Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 51 through 75 of 8,116 results

The Lady and Little Fox Fur

by Violette Leduc

Trapped in the depths of poverty, an old woman escapes into an existence where objects, streets, and entire cities have voices and personalities. Told with a feather-light touch and masterful compassion, this is a story for those moments when we catch ourselves talking to the furniture.

In a Dark Wood Wandering: A Novel of the Middle Ages

by Anita Miller Hella S. Haasse

In this novel, set in the 15th century during the Hundred Years War between France and England, Hella Haasse brilliantly captures all the drama of one of the great ages of history.

The Common Stream: Two Thousand Years of the English Village

by Rowland Parker

This is the story of the village of Foxton, in Cambridgeshire. The author studied archaeological excavations, oral tradition, manor court rolls, land tax returns, wills, bishops' registers and many other records, in order to build up a picture of the life, work, clothes, food and pastimes of the villagers, from the first traces of human settlement two thousand years ago, to the present day.

Three Lives

by Gertrude Stein

The first published work of fiction by legendary author and poet Gertrude Stein, Three Lives is a collection of two short stories and a novella focusing on the bleak existence that faced immigrant and minority women in turn-of-the-century America.Each impoverished woman must labor as a domestic worker to survive, and all three protagonists have their own tales of hardship. "The Good Anna" tells the story of a young German servant who must decide between loyalty to her employer and love. In "The Gentle Lena," another German servant girl marries the wrong man, and finds herself trapped as a wife and mother. And the introspective "Melanctha" examines the tragic life of a mulatto woman and those she loved.Pocket Books' Enriched Classics present the great works of world literature enriched for the contemporary reader. This edition of Three Lives has been prepared by Brenda Wineapple, professor of Modern Literary and Historical Studies at Union College. It includes her introduction, a selection of critical excerpts, and suggestions for further reading, as well as a unique visual essay of period illustrations and photographs.

Letters of a Woman Homesteader

by Elinore Pruitt Stewart

"Peopled with the kinds of characters most novelists only dream of"(Christian Science Monitor), this classic account of American frontier living captures the rambunctious spirit of a pioneer who set out in 1909 to prove that a woman could ranch. Stewart's captivating missives from her homestead in Wyoming bring to full life the beauty, isolation, and joys of working the prairie.

The Thirty-Nine Steps

by John Buchan

The novel of international intrigue and adventure that set the standard for the modern spy thrillerOne May evening in 1914, an ordinary Londoner named Richard Hannay receives word of an anarchist plot to assassinate the prime minister of Greece. A few nights later, the eccentric American who revealed the conspiracy is found stabbed to death in Hannay's flat. With only the dead man's encrypted notes to guide him, Hannay must try to foil the assassination attempt while outpacing both the police and the conspirators, whose dastardly plans extend far beyond one Greek politician. The fate of England, it seems, rests on one mysterious phrase repeated throughout the American's notebook; just what exactly are the thirty-nine steps?Buchan's groundbreaking novel, the first in a series featuring Richard Hannay, was adapted by Alfred Hitchcock and paved the way for Graham Greene, Robert Ludlum, John le Carré, and many other masters of literary espionage. Lightning-paced, relentlessly clever, and politically insightful, The Thirty-Nine Steps is just as thrilling today as when it was first published a century ago.This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Celtic Mythology

by J. A Macculloch

Few surviving Celtic myths bear any resemblance to their originals. In the course of time they have been infused with romance, pseudohistory and Christian theory. Stories of Ireland and Wales have been combined with tales of love, war and slaughterdeeds both noble and ignoble. In this classic study, MacCulloch proves that Celtic legend borrowed from preCeltic mythology, just as Christianity in Britain subsumed much of the Celtic past.

My Antonia / O Pioneers!

by Willa Cather

First published in 1918, My Ántonia is the unforgettable story of an immigrant woman's life on the hardscrabble Nebraska plains. Together here with O Pioneers!, a classic American tale of pioneer life and the transformation of the frontier, this volume of Willa Cather's works captures a time, a place, and a spirit that are part of our national heritage.

