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Readings in Church Authority: Gifts and Challenges for Contemporary Catholicism

by Kenneth Wilson Richard Gaillardetz

The issues of Authority and Governance in the Roman Catholic Church permeate each and every aspect of the Church's identity, teaching, influence, organisation, moral values and pastoral provision. They have left their mark, in turn, upon its diverse theological and philosophical traditions. The trends of postmodernity, advances in communication, the advent of new ecclesial movements and theologies, and a perceived policy towards increasing institutional centralisation on the part of the Curial authorities of the Church in Rome, have all facilitated a continuous and lively stream of dialogue and disagreement on authority and governance in relation to the place of the Church in our age and the new Millennium. This comprehensive Reader uniquely gathers together in one volume key writings and documents from the wealth of published literature that has emerged on the issues of authority and governance in the Roman Catholic Church. With guided introductions to each section and to each reading, and end of chapter further reading lists, this Reader offers a balanced range of perspectives, themes, international writings, ecumenical dimensions, and formal church documents and Papal pronouncements on core areas of contemporary study and debate. Focusing on the modern/post-modern period in the Roman Catholic Church, but grounded in the historical contexts, Readings in Church Authority presents an accessible source book and introduction for all those exploring current debates and studying central themes in church authority.

Biogeochemistry of Marine Systems (Sheffield Biological Siences Ser. #20)

by Kenneth D. Black Graham B. Shimmield

Marine systems vary in their sensitivities to perturbation. Perturbation may be insidious - such as increasing eutrophication of coastal areas - or it may be dramatic - such as a response to an oil spill or some other accident. Climate change may occur incrementally or it may be abrupt, and ecosystem resilience is likely to be a complex function of the interactions of the factors and species mediating key biogeochemical processes.Biogeochemistry of Marine Systems considers issues of marine system resilience, focusing on a range of marine systems that exemplify major global province types. Each system is interesting in its own right, on account of its sensitivity to natural or anthropogenic change or its importance as an ecological service provider. Each contributing author concentrates on advances of the last decade.This prime reference source for marine biogeochemists, marine ecologists, and global systems scientists provides a strong foundation for the study of the multiple marine systems undergoing change because of natural biochemical or anthropogenic factors.

Jean 'Django' Reinhardt: A Contextual Bio-Discography 1910-1953

by Paul Vernon

This volume gathers together and organizes in an easily accessible format all known information relevant to the life and work of the French jazz musician Django Reinhardt. Together with fellow musician, St ane Grappelli, Reinhardt became one of the twentieth century's most celebrated jazz artists with performances he gave as part of the Quintet of the Hot Club of France. Essentially discographical in format, this book updates the original work compiled by Charles Delauney in 1960, and draws on later work by Gould, Nevers, Royal and Rust, to detail all known recordings by Reinhardt, together with known film, radio and television appearances. For each entry Paul Vernon provides, where known, the location of the recording, the date, the artist credit as it appears on the label of the original issue, the performers and the instruments played by them, the matrix number, the exact timing of the recording and details of 78, LP, EP and CD issues. Interspersed at the appropriate chronological points are biographical details about Reinhardt and the political, social and cultural climate of his time. This is augmented with excerpts from reviews, letters and other documents to provide a vivid context for his recording work.

Protection Devices and Systems for High-Voltage Applications (Power Engineering (willis) Ser. #Vol. 20)

by Vladimir Gurevich

This publication discusses general problems related to the structure of current overload protection systems in high voltage (HV) electrical installations and introduces a family of new devices based on reed switch contacts, solid-state units, hybrid technology and automatic systems based on these components. It highlights their application in high

Group Activities with Older Adults

by Vicki Dent

If you have responsibility for providing activities for older adults and you aren't sure whether what you are providing is effective, or you have exhausted all your own activity ideas then this book is for you. This clear and easy-to-use resource provides the tools you require to develop and implement a range of activities that meet the needs of your group. Structured around the ten areas of activity need - cognitive, creative, cultural, educational/employment, emotional, physical, self-esteem, sensory, social and spiritual - this book is a resource of activity ideas with hints, tips and suggestions for successful planning and delivery, and guidance on recording and evaluating activity programmes. It explores some of the adaptations required to meet the needs of younger clients, those with dementia, and those with communication difficulties. It is an ideal resource for anyone working with elderly people wanting to improve on an existing activity programme, or wishing to commence one.

