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Survival Korean: How to Communicate without Fuss or Fear Instantly! (A Korean Language Phrasebook)

by Boye Lafayette De Mente Akiko Saito Woojoo Kim

"The travel vocabulary was especially helpful. Some of the smaller towns we explored did not have a lot of English speakers and so we had to rely on my Korean skills to navigate the buses, trains, and taxis. And these books are small so they fit easily into a purse or backpack without weighing you down." -- These Temporary Tents blog

Tuttle Compact Vietnamese Dictionary: Vietnamese-English English-Vietnamese

by Phan Van Giuong

This is a compact and user-friendly Vietnamese dictionary.The Tuttle Compact Vietnamese Dictionary is the most up-to-date and complete Vietnamese dictionary yet published. An essential tool to learn Vietnamese, it is written for English speakers and other non-native users who need to look up Vietnamese terms, and can also be used by Vietnamese speakers who are learning English. This dictionary has 25,000 entries covering all contemporary terms likely to be used in educational or business settings. The layout is user-friendly and attractive. Headwords are displayed in blue-this helps the reader to locate words quickly. Information on parts of speech, idiomatic expressions and sample sentences showing the us of the words in context are given for each entry. English pronunciations are given in the English to Vietnamese language section. A comprehensive pronunciation guide and detailed notes on Japanese grammar are also included. Completely comprehensive and up-to-date with over 25,000 entries.Contains English-Vietnamese and Vietnamese-English Clear, user-friendly layout with idioms, and sample sentences given. The ideal dictionary for students, teachers and business people.

The Czech Renascence of the Nineteenth Century

by Peter Brock H. Gordon Skilling

Literature and historical writing among the Czechs, as among many other nations lacking a political state, played a vital role in promoting national consciousness. This volume, written to honour the seventieth birthday of the eminent Czech historian Otakar Odložík, contains essays by outstanding scholars from Canada, Czechoslovakia, Britain, and the United States which examine significant episodes in the development of modern Czech nationalism from its origins in the late eighteenth century to the birth of an independent nation after the First World War. The main emphasis is on the middle decades of the nineteenth century, which were crucial for mapping the direction Czech nationalism was to take during the subsequent hundred years. The stand of the Czech and Slovak peoples in the crisis of August 1968 reflected the deep roots of their patriotism which developed during the nineteenth-century national renascence. This volume contains essays on Dobrovský, the pioneer of Czech language studies, and on Palacký, the author of the first great national history, as well as on other facets of literary history which have influenced national feeling. A Prague scholar investigates the social structure of the early Czech patriotic intelligentsia and reaches conclusions which considerably modify hitherto existing views. Two contributions examine the role of the press in the emergence of Czech nationalism; the Matice Ceskà, a leading patriotic literary foundation, is the subject of one of the studies. Slovak and Lusatian Serb, German, and American reaction to the Czech national renascence is examined in a series of chapters. The political expression of Czech nationalism, first during the Year of Revolutions, 1848, and then from the late 1870s until the early years of the twentieth century, is subjected to analysis in several studies. Finally, there is a brief review of the problems associated with the Czech-Slovak background of Tomáš Masaryk, the creator of modern Czechoslovakia. A fitting tribute to an outstanding scholar, this volume makes an important contribution to the literature in English on nineteenth-century Czech lands.

Twelve Years a Slave

by Dean King Solomon Northup Vera J. Williams

The incredible true story of the kidnapping, enslavement, and rescue of Solomon Northup in the era before the Civil War-now a major motion picture!In 1841, Solomon Northup was a free man living in Saratoga Springs, New York, making a living as a violinist and spending his spare time with his wife and three young children. Lured to Washington, DC, with the promise of a generous sum of money, Northup finds himself drugged, beaten, and sold before he can even begin to comprehend the tragic turn his life has taken. Twelve torturous years of slavery follow, with Northup passed from owner to owner, plantation to plantation, until his eventual rescue in 1853. Following his return to New York, Northup wrote and published this extraordinary book, one of the few accounts of American slavery written from the perspective of a man who had been free before being enslaved.Lost for nearly a century, Twelve Years a Slave offers unprecedented details of the slave markets of Washington, DC, and describes the excruciating life on Southern cotton plantations. In its time, Twelve Years a Slave was a bestseller and ignited a national dialogue on slavery in the years leading up to the Civil War. Northup's unsparing portrayal of the life of a slave captured minds and eventually divided a nation.

