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Human Green Development Report 2014

by Xiaoxi Li

This exhaustive survey assesses the performance of the United Nations and its member states in all key areas, at the same time as laying down a road map for sustainable development in the future. Deploying the Human Green Development Index as a new metric for an era in which human survival is intimately dependent on the viability of the Earth as a clean and sustainable habitat, the report showcases a vast array of data, including HGDI indicators for more than 120 nations. It provides a detailed and comparative rationale for the selection of data for the 12 goals and 54 HGDI targets, which cover human and global needs into the future. The index measures 12 Sustainable Development Goals, based on but also extending the eight Millennium Development Goals defined in 2000. The SDGs, proposed by a high-level UN panel, will supersede MDGs in 2015. They focus on ending poverty, achieving gender equality, providing quality education for all, helping people live healthy lives, securing sustainable energy use, and creating jobs offering sustainable livelihoods. They also work towards equitable growth, stable and peaceful societies, greater efficiency in governance, and closer international cooperation. With indicators covering everything from air particulates to percentage of threatened animal species in a nation's total, and informed by the latest research (with inequality-adjusted metrics for amenities such as education and healthcare), this comprehensive study offers readers not only a wealth of valuable core data, but also a well-argued rationale for using the HGDI. In today's world, we cannot view our development as being distinct from, and unaffected by, that of the Earth we inhabit, or that of our planetary cohabitees.

Human ICT Implants: Technical, Legal and Ethical Considerations

by Mark N. Gasson Diana M. Bowman Eleni Kosta

Human information and communication technology (ICT) implants have developed for many years in a medical context. Such applications have become increasingly advanced, in some cases modifying fundamental brain function. Today, comparatively low-tech implants are being increasingly employed in non-therapeutic contexts, with applications ranging from the use of ICT implants for VIP entry into nightclubs, automated payments for goods, access to secure facilities and for those with a high risk of being kidnapped. Commercialisation and growing potential of human ICT implants have generated debate over the ethical, legal and social aspects of the technology, its products and application. Despite stakeholders calling for greater policy and legal certainty within this area, gaps have already begun to emerge between the commercial reality of human ICT implants and the current legal frameworks designed to regulate these products. This book focuses on the latest technological developments and on the legal, social and ethical implications of the use and further application of these technologies.

Human iPS Cells in Disease Modelling

by Keiichi Fukuda

Human iPS cells have a great potential to be cell sources forregenerative medicine because of the promise of infinite self-renewal and thecapability to differentiate into multiple cell types. This book focuses onanother great potential of human iPS cells, which is the establishment of humandisease models using patient-specific iPS cells. Human iPS cells can be easilyobtained from a patient's somatic cells and provide the entire information on thepatient's genome. Accordingly, we can generate disease models for inheritablediseases in cell culture dishes using iPS cells. This is a quite new techniquebut holds tremendous potential for our increased understanding of pathogenesis,and will then be the basis for novel drug development industries. All theauthors are leading researchers in this field and they have reported many kindsof patient-derived iPS cells. In this book, they introduce the aspects thatcould be recapitulated in terms of disease modelling as well as furtherinnovative findings such as novel pathogenetic insights and novel therapies.

