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At the Speed of Light There Is Only Illumination: A Reappraisal of Marshall McLuhan (Reappraisals: Canadian Writers)

by John Moss Linda M. Morra

At the Speed of Light There is Only Illumination reevaluates Marshall McLuhan and his critical and theoretical legacy. The contributors, drawn from many academic disciplines, look at the many manifestations of McLuhan; from intellectual adventurer creating a complex architecture of ideas to cultural icon standing in line in Woody Allen's Annie Hall.

Canada's Religions: An Historical Introduction (Religion and Beliefs Series #No. 12)

by Robert Choquette

With nine out of ten Canadians claiming a religious affiliation of some kind - Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Aboriginal, or one of dozens of other religions - faith has huge impact on our personal and social lives. In this book, Robert Choquette offers a comprehensive history of religion in Canada and examines the ongoing tug-of-war between modernity and conservatism within the religious traditions themselves.

Home-Work: Postcolonialism, Pedagogy, and Canadian Literature (Reappraisals: Canadian Writers)

by Cynthia Sugars

Canadian literature, and specifically the teaching of Canadian literature, has emerged from a colonial duty to a nationalist enterprise and into the current territory of postcolonialism. From practical discussions related to specific texts, to more theoretical discussions about pedagogical practice regarding issues of nationalism and identity, Home-Work constitutes a major investigation and reassessment of the influence of postcolonial theory on Canadian literary pedagogy from some of the top scholars in the field.

Husserl and the Sciences: Selected Perspectives (Philosophica)

by Richard Feist

Edmund Husserl (1859-1938) is one of the previous century's most important thinkers. Often regarded as the "Father of phenomenology," this collection of essays reveals that he is indeed much more than that. The breadth of Husserl's thought is considerable and much remains unexplored. An underlying theme of this volume is that Husserl is constantly returning to origins, revising his thought in the light of new knowledge offered by the sciences.

Aboriginal Canada Revisited: Politics And Cultural Expression In The 21st Century (International Canadian Studies Series)

by Kerstin Knopf

Exploring a variety of topics--including health, politics, education, art, literature, media, and film--Aboriginal Canada Revisited draws a portrait of the current political and cultural position of Canada's Aboriginal peoples. While lauding improvements made in the past decades, the contributors draw attention to the systemic problems that continue to marginalize Aboriginal people within Canadian society. From the Introduction: "[This collection helps] to highlight areas where the colonial legacy still takes its toll, to acknowledge the manifold ways of Aboriginal cultural expression, and to demonstrate where Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people are starting to find common ground." Contributors include Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal scholars from Europe and Canada, including Marlene Atleo, University of Manitoba; Mansell Griffin, Nisga'a Village of Gitwinksihlkw, British Columbia; Robert Harding, University College of the Fraser Valley; Tricia Logan, University of Manitoba; Steffi Retzlaff, McMaster University; Siobhán Smith, University of British Columbia; Barbara Walberg, Confederation College.

Defending a Contested Ideal: Merit and the Public Service Commission, 1908–2008 (Governance Series)

by Luc Juillet Ken Rasmussen

In 1908, after decades of struggling with a public administration undermined by systemic patronage, the Canadian parliament decided that public servants would be selected on the basis of merit, through a system administered by an independent agency: the Public Service Commission of Canada. This history, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Commission, recounts its unique contribution to the development of an independent public service, which has become a pillar of Canadian parliamentary democracy.

The Evolving Physiology of Government: Canadian Public Administration in Transition (Governance Series)

by O. P. Dwivedi Tim A. Mau Byron M. Sheldrick

Canadian public administration has provided a rich ground for examining the changing nature of the state. Currents of political change have rippled through the administration of the public sector, often producing significant alterations in our understanding of how best to organize and administer public services. This volume brings together some of the leading Canadian and international scholars of public administration to reflect on these changes and their significance. Providing a historical perspective on public administration in Canada, the volume examines the shift from a traditional model of administration to newer forms such as new public management and governance, and explores current debates and the place of Canadian public administration within a broader comparative perspective.