Frederick Law Olmsted: Writings on Landscape, Culture, and Society

by Frederick Law Olmsted Charles Beveridge

The biggest and best single-volume collection ever published of the fascinating and wide-ranging writings of a vitally important nineteenth century cultural figure whose work continues to shape our world today. Seaman, farmer, abolitionist, journalist, administrator, reformer, conservationist, and without question America's foremost landscape architect and urban planner, Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) was a man of unusually diverse talents and interests, and the arc of his life and writings traces the most significant developments of nineteenth century American history. As this volume reveals, the wide-ranging endeavors Olmsted was involved in--cofounding The Nation magazine, advocating against slavery, serving as executive secretary to the United States Sanitary Commission (precursor to the Red Cross) during the Civil War, championing the preservation of America's great wild places at Yosemite and Yellowstone--emerged from his steadfast commitment to what he called "communitiveness," the impulse to serve the needs of one's fellow citizens. This philosophy had its ultimate expression is his brilliant designs for some of the country's most beloved public spaces: New York's Central Park, Prospect Park in Brooklyn, Boston's "Emerald Necklace," the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, the grounds of the U.S. Capitol, garden suburbs like Chicago's Riverside, parkways (a term he invented) and college campuses, the "White City" of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, and many others. Gathering almost 100 original letters, newspaper dispatches, travel sketches, essays, editorials, design proposals, official reports, reflections on aesthetics, and autobiographical reminiscences, this deluxe Library of America volume is profusely illustrated with a 32-page color portfolio of Olmsted's design sketches, architectural plans, and contemporary photographs. It also includes detailed explanatory notes and a chronology of Olmsted's life and design projects.From the Hardcover edition.

Walden

by Henry David Thoreau

In 1845 Henry David Thoreau left his pencil-manufacturing business and began building a cabin on the shore of Walden Pond near Concord, Massachusetts. This lyrical yet practical-minded book is at once a record of the 26 months Thoreau spent in withdrawal from society -- an account of the daily minutiae of building, planting, hunting, cooking, and, always, observing nature -- and a declaration of independence from the oppressive mores of the world he left behind. Elegant, witty, and quietly searching, Walden remains the most persuasive American argument for simplicity of life clarity of conscience. For the first time, the authoritative editions of works by major American novelists, poets, scholars, and essayists collected in the hardcover volumes of The Library of America are being published singly in a series of handsome paperback books. A distinguished writer has contributed an introduction for each volume, which also includes a chronology of the author's life and career, an essay on the text, and notes. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Journey to the Center of the Earth

by Jules Verne

One hundred fifty years later, Jules Verne's epic novel of science and adventure is just as thrilling as when it was first published A dirty slip of parchment falls from the pages of an ancient manuscript. Deciphered by the indefatigable Otto Liedenbrock, professor of geology, and his reluctant nephew, Axel, the parchment's coded message is a wild assertion made by a medieval alchemist: Inside a volcano in Iceland is a passageway to the center of the earth. Impossible, says Axel--the temperature of the earth's core is far too high for any human being to go near it. That is one theory, the professor replies. Two days later, they embark on a journey so fantastic it will alter the very meaning of history. First published in 1864, Journey to the Center of the Earth is a cornerstone of science fiction and one of the greatest stories ever told. This ebook edition contains the classic Ward Lock & Co. translation of 1877, one of the first English-language versions faithful to the original French. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

