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The Weaver's Studio - Woven Shibori: Revised and Updated

by Catharine Ellis

Rediscover Woven Shibori In this update of the classic Woven Shibori, master weaver Catharine Ellis teaches weavers of all skill levels how to create beautiful dyed woven cloth, using environmentally friendly natural dyes. Shibori is a traditional Japanese technique, in which a piece of cloth is shaped by folding, stitching, tying, or wrapping then dyed to create stunning color patterns. Ellis developed a method of weaving resist warp and weft threads directly into the cloth and shared her findings in her breakthrough book. Featuring all-new information on working with natural dyes and dozens of new photographs, this revised edition is an invaluable resource for weavers. It features:Techniques for incorporating shibori into two-shaft weaves, monk's belt, overshot, twills, laces, and other patternsGuidance and inspiration for creating your own woven shibori designsInstructions for preparing the fabric for dyeing and finishing the dyed clothRecipes for creating natural dyes from plants and insects to dye both plant and animal fibersSpecial effects for enhancing woven shibori, including layering colors, cross dyeing, felting, creating permanent pleats, and burning outWoven Shibori opens up a world of creative surface design possibilities for weavers and textile artists.

Extraterritorial Dreams: European Citizenship, Sephardi Jews, and the Ottoman Twentieth Century

by Sarah Abrevaya Stein

We tend to think of citizenship as something that is either offered or denied by a state. Modern history teaches otherwise.Reimagining citizenship as a legal spectrum along which individuals can travel, Extraterritorial Dreams explores the history of Ottoman Jews who sought, acquired, were denied or stripped of citizenship in Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries--as the Ottoman Empire retracted and new states were born--in order to ask larger questions about the nature of citizenship itself. Sarah Abrevaya Stein traces the experiences of Mediterranean Jewish women, men, and families who lived through a tumultuous series of wars, border changes, genocides, and mass migrations, all in the shadow of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the ascendance of the modern passport regime. Moving across vast stretches of Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas, she tells the intimate stories of people struggling to find a legal place in a world ever more divided by political boundaries and competing nationalist sentiments. From a poor youth who reached France as a stowaway only to be hunted by the Parisian police as a spy to a wealthy Baghdadi-born man in Shanghai who willed his fortune to his Eurasian Buddhist wife, Stein tells stories that illuminate the intertwined nature of minority histories and global politics through the turbulence of the modern era.

"I Heard You Paint Houses", Updated Edition: Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran & Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa

by Charles Brandt

Updated with a 57-page Conclusion by the author that features new, independent corroboration of Frank Sheeran's revelations about the killing of Jimmy Hoffa, the killing of Joey Gallo and the murder of JFK, along with stories that could not be told before."I Heard You Paint Houses" will soon be a major motion picture directed by Martin Scorsese. The working title for the movie is "The Irishman".The first words Jimmy Hoffa ever spoke to Frank "the Irishman" Sheeran were, "I heard you paint houses." To paint a house is to kill a man. The paint is the blood that splatters on the walls and floors. In the course of nearly five years of recorded interviews Frank Sheeran confessed to Charles Brandt that he handled more than twenty-five hits for the mob, and for his friend Hoffa. Sheeran learned to kill in the U.S. Army, where he saw an astonishing 411 days of active combat duty in Italy during World War II. After returning home he became a hustler and hit man, working for legendary crime boss Russell Bufalino. Eventually he would rise to a position of such prominence that in a RICO suit then-U.S. Attorney Rudy Giuliani would name him as one of only two non-Italians on a list of 26 top mob figures. When Bufalino ordered Sheeran to kill Hoffa, he did the deed, knowing that if he had refused he would have been killed himself. Sheeran's important and fascinating story includes new information on other famous murders including those of Joey Gallo and JFK, and provides rare insight to a chapter in American history. Charles Brandt has written a page-turner that has become a true crime classic.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Dark Horse Bundle

by Kate Sherwood

Dan Wheeler thought he'd found lasting love and stability, but when it's all taken away, can he take a chance on something new? In Dark Horse, Dan meets Evan Kaminski and Jeff Stevens while selling a horse and finds himself drawn to the pair of lovers. In Out of the Darkness, Dan is building a new life for himself in California with Evan and Jeff, but can the three of them find balance in their tumultuous relationship? In Of Dark and Bright, Dan, Evan, and Jeff have found their happily-ever-after--mostly--but when Dan's long-lost sister shows up on their doorstep, the pressure may crack their foundations.See excerpt for individual blurbs.