Wild Tales

by Nikolai Haitov

Haitov's tales are set in the small villages of the Rhodope Mountains in south-east Bulgaria, one of the most remote corners of Europe. They are related in a robust, down-to-earth style by a series of finely realized narrators, most of whom look back to the ea rly years of this century and beyond, when brides were stolen and bandits roamed the hills. These men - shepherds, shoemakers, coopers and foresters -speak to the reader directly, involving him in their triumphs, their disappointments, their exploits in love or in business. Each has a tale to tell, and tells it superbly; indeed, so vivid and engrossing are their stories, and such is the skill with which Haitov utilizes the rhythms and idioms .of colloquial speech, that one seems to be actually listening to rather than reading these stirring tales of 'those far-off days when men were men'. This collection, superbly translated by Michael Holman, reveals Nikolai Haitov as one of the contempo rary masters of the short- story form and provides an ideal introduction to the little-known literature of Bulgaria.

Poppy Muddlepup's Daring Rescue (Magic Animal Friends: Special Edition)

by Daisy Meadows

From the mind of Daisy Meadows comes a new fantasy world, with the same great magical voice as Rainbow Magic but brand-new adventures!

Folktales of Norway

by Pat Shaw Iversen Reidar Christiansen

Often lacking the clear episodic structure of folktales about talking animals and magic objects, legends grow from retellings of personal experiences. Christiansen isolated some seventy-seven legend types, and many of these are represented here in absorbing stories of St. Olaf, hidden treasures, witches, and spirits of the air, water, and earth. The ugly, massively strong, but slow-witted trolls are familiar to English-speaking readers. Less well-known, but the subject of an enormous number of legends, are the more manlike yet sinister "huldre-folk" who live in houses and try to woo human girls. These tales reflect the wildness of Norway, its mountains, forests, lakes, and sea, and the stalwart character of its sparse population. "The translation is excellent, retaining the traditional Norwegian style . . . the tales themselves will also appeal to the interested layman."--Library Journal

The Watkins Dictionary of Magic

by Nevill Drury

Over 3000 authoritative, cross-referenced entries, covering magical traditions from all around the world.

The Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, Volumes One through Three

by Dorothy L. Sayers

A special three-in-one edition of Dorothy Sayers's acclaimed Lord Peter Wimsey mystery series, books one through threeIn Whose Body?, Lord Peter Wimsey spends his days tracking down rare books, and his nights hunting killers. Though the Great War has left his nerves frayed with shellshock, Wimsey continues to be London's greatest sleuth--and he's about to encounter his oddest case yet. A strange corpse has appeared in a suburban architect's bathroom, stark naked save for an incongruous pince-nez. When Wimsey arrives on the scene, he is confronted with a once-in-a-lifetime puzzle. The police suspect that the bathtub's owner is the murderer, but Wimsey's investigation quickly reveals that the case is much stranger than anyone could have predicted.In Clouds of Witness, after three months in Corsica, Lord Peter Wimsey has begun to forget that the gray, dangerous moors of England ever existed. But traveling through Paris, he receives a shock that jolts him back to reality: His brother Gerald has been arrested for murder. The trouble began at the family estate in Yorkshire, where Gerald was hunting with the man soon to be his brother-in-law, Captain Denis Cathcart. When Cathcart is found dead, Gerald is presumed to be the only one who could have fired the fatal shot. The clock is ticking, and only England's premier sleuth can get to the bottom of this murky mystery. And in Unnatural Death, three operations failed to rid the aging Agatha Dawson of her cancer, but she refused to give in. As her body began to weaken, she accused lawyers, nurses, and doctors of trying to kill her and snatch her fortune. The town physician, an expert in cancer, gives her six months to live. Three days later, she is dead. Though the autopsy reveals nothing surprising, the doctor suspects that Agatha's niece had some hand in the old woman's death. When Lord Peter Wimsey, the dashing gentleman detective, looks into the matter, he finds that death stalks all those who might testify. How can he continue his investigation when every question marks another innocent for murder?

