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Take Two and . . . Rolling!

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Six teenagers have been cast in prime time's hottest new TV series--can they take their shot at the spotlight without sacrificing the things that matter most? A starring role on the prime-time show Hard Time High could give Molly O'Malley the fame and fortune she craves. But the real payoff, besides a steady income, is something the on-the-road actress has wanted for years: the chance to put down roots and live a normal life. And she'd get to celebrate her real birthday and stop pretending she's almost fifteen when she's barely fourteen, a fact she only recently discovered. But even fame has its price; Molly's mother wants a job on the show. And Molly has to keep up with her schooling. The show is giving Rafe Marquez his first taste of stardom. Maybe one day he'll be able to buy a mansion with a pool for his folks. But he's never going to abandon his dream of being lead guitarist in a famous band. Things are changing faster than Molly, Rafe, TJ, Miranda, Alison, and Bill ever imagined. Will this mark the beginning of new friendships and maybe even love?

Prime Time

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

The first book in Susan Beth Pfeffer's Make Me a Star series introduces six Teenagers, each waiting for that first big break Open call! Now casting for brand-new prime time series. No experience necessary. Tenth grader Miranda Newgate is visiting Los Angeles on spring break when her cousin hears about a casting call for extras on a new TV series. Miranda goes to the audition, but ends up reading for a bigger part. Then it's back to Massachusetts, to term papers and biology projects while waiting for the call that could change her life. Stage star Molly O'Malley is a serious actress. But she could sure use the exposure from a network show that will be seen from coast to coast. Alison Blake is Miss Young America, but that doesn't give her a free pass. She has to work harder than anyone else to prove she isn't just another pretty face. Former child star T. J. Tyler is ready for his comeback. He needs the leading role to show the world he wasn't washed up at eleven. Rafe Marquez has no acting experience. But he's hot and hunky and goes after what he wants--and he wants to make it big. Bill Douglas has been on so many TV shows, this one should be a breeze. But in this business, you never know. Who will make the final cut and rise to stardom on Hard Time High?

Getting Even

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

People think Annie can handle anything, and she can--but only because the alternative is worse Annie's summer in New York City was every teenager's dream. Being chosen as a summer intern at Image magazine meant the chance to work on real articles during the day and enjoy the independence and excitement of city life outside office hours. But now, going back to her high school routine feels like punishment--especially when the promised editorial job at the school paper doesn't work out the way she planned. Annie knows she's ready for bigger challenges, but it feels like every time she keeps her calm and saves the day, she gets punished for her own success. Suddenly she's tired of being the boring old dependable honor student that everyone thinks is getting along just fine. Annie tells her mom she has a right to get angry sometimes, and at first it does feel good to tell people what she really thinks. But can Annie keep her job, her boyfriend, and her family close when getting mad turns into getting even?

Fantasy Summer

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Robin doesn't want to be perfect, but it would be nice to be more than perfectly average Robin can't believe it: Out of the thousands of girls who applied for the Image magazine summer internships, she's one of only four winners who will be spending the summer in New York City. Robin knows she'll be working hard at the popular teen magazine, but she hopes there will be plenty of time for shopping, eating out, and living the fabulous life. Her excitement is only a little dulled when she hears her cousin Annie got one of the other spots. Robin and Annie used to be close, but now that their mothers compare them to each other all the time, both girls feel like they can't win. So when they meet at their hotel, the cousins agree: All they want is to be themselves and have a perfect summer. Along with their roommates, Ashley and Torey, Robin and Annie dive into their new responsibilities--and into the parties, makeovers, and social lives they've always dreamed of. But while their friendships are getting stronger, life in the public eye is harder than it looks, and all four girls know that only one intern can be chosen for the cover of the special Image issue. Will Robin's dream of the perfect summer survive reality?