Laura and Alan

by Melanie James

When a marriage is in trouble, the women of Éveiller Drive come together with advice and support, and you will be surprised by the solutions they concoct. Laura and Alan from New York Times and USA Today bestselling contemporary romance author Melanie James is book 3 in the hot sexy Éveiller Drive romance series.Laura has perfected the art of time management. Her tightly watched schedule is the only thing that keeps her busy life from slipping into chaos. After all, not only is she a devoted mother of two children, she is the head of advertising for a real estate development company-a growing business that she started with her equally busy husband, Alan.Fourteen years into their marriage, Laura notices that Alan has been emotionally distant, and wonders if there is something going on. Has Laura's meticulous scheduling gone too far? Has Alan given up? When she confronts him with her fears about their marriage, she receives a surprising response. Now, the question is if she will be able to take a kinky leap of faith in her marriage. Will her friends on Éveiller Drive be there for her?This contemporary erotic romance contains adult content and situations, and is not intended for readers under the age of 18.Previously Published: (2014) Melanie James, Black Paw Publishing

Forever Caspia

by Michelle Hoppe

A traitor king. A family in turmoil. He was born a Merman but raised as human, and now...his life is about to change again! Forever Caspia by paranormal erotic romance author Michelle Hoppe is an exciting tale of subterfuge and evil lurking beneath the waves of the Caspian Sea.A curse will dethrone a king and send his family into the world of humans. Living on land for most of his life, Prince Tiro resents his role in returning his family to their rightful heritage as rulers of the Mer city of Caspia. Resentment builds as Tiro has to give up the life he's built and become part of a world he barely remembers.Discover if Tiro can let go of his anger long enough to see the beauty of the undersea world. Will he find love or will Tiro turn his back on Caspia...forever?Jessica of Fallen Angel Reviews had this to say about Forever Caspia "... a wonderful story of romance above and below the sea. I was captivated by the well-written characters. Michelle Hoppe has done a wonderful job and earned 5 Angels in the process!"This paranormal erotic romance contains mermaids, suspense, and adult content and situations, and is not intended for readers under the age of 18.Previously Published: (2012) Liquid Silver Books, (2005) Changeling Press

Collected Poems: 1944-1979

by Kingsley Amis Clive James

Kingsley Amis's poetry tackles all the grimly humorous subjects he tackled in his novels--lust, lost love, booze, money and the lack of it, old age, death--and does so with immense formal poise. A master of both traditional and unconventional meters with a perfect ear for parody, Amis wrote satires, epigrams, and rueful and scornful songs that are remarkable not only for their virtuosity and humor but for their scabrous realism. It all adds up to a small, entirely individual, and memorably bracing body of work. As Amis writes: "Beauty, they tell me, is a dangerous thing, / Whose touch will burn, but I'm asbestos, see?"

Michigan Legends: Folktales and Lore from the Great Lakes State

by Sheryl James

Over the course of its history, the state of Michigan has produced its share of folktales and lore. Many are familiar with the Ojibwa legend of Sleeping Bear Dunes, and most have heard a yarn or two told of Michigan's herculean lumberjack, Paul Bunyan. But what about Detroit's Nain Rouge, the red-eyed imp they say bedeviled the city's earliest residents? Or Le Griffon, the Great Lakes' original ghost ship that some believe haunts the waters to this day? Or the Bloodstoppers, Upper Peninsula folk who've been known to halt a wound's bleeding with a simple touch thanks to their magic healing powers? In Michigan Legends, Sheryl James collects these and more stories of the legendary people, events, and places from Michigan's real and imaginary past. Set in a range of historical time periods and locales as well as featuring a collage of ethnic traditions--including Native American, French, English, African American, and Finnish--these tales are a vivid sample of the state's rich cultural heritage. This book will appeal to all Michiganders and anyone else interested in good folktales, myths, legends, or lore.