The Arms Trade, Security and Conflict (Routledge Studies In Defence And Peace Economics Ser. #Vol. 5)

by Paul Levine Ron Smith

The Arms Industry is an area that is of huge concern to many people around the world. The economics of this hugely important industry are a vital strand that needs to be understood. This volume brings together contributors from all over the globe, such as Todd Sandler and Keith Hartley, and focuses on the important issues surrounding the Arms Trade

Straight and Level: Practical Airline Economics

by Stephen Holloway

This title was first published in 2003.Airline operating profits are well known to be volatile, and the global industry aggregate figures conceal wide differences in performance between carriers. The fundamental reasons for the poor performance of the industry as a whole were in the early 1990's that output ran too far ahead of demand, and the yield earned on output sold was insufficient to cover costs. In strategic context, this second edition uses a simple yet powerful model to explore linkages between the fundamentals of airline economics and the volatility of industry results at the operating level. Its five parts look in turn at strategic context, supply side, demand side, network management and a general conclusion.

European Integration and Health Policy: The Artful Dance of Economics and History

by Panos Minogiannis

The impact of European integration on diverse national social policies is still largely unknown. While policy decision making remains at the country level, there is a strong possibility that indirectly, as a result of ideological imperatives and financial constraints, policies will change. National health policy is a case in point. This important volume explores the current and probable effect of European integration on health care protection. Will it tend to encourage all European member states to provide equitable and universal access to quality care? Or is the European integration process likely to lead to social exclusion of some? The high degree of social welfare as a health expectancy holds great significance for decisions in countries like the United States facing similiar pressures for expanded coverage. In answering these questions, Panos Minogiannis examines policies in Greece, France, Germany, and the Netherlands. Minogiannis frames his argument through an exploration of the history of the institutionalization of health care. Chapter 1 explores the nature of challenges that health care faces in an era of integration and the ways in which these challenges have emerged. Chapter 2 discusses centralization of governance in Brussels, describing the structure and relations of different European Union institutions, and their interactions with member states. The final portions of the book, through case studies of the Dutch, French, German, and Greek health reforms, explore the history of the political development of health care institutions with a particular interest in reform proposals in the last fifteen years. Chapter 7 brings together lessons from previous chapters and discusses the dynamics of health policy making in the European Union. Minogiannis concludes that health insurance will most likely remain at the member state level as far as politics are concerned, at least for the present, although policy makers will most likely have to deal with the issue of cross-border health more comprehensively than in the past. Those interested in comparative policy, and in particular health care policy, will find this volume highly informative reading. Those interested in the impact of European integration will find it provocative. Panos Minogiannis is with the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and is a research associate at the Eisenhower Center.

Prostitution, Trafficking, and Traumatic Stress

by PhD, Melissa Farley

Prostitution, Trafficking, and Traumatic Stress offers the reader an analysis of prostitution and trafficking as organized interpersonal violence. Even in academia, law, and public health, prostitution is often misunderstood as "sex work." The book&’s 32 contributors offer clinical examples, analysis, and original research that cou

Fictions of Authority: Women Writers and Narrative Voice

by Susan Sniader Lanser

Drawing on narratological and feminist theory, Susan Sniader Lanser explores patterns of narration in a wide range of novels by women of England, France, and the United States from the 1740s to the present. She sheds light on the history of "voice" as a narrative strategy and as a means of attaining social power. She considers the dynamics in personal voice in authors such as Mary Shelley, Charlotte Brontë, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jamaica Kincaid. In writers who attempt a "communal voice"—including Mary Wollstonecraft, Elizabeth Gaskell, Joan Chase, and Monique Wittig—she finds innovative strategies that challenge the conventions of Western narrative.

