of the first edition published in 1974, edited by William F.J. Ryan and Bernard J. Tyrrell of Gonzaga University, Spokane. The editors contribute an important introduction in which they emphasize that Lonergan's central concern is intentionality analysis, and that two major themes run through the papers: first, the clear emergence of the primacy of the fourth level of human consciousness, the existential level, the level of evaluation and love; secondly, the significance of historical consciousness. These papers, then, besides the unity they possess by appearing within the same seven year period, share a specific unity of theme.Bernard Lonergan (1904-1984), a professor of theology, taught at Regis College, Harvard University, and Boston College. An established author known for his Insight and Method in Theology, Lonergan received numerous honorary doctorates, was a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1971 and was named as an original members of the International Theological Commission by Pope Paul VI.

Showing 9,376 through 9,400 of 9,656 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.