Mammographies: The Cultural Discourses of Breast Cancer Narratives

by Mary K. Deshazer

While breast cancer continues to affect the lives of millions, contemporary writers and artists have responded to the ravages of the disease in creative expression. Mary K. DeShazer's book looks specifically at breast cancer memoirs and photographic narratives, a category she refers to as mammographies, signifying both the imaging technology by which most Western women discover they have this disease and the documentary imperatives that drive their written and visual accounts of it. Mammographies argues that breast cancer narratives of the past ten years differ from their predecessors in their bold address of previously neglected topics such as the link between cancer and environmental carcinogens, the ethics and efficacy of genetic testing and prophylactic mastectomy, and the shifting politics of prosthesis and reconstruction. Mammographies is distinctive among studies of contemporary illness narratives in its exclusive focus on breast cancer, its analysis of both memoirs and photographic texts, its attention to hybrid and collaborative narratives, and its emphasis on ecological, genetic, transnational, queer, and anti-pink discourses. DeShazer's methodology--best characterized as literary critical, feminist, and interdisciplinary--includes detailed interpretation of the narrative strategies, thematic contours, and visual imagery of a wide range of contemporary breast cancer memoirs and photographic anthologies. The author explores the ways in which the narratives constitute a distinctive testimonial and memorial tradition, a claim supported by close readings and theoretical analysis that demonstrates how these narratives question hegemonic cultural discourses, empower reader-viewers as empathic witnesses, and provide communal sites for mourning, resisting, and remembering.

Financing Medicaid: Federalism and the Growth of America's Health Care Safety Net

by Shanna Rose

Conventional wisdom holds that programs for the poor are vulnerable to instability and retrenchment. Medicaid, however, has grown into the nation's largest intergovernmental grant program, accounting for nearly half of all federal funding to state and local governments. Medicaid's generous open-ended federal matching grants have given governors a powerful incentive to mobilize on behalf of its maintenance and expansion, using methods ranging from lobbying and negotiation to creative financing mechanisms and waivers to maximize federal financial assistance. Perceiving federal retrenchment efforts as a threat to states' finances, governors, through the powerful National Governors' Association, have repeatedly worked together in bipartisan fashion to defend the program against cutbacks. Financing Medicaidengagingly intertwines theory, historical narrative, and case studies, drawing on sources including archival materials from the National Governors' Association and gubernatorial and presidential libraries, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data, the Congressional Record, and interviews.

The Tender Friendship and the Charm of Perfect Accord: Nabokov and His Father

by Gavriel Shapiro

Vladimir Nabokov (1899-1977), a writer of world renown, grew up in a culturally refined family with diverse interests. Nabokov's father, Vladimir Dmitrievich (1870-1922), was a distinguished jurist and statesman at the turn of the twentieth century. He was also a great connoisseur and aficionado of literature, painting, theater, and music as well as a passionate butterfly collector, keen chess player, and avid athlete. This book, the first of its kind, examines Vladimir Nabokov's life and works as impacted by his distinguished father. It demonstrates that V. D. Nabokov exerted the most fundamental influence on his son, making this examination pivotal to understanding the writer's personality and his world perception, as well as his literary, scholarly, and athletic accomplishments. The book contains never heretofore published archival materials. It is appended with rare articles by Nabokov and his father and is accompanied by old photographs. In addition, the book constitutes a survey of sorts of Russian civilization at the turn of the twentieth century by providing a partial view of the multifaceted picture of Imperial Russia in its twilight hours. The book illumines the historical background, political struggle, juridical battles, and literary and artistic life as well as athletic activities during the epoch, rich in cultural events and fraught with sociopolitical upheavals. Cover illustration: Vladimir Nabokov and his father, 1906. The Nabokov family photographs. Copyright © The Estate of Vladimir Nabokov, used by permission of The Wylie Agency, LLC; and of The Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations.

Arguments with Silence: Writing the History of Roman Women

by Amy Richlin

Women in ancient Rome challenge the historian. Widely represented in literature and art, they rarely speak for themselves. Amy Richlin, among the foremost pioneers in ancient studies, gives voice to these women through scholarship that scours sources from high art to gutter invective. In Arguments with Silence, Richlin presents a linked selection of her essays on Roman women's history, originally published between 1981 and 2001 as the field of "women in antiquity" took shape, and here substantially rewritten and updated. The new introduction to the volume lays out the historical methodologies these essays developed, places this process in its own historical setting, and reviews work on Roman women since 2001, along with persistent silences. Individual chapter introductions locate each piece in the social context of Second Wave feminism in Classics and the academy, explaining why each mattered as an intervention then and still does now. Inhabiting these pages are the women whose lives were shaped by great art, dirty jokes, slavery, and the definition of adultery as a wife's crime; Julia, Augustus' daughter, who died, as her daughter would, exiled to a desert island; women wearing makeup, safeguarding babies with amulets, practicing their religion at home and in public ceremonies; the satirist Sulpicia, flaunting her sexuality; and the praefica, leading the lament for the dead. Amy Richlin is one of a small handful of modern thinkers in a position to consider these questions, and this guided journey with her brings surprise, delight, and entertainment, as well as a fresh look at important questions.