The Beauty Queen

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Playing the role of a happy pageant winner is not exactly the acting career Kit had in mind Kit Carson keeps trying to tell people that she didn't do anything. All she did was put on a bathing suit in front of the judges, and suddenly she's a beauty contest winner. It's true that the money will come in handy--new dresses and college educations don't grow on trees when your mom is a nurse and your dad doesn't always remember to help out--but all Kit really wants is to try out her dream of being an actress. Not a famous one, just successful enough to have a career in a modest theater and make a living doing what she loves. But now that Kit's a beauty queen, people seem to expect a lot from her. Above all, they seem to think she should gratefully accept the limited roles she's being offered, which are mostly those of beautiful, not-too-independent, all-American girls. Between pageant ambitions and romantic interests, Kit gets the sense that there could be plenty of opportunities in her future--as long as she's willing to play the part.

Starring Peter and Leigh

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Leigh trades in her acting career to play a starring role in her own life Most people don't get to retire at age sixteen, but that's what Leigh is planning to do when she moves to Long Island to live with her mom and her new stepfather. Leigh has been acting all her life, most recently on a successful TV show, and she can't wait to be the kind of normal high school student she's only ever played on screen. For advice on playing the role of a normal teenager, Leigh turns to her new stepbrother, Peter. Peter has hemophilia, a medical condition that has kept him out of school for a while--but missing out on high school life has given him a good eye for what normal looks like. Together, they figure two outsiders can create one socially successful high school student. They might even be right. Peter is smart, wryly funny, and a good friend when he's not being a bad invalid. And Leigh knows she can do it--after all, acting is what she's good at. But the thing about acting is that at the end of the day you get to go back to being yourself, a luxury Leigh starts to think she might not have appreciated enough when she had it.

Better Than All Right

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

The darker the truth, the deeper you hide it--but what happens when you can't hide anymore?Innocence, I guess, is not my image. Sixteen-year-old Iris knows that between her bohemian playwright father who lives off the grid in the New Mexican desert and her mother, to whom getting married (but not staying married) is a full-time job, she's led an unorthodox life, which hasn't left with her with a lot of childhood illusions. So it's no surprise when her mom sends her to spend the summer with her aunt, uncle, and cousin. Iris's younger cousin Caryn is different. She's only fourteen, and much more sheltered. Aunt Elaine hopes that Iris will be good company for Caryn, and when the girls meet an appealing young man at the pool and all three become friends, it seems her plan just might be working. But for Iris, making things work means keeping secrets from Caryn. If Iris can't pretend to be someone she isn't all summer long, will she still be all right?

Just Morgan

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

"The right thing never just happens; you have to make it happen." Morgan knows her parents left her in boarding school so they could travel the world, which is why hardly anything changes when they're killed in an accident during her freshman year at Fairfield. But every orphan needs a guardian, and Morgan's is her uncle Tom, a famous and somewhat eccentric author. Tom's New York City apartment has plenty of space for Morgan, and her room is the nicest one she's ever seen, but her uncle, uncomfortable suddenly raising a fourteen-year-old girl, seems distant and preoccupied. Alone in an unfamiliar world, Morgan imagines what her school roommate, the popular and sarcastic Trinck, would think of everything. Would she approve of Morgan's newly discovered love of reading or the friends she makes in New York? Slowly, Morgan makes a place for herself that is all her own and reflects on the person she is becoming--whether Trinck would like it or not.

Starting with Melodie

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

When Melodie's glamorous parents split up, all she needs is a friend--but can Elaine be there for her? Elaine Zuckerman's parents are definitely not glamorous--her dad does something boring with computer chips, and her mom is a dentist whose office is in their house. They're nothing like her friend Melodie's family. Melodie's mom, Constance King, is a beautiful Broadway star, and her dad, Trevor Ashford, has a thrilling British accent. Even Melodie's name is glamorous! And Elaine would trade her oblivious older brothers for Melodie's little sister in a heartbeat. But glamour won't keep Constance and Trevor's marriage together or make them stop fighting in front of their daughters. And Elaine isn't sure how to help the friend who's always had everything, especially when the Zuckermans get caught in the middle. What will it take for Melodie's parents to behave like the grown-ups they're supposed to be?

Whatever Words You Want to Hear

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

When Paula falls for the bad boy down the street, what she thought would be a silly summer romance becomes anything but It's Paula's last summer at home, and in need of an affectionate distraction, she decides now is the perfect time to get involved with one of the two brothers from down the road, Jonny and Jordon. But which one? Likable, well-mannered Jonny? Or Jordon, who's been kicked out of every school that would take him and who tells her up front that he wants her to have to choose--and wants her to choose him? Who can say no to a bad boy? Underneath it all, Paula knows Jordon is the kind and gentle person she's falling in love with--something his parents can't, or won't, see. And better yet, Jordon says he loves her back and promises to always be honest with her. But sometimes the truth isn't what we want to hear . . .

