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Blue Voyage

by Conrad Aiken

In this autobiographical debut novel from one of America's most acclaimed poets, a writer's sentimental journey across the Atlantic becomes a crucible of heartbreak and mental anguish William Demarest settles into his room, checks his pockets for his seasickness pills, and wanders onto the deck of the ship that will be his home for the next few days. The lights of New York City are still faintly visible, but Demarest's mind is on London, where he hopes to be reunited with the woman he adores. He has spent countless nights pining for her and is finally ready to declare his love. In a state of feverish anticipation, Demarest steals onto the first-class section of the ship. There, to his surprise, he discovers the woman he is traveling thousands of miles to see, only for her to dismiss him with devastating coldness. For the rest of the voyage, Demarest must wrestle with golden memories turned to dust and long-cherished fantasies that will never come to pass. A brilliant novel of psychological insight and formal experimentation reminiscent of the stories of James Joyce, Blue Voyage is a bold work of art from a winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize.

Emil and the Detectives

by Maurice Sendak J. D. Stahl Erich Kastner

Originally published in 1929, Erich Kästner’s engaging tale has delighted readers young and old for generations. It’s Emil’s first train ride alone and he’s excited—and a little nervous. On the train, his fellow passengers are impressed with how polite and grown-up Emil is, and the man in the bowler hat offers him some chocolate—but Emil keeps checking his coat pocket, where he’s pinned the money that he is taking to his grandmother. Soon, though, Emil finds himself getting sleepy . . . and the next thing he knows, the man in the bowler hat is gone— and so is the money! With the help of some new friends Emil becomes a detective and tracks the thief through the city. Filled with enduring themes of leadership, courage, and teamwork, and the delightful illustrations of Walter Trier, Emil and the Detectives is a rollicking, heartwarming tale come alive.

Great Circle

by Conrad Aiken

A profound examination of the mysteries of memory and perception from one of the twentieth century's most admired literary artists The train races from New York to Boston. For Andrew Cather, it is much too fast. He will return home three days early, and he is both terrified and intrigued by what he may find there. He pictures himself unlocking the door to his quiet Cambridge house, padding silently through its darkened halls, and finally discovering the thing he both fears and yearns to see: his wife in the arms of another man. Cather knows that what he finds in Cambridge may destroy his life, yet finally set him free. A masterful portrait of an average man at the edge of a shocking precipice, Great Circle is a triumph of psychological realism. One of Sigmund Freud's favorite novels, it is a probing exploration of the secrets of consciousness.

Mornings on Horseback

by David Mccullough

The National Book Award-winning biography that tells the story of how young Teddy Roosevelt transformed himself from a sickly boy into the vigorous man who would become a war hero and ultimately president of the United States, told by master historian David McCullough.Mornings on Horseback is the brilliant biography of the young Theodore Roosevelt. Hailed as "a masterpiece" (John A. Gable, Newsday), it is the winner of the Los Angeles Times 1981 Book Prize for Biography and the National Book Award for Biography. Written by David McCullough, the author of Truman, this is the story of a remarkable little boy, seriously handicapped by recurrent and almost fatal asthma attacks, and his struggle to manhood: an amazing metamorphosis seen in the context of the very uncommon household in which he was raised. The father is the first Theodore Roosevelt, a figure of unbounded energy, enormously attractive and selfless, a god in the eyes of his small, frail namesake. The mother, Mittie Bulloch Roosevelt, is a Southerner and a celebrated beauty, but also considerably more, which the book makes clear as never before. There are sisters Anna and Corinne, brother Elliott (who becomes the father of Eleanor Roosevelt), and the lovely, tragic Alice Lee, TR's first love. All are brought to life to make "a beautifully told story, filled with fresh detail" (The New York Times Book Review). A book to be read on many levels, it is at once an enthralling story, a brilliant social history and a work of important scholarship which does away with several old myths and breaks entirely new ground. It is a book about life intensely lived, about family love and loyalty, about grief and courage, about "blessed" mornings on horseback beneath the wide blue skies of the Badlands.nt scholarship, which does away with several old myths and breaks entirely new ground. For the first time, for example, Roosevelt's asthma is examined closely, drawing on information gleaned from private Roosevelt family papers and in light of present-day knowledge of the disease and its psychosomatic aspects. At heart it is a book about life intensely lived...about family love and family loyalty...about courtship and childbirth and death, fathers and sons...about winter on the Nile in the grand manner and Harvard College...about gutter politics in washrooms and the tumultuous Republican Convention of 1884...about grizzly bears, grief and courage, and "blessed" mornings on horseback at Oyster Bay or beneath the limitless skies of the Badlands. "Black care rarely sits behind a rider whose pace is fast enough," Roosevelt once wrote. It is the key to his life and to much that is so memorable in this magnificent book.