The Dower House Mystery

by Patricia Wentworth

In this atmospheric tale from the author of the Miss Silver Mysteries, a widow is reunited with her girlhood love in a house haunted by all-too-human ghosts They meet again in the dusk of a ruined garden. Amabel Grey hasn't laid eyes on Julian Forsham in twenty years, not since she gave him up--the man she'd fallen passionately in love with--for the fiancé who needed her. Now an unexpected circumstance brings the British widow and the world-famous scientist together again. Amabel's nineteen-year-old daughter, Daphne, has been invited to join her friends--and the boy she adores--on a trip to Egypt. But she needs two hundred pounds from her mother. George Forsham is offering that exact sum to anyone willing to stay six months at Dower House, the centuries-old estate in the English countryside where Amabel and Julian first met. The fact that the overgrown, sadly neglected house is rumored to be haunted doesn't deter Amabel. Until strange things start happening . . . The mewing of a cat that doesn't exist, the sound of flapping wings, someone crying in the dark. Are restless spirits walking the night? Or is there a rational explanation? Plunged into deadly danger, Amabel could lose her second chance with the man she never stopped loving.

Empire of the Sikhs: The Life and Times of Maharaja Ranjit Singh

by Patwant Singh Jyoti M. Rai

Ranjit Singh has been largely written out of accounts of India's past by British historians, yet he was one of the most powerful and charismatic figures in Indian history. He unified the warring chiefdoms of the Punjab into an extraordinary northern empire, built up a formidable army, kept the British in check to the south of his realm, and closed the Khyber Pass through which plunderers had poured into India for centuries. His consummate humanity was unique among empire-builders. He gave employment to defeated foes, honored faiths other than his own, and included Hindus and Muslims among his ministers. A colorful character, he was inspired by the principles of peaceful coexistence uniquely articulated by the Sikh Gurus, firm in upholding the rights of others, and unabashed in exercising his own. The authors of this first full-length biography in English make use of a variety of eyewitness accounts, from reports by Maratha spies at the Lahore Durbar to British parliamentary papers and travel accounts. The story ends with the controversial Anglo-Sikh Wars following Ranjit's death, which saw the fall of his empire in the hands of his successors whose internecine conflict was exploited by the British. Coinciding with the 300th anniversary of the consecration of the Sikh holy scriptures, this book honors a vital figure in Sikh history.

Observations: Poems

by Marianne Moore Linda Leavell

Marianne Moore's Observations stands with T. S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Ezra Pound's early Cantos, and Wallace Stevens's Harmonium as a landmark of modern poetry. But to the chagrin of many admirers, Moore eliminated a third of its contents from her subsequent poetry collections while radically revising some of the poems she retained. This groundbreaking book has been unavailable to the general reader since its original publication in the 1920s.Presented with a new introduction by Linda Leavell, the author of the award-winning biography Holding On Upside Down: The Life and Work of Marianne Moore, this reissue of Observations at last allows readers to experience the untamed force of Moore's most dazzling innovations. Her fellow modernists were thrilled by her originality, her "clear, flawless" language--to them she was "a rafter holding up . . . our uncompleted building." Equally forceful for subsequent generations, Observations was an "eye-opener" to the young Elizabeth Bishop, its poems "miracles of language and construction." John Ashbery has called "An Octopus" the finest poem of "our greatest modern poet." Moore's heroic open-mindedness and prescient views on multiculturalism, biodiversity, and individual liberty make her work uniquely suited to our times.Impeccably precise yet playfully elusive, emotionally complex but stripped of all sentiment, the poems in Observations show us one of America's greatest poets at the height of her powers.