Rainbows & Fireworks

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

What if the one person you can't stand is the only one you can depend on? Nobody ever asked Betsy Reisman if she wanted to be a twin, but since she and Meg are stuck with each other, they've reached a truce. Mostly they keep busy--Betsy with her beloved piano and her plans to go to Juilliard and Meg with learning her fifth (or is it sixth?) language. It's about to get harder, though, since their parents, both writers, have decided to take the year off from New York City's high rents and live in a country cottage on the estate of a much-wealthier family. The owner is a friend of Betsy's mom, and the whole family is sort of local nobility, or at least that's how everyone treats them. Eunice, the oldest daughter, is not at all happy about the Reismans' arrival. This is just fine with Betsy, who only likes people who like music. But Meg goes for successful and popular--and Betsy knows that Meg will be heartbroken if Eunice snubs her--and the rest of the school follows suit. Worse, their parents haven't stopped fighting since they got there. The sisters decide that to make the year as tolerable as possible, they're going to have to stick together and at least try to get along. Kind of like friends--or maybe even like sisters.

Most Precious Blood

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

You can buy a lot of things with enough money, but you can't buy the truth After Val skips one Sunday dinner with her cousin Michelle's family, everything changes. Val and Michelle's fathers aren't getting along, and she just wanted to avoid the tension that she knew would be on the menu. Val's mom died of cancer two years ago, and now her father's love and her mother's memory are all she has. But Michelle can't let it go, and in her anger she drops a bombshell: "You're not really family. You don't really count." Is it true? How come no one--not her teachers, not her classmates, not their parents--seems surprised? Other kids at school are adopted; it's not a secret. So why hasn't anyone told Val? Slowly Val starts to see that things are different for her. Other kids don't have bodyguards or a dad who gives them whatever they want with his piles of money. Up till now, Val has repaid her father's love by being the obedient daughter he expects, but now she needs something else: She needs the truth.

The Ring of Truth

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

The truth isn't the most comfortable choice, but it's the only one with any future Sloan Fredericks can still remember the weeks she spent in the hospital when she was nine, the only survivor of the accident that killed her parents and little brother. Now she lives with her grandmother in the kind of grand old house you'd expect from a family known for both their wealth and their political prowess. It's also the kind of house that has a music room, which is where Sloan goes searching for a little peace and quiet during her gran's annual party, until an older man with a important reputation corners her long enough to say some things that Sloan doesn't want to hear. She quickly brushes past him, hoping that no one saw them. But someone did--one of Sloan's own friends--who confesses that the man did the same thing to her, only much, much worse. Although meant to be private, the confession doesn't stay that way, and soon the secret is all anyone can talk about. Can the truth save their family, or will it just dig up even uglier secrets?

A Matter of Principle

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

When Becca and her friends publish an underground newspaper, their principles are put to the test Becca and her friends are fed up with having their school paper controlled by the faculty. They want to run stories that reflect the real challenges high schoolers are facing at Southfield, and they'll do it themselves if they have to. Except when they do put out an independent underground newspaper, the first edition gets them into a lot of trouble. Becca's dad, a lawyer, is helping her stand on principle, but not everyone can afford to deal with the repercussions the same way she does--financially or emotionally. Can Becca learn to love her friends and still let them make their own decisions, even if they make mistakes? If she doesn't, she might not have any friends left.

Dynamic Data-Driven Environmental Systems Science

by Sai Ravela Adrian Sandu

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the First International Conference on Dynamic Data-Driven Environmental Systems Science, DyDESS 2014, held in Cambridge, MA, USA, in November 2014. The 24 revised full papers and 7 short papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 62 submissions and cover topics on sensing, imaging and retrieval for the oceans, atmosphere, space, land, earth and planets that is informed by the environmental context; algorithms for modeling and simulation, downscaling, model reduction, data assimilation, uncertainty quantification and statistical learning; methodologies for planning and control, sampling and adaptive observation, and efficient coupling of these algorithms into information-gathering and observing system designs; and applications of methodology to environmental estimation, analysis and prediction including climate, natural hazards, oceans, cryosphere, atmosphere, land, space, earth and planets.