Bluestocking Feminism and British-German Cultural Transfer, 1750-1837

by Alessa Johns

Bluestocking Feminism and British-German Cultural Transfer, 1750-1837 examines the processes of cultural transfer between Britain and Germany during the Personal Union, the period from 1714 to 1837 when the kings of England were simultaneously Electors of Hanover. While scholars have generally focused on the political and diplomatic implications of the Personal Union, Alessa Johns offers a new perspective by tracing sociocultural repercussions and investigating how, in the period of the American and French Revolutions, Britain and Germany generated distinct discourses of liberty even though they were nonrevolutionary countries. British and German reformists--feminists in particular--used the period's expanded pathways of cultural transfer to generate new discourses as well as to articulate new views of what personal freedom, national character, and international interaction might be. Johns traces four pivotal moments of cultural exchange: the expansion of the book trade, the rage for translation, the effect of revolution on intra-European travel and travel writing, and the impact of transatlantic journeys on visions of reform. Johns reveals the way in which what she terms "bluestocking transnationalism" spawned discourses of liberty and attempts at sociocultural reform during this period of enormous economic development, revolution, and war.

Pastplay: Teaching and Learning History with Technology

by Kevin Kee

In the field of history, the Web and other technologies have become important tools in research and teaching of the past. Yet the use of these tools is limited--many historians and history educators have resisted adopting them because they fail to see how digital tools supplement and even improve upon conventional tools (such as books). In Pastplay, a collection of essays by leading history and humanities researchers and teachers, editor Kevin Kee works to address these concerns head-on. How should we use technology? Playfully, Kee contends. Why? Because doing so helps us think about the past in new ways; through the act of creating technologies, our understanding of the past is re-imagined and developed. From the insights of numerous scholars and teachers, Pastplay argues that we should play with technology in history because doing so enables us to see the past in new ways by helping us understand how history is created; honoring the roots of research, teaching, and technology development; requiring us to model our thoughts; and then allowing us to build our own understanding.

Wicked Takes the Witness Stand: A Tale of Murder and Twisted Deceit in Northern Michigan

by Mardi Link

On a bitterly cold afternoon in December 1986, a Michigan State trooper found the frozen body of Jerry Tobias in the bed of his pickup truck. The 31-year-old oil field worker and small-time drug dealer was curled up on his side on the truck's bare metal, pressed against the tailgate, clad only in jeans, a checkered shirt, and cowboy boots. Inside the cab of the truck was a fresh package of expensive steaks from a local butcher shop--the first lead in a case that would be quickly lost in a thicket of bungled forensics, shady prosecution, and a psychopathic star witness out for revenge. Award-winning author Mardi Link's third book of Michigan true crime, Wicked Takes the Witness Stand, unravels this mysterious and still unsolved case that sucked state police and local officials into a morass of perjury and cover-up and ultimately led to the separate conviction and imprisonment of five innocent men. This unbelievable story will leave the reader shocked and aching for justice.

The North Country Trail: The Best Walks, Hikes, and Backpacking Trips on America’s Longest National Scenic Trail

by North Country Trail Association Ron Strickland

The North Country Trail is the longest of America's eleven congressionally designated National Scenic Trails. Winding through seven states--New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota--the NCT's 4,600 miles attract more than one million visitors annually. These hikers are treated to a smorgasbord of Upper Midwest hiking featuring everything from urban strolls to backcountry adventure through mountains, rivers, prairies, and shoreline. This book is the definitive guide for NCT hikers--whether first-timers, seasoned backpackers, or any level in between--who wish to maximize their experience on this splendid trail. In addition to a full overview of the trail's tread in each state, the guide describes in detail forty of the NCT's premier segments, with helpful information including easy-to-read trail descriptions, physical and navigation difficulties, trail highlights, hiking tips, and precise maps incorporating the latest GPS technology.

Cultural Struggles: Performance, Ethnography, Praxis

by E. Patrick Johnson Dwight Conquergood

The late Dwight Conquergood's research has inspired an entire generation of scholars invested in performance as a meaningful paradigm to understand human interaction, especially between structures of power and the disenfranchised. Conquergood's research laid the groundwork for others to engage issues of ethics in ethnographic research, performance as a meaningful paradigm for ethnography, and case studies that demonstrated the dissolution of theory/practice binaries.Cultural Struggles is the first gathering of Conquergood's work in a single volume, tracing the evolution of one scholar's thinking across a career of scholarship, teaching, and activism, and also the first collection of its kind to bring together theory, method, and complete case studies. The collection begins with an illuminating introduction by E. Patrick Johnson and ends with commentary by other scholars (Micaela di Leonardo, Judith Hamera, Shannon Jackson, D. Soyini Madison, Lisa Merrill, Della Pollock, and Joseph Roach), engaging aspects of Conquergood's work and providing insight into how that work has withstood the test of time, as scholars still draw on his research to inform their current interests and methods.