Russia and the North

by Elana Wilson Rowe

Russia holds more Arctic territory than any other state, yet unlike other Arctic states it does not have a unified strategy identifying economic and political aims for the North. Russia's policies on the North are dispersed across a variety of fields from domestic migration politics to oil and gas development. This volume engages the disparate elements of Russian northern policy and illustrates how the centralized, relatively economically strong and politically assertive Russia of today defines and addresses northern spaces, opportunities, and challenges. As energy markets continue looking northward and climate change renders the Arctic increasingly accessible, the geopolitical interests of Arctic states will be brought more frequently to the forefront. These circumstances will make the disputed borders and overlapping sovereignty claims of the North an important topic in international politics. Given its geographic size and political influence, Russia is and will continue to be a key regional and global actor in the international politics of the North.

Poems to Make the Soul Sing: A Collection of Mystical Poetry through the Ages

by Alan Jacob

A beautifully designed collection of mystical poems to soothe, inspire and rejuvenate the soul. With a body of work spanning the centuries, from the Vedas to St Teresa of Avila, Rumi and Rilke, and arranged by transcendent themes, this book will connect readers with nature, with the stillness within themselves and with the Divine. When your soul hungers for peace, knowledge or comfort, there is no answer as profound as poetry. In a world that is increasingly noisy and disconnected from the Divine, this wonderfully inspiring collection of poems for the soul from mystics of all traditions encourages readers to listen to their own hearts, marvel at the wonder of nature and explore profound truths of life, death, eternity and God. With its elegant design and comprehensive selection of poets, the volume is ideal for gifting. Themed chapters allow readers to choose topics to explore, including: DIVINITY – what is the nature of God or the One? TRANSCENDENCE – what deep truths can we find in our spiritual quest? LOVE – how can we give and cherish most profoundly? DEVOTION – how should we explore and affirm our faith? PEACE – how can we find stillness amidst turmoil and loss? NATURE – what lessons can we learn from creation? SPIRIT – what is sacred about the individual self? From the Bhagavad Gita, the Vedas and the Song of Solomon to the Divine Comedy and the Rubaiyat of Mar Khayyam, readers will find all the great mystical writers, including Attar, Ansari, St Francis of Assisi, Lao Tzu, John Donne, John Bunyan, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Elizabeth Barratt Browning, Christine Rossetti and Walt Whitman, as well as many fine but lesser-known spiritual writers. A book to give as a thoughtful gift, and also one to treasure.

Santa Biblia: The Bible Through Hispanic Eyes

by Justo L. González

Gonzalez explores how a Hispanic perspective illuminates the biblical text in ways that will be valuable not only for Latino readers but also for the church at large. Introducing five "paradigms" for Latino biblical interpretation, Gonzalez discusses theory and provides concrete examples of biblical texts that gain new meaning when read from a different perspective.

Southern Women

by Caroline M. Dillman

First published in 1988. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Homicide: Foundations of Human Behavior (Foundations of Human Behavior)

by Martin Daly Margo Wilson

The human race spends a disproportionate amount of attention, money, and expertise in solving, trying, and reporting homicides, as compared to other social problems. The public avidly consumes accounts of real-life homicide cases, and murder fiction is more popular still. Nevertheless, we have only the most rudimentary scientific understanding of who is likely to kill whom and why. Martin Daly and Margo Wilson apply contemporary evolutionary theory to analysis of human motives and perceptions of self-interest, considering where and why individual interests conflict, using well-documented murder cases. This book attempts to understand normal social motives in murder as products of the process of evolution by natural selection. They note that the implications for psychology are many and profound, touching on such matters as parental affection and rejection, sibling rivalry, sex differences in interests and inclinations, social comparison and achievement motives, our sense of justice, lifespan developmental changes in attitudes, and the phenomenology of the self. This is the first volume of its kind to analyze homicides in the light of a theory of interpersonal conflict. Before this study, no one had compared an observed distribution of victim-killer relationships to "expected" distribution, nor asked about the patterns of killer-victim age disparities in familial killings. This evolutionary psychological approach affords a deeper view and understanding of homicidal violence.