The Human Jungle

by Bruce Fulton Ju-Chan Fulton Cho Chongnae

Equal parts muckraking novel, transnational love story, and socially engaged panorama, Cho Chongnae's The Human Jungle portrays China on the verge of becoming the world's dominant economic force.Against a backdrop of rapidly morphing urban landscapes, readers meet migrant workers, Korean manufacturers out to save a few bucks, high-flying venture capitalists, street thugs, and shakedown artists. The picture of China that emerges is at turns unsettling, awe-inspiring, and heart-breaking. Chongnae deftly portrays a giant awakening to its own raw, volatile, and often uncontrollable power.Translators Bruce Fulton and Ju-Chan Fulton have condensed three of Chongnae's Korean novels, each of which sold more than one million copies in South Korea, into this single English-language edition.Cho Chongnae is one of Korea's most important living writers. He is best known for a trio of massive historical novels: the ten-volume T'aebaek Mountains (1989), the twelve-volume Arirang (1995), and the ten-volume Han River (2002). Cho lives in Seoul, South Korea.Bruce Fulton and Ju-Chan Fulton are the translators of numerous volumes of modern Korean fiction, including the award-winning women's anthologies Words of Farewell and Wayfarer, and, with Marshall R. Pihl, Land of Exile: Contemporary Korean Fiction. They have received two National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowships, including the first ever given for a translation from the Korean language, and the first residency at the Banff International Literary Translation Centre awarded to translators from any Asian language. Bruce Fulton is the inaugural holder of the Young-Bin Min Chair in Korean Literature and Literary Translation at the University of British Columbia.

Human Law and Computer Law: Comparative Perspectives

by Jeanne Gaakeer Mireille Hildebrandt

The focus of this book is on the epistemological and hermeneutic implications of data science and artificial intelligence for democracy and the Rule of Law. How do the normative effects of automated decision systems or the interventions of robotic fellow 'beings' compare to the legal effect of written and unwritten law? To investigate these questions the book brings together two disciplinary perspectives rarely combined within the framework of one volume. One starts from the perspective of 'code and law' and the other develops from the domain of 'law and literature'. Integrating original analyses of relevant novels or films, the authors discuss how computational technologies challenge traditional forms of legal thought and affect the regulation of human behavior. Thus, pertinent questions are raised about the theoretical assumptions underlying both scientific and legal practice.

Human Nature and the Limits of Darwinism

by Whitley R.P. Kaufman

This book compares two competing theories of human nature: the more traditional theory espoused in different forms by centuries of western philosophy and the newer, Darwinian model. In the traditional view, the human being is a hybrid being, with a lower, animal nature and a higher, rational or "spiritual" component. The competing Darwinian account does away with the idea of a higher nature and attempts to provide a complete reduction of human nature to the evolutionary goals of survival and reproduction. Whitley Kaufman presents the case that the traditional conception, regardless of one's religious views or other beliefs, provides a superior account of human nature and culture. We are animals, but we are also rational animals. Kaufman explores the most fundamental philosophical questions as they relate to this debate over human nature--for example: Is free will an illusion? Is morality a product of evolution, with no objective basis? Is reason merely a tool for promoting reproductive success? Is art an adaptation for attracting mates? Is there any higher meaning or purpose to human life? Human Nature and the Limits of Darwinism aims to assess the competing views of human nature and present a clear account of the issues on this most pressing of questions. It engages in a close analysis of the numerous recent attempts to explain all human aims in terms of Darwinian processes and presents the arguments in support of the traditional conception of human nature.

Human Nature in an Age of Biotechnology

by Tamar Sharon

New biotechnologies have propelled the question of what it means to be human - or posthuman - to the forefront of societal and scientific consideration. This volume provides an accessible, critical overview of the main approaches in the debate on posthumanism, and argues that they do not adequately address the question of what it means to be human in an age of biotechnology. Not because they belong to rival political camps, but because they are grounded in a humanist ontology that presupposes a radical separation between human subjects and technological objects. The volume offers a comprehensive mapping of posthumanist discourse divided into four broad approaches--two humanist-based approaches: dystopic and liberal posthumanism, and two non-humanist approaches: radical and methodological posthumanism. The author compares and contrasts these models via an exploration of key issues, from human enhancement, to eugenics, to new configurations of biopower, questioning what role technology plays in defining the boundaries of the human, the subject and nature for each. Building on the contributions and limitations of radical and methodological posthumanism, the author develops a novel perspective, mediated posthumanism, that brings together insights in the philosophy of technology, the sociology of biomedicine, and Michel Foucault's work on ethical subject constitution. In this framework, technology is neither a neutral tool nor a force that alienates humanity from itself, but something that is always already part of the experience of being human, and subjectivity is viewed as an emergent property that is constantly being shaped and transformed by its engagements with biotechnologies. Mediated posthumanism becomes a tool for identifying novel ethical modes of human experience that are richer and more multifaceted than current posthumanist perspectives allow for. The book will be essential reading for students and scholars working on ethics and technology, philosophy of technology, poststructuralism, technology and the body, and medical ethics.