Sacred Places Europe: 108 Destinations

by Brad Olsen

Combining current trends, academic theories, and historical insights, this travel guide brings both lesser-known and famous European spiritual locales into perspective by explaining the significance of each sacred site. The cultural relevance, history, and spirituality of each site--including Stonehenge, the Acropolis, Mont Saint Michel, Pompeii, and Saint Peter's Basilica--are explained, creating a moving and artistic travel experience. Each destination--with selections spanning more than 15 countries throughout Europe--is accompanied by easy-to-follow maps and directions.

The Amazing Chance

by Patricia Wentworth

A former soldier who's been unwittingly living another man's life is given the chance to turn back the clock Anton Blum is the strongest man in Konigswald. But the German peasant is mute; he hasn't spoken a word since he was wounded in action nearly a decade earlier. On a stormy night, he is recruited by British officers to help remove a tree that has fallen across the road. A flash of lightning strikes, and Anton is struck in the head by a branch. He opens his eyes and addresses one of the officers in English, calling him a nickname he couldn't possibly know. The truth is even more extraordinary: Anton isn't actually Anton, but a long-missing English soldier. Lookalike cousins Jack and Jim Laydon were presumed to have perished in a raid during the war. Cotterell Laydon, the present owner of Laydon Manor, is stunned to discover that one of his grandsons might be alive. But is he Jack or Jim? Now the long-lost Laydon must prove his identity before he can lay claim to the ancestral estate--and the wife who sees him as a complete stranger. Is it possible he isn't a Laydon at all?

Beethoven Confidential & Brahms Gets Laid

by Ken Russell

Beethoven Confidential started life as a play that was developed into a screenplay for a film starring Jodie Foster and Glenda Jackson, with Anthony Hopkins as the deaf musical genius Ludwig von Beethoven. It tells the story of the rivalry between two would-be biographers in the quest for the so-called "Immortal Beloved"--Beethoven's secret love. Personal friends of Beethoven, the biographers become pitted against each other in a race to reveal the mysterious lover. The film was never made but the mystery is solved in this novel about the great composer. It is a story that Ken Russell considers to be one of the most bizarre and compelling detective yarns of all time. Johannes Brahms was renowned for his three B's--beer, beard, and belly. Tradition has it that Brahms died a confirmed bachelor and a respected pillar of society who liked nothing better than a pint in the evening and a walk through the Black Forest at weekends. But what of his sex life? According to Ken Russell, "Brahms probably knew more about sex than any composer before or since." The evidence is in the music: for sheer sensuality try the inner movements of his Third Symphony, or the opening of his First Symphony ("tell me if that doesn't have balls") or a section in the Fourth that can only be described as "the sex act set to music." But the composer's early life tells us more. Born in the red-light district of Hamburg, Brahms spent his formative years playing piano in city brothels. Brahms Gets Laid investigates his close association with insane genius Robert Schumann and his even closer relationship with the psychologically disturbed Clara Schumann and her daughters.

Hue and Cry

by Patricia Wentworth

Accused of being a thief and spy, an English governess becomes a fugitive in this cunningly plotted mystery In six months, Marion "Mally" Lee will wed the dashing Roger Mooring and become mistress of Curston, his family estate. Determined to enjoy her freedom before she becomes a married woman, Mally impulsively accepts a position as governess to the young daughter of a shipping magnate. But when she arrives at the Peterson townhouse in London, Mally has the strangest urge to flee. Sir George Peterson, whose wife left him for an itinerant artist, is an enigma. His sister, Lena Craddock, is nice enough, but Mally's young charge, Barbara, hates Lena's nephew, Paul, with a passion. When Mally is suddenly branded a thief and spy after valuable papers and a priceless diamond pendant disappear, she does the only thing she can: run away. With her fiancé believing the worst of her and private investigators hot on her trail, Mally goes on the lam, feeling like a fugitive from justice. But she's stumbled upon a dangerous criminal conspiracy led by men desperate to get back the missing documents before a critical encrypted message is decoded.