Anna Karenina: Roman In 6 Büchern. - Primary Source Edition

by Leo Tolstoy

Anna Karenina in half the time Anna Karenina is the heart-wrenching tale of a woman who recklessly throws away everything she has for a passionate affair with a young soldier. Beautiful, popular, wife to a wealthy man and mother to an adored son, Anna seems to be in an enviable position. However, it takes only one encounter with Count Vronsky to fill her with the sense that her life has hitherto been empty. As the rest of the world fades into insignificance next to her great love, Anna faces an impossible choice¿

Technoscience in History: Prussia, 1750-1850 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)

by Ursula Klein

The second edition of a comprehensive introduction to machine learning approaches used in predictive data analytics, covering both theory and practice.Machine learning is often used to build predictive models by extracting patterns from large datasets. These models are used in predictive data analytics applications including price prediction, risk assessment, predicting customer behavior, and document classification. This introductory textbook offers a detailed and focused treatment of the most important machine learning approaches used in predictive data analytics, covering both theoretical concepts and practical applications. Technical and mathematical material is augmented with explanatory worked examples, and case studies illustrate the application of these models in the broader business context.

The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions: 1874 (Routledge Library Editions: The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions #7)

by Janet Horowitz Murray Myra Stark

The Englishwoman’s Review, which published from 1866 to 1910, participated in and recorded a great change in the range of possibilities open to women. The ideal of the magazine was the idea of the emerging emancipated middle-class woman: economic independence from men, choice of occupation, participation in the male enterprises of commerce and government, access to higher education, admittance to the male professions, particularly medicine, and, of course, the power of suffrage equal to that of men. First published in 1985, this seventh volume contains issues from 1874. With an informative introduction by Janet Horowitz Murray and Myra Stark, and an index compiled by Anna Clark, this set is an invaluable resource to those studying nineteenth and early twentieth-century feminism and the women’s movement in Britain.

The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions: 1907-1908 (Routledge Library Editions: The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions #39)

by Janet Horowitz Murray Myra Stark

The Englishwoman’s Review, which published from 1866 to 1910, participated in and recorded a great change in the range of possibilities open to women. The ideal of the magazine was the idea of the emerging emancipated middle-class woman: economic independence from men, choice of occupation, participation in the male enterprises of commerce and government, access to higher education, admittance to the male professions, particularly medicine, and, of course, the power of suffrage equal to that of men. First published in 1985, this thirty-ninth volume contains issues from 1907 to 1908. With an informative introduction by Janet Horowitz Murray and Myra Stark, and an index compiled by Anna Clark, this set is an invaluable resource to those studying nineteenth and early twentieth-century feminism and the women’s movement in Britain.

The Education of Henry Adams: An Autobiography (The\best Sellers Of 1919 Ser.)

by Henry Adams

The Modern Library's number-one nonfiction book of the twentieth century and winner of the Pulitzer Prize: The acclaimed memoir of a brilliant man reckoning with an era of profound change The great-grandson of President John Adams and the grandson of President John Quincy Adams, Henry Adams possessed one of the most remarkable minds of his generation. Yet he believed himself fundamentally unsuited to the era in which he lived--the tumultuous period between the Civil War and World War I. One of the finest autobiographies ever written, The Education of Henry Adams is a remarkable and uniquely unclassifiable work. Written in third person and originally circulated in a private edition to friends and family only, it recounts Adams's lifelong search for self-knowledge and moral enlightenment and bears witness to some of the most significant developments in American history. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Bluff, Bluster, Lies and Spies: The Lincoln Foreign Policy, 1861–1865

by David Perry

An in-depth illustration of shifting Civil War alliances and strategies and of Great Britain's behind-the-scenes role in America's War Between the States. In the early years of the Civil War, Southern arms won spectacular victories on the battlefield. But cooler heads in the Confederacy recognized the demographic and industrial weight pitted against them, and they counted on British intervention to even the scales and deny the United States victory. Fearful that Great Britain would recognize the Confederacy and provide the help that might have defeated the Union, the Lincoln administration was careful not to upset the greatest naval power on earth. Bluff, Bluster, Lies and Spies takes history buffs into the mismanaged State Department of William Henry Seward in Washington, DC, and details the more skillful work of Lords Palmerston, Russell, and Lyons in the British Foreign Office. It explains how Great Britain's safety and continued existence as an empire depended on maintaining an influence on American foreign policy and how the growth of the Union navy--particularly its new ironclad ships--rendered her a paper tiger who relied on deceit and bravado to preserve the illusion of international strength. Britain had its own continental rivals--including France--and the question of whether a truncated United States was most advantageous to British interests was a vital question. Ultimately, Prime Minister Palmerston decided that Great Britain would be no match for a Union armada that could have seized British possessions throughout the Western Hemisphere, including Canada, and he frustrated any ambitions to break Lincoln's blockade of the Confederacy. Revealing a Europe full of spies and arms dealers who struggled to buy guns and of detectives and publicists who attempted to influence opinion on the continent about the validity of the Union or Confederate causes, David Perry describes how the Civil War in the New World was determined by Southern battlefield prowess, as the powers of the Old World declined to intervene in the American conflict.

