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Disney's Pixar®: How Steve Jobs Changed Hollywood

by Aurelia Jackson

Pixar is one of the most successful companies creating movies today. You've probably seen at least one of their huge hits, movies such as Toy Story, Monsters, Inc., Cars, or Wall*E. Ever since Steve Jobs, founder of Apple Computers, bought the company from George Lucas, creator of Star Wars, Pixar has changed the way animated movies are made. Steve has turned the company into something incredible. Discover the story of how Steve gave Pixar the chance to make their first movies, how Pixar changed Hollywood--and how Pixar hopes to keep on amazing moviegoers in the future.

Facebook®: How Mark Zuckerberg Connected More Than a Billion Friends

by Celicia Scott

Today, Facebook is one of the most-used websites on the Internet, visited by millions of users each day and home to more than 500 million accounts. Many people use Facebook to share pictures, news, and ideas with friends--but they may not know the true story behind Facebook's massive success. Facebook began as the idea of one college student: Mark Zuckerberg. Discover how Mark founded one of the most successful social networking sites on the Internet while he was still in school. Learn how he first got Facebook growing, and how he keeps millions of people logging in day after day. Find out more about the man behind Facebook--and learn what's next for his company.

Google®: How Larry Page & Sergey Brin Changed the Way We Search the Web

by Aurelia Jackson

Google is one of the most successful companies of the Internet age. For many people, looking up information with Google's search engine is the best way to find just what they want to know. Millions of people write and read e-mails using Google's Gmail. You can listen to music on Google Play or share a document with a friend using Google Drive. Today, Google also owns YouTube, the number-one video site on the Internet. You may use Google websites every day, but do you know the story of the men behind Google--Larry Page and Sergey Brin? Find out how Larry and Sergey started the company and how they got their first inspiration. Learn how Google grew to become the amazing success we all know today.

Instagram®: How Kevin Systrom & Mike Krieger Changed the Way We Take and Share Photos

by Rosa Waters

Instagram has had huge success in just a short time. With a popular website and smartphone app, Instagram has become one of the best ways to share pictures with friends. Instagram, however, was once just the idea of two men: Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger. Together, these two men have taken Instagram to new heights and made it one of the most popular tech companies. Discover their story. Find out how Instagram grew to what it is today.

Netflix®: How Reed Hastings Changed the Way We Watch Movies & TV

by Aurelia Jackson

Today, when you want to watch a movie or television show, there's a good chance you may choose to watch it using Netflix, one of the most popular video services on the Internet. With thousands of movies and TV shows, Netflix has changed the way we watch our favorite entertainment. You may use Netflix every day--but do you know the story of the man behind the company's success? Netflix was once only an idea in the mind of Reed Hastings, a businessman who has done amazing things since starting the online movie and TV company. Discover how Reed was able to make Netflix a success around the world--and find out what he has planned next to keep the company on top.

Pinterest®: How Ben Silbermann & Evan Sharp Changed the Way We Share What We Love

by Rosa Waters

In the last few years, Pinterest has become one of the world's most popular social networking sites, allowing users to share the things they love with others by "pinning" pictures to an interactive online bulletin board. You may have heard of Pinterest, you may use it yourself--but do you know the story behind the success? Discover the story of how two friends, Ben Silbermann and Evan Sharp, changed social networking with Pinterest. Find out what it took for the two young men to start their own company--and learn what they have planned for the future of Pinterest.

Tumblr®: How David Karp Changed the Way We Blog

by Aurelia Jackson

In the last few years, Tumblr has become one of the most popular social networking websites. Before Tumblr was the company we know today, however, it was just one of David Karp's smaller projects. Learn more about one of the most successful young people working in tech--and how he changed the way people share who they are and what they like. Discover the story behind David Karp's success--and find out what it takes to turn a new company into something amazing.