Human Nutrition from the Gastroenterologist's Perspective

by Enzo Grossi Fabio Pace

This book presents the latest insights into the role of nutrition and diet in the pathophysiology and clinical outcome of many digestive diseases, including gastrointestinal cancer, gastroesophageal reflux, gastroparesis, diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, autism and other severe neurological diseases, and liver disease. The editors have aimed to build upon the dissemination of scientific information on human health and nutrition that took place at Expo Milano 2015 (theme: "Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life") by bringing together distinguished experts in gastroenterology from prestigious Italian universities and hospital centers to tackle novel topics in human nutrition and diet. In the context of modern, high tech gastroenterology, it is easy to neglect or underplay the importance of factors such as nutrition. Readers will find this book to be an excellent source of the most recently acquired scientific knowledge on the topic, and a worthy legacy of Expo Milano 2015.

Human Physical Fitness and Activity

by Ann E. Caldwell

The science of human physical activity and fitness is ripefor a novel theoretical framework that can integrate the ecological, genetic,physiological and psychological factors that influence physical activity inhumans. Physical inactivity dominates most developed nations around theworld, and is among the leading causes of disease burden and death worldwide. Despitethe wide array of physical and mental health benefits, few people get therecommended level of physical activity to achieve these benefits. Currentresearch on physical activity has not, as of yet, been successful for thedevelopment of effective exercise interventions. Several researchers haveadvocated a more integrative approach that takes evolutionary history intoaccount, but such a framework has yet to be advanced. To that aim, the firstgoal of this book is to present a comprehensive evolutionary and life historyframework that highlights the domain-specific aspects of the evolved psychologyand physiology that can lead to a more integrated and complete understanding ofphysical activity across the lifespan. It summarizes and extends previous workthat has been done to understand the ways natural selection has shaped physicalactivity in humans in traditional and modern economies and environments. In many ways, humans are adaptedto be physically active. Overall, however, natural selection has shaped aflexible, but energy conscious system that responds to environmental andindividual costs and benefits of physical activity to optimally allocate afinite energetic budget across the lifespan. This system is adapted to respondto cues of resource scarcity and high levels of obligatory physical activity, andconserves energy to favor allocation in ways that increase the likelihood ofreproductive success and survival. This nuanced application leads to a morethorough understanding of the circumstances that natural selection is predictedto favor both sedentary and active behaviors in predictable ways across thelifespan. The second goal of this book is to synthesizeand interpret cross-disciplinary research (from biological and evolutionaryanthropology and psychology; epidemiology; health psychology; and exercisephysiology) that can illuminate original approaches to increase physicalactivity in modern, primarily sedentary contexts. This includes a breakdown ofthe human lifespan to discuss the predicted costs and benefits of physicalactivity at each stage of life in order to differentiate the obstacles tophysical activity and exercise that are functionally adaptive--or were in theenvironments that they evolved--and identifying which factors are moremodifiable than others in order to develop interventions and environments thatare more conducive to physical activity. Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table. MsoNormalTable {{mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5. 4pt 0in 5. 4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10. 0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11. 0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}}

The Human Pursuit of Well-Being

by Ingrid Brdar

This book brings together the latest research on positive psychology from an international cast of researchers and particularly from the growing body of European researchers. The chapters describe research and practice from diverse fields of positive psychology, covering topics such as happiness and well-being, motivation and goals, personality, academic performance and coping, measurement and interventions. The book emphasizes a cultural approach to the human pursuit of well-being. It is unique in that it presents research from a range of cultures, such as Russia, Croatia, and Egypt, in addition to ten different Western cultures. This approach helps broaden our understanding of those aspects of human experience that make life worth living in diverse cultural conditions. The book includes well-known and new authors from the field and contains selected papers that were presented at the 4th European Conference of Positive Psychology held in 2008 in Croatia.