Notes of a Plenipotentiary: Russian Diplomacy and War in the Balkans, 1914–1917 (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

by G. N. Trubetskoi

A prince in one of Russia's most exalted noble families, Grigorii N. Trubetskoi was a unique and contradictory figure during World War I. A lifelong civil servant and publicist, he began his diplomatic career in Constantinople, where he served as first secretary of the embassy there for several years. He became one of the leaders of an important political orientation among the liberals that began to express opposition to the tsar, not only on questions of political freedom and domestic political reform, but also by criticizing the tsar's foreign policy on nationalistic grounds. Trubetskoi possessed significant influence over Russian foreign policy and was instrumental in pushing the regime toward an aggressive annexationist stand in the Balkans. When the Russian ambassador to Serbia died suddenly in June of 1914, Trubetskoi was appointed as his replacement—situating him at the center of Russian diplomacy during the decisive period of Russia's entry into the war. His account of this period serves as an important reference for the study of the war's outbreak. Trubetskoi also discusses how he drafted the proclamation on Poland and gives a revealing account of its origins. A valuable source on the major historical problem of the entry of Turkey into the war, the narrative provides interesting details about agreements with Britain and France. Translated by Trubetskoi's granddaughter, Elizabeth Saika-Voivod, and featuring Trubetskoi's original photographs, this fascinating memoir provides an inside look at Russian foreign policies during crucial points of the war. It will appeal to scholars, students, and general readers interested in World War I and Russian history.

The Visual Dominant in Eighteenth-Century Russia (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)

by Marcus C. Levitt

The Enlightenment privileged vision as the principle means of understanding the world, but the eighteenth-century Russian preoccupation with sight was not merely a Western import. In his masterful study, Levitt shows the visual to have had deep indigenous roots in Russian Orthodox culture and theology, arguing that the visual played a crucial role in the formation of early modern Russian culture and identity. Levitt traces the early modern Russian quest for visibility from jubilant self-discovery, to serious reflexivity, to anxiety and crisis. The book examines verbal constructs of sight—in poetry, drama, philosophy, theology, essay, memoir—that provide evidence for understanding the special character of vision of the epoch. LevittÆs groundbreaking work represents both a new reading of various central and lesser known texts and a broader revisualization of Russian eighteenth-century culture. Works that have considered the intersections of Russian literature and the visual in recent years have dealt almost exclusively with the modern period or with icons. The Visual Dominant in Eighteenth-Century Russia is an important addition to the scholarship and will be of major interest to scholars and students of Russian literature, culture, and religion, and specialists on the Enlightenment.

They Gave Me a Seafire

by R. "Mike" Crosley

A classic in every sense of the word, the re-issuing of this book is sure to provoke an enthusiastic response. First published in 1986 by Airlife, its publishing history has seen a great number of glowing reviews generated, coming from both historians and participants in the proceedings that the author so eloquently relays.The book charts Crosley's service career in the Fleet Air Arm during the entire period of the Second World War. Part of his service saw him in action aboard HMS Eagle, flying Sea Hurricanes on the Harpoon and Pedestal Malta convoys of June and August 1942. It was during this time that he shot down his first enemy aircraft and survived the dramatic sinking of HMS Eagle. From there he graduated on to Seafires, (the Naval equivalent of the Spitfire), and flew this type in Combat Air Patrols over Norway and ramrod strikes from Operation Torch (the invasion of French North Africa in November 1942), through to D-Day in June 1944 in the European Theatre of Operations, and then in the Pacific abroad HMS Implacable as part of the British Pacific Fleet in 1945 until the end of the Pacific War, by which time he had command of his own combined squadron, 801 and 880.The narrative is well written in a frank and often scathingly critical way of Fleet Air Arm operations during the Second World War and beyond. The book looks set to bring the endeavours of Crosley to a whole new generation of enthusiasts, and it should appeal across the board to fans of aviation, naval history and families and friends of Armed Forces, past and present.