The Senator Next Door

by Amy Klobuchar

One of the U.S. Senate's most candid--and funniest--women tells the story of her life and her unshakeable faith in our democracyMinnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar has tackled every obstacle she's encountered--her parents' divorce, her father's alcoholism and recovery, her political campaigns and Washington's gridlock--with honesty, humor and pluck. Now, in The Senator Next Door, she chronicles her remarkable heartland journey, from her immigrant grandparents to her middle-class suburban upbringing to her rise in American politics.After being kicked out of the hospital while her infant daughter was still in intensive care, Klobuchar became the lead advocate for one of the first laws in the country guaranteeing new moms and their babies a 48-hour hospital stay. Later she ran Minnesota's biggest prosecutor's office and in 2006 was the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate from her state. Along the way she fashioned her own political philosophy grounded in her belief that partisan flame-throwing takes no courage at all; what really matters is forging alliances with unlikely partners to solve the nation's problems.Optimistic, plainspoken and often very funny, The Senator Next Door is a story about how the girl next door decided to enter the fray and make a difference. At a moment when America's government often seems incapable of getting anything done, Amy Klobuchar proves that politics is still the art of the possible.

Second Founding

by David Quigley

At the close of the Civil War, Americans found themselves drawn into a new conflict, one in which the basic shape of the nation's government had to be rethought and new rules for the democratic game had to be established. In this superb new study, David Quigley argues that New York City's politics and politicians lay at the heart of Reconstruction's intense, conflicted drama. In ways that we understand all too well today, New York history became national history.The establishment of a postwar interracial democracy required the tearing down and rebuilding of many basic tenets of American government, yet, as Quigley shows in dramatic detail, the white supremacist traditions of the nation's leading city militated against a genuine revision of America's racial order, for New York politicians placed limits on the possibilities of true Reconstruction at every turn. Still, change did occur and a new America did take shape. Ironically, it was in New York City that new languages and practices for public life were developing which left an indelible mark on progressive national politics. Quigley's signal accomplishment is to show that the innovative work of New York's black activists, Tammany Democrats, bourgeois reformers, suffragettes, liberal publicists, and trade unionists resulted in a radical redefinition of reform in urban America.

An Accidental archist: How the Killing of a Humble Jewish Immigrant by Chicago's Chief of Police Exposed the Conflict Between Law & Order and Civil Rights in Early 20th Century America

by Walter Roth

It was a bitter cold morning in March, 1908. A nineteen-year-old Jewish immigrant traversed the confusing and unfamiliar streets of Chicago-a one-and-a-half-hour-long journey-from his ghetto home on Washburne Avenue to the luxurious Lincoln Place residence of Police Chief George Shippy. He arrived at 9 a.m. Within minutes after knocking on the front door, Lazarus Averbuch lay dead on the hallway floor, shot no less than six times by the chief himself. Why Averbuch went to the police chief's house or exactly what happened after that is still not known. This is the most comprehensive account ever written about this episode that stunned Chicago and won the attention of the entire country. It does not "solve" the mystery as much as it places it in the context of a nation that was unsure how to absorb all of the immigrants flowing across its borders. It attempts to reconstruct the many different perspectives and concerns that comprised the drama surrounding the investigation of Averbuch's killing.

Love of Worker Bees

by Cathy Porter Sheila Rowbotham Alexandra Kollontai

A rare, graphic portrait of Russian life in 1917 immediately after the October Revolution. The heroine struggles with her passion for her husband, and the demands of the new world in which she lives.

Roughing It

by Mark Twain

The Wild West as Mark Twain lived it In 1861, Mark Twain joined his older brother Orion, the newly appointed secretary of the Nevada Territory, on a stagecoach journey from Missouri to Carson City, Nevada. Planning to be gone for three months, Twain spent the next "six or seven years" exploring the great American frontier, from the monumental vistas of the Rocky Mountains to the lush landscapes of Hawaii. Along the way, he made and lost a theoretical fortune, danced like a kangaroo in the finest hotels of San Francisco, and came to terms with freezing to death in a snow bank--only to discover, in the light of morning, that he was fifteen steps from a comfortable inn. As a record of the "variegated vagabondizing" that characterized his early years--before he became a national treasure--Roughing It is an indispensable chapter in the biography of Mark Twain. It is also, a century and a half after it was first published, both a fascinating history of the American West and a laugh-out-loud good time. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Pedestrianism: When Watching People Walk Was America's Favorite Spectator Sport