Marly the Kid

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Sometimes you just have to pack a suitcase and walk out the door Marly knows her older sister, Kit, is tall, beautiful, and outspoken--everything Marly isn't. But does everyone have to remind her of it all the time? Since her parents' divorce, her mom hasn't had a single nice thing to say--and even if she did, she's always working. So Marly packs her bags and catches the bus to stay with her dad. She knows he'll want her, and hopefully his new wife will too. Ed and Sally are surprised to find Marly on their doorstep but excited to take her in and become a family. They cook together and laugh together, and no one ever shouts at anyone else, a big difference from Marly's life with her mom. Marly has kept quiet up until now, which has given her a reputation for being well behaved. But once she starts getting used to being treated like an actual person, she begins talking about what's important to her. She may not be able to stop--and she may not want to.

Make Believe

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

When her best friend's parents separate, a seventh grader struggles to keep their friendship alive When Carrie and Jill are alone together, they can be anyone in the whole world. Whether they're pretending to be movie stars, environmental activists, or the leaders of the free world, there is one thing they don't have to imagine: They are as close as any friends could be. Going into seventh grade, there is a lot that Carrie is afraid of, but she knows Jill will be by her side forever--until, suddenly, she's not. When Jill's father announces that he wants a divorce, it puts a distance between the two friends that never used to be there. As Jill's life falls apart around her, Carrie must find a way to talk to her friend again and save her from a problem that's anything but make-believe.

Just Between Us

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

An incurable gossip tries to learn how to keep secrets to herself Sometimes Cass just can't help herself. Tell her something personal, even something embarrassing, and before you know it, the whole school will have heard. It's not that Cass doesn't want to keep secrets--she just doesn't know how. After her bad habit lands her in a fight with one of her friends, Cass asks her family for help. Mom proposes a psychological experiment. Every time Cass manages to keep a secret, she'll get a dollar--and a lesson worth far more than that. It's easy at first, but pretty soon Cass is so full of gossip, she feels like she's going to burst. When an earth-shattering secret traps her in the middle of her two best friends, she learns that sometimes it's more important not to keep your mouth shut.

The Friendship Pact

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Tracy's favorite TV star is coming to town, and she will do anything to meet him face to face The two people Tracy loves most are Rabbit O'Shea, a smooth-talking bad boy, and Ross Perlman, an innocent young man with a golden voice. She could never choose between them, and she'll never have to, because Rabbit is a TV character, and Ross is the actor who plays him. When Ross announces a concert in Tracy's hometown, she pledges to do whatever it takes to meet the real-life Rabbit--a decision that could cost her everything she holds dear. She and her best friend, Andrea, make a pact that they will meet Ross together or not at all. But when one of them gets the chance to meet him alone, it threatens to tear their friendship apart. Suddenly, Tracy finds herself longing for the days when Ross Perlman was just another poster on her wall.

Devil's Den

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Tending to a veteran's grave leads a boy on a search for his father The battlefield at Gettysburg is a landscape of rolling hills, thickly wooded forests, and monuments to men who died here long ago. When Joey looks at this peaceful landscape, he sees it through the eyes of Joshua Gibbs, a soldier from his hometown who came to Gettysburg to save the Union. Joey comes here with his stepfather hoping to learn more about the soldier whose story has captured his imagination, but he will leave obsessed with another person's history: his own. Joey doesn't know much about his biological father, who left his mother long ago, and he has never been all that curious. But during the trip to Gettysburg, his stepfather announces that he wants to adopt him. This surprising declaration sends Joey on a frantic search for his birth father--a search that uncovers truths even harder to understand than those of Gettysburg, and just as painful as any battle ever fought.