The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions: 1909-1910 (Routledge Library Editions: The Englishwoman's Review of Social and Industrial Questions #40)

by Janet Horowitz Murray Myra Stark

The Englishwoman’s Review, which published from 1866 to 1910, participated in and recorded a great change in the range of possibilities open to women. The ideal of the magazine was the idea of the emerging emancipated middle-class woman: economic independence from men, choice of occupation, participation in the male enterprises of commerce and government, access to higher education, admittance to the male professions, particularly medicine, and, of course, the power of suffrage equal to that of men. First published in 1985, this fortieth volume contains issues from 1909 to 1910. With an informative introduction by Janet Horowitz Murray and Myra Stark, and an index compiled by Anna Clark, this set is an invaluable resource to those studying nineteenth and early twentieth-century feminism and the women’s movement in Britain.

The Time Machine: 30 Books And Response Journal: Literary Touchstone Classic

by H. G. Wells

The book that introduced the world to time travel In H. G. Wells’s immortal novella, an unnamed Time Traveller builds a machine that hurtles him to the year 802,701 AD. He discovers a world divided into two species: the peaceful Eloi, who live in colossal, crumbling buildings and are childlike in size and demeanor, and the hulking Morlocks—pale, simian creatures who dwell below ground and prey on their terrestrial counterparts. When his time machine is stolen, the Traveller must outwit the Morlocks in order to retrieve it, escaping their clutches by skipping like a stone across the surface of time. On a frozen red beach thirty million years in the future, he bears witness to the planet’s terrible last days. The first of H. G. Wells’s “scientific romances,” The Time Machine is a thrilling tale of adventure, and an unsettling thought experiment on the nature of progress and the transience of humankind. Its central conceit has inspired countless writers, artists, and filmmakers, and is undoubtedly one of the greatest inventions in modern literature. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences 1815-1897

by Elizabeth Cady Stanton

The autobiography of women&’s rights pioneer Elizabeth Cady Stanton—published for the 100th anniversary of women&’s suffrage—including an updated introduction and afterword from noted scholars of women&’s history Ellen Carol DuBois and Ann D. Gordon. Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences 1815–1897, is one of the great American autobiographies. There is really no other American woman&’s autobiography in the nineteenth century that comes near it in relevance, excellence, and historical significance. In 1848, thirty-three-year-old Stanton and four others organized the first major women&’s rights meeting in American history. Together with Susan B. Anthony, her partner in the cause, she led the campaign for women&’s legal rights, most prominently woman suffrage, for the rest of the century. In those years, Stanton was the movement&’s spokeswoman, theorist, and its visionary. In addition to her suffrage activism, she was a pioneering advocate of women&’s reproductive freedom, and a ceaseless critic of religious misogyny. As the mother of seven, she also had pronounced opinions on women&’s domestic responsibilities, especially on raising children. In Eighty Years and More, Stanton reminisces about dramatic moments in the history of woman suffrage, about her personal challenges and triumphs, and about the women and men she met in her travels around the United States and abroad. Stanton&’s writing retains its vigor, intelligence, and wit. Much of what she had to say about women, their lives, their frustrations, their aspirations and their possibilities, remains relevant and moving today.

Revolutionary Staten Island: From Colonial Calamities to Reluctant Rebels

by Joe Borelli

The shores of Staten Island were one of the first places Giovanni da Verrazzano and Henry Hudson landed in North America, and they became a safe harbor for thousands of refugees fleeing religious conflicts in Europe. As Dutch Staaten Eylandt and then English Richmond County, the island played a vital role in colonial development of the continent and the American Revolution. Rebel raids along the kills and inlets kept British forces and local Tories constantly battling for position, while Hessian and British troops occupied the island longer than any other county during the war. Staten Island's strategic location was used to launch counterstrikes against Washington's forces in New Jersey, while Major General John Sullivan led Continental army troops in defeat at the Battle of Staten Island. Author Joe Borelli reveals the colonial history of Richmond County and its role in the fight for American independence.

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