King Coffin

by Conrad Aiken

Inspired by the infamous case of Leopold and Loeb, King Coffin is a chilling glimpse into the mind of a twisted genius The sun is setting over Harvard, and Jasper Ammen is not impressed. A brilliant student who loathes all that the world has put before him, he gazes with contempt at the beauty of the campus, the intellectual pretensions of his fellow students, and the gaudiness of the sunset, for none of these approaches the majesty of Jasper's mind. A reader of Nietzsche and Stirner, he is convinced of his own superiority, and has decided to prove it in the most irrefutable manner: with the perfect murder. Ammen will choose his victim at random and commit the unsolvable crime before a host of witnesses who will see what happens but not be able to understand it. Only his closest friends will realize that he has gotten away with murder, and they won't be able to stop him or see him punished for the ghastly deed. An intense and disturbing portrait of rationalism taken to a dangerous extreme, King Coffin ranks alongside the works of Henry James and Fyodor Dostoevsky as a masterpiece of psychological realism.

Halfway House

by Ellery Queen

Called to an urgent meeting at a mysterious shack in the middle of nowhere, attorney Bill Angell finds his brother-in-law, traveling salesman Joe Wilson, stabbed. With Joe's dying breath, he manages to convey that his murderer was a veiled woman. Was it the wild-eyed woman who had sped past Bill on his way up the dark road to the shack?To help him unravel the mystery, Bill calls on his old friend Ellery Queen. But first Queen will have to unravel the victim's double life - starting with the shack where he's been found dead, smack dab between two very different worlds.

I Can Get It for You Wholesale

by Alistair Cooke Jerome Weidman

Jerome Weidman's enduring classic novel about life in New York's cutthroat garment districtJust south of Times Square, more than six thousand manufacturers of dresses are crammed into the few blocks that make up Manhattan's garment district. Their factories are cramped, noisy, and incredibly profitable--and Harry Bogen is going to take them for all they're worth. A classic conniver, he knows that it's easier, and a hell of a lot more fun, to turn a buck by lying than by telling the truth. First he convinces the shipping clerks--the pack animals of the garment industry--to go on strike. With the dress manufacturers brought to their knees, Harry will be there to pick them up again. His conscience might be conflicted, if he had one in the first place. A bracing comic sensation when first published, I Can Get It for You Wholesale remains a timeless masterpiece--its hero still a scoundrel, and his charm as irresistible as ever.This ebook features a foreword by Alistair Cooke.

Intellectual Memoirs

by Mary Mccarthy

In this no-holds-barred memoir with a foreword by Elizabeth Hardwick, the bestselling author of The Group recalls her early life in New York, revealing the genesis of and genius behind her groundbreaking fiction Mary McCarthy is a married twenty-four-year-old Communist and critic when this memoir begins. She's disciplined, dedicated, and sexually experimental: At one point she realizes that in twenty-four hours she "had slept with three different men." But she believes in the institution of marriage. Over the course of three years, she will have had two husbands, the second being the esteemed, much older critic Edmund Wilson. It is Wilson who becomes McCarthy's mentor and muse, urging her to try her hand at fiction.McCarthy's powers of observation are on witty display here, as the seventy-something writer recalls events that took place half a century earlier. Her eye for the revealing detail will be recognized by readers of her novels as she describes marching in May Day parades, attending parties for the Scottsboro Boys, and witnessing firsthand the American left wing's response to the Moscow trials and the Spanish Civil War.Picking up where How I Grew left off and unfinished at the time of her death in 1989, Intellectual Memoirs is a vivid snapshot of a distinctive place and time--New York in the late 1930s--and the forces that shaped Mary McCarthy's life as a woman and a writer.This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary McCarthy including rare images from the author's estate.