Human Reproductive Biology, 4th Edition

by Kristin H. Lopez Richard E. Jones

The fourth edition of Human Reproductive Biology-winner of a 2015 Textbook Excellence Award (Texty) from The Text and Academic Authors Association-emphasizes the biological and biomedical aspects of human reproduction, explains advances in reproductive science and discusses the choices and concerns of today. Generously illustrated in full color, the text provides current information about human reproductive anatomy and physiology. This expansive text covers the full range of topics in human reproduction, from the biology of male and female systems to conception, pregnancy, labor and birth. It goes on to cover issues in fertility and its control, population growth and family planning, induced abortion and sexually transmitted diseases. This is the ideal book for courses on human reproductive biology, with chapter introductions, sidebars on related topics, chapter summaries and suggestions for further reading. Winner of a 2015 Texty Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association Beautifully redrawn full-color illustrations complement completely updated material with the latest research results, and clear, logical presentation of topics Covers the basic science of reproduction-endocrinology, anatomy, physiology, development, function and senescence of the reproductive system-as well as applied aspects including contraception, infertility and diseases of the reproductive system New companion website features full-color illustrations as PPT and jpeg files for both professors and students to use for study and presentations

Human Resource Management and Technological Challenges

by J. Paulo Davim Carolina Machado

This book focuses on the challenges and changes that new technologies bring to human resources (HR) of modern organizations. It examines the technological implications of the last changes taking place and how they affect the management and motivation of human resources belonging to these organizations. It looks for ways to understand and perceive how organizational HR, individually and as a team, conceptualize, invent, adapt, define and use organizational technology, as well as how they are constrained by features of it. The book provides discussion and the exchange of information on principles, strategies, models, techniques, methodologies and applications of human resources management and technological challenges and changes in the field of industry, commerce and services.

Human Resources and Payroll in China

by Chris Devonshire-Ellis Christian Fleming Eunice Ku

Chinese law places significant obligations on employers to remain legally compliant in all labor matters. In this guide, we address the major issues in managing employment relationships in China. Including: Recruiting Professionals Hiring Staff Handling Payroll Managing the Employment Relationship Terminating the Employment Relationship Organizing Visas Within these topics, we address labor contracts, company rulebooks, salary packages, social insurance contributions, special circumstances for employees (extended sickness or pregnancy), termination and severance pay, and visas for foreign staff and Chinese staff being sent to work abroad.

Human Resources in China

by Andy Scott Sam Woollard Chris Devonshire-Ellis

Due to the rapidly changing nature of the labor market and the laws that govern it in China, it can be very difficult for foreign investors and managers to understand how to manage human resources on the mainland. Specifically designed to cover the most important issues relating to managing a Chinese workforce, this guide details the HR issues that both local managers in China and investors looking to establish a presence on the mainland should know. China Briefing's guides are leaders in their field, providing practical and pragmatic legal and tax information to foreign investors in the People's Republic of China. They will interest all business people, lawyers, accountants and academics working in the field.

Human Rights and Religion in Educational Contexts

by Manfred L. Pirner Johannes Lähnemann Heiner Bielefeldt

What is the role of religion(s) in a human rights culture and in human rights education? How do human rights and religion relate in the context of public education? And what can religious education at public schools contribute to human rights education? These are the core questions addressed by this book. Stimulating deliberations, illuminating analyses and promising conceptual perspectives are offered by renowned experts from ten countries and diverse academic disciplines.

The Human Rights-Based Approach to Carbon Finance

by Damilola S. Olawuyi

This book analyses the topical and contentious issue of the human rights impacts associated with carbon projects, especially in developing countries. It outlines a human rights-based approach to carbon finance as a functional framework for mainstreaming human rights into the design, approval, finance and implementation of carbon projects. It also describes the nature and scope of carbon projects, the available legal options for their financing and the key human rights issues at stake in their planning and execution. Written in a user-friendly style, the proposal for a rights-based due diligence framework through which human rights issues can be anticipated and addressed makes this book relevant to all stakeholders in carbon, energy, and environmental investments and projects.