by Matthew Algeo

Strange as it sounds, during the 1870s and 1880s, America's most popular spectator sport wasn't baseball, football, or horseracing--it was competitive walking. Inside sold-out arenas, competitors walked around dirt tracks almost nonstop for six straight days (never on Sunday), risking their health and sanity to see who could walk the farthest--more than 500 miles. These walking matches were as talked about as the weather, the details reported in newspapers and telegraphed to fans from coast to coast. This long-forgotten sport, known as pedestrianism, spawned America's first celebrity athletes and opened doors for immigrants, African Americans, and women. But along with the excitement came the inevitable scandals, charges of doping and insider gambling, and even a riot in 1879. Pedestrianism chronicles competitive walking's peculiar appeal and popularity, its rapid demise, and its enduring influence.

The Call of the Wild

by Jack London

Penguin Readers is a series of simplified novels, film novelizations and original titles that introduce students at all levels to the pleasures of reading in English. Originally designed for teaching English as a foreign language, the series' combination of high interest level and low reading age makes it suitable for both English-speaking teenagers with limited reading skills and students of English as a second language. Many titles in the series also provide access to the pre-20th century literature strands of the National Curriculum English Orders.

Philosophers Behaving Badly

by Mel Thompson Nigel Rodgers

An engaging and often hilarious survey of the far-from-fusty extra-curricular activities of some of philosophy's finest practitioners Philosophers Behaving Badly examines the lives of eight great philosophers--Rousseau, whose views on education and the social order seem curiously at odds with his own outrageous life; Schopenhauer and Nietzsche, two giants of the 19th century whose words seem ever more relevant today; and five immensely influential philosophers of the 20th century, Russell, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Sartre, and Foucault.

The Road to Cuba, Revised and Updated Edition: The Opportunities and Risks for US Business

by Mauro F. Guillén Knowledge Wharton Gustavo Arnavat Faquiry Diaz Cala

Fully updated and revised as of March 2016, this new edition covers the latest developments to help US businesses build a strategic roadmap into the Cuban market.After President Barack Obama's announcement in December 2014, investors, business leaders, and entrepreneurs asked, What will this historic change mean for economic relations between the United States and Cuba? What opportunities-and risks-should US companies consider as they explore the business potential of one of the largest markets in the Caribbean? Now, 15 months later, the answers are becoming more clear.In The Road to Cuba: The Opportunities and Risks for US Business, Knowledge@Wharton, The Wharton School's online journal of business analysis, answers these questions and addresses:Quick-win opportunities: travel and tourism, telecoms, financial services, and food industriesLonger-term prospects: construction and real estate, energy production and mining, manufacturing and retail, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology, and agricultureThe political and economic risks and hurdles: An analysis of what could speed up-or derail-progress in relationsThe Road to Cuba is the most up-to-date guide for business leaders in the United States who want to understand the opportunities the Cuban market holds. It is also a must-read for business leaders in Cuba and around the world who want to understand the investment and competition that is on its way.

The Prosperity Bible: The Greatest Writings of All Time on the Secrets to Wealth and Prosperity

by Napoleon Hill

In a beautiful, durable volume suited to a lifetime of use, here is the all-in-one "bible" on how to harness the creative powers of your mind to achieve a life of prosperity-packaged in a handsome display box with a ribbon bookmark. The Prosperity Bible is a one-of-a-kind resource that collects the greatest moneymaking secrets of authors from every field-religion, finance, philosophy, and self-help-and makes them available in an attractive, keepsake edition. This is a book to treasure and return to again and again for guidance, ideas, know-how, and inspiration. Here is the only single volume where you can read success advice from Napoleon Hill, P. T. Barnum, Benjamin Franklin, Charles Fillmore, Wallace D. Wattles, Florence Scovel Shinn, and Ernest Holmes-along with a bevy of million-copy-selling writers who have one key element in common: a commitment to understanding and promulgating the laws of winning. These are the beloved teachers and writers who created the idea of a mental formula for success. Their principles, comprehensively collected in nineteen selected writings, have been proved in the experience of millions of men and women who have cherished their works from the late nineteenth century to the present day. Now they are enshrined in this all-in-one treasury-complete in a handsome display box with a ribbon bookmark.