Twitter®: How Jack Dorsey Changed the Way We Communicate

by Celicia Scott

In the modern world, Twitter has changed the way we talk to each other, the way we share important news, and the way we learn about the world. You've probably heard of movie celebrities, politicians, and sports stars using Twitter to communicate with fans, but the social networking site has also done a lot to change the way ordinary people use the Internet. It's even changed the way we speak! Discover the story of Jack Dorsey, Twitter's co-founder, and how he helped to create one of the Internet's biggest successes. Learn how Jack and his friends came up with the ideas for the business that would change their lives--and the lives of so many Internet users--forever.

YouTube®: How Steve Chen Changed the Way We Watch Videos

by Celicia Scott

You probably watch music videos, movie trailers, or funny clips on YouTube--but just a few years ago, YouTube was only an idea a few friends shared. One of those friends was Steve Chen. Learn about the beginning of one of the most important websites ever created. Discover the story of how Steve helped to start the biggest video site on the Internet.

The Alamo: Symbol of Freedom

by Hal Marcovitz

In 1836, a small group of Texan settlers fighting for their freedom from Mexico fortified an old Spanish mission near the village of San Antonio de Béxar. Surrounded and badly outnumbered by a larger Mexican army, the defenders of the Alamo vowed to fight rather than surrender. Their sacrifice allowed other Texans the opportunity to organize and prepare their army to face the Mexicans, and win freedom for Texas at the Battle of San Jacinto six weeks later. Today the Alamo remains a shrine to liberty, and a symbol of courage and determination in the face of overwhelming odds.

American Flag: The Story of Old Glory

by Joseph Ferry

By whatever name it is called--the Stars and Stripes, Old Glory, the Star-Spangled Banner--the American flag is the ultimate symbol of American freedom. But why stars, why stripes? What is the significance of the elements of the flag? The American flag went through several incarnations before the design we recognize today was established. From a banner based on a British flag and a colonial rattlesnake flag that read, "Don't Tread on Me" to the enormous 15-star flag that flew over Fort McHenry in 1814, inspiring Francis Scott Key to write the national anthem, this symbol of America has inspired music and joy in the hearts of people around the world. It is a beacon to those who long for liberty, as well as a representation of the unity of our great nation.

Bald Eagle: Story of Our National Bird

by Hal Marcovitz

In the early days of American independence, government leaders tried to identify an animal that would represent the new nation. They settled on the bald eagle, a proud raptor that fiercely defends its nest and its family. The eagle has been used to represent government power since the time of the Roman Empire. In 1787 the bald eagle was officially adopted as the emblem of the United States. The eagle is often shown holding an olive branch (representing peace) and arrows (representing war) in its talons. Today the bald eagle remains a living symbol of American strength and values.

Confederate Flag: Controversial Symbol of the South

by Hal Marcovitz

The issue of slavery had divided the nation for decades, but problems came to a head after the election of Abraham Lincoln as president in 1860. Fearing that Lincoln would attempt to abolish slavery, the legislatures of 11 southern states voted to withdraw from the United States and create a new nation, the Confederate States of America. This would result in four bloody years of Civil War in which more than 600,000 Americans were killed. The Confederacy adopted several flags between 1861 and 1865; the best known today is the battle flag, which featured a blue saltire cross on a red background. To some people, the Confederate flag is a proud symbol of Southern heritage and bravery. Others, however, view the Confederate flag as a symbol that represents the enslavement and oppression of African Americans. As a result, the Confederate flag is among the most controversial of American symbols.

The Declaration of Independence: Forming a New Nation

by Hal Marcovitz

The issue of slavery had divided the nation for decades, but problems came to a head after the election of Abraham Lincoln as president in 1860. Fearing that Lincoln would attempt to abolish slavery, the legislatures of 11 southern states voted to withdraw from the United States and create a new nation, the Confederate States of America. This would result in four bloody years of Civil War in which more than 600,000 Americans were killed. The Confederacy adopted several flags between 1861 and 1865; the best known today is the battle flag, which featured a blue saltire cross on a red background. To some people, the Confederate flag is a proud symbol of Southern heritage and bravery. Others, however, view the Confederate flag as a symbol that represents the enslavement and oppression of African Americans. As a result, the Confederate flag is among the most controversial of American symbols.