Butch Queens Up in Pumps: Gender, Performance, and Ballroom Culture in Detroit

by Marlon M. Bailey

Butch Queens Up in Pumpsexamines Ballroom culture, in which inner-city LGBT individuals dress, dance, and vogue to compete for prizes and trophies. Participants are affiliated with a house, an alternative family structure typically named after haute couture designers and providing support to this diverse community. Marlon M. Bailey's rich first-person performance ethnography of the Ballroom scene in Detroit examines Ballroom as a queer cultural formation that upsets dominant notions of gender, sexuality, kinship, and community.

Animal Acts: Performing Species Today

by Holly Hughes Una Chaudhuri

We all have an animal story--the pet we loved, the wild animal that captured our childhood imagination, the deer the neighbor hit while driving. While scientific breakthroughs in animal cognition, the effects of global climate change and dwindling animal habitats, and the exploding interdisciplinary field of animal studies have complicated things, such stories remain a part of how we tell the story of being human. Animal Acts collects eleven exciting, provocative, and moving stories by solo performers, accompanied by commentary that places the works in a broader context. Work by leading theater artists Holly Hughes, Rachel Rosenthal, Deke Weaver, Carmelita Tropicana, and others joins commentary by major scholars including Donna Haraway, Jane Desmond, Jill Dolan, and Nigel Rothfels. Una Chaudhuri's introduction provides a vital foundation for understanding and appreciating the intersection of animal studies and performance. The anthology foregrounds questions of race, gender, sexuality, class, nation, and other issues central to the human project within the discourse of the "post human," and will appeal to readers interested in solo performance, animal studies, gender studies, performance studies, and environmental studies.

The End of Normal: Identity in a Biocultural Era

by Lennard Davis

In an era when human lives are increasingly measured and weighed in relation to the medical and scientific, notions of what is "normal" have changed drastically. While it is no longer useful to think of a person's particular race, gender, sexual orientation, or choice as "normal," the concept continues to haunt us in other ways. In The End of Normal, Lennard J. Davis explores changing perceptions of body and mind in social, cultural, and political life as the twenty-first century unfolds. The book's provocative essays mine the worlds of advertising, film, literature, and the visual arts as they consider issues of disability, depression, physician-assisted suicide, medical diagnosis, transgender, and other identities. Using contemporary discussions of biopower and biopolitics, Davis focuses on social and cultural production--particularly on issues around the different body and mind. The End of Normal seeks an analysis that works comfortably in the intersection between science, medicine, technology, and culture, and will appeal to those interested in cultural studies, bodily practices, disability, science and medical studies, feminist materialism, psychiatry, and psychology.

The Rag-Picker's Guide to Poetry: Poems, Poets, Process

by Maurice Manning Eleanor Wilner

The venture of this inviting collection is to look, from the many vantages that the 35 poets in this eclectic anthology chose to look, at what it was--knowing that a poem can't be conceived in advance of its creation--that helped their poems to emerge or connected them over time. The Rag-Picker's Guide to Poetrypermits an inside view of how poets outwit internal censors and habits of thought, showing how the meticulous and the spontaneous come together in the process of discovery. Within are contained the work and thoughts of: Betty Adcock Joan Aleshire Debra Allbery Elizabeth Arnold David Baker Rick Barot Marianne Boruch Karen Brennan Gabrielle Calvocoressi Michael Collier Carl Dennis Stuart Dischell Roger Fanning Chris Forhan Reginald Gibbons Linda Gregerson Jennifer Grotz Brooks Haxton Tony Hoagland Mark Jarman A. Van Jordan Laura Kasischke Mary Leader Dana Levin James Longenbach Thomas Lux Maurice Manning Heather McHugh Martha Rhodes Alan Shapiro Daniel Tobin Ellen Bryant Voigt Alan Williamson Eleanor Wilner C. Dale Young