The Transmission of "Beowulf": Language, Culture, and Scribal Behavior (Myth and Poetics II)

by Leonard Neidorf

Beowulf, like The Iliad and The Odyssey, is a foundational work of Western literature that originated in mysterious circumstances. In The Transmission of Beowulf, Leonard Neidorf addresses philological questions that are fundamental to the study of the poem. Is Beowulf the product of unitary or composite authorship? How substantially did scribes alter the text during its transmission, and how much time elapsed between composition and preservation? Neidorf answers these questions by distinguishing linguistic and metrical regularities, which originate with the Beowulf poet, from patterns of textual corruption, which descend from copyists involved in the poem’s transmission. He argues, on the basis of archaic features that pervade Beowulf and set it apart from other Old English poems, that the text preserved in the sole extant manuscript (ca. 1000) is essentially the work of one poet who composed it circa 700. Of course, during the poem’s written transmission, several hundred scribal errors crept into its text. These errors are interpreted in the central chapters of the book as valuable evidence for language history, cultural change, and scribal practice. Neidorf’s analysis reveals that the scribes earnestly attempted to standardize and modernize the text’s orthography, but their unfamiliarity with obsolete words and ancient heroes resulted in frequent errors. The Beowulf manuscript thus emerges from his study as an indispensible witness to processes of linguistic and cultural change that took place in England between the eighth and eleventh centuries. An appendix addresses J. R. R. Tolkien’s Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, which was published in 2014. Neidorf assesses Tolkien’s general views on the transmission of Beowulf and evaluates his position on various textual issues.

Urban Environmental Education Review (Cornell Series in Environmental Education)


Urban Environmental Education Review explores how environmental education can contribute to urban sustainability. Urban environmental education includes any practices that create learning opportunities to foster individual and community well-being and environmental quality in cities. It fosters novel educational approaches and helps debunk common assumptions that cities are ecologically barren and that city people don't care for, or need, urban nature or a healthy environment.Topics in Urban Environmental Education Review range from the urban context to theoretical underpinnings, educational settings, participants, and educational approaches in urban environmental education. Chapters integrate research and practice to help aspiring and practicing environmental educators, urban planners, and other environmental leaders achieve their goals in terms of education, youth and community development, and environmental quality in cities.The ten-essay series Urban EE Essays, excerpted from Urban Environmental Education Review, may be found here: naaee.org/eepro/resources/urban-ee-essays. These essays explore various perspectives on urban environmental education and may be reprinted/reproduced only with permission from Cornell University Press.

Plots against Russia: Conspiracy and Fantasy after Socialism

by Eliot Borenstein

In this original and timely assessment of cultural expressions of paranoia in contemporary Russia, Eliot Borenstein samples popular fiction, movies, television shows, public political pronouncements, internet discussions, blogs, and religious tracts to build a sense of the deep historical and cultural roots of konspirologiia that run through Russian life. Plots against Russia reveals through dramatic and exciting storytelling that conspiracy and melodrama are entirely equal-opportunity in modern Russia, manifesting themselves among both pro-Putin elites and his political opposition. As Borenstein shows, this paranoid fantasy until recently characterized only the marginal and the irrelevant. Now, through its embodiment in pop culture, the expressions of a conspiratorial worldview are seen everywhere. Plots against Russia is an important contribution to the fields of Russian literary and cultural studies from one of its preeminent voices.

More Than Medicine: Nurse Practitioners and the Problems They Solve for Patients, Health Care Organizations, and the State (The Culture and Politics of Health Care Work)

by LaTonya J. Trotter

In More Than Medicine, LaTonya J. Trotter chronicles the everyday work of a group of nurse practitioners (NPs) working on the front lines of the American health care crisis as they cared for four hundred African American older adults living with poor health and limited means. Trotter describes how these NPs practiced an inclusive form of care work that addressed medical, social, and organizational problems that often accompany poverty. In solving this expanded terrain of problems from inside the clinic, these NPs were not only solving a broader set of concerns for their patients; they became a professional solution for managing "difficult people" for both their employer and the state. Through More Than Medicine, we discover that the problems found in the NP's exam room are as much a product of our nation's disinvestment in social problems as of physician scarcity or rising costs.

The Medieval Saga

by Carol J. Clover

Written in the thirteenth century, the Icelandic prose sagas, chronicling the lives of kings and commoners, give a dramatic account of the first century after the settlement of Iceland—the period from about 930 to 1050. To some extent these elaborate tales are written versions of traditional sagas passed down by word of mouth. How did they become the long and polished literary works that are still read today?The evolution of the written sagas is commonly regarded as an anomalous phenomenon, distinct from contemporary developments in European literature. In this groundbreaking study, Carol J. Clover challenges this view and relates the rise of imaginative prose in Iceland directly to the rise of imaginative prose on the Continent. Analyzing the narrative structure and composition of the sagas and comparing them with other medieval works, Clover shows that the Icelandic authors, using Continental models, owe the prose form of their writings, as well as some basic narrative strategies, to Latin historiography and to French romance.