Lawrence and the Arabs

by Robert Graves

Immortalized in the film "Lawrence of Arabia," the real T.E. Lawrence was a leader, a war strategist, and a scholar, and is here immortalized in an intimate biography written by his close friend, the award-winning British novelist, poet and classicist Robert Graves.As a student at Oxford, T.E. Lawrence was fascinated with Middle Eastern history and culture, and underwent a four-month visit to Syria to study the fortifications built by the Crusaders. Later, he returned to the region, this time as an archaeologist working with the British Army's Intelligence unit in Egypt during World War I. From there, in 1916, he joined Arab rebels fighting against Turkish domination. His brilliance as a desert war tactician earned him the respect of the Turkish fighters and worldwide renown.This is the real story of T.E. Lawrence's life, told by one of the most influential British writers of the 20th century, and a personal friend.

Unnatural Death

by Dorothy L. Sayers

When a terminally ill woman dies much earlier than expected, Lord Peter suspects murderThough never quick-witted, Agatha Dawson had an iron constitution and a will to fight that never abated in her old age. Even after three operations failed to rid her of her cancer, she refused to give in. But as her body began to weaken, she accused lawyers, nurses, and doctors of trying to kill her and snatch her fortune. The town physician, an expert in cancer, gives her six months to live. Three days later, she is dead. Though the autopsy reveals nothing surprising, the doctor suspects that Agatha's niece had some hand in the old woman's death. When Lord Peter Wimsey, the dashing gentleman detective, looks into the matter, he finds that death stalks all those who might testify. How can he continue his investigation when every question marks another innocent for murder? This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College.

Grey Mask

by Patricia Wentworth

The first of the classic mysteries featuring governess-turned-detective Miss Silver, who investigates a deadly conspiratorial ringCharles Moray has come home to England to collect his inheritance. After four years wandering the jungles of India and South America, the hardy young man returns to the manor of his birth, where generations of Morays have lived and died. Strangely, he finds the house unlocked, and sees a light on in one of its abandoned rooms. Eavesdropping, he learns of a conspiracy to commit a fearsome crime. Never one for the heroic, Charles's first instinct is to let the police settle it. But then he hears her voice. Margaret, his long lost love, is part of the gang. To unravel their diabolical plot, he contacts Miss Silver, a onetime governess who applies her reason to solve crimes and face the dangers of London's underworld.

Private Views

by Frederic Raphael

Charlie Marsden has to come to terms with a woman whom he cannot help but love unconditionally but who can never quite be his in this portrait of a vanishing generationWho is Katya Lowell and what is the secret of her life? A beautiful, seemingly cool painter of unnerving images in 1970s London, she comes to the attention of Charlie Marsden, an aristocrat who works at an old merchant bank in the City. Why does this elegant, enigmatic woman choose to spend time with outsiders such as the former secret agent Harry Groves and the suburban multi-millionaire Jarvis Green? Private Views is a portrait gallery of smart society. The author's pitch-perfect dialogue fills the reader's ears with the voices of the stammeringly voluble dramatic critic Benedict Bligh, the glossy-magazine columnist Tamsin Fairfax, Charlie's smart, bisexual auctioneer flatmate Marcus Steele, the gentleman cook Theo Plant and his thriller-writing brother Ferdy, and Charlie and his delicious sister Camilla. Like a threatened species, they prefer not to look at the cunning predators and their low-life sidekicks who are taking control of old England. This love story, at once superbly romantic and darkly erotic, guides our imagination towards savoring the ambiguous connection between life and art. Frederic Raphael's new novel is both an original work of art and the portrait of a vanishing generation. It is as if The Story of O. had been crossed with The Portrait of a Lady.

The Fun of It

by Amelia Earhart

Autobiography of the famous flyer which describes her own ambitions to become a pilot and offers advice to others.

Showing 51 through 75 of 8,116 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.