Old and New New Englanders: Immigration and Regional Identity in the Gilded Age

by Bluford Adams

In Old and New New Englanders, Bluford Adams provides a reenvisioning of New England's history and regional identity by exploring the ways the arrival of waves of immigrants from Europe and Canada transformed what it meant to be a New Englander during the Gilded Age. Adams's intervention challenges a number of long-standing conceptions of New England, offering a detailed and complex portrayal of the relations between New England's Yankees and immigrants that goes beyond nativism and assimilation. In focusing on immigration in this period, Adams provides a fresh view on New England's regional identity, moving forward from Pilgrims, Puritans, and their descendants and emphasizing the role immigrants played in shaping the region's various meanings. Furthermore, many researchers have overlooked the newcomers' relationship to the regional identities they found here. Adams argues immigrants took their ties to New England seriously. Although they often disagreed about the nature of those ties, many immigrant leaders believed identification with New England would benefit their peoples in their struggles both in the United States and back in their ancestral lands. Drawing on and contributing to work in immigration history, as well as American, gender, ethnic, and New England studies, this book is broadly concerned with the history of identity construction in the United States while its primary focus is the relationship between regional categories of identity and those based on race and ethnicity. With its interdisciplinary methodology, original research, and diverse chapter topics, the book targets both specialist and nonspecialist readers.

Waiting for Cancer to Come: Women’s Experiences with Genetic Testing and Medical Decision Making for Breast and Ovarian Cancer

by Sharlene Hesse-Biber

Waiting for Cancer to Come tells the stories of women who are struggling with their high risk for cancer. Based on interviews and surveys of dozens of women, this book pieces together the diverse yet interlocking experiences of women who have tested positive for the BRCA 1/2 gene mutations, which indicate a higher risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Sharlene Hesse-Biber brings these narratives to light and follows women's journeys from deciding to get screened for BRCA, to learning the test has come back positive, to dealing with their risk. Many women already know the challenges of a family history riddled with cancer and now find themselves with the devastating knowledge of their own genetic risk. Using the voices of the women themselves to describe the under-explored BRCA experience, Waiting for Cancer to Come looks at the varied emotional, social, economic, and psychological factors at play in women's decisions about testing and cancer prevention.

Finding Italy: Travel, Nation, and Colonization in Vergil's Aeneid

by Kristopher Fletcher

Finding Italy explores the journey of the Romans' ancestor Aeneas and his fellow Trojans from their old home, Troy, to their new country, Italy, narrated in Vergil's epic poem Aeneid. K. F. B. Fletcher argues that a main narrative theme is patriotism, specifically the problem of how one comes to love one's new country. The various directions Aeneas receives throughout the first half of the poem are meant to create this love, explaining both to Aeneas and to Vergil's readers how they should respond to the new, unified Italy synonymous with Rome. These directions come from the gods, or from people close to Aeneas who have divine connections, and they all serve to instill an emotional connection to the land, creating a mental image of Italy that tells him far more about his destination than merely its location, and ultimately making him fall in love with Italy enough to fight for it soon after his arrival. The poem thus dramatizes the birth of nationalism, as Italy is only a concept to Aeneas throughout his trip; these directions do not describe Italy as it is at the time of Aeneas' journey, but as an ideal to be realized by Aeneas and his descendants, reaching its final, perfect form under Augustus Caesar. Finding Italy provides a very detailed reading of the directions Aeneas receives by situating them within their relevant contexts: ancient geography, Greek colonization narratives, prophecy, and ancient views of wandering. Vergil draws on all of these concepts to craft instructions that create in Aeneas an attachment to Italy before he ever arrives, a process that dramatizes a key emotional problem in the late first century BCE in the wake of the Social and Civil Wars: how to balance the love of one's modest birthplace with the love of Rome, the larger city that now encompasses it.

Evita, Inevitably: Performing Argentina's Female Icons Before and After Eva Perón

by Jean Graham-Jones

Evita, Inevitably sheds new light on the history and culture of Argentina by examining the performances and reception of the country's most iconic female figures, in particular, Eva Perón, who rose from poverty to become a powerful international figure. The book links the Evita legend to a broader pattern of female iconicity from the mid-nineteenth century onward, reading Evita against the performances of other female icons: Camila O'Gorman, executed by firing squad over her affair with a Jesuit priest; Difunta Correa, a devotional figure who has achieved near-sainthood; cumbia-pop performer Gilda; the country's patron saint, the Virgin of Luján; and finally, Argentina's president, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner. Employing the tools of discursive, visual, and performance analysis, Jean Graham-Jones studies theatrical performance, literature, film, folklore, Catholic iconography, and Internet culture to document the ways in which these "femicons" have been staged.

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