Human Rights-Based Approaches to Clinical Social Work

by S. Megan Berthold

This groundbreaking Brief brings a rights-based perspective to social work as opposed to the charity- and needs-based formats traditional to the field. Core principles for effective practice are discussed in the context of global human rights advocacy, from addressing individuals' immediate issues to challenging the structures that allow continued injustices to marginalized populations. Focusing specifically on interventions with survivors (and some perpetrators) of torture, human trafficking, and domestic violence, coverage explores and explodes myths about these issues--some of which survivors themselves may believe--and illustrates the immediate application and long-term benefits of rights-based therapy. Case examples, discussion questions, resource links, and a clinician self-care section reinforce the salience of this approach, modeling practice that is ethical in its outlook and empowering in its healing. Clinician skills emphasized in Human Rights-Based Approaches to Clinical Social Work: Reframing client needs as human rights. Cultural humility versus cultural competence. Building the therapeutic relationship and reconstructing safety. Developing trauma-informed practice and avoiding re-traumatization. Forensic and activist roles for social workers. Burnout prevention for practitioners.

Human Rights-Based Community Practice in the United States

by Kathryn R. Libal Scott Harding

A transformative model for community social work rooted in basic social and economic rights is the basis of this timely Brief. With specific chapters spotlighting the rights to health care, nutritious food, and adequate and affordable housing, the book describes in depth the role of community practice in securing rights for underserved and vulnerable groups and models key aspects of rights-based work such as empowerment, participation, and collaboration. Case examples relate local struggles to larger regional and statewide campaigns, illustrating ways the book's framework can inform policymakers and improve social structures in the larger community. This rights-based perspective contrasts sharply with the deficits-based approach commonly employed in community social work, and has the potential to inspire new strategies for addressing systemic social inequality. Features of Human Rights-Based Community Practice in the United States: A conceptual basis for a rights-based approach to community practice. Detailed analysis of legal and social barriers to health care, housing, and food. Examples of effective and emerging rights-based community interventions. Methods for assessing the state of human rights at the community level. Documents, discussion questions, resource lists, and other valuable tools.

Human Rights in European Criminal Law

by Stefano Ruggeri

This book deals with human rights in European criminal law after the Lisbon Treaty. Doubtless the Lisbon Treaty has constituted a milestone in the development of European criminal justice. Not only has the reform following the Treaty given binding force to the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights, but furthermore it has paved the way for unprecedented forms of supranational legislation. In this scenario, the enforcement of individual rights in criminal matters has become a core goal of EU legislation. Alongside these developments, new interactions between national and supranational jurisprudences have emerged, which have significantly contributed to a human rights-oriented approach to European criminal law. The book analyses the main developments of this complex phenomenon from an interdisciplinary perspective. Criminal and procedural law, constitutional law and comparative law must thus be combined to achieve a full understanding of these developments and of their impact on national law.

Human Rights in History: Cold War Germany, the Third World, and the Global Humanitarian Regime

by Young-Sun Hong

This book examines competition and collaboration among Western powers, the socialist bloc, and the Third World for control over humanitarian aid programs during the Cold War. Young-sun Hong's analysis reevaluates the established parameters of German history. On the one hand, global humanitarian efforts functioned as an arena for a three-way political power struggle. On the other, they gave rise to transnational spaces that allowed for multidimensional social and cultural encounters. Hong paints an unexpected view of the global humanitarian regime: Algerian insurgents flown to East Germany for medical care, barefoot Chinese doctors in Tanzania, and West and East German doctors working together in the Congo. She also provides a rich analysis of the experiences of African trainees and Asian nurses in the two Germanys. This book brings an urgently needed historical perspective to contemporary debates on global governance, which largely concern humanitarianism, global health, south-north relationships, and global migration.