Building China: Informal Work and the New Precariat

by Sarah Swider

Roughly 260 million workers in China have participated in a mass migration of peasants moving into the cities, and construction workers account for almost half of them. In Building China, Sarah Swider draws on her research in Beijing, Guangzhou, and Shanghai between 2004 and 2012, including living in an enclave, working on construction jobsites, and interviews with eighty-three migrants, managers, and labor contractors. This ethnography focuses on the lives, work, family, and social relations of construction workers. It adds to our understanding of China's new working class, the deepening rural-urban divide, and the growing number of undocumented migrants working outside the protection of labor laws and regulation. Swider shows how these migrants--members of the global "precariat," an emergent social force based on vulnerability, insecurity, and uncertainty--are changing China's class structure and what this means for the prospects for an independent labor movement. The workers who build and serve Chinese cities, along with those who produce goods for the world to consume, are mostly migrant workers. They, or their parents, grew up in the countryside; they are farmers who left the fields and migrated to the cities to find work. Informal workers--who represent a large segment of the emerging workforce--do not fit the traditional model of industrial wage workers. Although they have not been incorporated into the new legal framework that helps define and legitimize China's decentralized legal authoritarian regime, they have emerged as a central component of China's economic success and an important source of labor resistance.

The Afterlives of the Terror: Facing the Legacies of Mass Violence in Postrevolutionary France

by Ronen Steinberg

The Afterlives of the Terror explores how those who experienced the mass violence of the French Revolution struggled to come to terms with it. Focusing on the Reign of Terror, Ronen Steinberg challenges the presumption that its aftermath was characterized by silence and enforced collective amnesia. Instead, he shows that there were painful, complex, and sometimes surprisingly honest debates about how to deal with its legacies. As The Afterlives of the Terror shows, revolutionary leaders, victims' families, and ordinary citizens argued about accountability, retribution, redress, and commemoration. Drawing on the concept of transitional justice and the scholarship on the major traumas of the twentieth century, Steinberg explores how the French tried, but ultimately failed, to leave this difficult past behind. He argues that it was the same democratizing, radicalizing dynamic that led to the violence of the Terror, which also gave rise to an unprecedented interrogation of how society is affected by events of enormous brutality. In this sense, the modern question of what to do with difficult pasts is one of the unanticipated consequences of the eighteenth century's age of democratic revolutions.Thanks to generous funding from Michigan State University and its participation in TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem), the ebook editions of this book are available as Open Access (OA) volumes, available from Cornell Open (cornellopen.org) and other Open Access repositories.

Investing in Financial Research: A Decision-Making System for Better Results (AREA Method Publications)

by Cheryl Strauss Einhorn

Finalist in the Business/Personal Finance category of the 2019 International Book AwardsEvery day, people around the world make financial decisions. They choose to invest in a stock, sell their holdings in a mutual fund or buy a condominium. These decisions are complex and financially tricky—even for financial professionals. But the literature available on financial research is dated and narrowly focused without any real practical application. Until now there's been a gap in the literature: a book that shows you how to conduct a step by step comprehensive financial investigation that ends in a decision.This book gives you that how.Investing in Financial Research is a guidebook for conducting financial investigations and lays out Cheryl Strauss Einhorn's AREA Method—a research and decision-making system that uniquely controls for bias, focuses on the incentives of others and expands knowledge while improving judgement—and applies it to investigating financial situations. AREA is applicable to all sorts of financial sleuthing, whether for investment analysis or investigative journalism. It allows you to be the expert in your own life.The AREA Method provides you with: *Defined tasks that guide and focus your research on your vision of success; *A structure that isolates your sources, giving you insight into their perspectives, biases and incentives; *Investigative resources, tips and techniques to upgrade your research and analysis beyond document-based sources; *Exercises to foster creativity and originality in your thinking; *A sequence and framework that brings your disparate pieces of research together to build your confidence and conviction about your financial decision.