The Zuni and the American Imagination

by Eliza Mcfeely

A bold new study of the Zuni, of the first anthropologists who studied them, and of the effect of Zuni on America's sense of itselfThe Zuni society existed for centuries before there was a United States, and it still exists in its desert pueblo in what is now New Mexico. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists-among the first in this new discipline-came to Zuni to study it and, they believed, to salvage what they could of its tangible culture before it was destroyed, which they were sure would happen. Matilda Stevenson, Frank Hamilton Cushing, and Stewart Culin were the three most important of these early students of Zuni, and although modern anthropologists often disparage and ignore their work-sometimes for good, sometimes for poor reasons-these pioneers gave us an idea of the power and significance of Zuni life that has endured into our time. They did not expect the Zuni themselves to endure, but they have, and the complex relation between the Zuni as they were and are and the Zuni as imagined by these three Easterners is at the heart of Eliza McFeely's important new book.Stevenson, Cushing, and Culin are themselves remarkable subjects, not just as anthropology's earliest pioneers but as striking personalities in their own right, and McFeely gives ample consideration, in her colorful and absorbing study, to each of them. For different reasons, all three found professional and psychological satisfaction in leaving the East for the West, in submerging themselves in an alien and little-known world, and in bringing back to the nation's new museums and exhibit halls literally thousands of Zuni artifacts. Their doctrines about social development, their notions of "salvage anthropology," their cultural biases and predispositions are now regarded with considerable skepticism, but nonetheless their work imprinted Zuni on the American imagination in ways we have yet to measure. It is the great merit of McFeely's fascinating work that she puts their intellectual and personal adventures into a just and measured perspective; she enlightens us about America, about Zuni, and about how we understand each other.

The Renaissance and English Humanism

by Douglas Bush

The appearance of a fourth printing of The Renaissance and English Humanism indicated the scholarly success this book has enjoyed for more than a decade. As a brief yet thoughtful and eloquent evaluation of the influence of the Christian humanistic tradition upon our culture it has not been surpassed. The study is divided into four parts: in the first, Professor Bush discusses modern theories of the Renaissance; in the second and third, the character of classical humanism on the Continent and in England; and in the fourth, the place of Milton in the humanistic tradition."Douglas Bush has shown an unusual awareness," wrote Wallace K. Ferguson, "of the historiographical evolution of the Renaissance, and has taken his stand with rare explicitness on the side of those who find the Renaissance filled with mediaeval traditions." Professor Bush sees the dominant ideal of the English Renaissance as rational and religious order, rather than rebellious individualism, and his view has provided an important clue to the English literature and thought of the 16th and the earlier 17th century.

Rhythm in the Novel

by E. K. Brown

The Alexander Lectures for 1949-50. In his Preface, Professor Brown says, "Isolating a single element or group of elements in the novel, and considering it in unreal separation from all the other elements which it actually fuses, is artificial, but so is all criticism. The artificiality is justified if when one turns back from the criticism to the novels these appear more intelligible and more delightful. That is the test." Applying the test to Dr. Brown's present work, the method is more than justified by the results. they are titled: "Phrase, Character, Incident," "Expanding Symbols," "Interweaving Themes," and "Rhythm in E.M. Forster's A Passage to India."

Customs Administration in Canada

by Gordon Blake

The Canadian tariff has been a singularly faithful mirror of economic and political change in this country, but it is a glass through which much has been seen darkly. This study is an attempt to improve the view. It traces the administration of the tariff through Canadian history, and provides the first complete treatment of the subject and its significance for the country's commerce.Dr. Blake's work begins with customs administration during the French régime, and follows with the British period---the struggle for responsible government, the problem of smuggling, and the establishment of free ports. The author discusses such early problems as customs union in the Canadas, reciprocity and the Galt tariff, and ad valorem duties and their administrative consequences. Confederation and its effect on customs administration are analysed, as are the tariff schedule up to modern times, valuation and the effects of war, and the system and problems of appraisement. The customs establishment since Confederation is studied under such heads as organization, problems of adjustment, and political patronage in the service. Finally, the Canadian Tariff Board is put under examination.This study does not constitute an argument on either side of the policy controversy as regards free trade or protection nor is it a linearly historical treatment of Canadian commercial policy. It is an attempt to fit into the Canadian environment certain more or less theoretical concepts which may serve to explain the tariff as an important economic institution. It will be of interest to students of Canadian economic history, particularly in the area of national revenue.