Ellis Island: The Story of a Gateway to America

by Hal Marcovitz

Between 1892 and 1954, more than 12 million immigrants entered the United States through the Ellis Island processing station in New York harbor. To these immigrants, Ellis Island was a symbol of the American dream--once they passed through its gates, they could start a new life with opportunities that were not available to them in their countries of origin. Today, roughly one-third of our country's population is descended from those who were processed at Ellis Island, and the facility is now a museum dedicated to American immigration.

Independence Hall: Birthplace of Freedom

by Hal Marcovitz

Some of the most important documents in American history were composed and debated within the Pennsylvania State House, now known as Independence Hall. In 1776, the Second Continental Congress voted to approve the Declaration of Independence, which said that the American colonies would no longer be subject to the British rule. In 1787, Independence Hall hosted discussions for a new Constitution, which even today remains the foundation of government for the United States. The Liberty Bell, which once hung in the steeple of Independence Hall, has also become an important American symbol. Today, millions of people visit Independence Hall each year to celebrate the origins of America.

The Poverty Law Canon: Exploring the Major Cases

by Ezra Rosser Marie Failinger

The Poverty Law Canon takes readers into the lives of the clients and lawyers who brought critical poverty law cases in the United States. These cases involved attempts to establish the right to basic necessities, as well as efforts to ensure dignified treatment of welfare recipients and to halt administrative attacks on federal program benefit levels. They also confronted government efforts to constrict access to justice, due process, and rights to counsel in child support and consumer cases, social welfare programs, and public housing. By exploring the personal narratives that gave rise to these lawsuits as well as the behind-the-scenes dynamics of the Supreme Court, the text locates these cases within the social dynamics that shaped the course of litigation. Noted legal scholars explain the legal precedent created by each case and set the case within its historical and political context in a way that will assist students and advocates in poverty-related disciplines in their understanding of the implications of these cases for contemporary public policy decisions in poverty programs. Whether the focus is on the clients, on the lawyers, or on the justices, the stories in The Poverty Law Canon illuminate the central legal themes in federal poverty law of the late 20th century and the role that racial and economic stereotyping plays in shaping American law.

The Return of Ideology: The Search for Regime Identities in Postcommunist Russia and China

by Cheng Chen

As a nation makes the transition from communism to democracy or another form of authoritarianism, its regime must construct not only new political institutions, but also a new political ideology that can guide policy and provide a sense of mission. The new ideology is crucial for legitimacy at home and abroad, as well as the regime's long-term viability. In The Return of Ideology, Cheng Chen compares post-communist regimes, with a focus on Russia under Putin and post-Deng China, investigating the factors that affect the success of an ideology-building project and identifies the implications for international affairs. Successful ideology-building requires two necessary--but not sufficient--conditions. The regime must establish a coherent ideological repertoire that takes into account the nation's ideological heritage and fresh surges of nationalism. Also, the regime must attract and maintain a strong commitment to the emerging ideology among the political elite. Drawing on rich primary sources, including interviews, surveys, political speeches, writings of political leaders, and a variety of publications, Chen identifies the major obstacles to ideology-building in modern Russia and China and assesses their respective long-term prospects. Whereas creating a new regime ideology has been a protracted and difficult process in China, it has been even more so in Russia. The ability to forge an ideology is not merely a domestic concern for these two nations, but a matter of international import as these two great powers move to assert and extend their influence in the world.