Proceedings of Eurocogsci 03: The European Cognitive Science Conference 2003

by Richard Young Franz Schmalhofer Graham Katz

The aim of the European Cognitive Science Conference is the presentation of empirical, theoretical, and analytic work from all areas of interest in cognitive science, such as artificial intelligence, education, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, psychology, and anthropology. The focus is on interdisciplinary work that is either of interest for more than one of the research areas mentioned or integrates research methods from different fields. With contributions by cognitive scientists from 20 different countries, the papers in this volume reflect the origins of this conference, as well as its international scope.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation

by James Robertson Claude Roux Kenneth G. Wiggins

This second edition presents a timely and practical discussion of vagal nerve stimulation in a clear and well-illustrated format. It provides a clinical approach to the treatment of patients with medically-intractable seizures, as well as for those with depression (a new indication since the publication of first edition). The book's focus has made

Daniel O'Connell, The British Press and The Irish Famine: Killing Remarks (The Nineteenth Century Series)

by Leslie A. Williams

Through an investigation of the reportage in nineteenth-century English metropolitan newspapers and illustrated journals, this book begins with the question 'Did anti-O'Connell sentiment in the British press lead to "killing remarks," rhetoric that helped the press, government and public opinion distance themselves from the Irish Famine?' The book explores the reportage of events and people in Ireland, focussing first on Daniel O'Connell, and then on debates about the seriousness of the Famine. Drawing upon such journals as The Times, The Observer, the Morning Chronicle, The Scotsman, the Manchester Guardian, the Illustrated London News, and Punch, Williams suggests how this reportage may have effected Britain's response to Ireland's tragedy. Continuing her survey of the press after the death of O'Connell, Leslie Williams demonstrates how the editors, writers and cartoonists who reported and commented on the growing crisis in peripheral Ireland drew upon a metropolitan mentality. In doing so, the press engaged in what Edward Said identifies as 'exteriority,' whereby reporters, cartoonists and illustrators, basing their viewpoints on their very status as outsiders, reflected the interests of metropolitan readers. Although this was overtly excused as an effort to reduce bias, stereotyping and historic enmity - much of unconscious - were deeply embedded in the language and images of the press. Williams argues that the biases in language and the presentation of information proved dangerous. She illustrates how David Spurr's categories or tropes of invalidation, debasement and negation are frequently exhibited in the reports, editorials and cartoons. However, drawing upon the communications theories of Gregory Bateson, Williams concludes that the real 'subject' of the British Press commentary on Ireland was Britain itself. Ireland was used as a negative mirror to reinforce Britain's own commitment to capitalist, industrial values at a time of great internal stress.

Europe, 1890–1945 (Spotlight History)

by Stephen J. Lee

Europe, 1890-1945 is a new approach to teaching and learning early twentieth century European history at A level. It meets the needs of teachers and students studying for today's revised AS and A2 exams. In a unique style, Europe, 1890-1945 focuses on the key topics within the period. Each topic is then comprehensively explored to provide background information, essay writing advice and examples, source work, and historical skills exercises. From 1890 to 1945, the key topics featured include: * the origins and impact of the First World War* the Russian Revolution and the rise of Stalin* the Weimar Republic and the rise of Hitler* Mussolini and Fascist Italy* Stalin and the Soviet Union, 1928-41.

Science, Theology, and Ethics (Routledge Science and Religion Series)

by Ted Peters

Science challenges faith to seek fuller understanding, and faith challenges science to be socially and ethically responsible. This book begins with faith in God the Creator of the world, and then expands our understanding of creation in light of Big Bang cosmology and new discoveries in physics. Examining the expanding frontier of genetic research, Ted Peters draws out implications for theological understandings of human nature and human freedom. Issues discussed include: methodology in science and theology; eschatology in cosmology and theology; freedom and responsibility in evolution and theology; and genetic determinism, genetic engineering, and cloning in relation to freedom, the comodification of human life, and equitable distribution of the fruits of genetic technology. The dialogue model of relationship between science and religion, proposed in this book, provides a common ground for the disparate voices among theologians, scientists, and world religions. This common ground has the potential to breathe new life into current debates about the world in which we live, move, and have our being.

The Theatre Arts Audition Book for Men

by Annika Bluhm

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Parasites of Homo sapiens: An Annotated Checklist of the Protozoa, Helminths and Arthropods for which we are Home

by Richard Ashford William Crewe

Homo sapiens rank among the most parasitized of all animals. In part this is because we know so much about all aspects of the biology of our species, but in addition, our varied habitat and diet and our global distribution exposes us to more infections than any other species. Whereas some familiar parasitic infections are responsible for much human

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