Their Eyes Were Watching God: A Novel

by Zora Neale Hurston

“A deeply soulful novel that comprehends love and cruelty, and separates the big people from the small of heart, without ever losing sympathy for those unfortunates who don’t know how to live properly.” —Zadie SmithOne of the most important and enduring books of the twentieth century, Their Eyes Were Watching God brings to life a Southern love story with the wit and pathos found only in the writing of Zora Neale Hurston. Out of print for almost thirty years—due largely to initial audiences’ rejection of its strong black female protagonist—Hurston’s classic has since its 1978 reissue become perhaps the most widely read and highly acclaimed novel in the canon of African-American literature.

Winged Pharaoh

by Joan Grant

In ancient Egypt, a Pharaoh who by strength of extra-sensory powers also became a priest was called a Winged Pharaoh. As a child, the astonishing Joan Grant became aware of her uncanny "Far Memory," the ability to recall past incarnations who had lived in long-ago times and far-flung places. Her seven historical novels stand out for their vividness and rich detail. For Joan, these books were not works of the imagination but personal recollections of her previous lives. In Winged Pharaoh, Joan Grant tells the story of Sekeeta, the Pharaoh's daughter. The ancient Egyptians reserved the title of "Winged Pharaoh" for ruler-priests who possessed extra-sensory powers. When Sekeeta demonstrates psychic abilities, she is sent to the temple and trained to recall past lives. Upon the death of her father, she becomes a "Winged Pharaoh" - both priestess and Pharaoh - and leads her country with enlightenment. The most famous of Joan Grant's "Far Memory" novels, this book brings the grandeur, beauty, and mystery of ancient Egypt to life. Upon Winged Pharaoh's original publication in 1937, the New York Times called it "an unusual book that shines with fire."

A Night of Serious Drinking

by Rene Daumal

Daumal’s keen perceptions of the human condition infuse A Night of Serious Drinking with a critique of culture and consciousness that if both disquieting and enlivening. A Night of Serious Drinking is among Rene Daumal's most important literary works. Like Daumal’s Mount Analogue it is a classic work of symbolic fiction. An unnamed narrator spends an evening getting drunk with a group of friends; as the party becomes intoxicated and exuberant, the narrator embarks on a journey that ranges from seeming paradises to the depths of pure hell. The fantastic world depicted in A Night of Serious Drinking is actually the ordinary world turned upside down. The characters are called the Anthographers, Fabricators of useless objects, Scienters, Nibblists, Clarificators, and other absurd titles. Yet the inhabitants of these strange realms are only too familiar: scientists dissecting an animal in their laboratory, a wise man surrounded by his devotees, politicians, poets expounding their rhetoric. These characters perform hilarious antics and intellectual games, which they see as serious attempts to find meaning and freedom.

What's in It for Me?

by Jerome Weidman Alistair Cooke

Out of the game and itching for action, Harry schemes up a way back to the top in this engrossing sequel to I Can Get It for You WholesaleWhen Harry Bogen became king of the garment district, he blossomed into a natural-born tyrant: imperious, cruel, and quick with a lie. But after he built his empire, he blew it up, leaving his partners in jail and securing the whole of the fortune for himself. It takes only three months for Harry to find that retirement does not suit him. To get back in the action, he'll have to spin a lie that would be his biggest yet. The scheme starts with an order for one thousand dresses, bought at cut-rate price from a vendor who can't afford not to sell. From there, Harry raises the stakes, juggling deals and spinning stories as fast as he possibly can. Will he secure himself fortune everlasting, or will this little Napoleon meet his Waterloo? Win or lose, Harry Bogen will keep scrapping every inch of the way.This ebook features a foreword by Alistair Cooke.