Jefferson Memorial: A Monument to Greatness

by Joseph Ferry

The third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, was much more than just a politician--he was a writer, scientist, architect, and scholar who was considered one of the most brilliant figures of his age. To commemorate Jefferson's numerous accomplishments, a rotunda was constructed on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Within is a statue of Jefferson, while on the walls nearby are quotations from some of his most famous writings, including the Declaration of Independence. The Jefferson Memorial is a symbol of American liberty. Surrounded by cherry blossom trees, it remains a popular site for reflection and inspiration.

Liberty Bell: Let Freedom Ring

by Hal Marcovitz

On July 8, 1776, the bell in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia began to ring, letting the citizens know that an important announcement was about to take place. It was the reading of the Declaration of Independence, a statement by representatives of the 13 American colonies that they would no longer be subject to the rule of the British king. Since then, the Liberty Bell, with its famous crack, has been a symbol of American freedom and patriotism.

Lincoln Memorial: Shrine to an American Hero

by Hal Marcovitz

In November 1860, Abraham Lincoln was elected as the 16th president of the United States. By the time Lincoln took office in March 1861, the country was in crisis, as 11 states had declared their intention to secede and form a new nation, the Confederate States of America. More than four bloody years of civil war followed. Lincoln managed the government's effort to put down the rebellion and restore harmony to the country, and in the process set the nation on the path toward ending slavery forever. The Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., commemorates Lincoln's accomplishments, as well as his personal belief in the dignity and inherent equality of all people. It has been the site of many large gatherings and protests. For millions of Americans, the Lincoln Memorial remains an inspiring symbol of freedom.

Mount Rushmore: Memorial to Our Greatest Presidents

by Laura K. Hahn

In 1927, sculptor Gutzon Borglum began a project to carve the heads of four great American presidents into the granite of Mount Rushmore. Over the next 14 years, the 60-foot-high likenesses of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt emerged from the rock. Today, nearly 3 million people visit Mount Rushmore National Memorial each year. They come to marvel at the majestic beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota and learn about the birth, growth, development, and preservation of our country. From the history of the Native American tribes who considered this sacred land, to the diversity of America today, Mount Rushmore is a symbol of the rich heritage that we all share.

Rock 'n' Roll: Voice of American Youth

by Hal Marcovitz

For more than six decades, Rock 'n' Roll music has been a voice of youth. This uniquely American style of music has had an enormous impact on the fashion, lifestyles, and attitudes of young people, both in the United States and elsewhere around the world. During the 1960s, rock music helped to change attitudes toward civil rights for African Americans. In the 1980s, rock helped to subvert the governments of the Soviet Union and its Eastern Bloc satellites, leading to the collapse of Communism. Major rock concert events like the Concert for Bangladesh (1971), Live Aid (1985), and Live 8 (2005) have raised awareness, and money, for worthwhile causes. Rock 'n' Roll music continues to evolve, as well as to influence self-expression in young people today.

Statue of Liberty: A Beacon of Welcome and Hope

by Hal Marcovitz

The Statue of Liberty was given to the United States as a gift from the people of France in 1886. It was originally meant as an emblem of the friendship between the two nations, but over the years it has come to mean much more. The Statue of Liberty has come to represent the promise of America--a promise that drew tens of millions of immigrants from other countries, seeking greater freedom and opportunities. For many of these immigrants, Lady Liberty was the first thing they saw when they arrived in the United States. The Statue of Liberty has also served as a symbol of freedom for those who are oppressed throughout the world.

The Pledge of Allegiance: Story of One Indivisible Nation

by Lisa Kozleski

In 1892, a magazine writer named Francis Bellamy came up with a simple 23-word statement of loyalty to the United States of America. This statement forms the basis for the Pledge of Allegiance, which today is often recited by Americans at the start of the school day, or before public meetings. Reciting the Pledge is a promise that the person will support and be faithful to the United States of America, and to the core values on which our nation was founded. The Pledge of Allegiance remains an important symbol of American values, including liberty and justice for all.

Showing 3,026 through 3,050 of 16,481 results

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