The Antichrist

by Joseph Roth Richard Panchyk

Long out of print in English, this dizzying hybrid of novel, essay, and polemic has less to do with religion than with what Roth sees as the disintegrating moral fabric of the modern world Written while Roth was in exile from Germany and his native Austria following the rise of Nazism, this work was composed in cafés across free Europe after all his works in German went up in flames. Such events no doubt influence the apocalytic tones of The Antichrist's protaganist, J.R., a journalist hired by an inscrutable media mogul hellbent on exposing evidence of the "Antichrist" throughout the world. This mission leads J.R. to authoritarian political regimes such as Red Earth (the Soviet Union) but also other poisonous terrains like The Land of Shadows (Hollywood)--it becomes all too clear that it is Roth's mission to chart the whole of civilization's slide into moral and political chaos. But herein lies the extraordinary strength and appeal of this work, as Roth is powerfully and even hilariously prescient. Mixing the diatribe with his trademark sardonic wit, he miraculously predicts the advent of the Holocaust, globalization, multimedia--even the paparazzi. Combining beautiful but savage writing with visual imagery out of a Coen Brothers movie, this is an invaluable addition to the Roth canon in English.

Perlefter

by Joseph Roth

Now available for the first time in English, this important addition to the Roth canon is rich in irony and exemplary of Roth's keen powers of social and political observation A novel fragment that was discovered among Joseph Roth's papers decades after his death, this book chronicles the life and times of Alexander Perlefter, the well-to-do Austrian urbanite with whom his relative, a small-town narrator, Naphthali Kroj, has come to live after becoming orphaned. The colorful cast of characters includes Perlefter's four children: foolish Alfred, with his predilection for sleeping with servant girls and widows and boasting of the venereal diseases he contracts; the hapless Karoline, whose interest in math and physics and employment at a scientific institute seem to repel serious suitors; the flamboyant Julie, a sweet, pale, and anemic girl who likes any man who is inclined toward marriage; and the beautiful and flighty Margarete, besotted with a professor of history. Written circa 1928-30, Perlefter represents Joseph Roth at the very peak of his literary powers--it was penned just after the publication of The Silent Prophet and just before his masterpieces Job and The Radetzky March.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells

The book that introduced the world to time travel In H. G. Wells's immortal novella, an unnamed Time Traveller builds a machine that hurtles him to the year 802,701 AD. He discovers a world divided into two species: the peaceful Eloi, who live in colossal, crumbling buildings and are childlike in size and demeanor, and the hulking Morlocks--pale, simian creatures who dwell below ground and prey on their terrestrial counterparts. When his time machine is stolen, the Traveller must outwit the Morlocks in order to retrieve it, escaping their clutches by skipping like a stone across the surface of time. On a frozen red beach thirty million years in the future, he bears witness to the planet's terrible last days. The first of H. G. Wells's "scientific romances," The Time Machine is a thrilling tale of adventure, and an unsettling thought experiment on the nature of progress and the transience of humankind. Its central conceit has inspired countless writers, artists, and filmmakers, and is undoubtedly one of the greatest inventions in modern literature. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

In the Days of Queen Victoria

by Eva March Tappan

This early work by Eva March Tappan was originally published in 1903 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'In the Days of Queen Victoria' is a biography of Queen Victoria and details aspects of her school days, her coronation, and her family life. Eva March Tappan was born on 26th December 1854, in Blackstone, Massachusetts, United States. Tappan began her literary career writing about famous characters from history in works such as 'In the Days of William the Conqueror' (1901), and 'In the Days of Queen Elizabeth' (1902). She then developed an interest in children's books, writing her own and publishing collections of classic tales.

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