The I. L. Peretz Reader

by Ruth R. Wisse I. L. Peretz

Isaac Leybush Peretz (1852-1915) is one of the most influential figures of modern Jewish culture. Born in Poland and dedicated to Yiddish culture, he recognized that Jews needed to adapt to their times while preserving their cultural heritage, and his captivating and beautiful writings explore the complexities inherent in the struggle between tradition and the desire for progress. This book, which presents a memoir, poem, travelogue, and twenty-six stories by Peretz, also provides a detailed essay about Peretz's life by Ruth R. Wisse. This edition of the book includes, as well, Peretz's great visionary drama A Night in the Old Marketplace, in a rhymed, performable translation by Hillel Halkin.

Conversation; or, Pilgrims' Progress

by Conrad Aiken

A painter torn between his domestic arrangements and his artistic pursuits makes a fateful choice in this brilliant and provocative novel from a winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize Timothy Kane brought his wife and young daughter to Cape Cod in order to find the peace and quiet necessary to paint. But the mood inside their small cottage is far from tranquil--a past affair weighs on Timothy's conscience, and the strain of running a household by herself is causing Enid to resent her husband. To make matters worse, Timothy's friend Jim Connor has decided to move to the Cape and bring a gaggle of their Greenwich Village acquaintances with him. A committed anarchist, Jim does more than just preach the redistribution of wealth: He accomplishes it himself by shoplifting from department stores and giving the loot to struggling poets and painters. Jim and his rabble-rousing, art-obsessed crew stir up trouble wherever they go, and Timothy's association with the group soon becomes a major point of contention between him and Enid. She expects him to sacrifice his friendship for the sake of his family's security--a demand that runs counter to Timothy's nature and his sense of what it means to be an artist. With the pressure mounting, he must find a way to balance his marriage and his work, or risk devastating consequences to both. An exquisitely crafted story about the hard truths of the creative life, Conversation has been lauded by the New York Times as a testament to "the brilliance of [Conrad Aiken's] mind and the understanding of his heart."

A Heart for the Gods of Mexico

by Conrad Aiken

This tale of an exotic adventure undertaken in the face of tragedy includes a revealing portrait of Conrad Aiken's friend and protégé Malcolm Lowry Blomberg has loved Noni for what seems like his whole life. He loves her like he loves the sunset, like he loves the air he breathes. But beautiful, strange, impulsive Noni--who has spent years in a passionless marriage to one of Boston's most notorious swindlers--has only a few months to live; her heart is about to give out. Before she dies, Noni begs Blom to finance a trip to Mexico, where she can obtain a quick divorce and marry the man she loves. That man is not Blom, however, but Gil--an upstanding young gentleman who is to know nothing of Noni's condition. With his own heart aching, Blom arranges the money, and the trio heads south on a journey that will bring them face to face with the mysteries of life and death.

The C. S. Lewis Collection: Signature Classics and Other Major Works

by C. S. Lewis

Eight of C. S. Lewis’s timeless signature classics together in one volume.<P><P> Includes:<P> * Mere Christianity<P> * The Screwtape Letters<P> * The Great Divorce<P> * The Problem of Pain<P> * Miracles<P> * A Grief Observed<P> * The Abolition of Man<P> * The Four Loves<P> * Reflections on the Psalms<P> * Surprised by Joy<P> * Letters to Malcolm