Dear Dad, Love Laurie

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

After her father moves away, Laurie sends her love by mail The scariest thing Laurie has ever seen is a half-empty house, which she discovered the day her dad moved away. The divorce was a long time coming, but that didn't make it hurt any less. To stay in touch with her father, Laurie's mom forces her to write him a letter each week, keeping him updated on everything from quizzes and tests to parties and boys. At first, the letters are a chore, a painful reminder that Dad isn't around anymore, but with every stamp she licks, Laurie finds herself growing up just a little bit more. This remarkable novel, told entirely through Laurie's letters to her father, is a powerful story of divorce and renewal that proves it's not impossible to love someone from afar.

Courage, Dana

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

After saving a young boy's life, a girl finds that fame can be a real headache On the last warm day of autumn, Dana and her best friend eat ice cream, gossip, and complain about school. It's just like any other afternoon until Dana walks home and sees a toddler break away from his mother and sprint into the street. Without thinking, she chases after him, pushing him onto the sidewalk just before a giant blue car would have run them both down. She didn't mean to do it, but Dana has become a heroine--and her life will never be the same. Saving the boy makes her the darling of the entire town. She gets a story written about her in the paper, praise from strangers--even a beautiful Persian kitten as a gift from the boy's mother. At first she loves the attention, but she soon learns that being a celebrity brings hardship, too--and a challenge that will require her to show courage in a whole new way.

Buried Dreams

by Tim Cahill

Drawing on exclusive interviews and previously unreported material, journalist Tim Cahill "offers the stuff of wrenching nightmares" (The Wall Street Journal): a harrowing journey inside the mind of a serial killer. Meticulously researched and graphically recounted, Buried Dreams brings to vivid life the real John Wayne Gacy--his complex personality, compulsions, inadequacies, and torments--often in the killer's own words. Called "an absorbing and disturbing story" by Publishers Weekly and "surprisingly graceful" by the New York Times, this is a journey to the heart of human evil that you will never forget.

A Way of Life, Like Any Other: A Novel

by Darcy O'Brien

Winner of the Ernest Hemingway Award for Best First Novel in 1978The hero of Darcy O'Brien's A Way of Life, Like Any Other is a child of Hollywood, and once his life was a glittery dream. His father starred in Westerns. His mother was a goddess of the silver screen. The family enjoyed the high life on their estate, Casa Fiesta. But his parents' careers have crashed since then, and their marriage has broken up too.Lovesick and sex-crazed, the mother sets out on an intercontinental quest for the right--or wrong--man, while her mild-mannered but manipulative former husband clings to his memories in California. And their teenage son? How he struggles both to keep faith with his family and to get by himself, and what in the end he must do to break free, makes for a classic coming-of-age story--a novel that combines keen insight and devastating wit to hilarious and heartbreaking effect.

The Silver Spooner: A Novel

by Darcy O'Brien

A novel of enduring power, The Silver Spooner is the story of a man who tries to be something he is not, a woman who loves him for what he is, and a friend who tries to free him from his illusionsEarl Kruger was one of the last of his breed. A kingpin rancher, he wanted to own all of Oklahoma. He ran the largest cattle operation in the state--and acted as though he ran everything else, too. A. G. Kruger is running hard--trying to catch his father's shadow. But he lacks the old man's confidence and power, and when Earl dies, A. G. feels unprepared to manage the Sunrise Ranch alone. He never knows whether to treat his workers as buddies or servants. He learns the hard way that he can't do both.Claire is A. G.'s wife. She's a bright and beautiful woman whose modern ideas and ambitions are respected--if not thoroughly understood--by A. G. and scorned by his father. But Claire is used to grappling for her share in life. She grapples now with Earl Kruger--and his memory--for possession of his son.Ramsey Hogan is A. G.'s best friend from childhood. Fatherless, he grew up on the Sunrise, and has always felt a great debt to the Krugers. Now he wonders if it was worth the price.These are people whose lives reflect all the subtle complexities of modern American life and the rawness of a land that rose out of dust bowl bankruptcy. Caught up in an environment of wildly clashing values, they struggle to play out their lives, torn between the claims of past and present. Their story is one of powerful dreams, expectations, attempts, and failures; of love that gets buried beneath disappointments, and unwanted desires that appear in its place; of friendship and marriage; of pride and resentment; and of hope.Peopled with characters who live and breathe, The Silver Spooner is an unforgettable human drama that is as funny and sad and unpredictable as life itself.

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