Human Rights in History: The Emergence of Humanitarian Intervention

by Fabian Klose

How should the international community react when a government transgresses humanitarian norms and violates the human rights of its own nationals? And where does the responsibility lie to protect people from such acts of violation? In a profound new study, Fabian Klose unites a team of leading scholars to investigate some of the most complex and controversial debates regarding the legitimacy of protecting humanitarian norms and universal human rights by non-violent and violent means. Charting the development of humanitarian intervention from its origins in the nineteenth century through to the present day, the book surveys the philosophical and legal rationales of enforcing humanitarian norms by military means, and how attitudes to military intervention on humanitarian grounds have changed over the course of three centuries. Drawing from a wide range of disciplines, the authors lend a fresh perspective to contemporary dilemmas using case studies from Europe, the United States, Africa and Asia.

Human Rights in History: Idealism beyond Borders

by Eleanor Davey

This is a major new account of how modern humanitarian action was shaped by transformations in the French intellectual and political landscape from the 1950s to the 1980s. Eleanor Davey reveals how radical left third-worldism was displaced by the 'sans-frontiériste' movement as the dominant way of approaching suffering in what was then called the third world. Third-worldism regarded these regions as the motor for international revolution, but revolutionary zeal disintegrated as a number of its regimes took on violent and dictatorial forms. Instead, the radical humanitarianism of the 'sans-frontiériste' movement pioneered by Médecins Sans Frontières emerged as an alternative model for international aid. Covering a period of major international upheavals and domestic change in France, Davey demonstrates the importance of memories of the Second World War in political activism and humanitarian action and underlines the powerful legacies of Cold War politics for international affairs since the fall of the Iron Curtain.

Human Rights in History: The Right of Self-Determination of Peoples

by Fisch, Jörg and Mage, Anita Jörg Fisch Anita Mage

The right of self-determination of peoples holds out the promise of sovereign statehood for all peoples and a domination-free international order. But it also harbors the danger of state fragmentation that can threaten international stability if claims of self-determination lead to secessions. Covering both the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century independence movements in the Americas and the twentieth-century decolonization worldwide, this book examines the conceptual and political history of the right of self-determination of peoples. It addresses the political contexts in which the right and concept were formulated and the practices developed to restrain its potentially anarchic character, its inception in anti-colonialism, nationalism, and the labor movement, its instrumentalization at the end of the First World War in a formidable duel that Wilson lost to Lenin, its abuse by Hitler, the path after the Second World War to its recognition as a human right in 1966, and its continuing impact after decolonization.

Human Rights in History: The World Reimagined

by Bradley Mark Philip

Concerns about rights in the United States have a long history, but the articulation of global human rights in the twentieth century was something altogether different. Global human rights offered individuals unprecedented guarantees beyond the nation for the protection of political, economic, social and cultural freedoms. The World Reimagined explores how these revolutionary developments first became believable to Americans in the 1940s and the 1970s through everyday vernaculars as they emerged in political and legal thought, photography, film, novels, memoirs and soundscapes. Together, they offered fundamentally novel ways for Americans to understand what it means to feel free, culminating in today's ubiquitous moral language of human rights. Set against a sweeping transnational canvas, the book presents a new history of how Americans thought and acted in the twentieth-century world.

Human Rights in Transnational Business

by Julia Ruth-Maria Wetzel

This book investigates how human rights lawcan be applied to corporate entities. To date there have been insufficientinternational legal mechanisms to bring corporations to justice for theirmisconduct abroad. The book argues that rather than trying to solve the problemlocally, an international approach to corporate human rights compliance needsto be sought to prevent future corporate human rights abuses. Implementing effective and enforceablehuman rights compliance policies at corporate level allows businesses toprevent negative human rights impacts such as loss of revenue, high litigationcosts and damage to reputation. By considering human rights to be aninherent part of their business strategy, corporations will be well equipped tomeet national and regional business and human rights standards, which willinevitably be implemented in the next few years. This approach, in turn, also furthers thefundamental aim of international human rights law.

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