The Company She Keeps

by Mary Mccarthy

A novel in six episodes, this stunning debut by Mary McCarthy follows a young intellectual on her reckless bohemian journey through life and dangerous love in 1930s New York CityMargaret Sargent is young and fearless, a deep thinker inspired by the bohemian energy that abounds in New York City in the years leading up to the Second World War. With careless abandon, she destroys her marriage and numerous love affairs as she moves through the social circles of artists and writers, playing at the fringes of political extremism. She is an enigma, often wanton and frivolous, but possessing intelligence and a razor-sharp wit, as well as a troubling core of inner darkness, self-doubt, and puzzling tendencies toward self-destruction. For Margaret, urban life in the 1930s is an ongoing adventure--ever-changing, always surprising, and deeply, profoundly unsatisfying.Mary McCarthy, author of the bestselling American classic The Group, burst boldly onto the literary scene with her provocative debut, The Company She Keeps. A brilliant, stylistically inventive novel, it offers a rich portrait of a truly fascinating protagonist in six revealing episodes. Love her, despise her, or fear for her, you will never forget Margaret Sargent.This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary McCarthy including rare images from the author's estate.

Jack and Rochelle: A Holocaust Story of Love and Resistance

by Lawrence Sutin Jack Sutin Rochelle Sutin

When the Holocaust descended on Poland, two young Jews fought back--and fell in love Jack and Rochelle first met at a youth dance in Poland before the war. They shared one dance, and Jack stepped on Rochelle's shoes. She was unimpressed. When the Nazis invaded eastern Poland in 1941, both Jack (in the town of Mir) and Rochelle (in the town of Stolpce) witnessed the horrors of ghettoization, forced labor, and mass killings that decimated their families. Jack and Rochelle managed, in their separate ways, to escape into the forest. They reunited, against all odds, in the winter of 1942-43 and became Jewish partisans who fought back against the Nazis. The couple's careful courtship soon blossomed into an enduring love that sustained them through the raging hatred of the Holocaust and the destruction of the lives they had known. Jack and Rochelle's story, told in their own voices through extensive interviews with their son, Lawrence, has been in print for twenty years and is celebrated as a classic of Holocaust memoir literature. This is the first electronic edition.

Mary McCarthy: Novels & Stories 1942-1963

by Thomas Mallon Mary Mccarthy

In the first volume of the definitive edition of her fiction, four novels and eight classic stories by the witty and provocative writer who defined a generation.Seventy-five years ago Mary McCarthy provoked a scandal with her electrifying debut novel, The Company She Keeps (1942), announcing the arrival of a major new voice in American literature. A candid, thinly-veiled portrait of the late-1930s New York intellectual scene, its penetrating gaze and creative fusion of life and literature--"mutual plagiarism," she called it--became the hallmark of McCarthy's fiction, which the Library of America now presents in full for the first time in deluxe collector's edition. The Oasis (1949), a wicked satire about a failed utopian community, and The Groves of Academe (1952), a pioneering campus novel depicting the insular and often absurd world of academia, burnished her reputation as an acerbic truth-teller, but it was with A Charmed Life (1955), a searing story of small-town infidelity, that McCarthy fully embraced the frank and avant-garde treatment of gender and sexuality that would inspire generations of readers and writers. Also included are all eight of McCarthy's short stories, four from her collection Cast a Cold Eye (1950), and four collected here for the first time.From the Hardcover edition.

Barefoot Boy with Cheek

by Max Shulman

A wild and witty satire of American college life from the author of The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis On his first day of college, farm boy Asa Hearthrug enthusiastically jumps out of bed--and discovers that his pajama pants are caught in the bedsprings. He learns that his dog has died, and his father, in an effort to soften the blow, tells an absurd story about a female bullfighter. Next, the freshman pays a visit to his high school sweetheart to say a heartfelt goodbye, but Lodestone La Toole is more interested in hamburgers than vows of devotion. And when Asa finally arrives at the University of Minnesota--wham!--he gets run over by a frat boy's convertible. Max Shulman's bestselling debut novel, written when he was almost as fresh-faced as his protagonist, delightfully skewers every sacred cow of collegiate life. From the faculty expert on "Merrie Olde England" who once spent two weeks on that distant land to the sidewalk booby-trap used by the Alpha Cholera fraternity to round-up reluctant pledges, Barefoot Boy with Cheek bursts at the seams with outrageous characters, delirious set pieces, and gut-busting one-liners.

Hinduism and Buddhism

by Ananda K. Coomaraswamy

A highly original discussion of problems of philosophy of religion from the lndian point of view. The exposition shows that the Christian theologian who will take the trouble to study Indian religion seriously, and not merely "historically," will find in its teachings abundant extrinsic and probable proofs of the truth of Christian doctrine; and may at the same time realize the essential unity of all religions.

The Feather Merchants

by Max Shulman

The raucous and randy adventures of a stateside soldier during World War II Sergeant Dan Miller wanted to be a flying ace, but the air force grounded him for poor vision. To make matters worse, when the myopic Miller travels home to Minneapolis on furlough, he finds the local "feather merchants"--aka civilians--breaking all the wartime rules. They're guzzling black-market gas, hoarding rationed food, and listening to suspiciously expensive radios. But the most troubling news of all arrives when Sergeant Dan's main squeeze, the voluptuous Estherlee McCracken, declares that she wants nothing to do with a pencil-pushing GI. The night after he gets dumped, Sergeant Dan seeks solace in watered-down whiskeys and a chorus line of ladies dancing in red, white, and blue G-strings. A friend introduces the sad-sack noncom as Robert Jordan, dynamiter of bridges, and before Sergeant Dan can stop that bell from tolling, he's the most celebrated man in town. What follows is a hysterical comedy of errors as our hero tries to outrun his patriotic admirers, win back Estherlee's love, and avoid a court martial.

The Price of Salt: OR Carol

by Patricia Highsmith

A chance encounter between two lonely women leads to a passionate romance in this lesbian cult classic. Therese, a struggling young sales clerk, and Carol, a homemaker in the midst of a bitter divorce, abandon their oppressive daily routines for the freedom of the open road, where their love can blossom. But their newly discovered bliss is shattered when Carol is forced to choose between her child and her lover.Author Patricia Highsmith is best known for her psychological thrillers Strangers on a Train and The Talented Mr. Ripley. Originally published in 1952 under a pseudonym, The Price of Salt was heralded as "the novel of a love society forbids." Highsmith's sensitive treatment of fully realized characters who defy stereotypes about homosexuality marks a departure from previous lesbian pulp fiction. Erotic, eloquent, and suspenseful, this story offers an honest look at the necessity of being true to one's nature. The book is also the basis of the acclaimed 2015 film Carol, starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara.

Calamity at Harwood

by George Bellairs

To solve a murder case, Thomas Littlejohn contends with ghosts, Nazis, and crooked real estate speculators Known across London as one of the premier slumlords of the East End, Solomon Burt has never fallen in love with a property the way he has with Harwood, a faded manor house halfway between London and the sea. When the owner refuses to sell, Burt uses every trick he knows to buy the house out from under the man and convert it into apartments. Now Burt owns the property lock, stock, and barrel—but he will have to share it with the ghosts. When Burt is found murdered, the tenants fear a ghost might be responsible. Detective-Inspector Littlejohn is called down from London to solve the case and restore reason. But what he find lurking in the back corners of Harwood is far more dangerous than a poltergeist.

The Murderer is a Fox

by Ellery Queen

World War II hero Davy Fox has returned to his New England hometown of Wrightsville a changed man. When his wife Linda wakes up to find Davy's hands squeezed around her neck, it takes all of her strength to get away. But Davy is more than shellshocked from the war. He's haunted by events of twelve years before, when his mother was murdered by his father, Bayard, who is serving life in prison and had always insisted that he was not the one who killed his wife.Linda hopes that if Davy's father could be proved innocent, it might clear the conscience of her young, angry war hero husband, saving her marriage and herself. She suggests to Davy that they seek out Ellery Queen, a New York writer whom she remembers successfully solved a previous Wrightsville mystery.For Queen, the case is a long shot: with his only witnesses people closely connected to the victim, and Queen's only clue Bayard Fox's insistence of innocence, the clearest path leads back to the man already serving a life sentence. Determined to get to the truth of the matter, Queen returns to the house where the murder took place, a house preserved down to the smallest detail precisely as it had been when the tragedy struck. And here he finds the clues that blast the case wide open.

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