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The 'Girl Question' in Education: Vocational Education for Young Women in the Progressive Era (Routledge Library Editions: Education)

by Jane Bernard-Powers

This book is a history of the genesis and development of vocational education for young women in the United States. Home economics, trade training and commercial education – the three key areas of vocational training available to young women during the progressive era – are the focus of this work. Beginning with a study of the "woman question", or what women were supposed to be, the book traces the three curriculum areas from prescription, through lively discussions of policy to the actual programs and student responses to the programs. The author tells the story of education for work from several different perspectives and draws on a vast array of sources to paint this broad canvas of vocational education for young women at the turn of the twentieth century.

GIS And Public Health

by Sara McLafferty Ellen Cromley

Authoritative and comprehensive, this is the leading text and professional resource on using geographic information systems (GIS) to analyze and address public health problems. Basic GIS concepts and tools are explained, including ways to access and manage spatial databases. The book presents state-of-the-art methods for mapping and analyzing data on population, health events, risk factors, and health services, and for incorporating geographical knowledge into planning and policy. Numerous maps, diagrams, and real-world applications are featured. The companion Web page provides lab exercises with data that can be downloaded for individual or course use.

Give Up Something Bad for Lent: A Lenten Study for Adults

by James W. Moore

During Lent each year, Christians give up something as an act of sacrifice and spiritual discipline. Often it is something like chocolate, knowing that after Easter Sunday they can once again enjoy what they have given up. James Moore challenges readers to take it further--to give up something spiritually that they would be better off not doing. He invites all to seek God's help to focus on eliminating one habit or attitude that is destructive. Imagine giving up envy, jealousy, self-pity, apathy, procrastination, gossip, resentment, or negative thinking, how much better life would be.The forty days of Lent are ideal to use this study and prepare to give up something bad while preparing to fully embrace the "Good News" of Easter. Study includes seven sessions, one for each Sunday in Lent and Easter Sunday. Each session features a Scripture reference, a personal reading, questions for personal reflection or group study, and closing prayer.

Glencoe Physical Science, Science Notebook: Introduction to Physical Science (Physical Science)

by Douglas Fisher

NIMAC-sourced textbook

Global and Regional Problems: Towards an Interdisciplinary Study (The International Political Economy of New Regionalisms Series)

by Vilho Harle

Distinctive due to explicit and systematically developed links between international relations (IR) and related disciplines, this book addresses global and regional interactions and the complex policy problems that often characterise this agenda. Such enhanced communication is crucial for improving the capacity of IR to engage with concrete issues that today are of high policy relevance for international organisations, states, diplomats, mediators and humankind in general. Whilst the authors do not reject the present IR, they offer a wider research agenda with new directions intended not only for those IR scholars who are unsatisfied with the analytical power of the current discipline, but also for those working on 'international', 'foreign', 'global' or 'interregional' issues in other disciplines and fields of research. In this instance they pay particular attention to linking up with peace research, international political economy (IPE) and cultural political economy (CPE), sociology, political geography, development studies, linguistics, cultural studies, environmental studies and energy research, gender studies, and traditions of area studies.

The Global Anti-Money Laundering Regulatory Landscape in Less Developed Countries

by Norman Mugarura

Examining the challenges of using the global anti-money laundering (AML) framework in an uneven global regulatory landscape, this book discusses the difficulties of relating de-regulation, liberalization and conflict of laws to the dynamics of the market economy and demonstrates how the global environment engenders money laundering. It suggests that corruption, general systemic failure and lack of infrastructural capacity in some developing economies are hampering the implementation of laws and regulations. Suggesting that these challenges can be overcome by designing AML regimes more suited to developing economies within the prevailing global climate, the book questions the assumption that that global regimes will be applicable and emphasises the need for more representation of developing economies on the relevant committees. This book is the first of its kind to present the perspective of developing economies and their involvement in AML regimes and should be of interest to those involved in business and commercial law as well as comparative law.

Global Cold War Literature: Western, Eastern and Postcolonial Perspectives (Routledge Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature #Vol. 3)

by Andrew Hammond

In countries worldwide, the Cold War dominated politics, society and culture during the second half of the twentieth century. Global Cold War Literatures offers a unique look at the multiple ways in which writers from Asia, Africa, Europe and North and South America addressed the military conflicts, revolutions, propaganda wars and ideological debates of the era. While including essays on western European and North American literature, the volume views First World writing, not as central to the period, but as part of an international discussion of Cold War realities in which the most interesting contributions often came from marginal or subordinate cultures. To this end, there is an emphasis on the literatures of the Second and Third Worlds, including essays on Latin American poetry, Soviet travel writing, Chinese autobiography, African theatre, North Korean literature, Cuban and eastern European fiction, and Middle Eastern fiction and poetry. With the post-Cold War era still in a condition of emergence, it is essential that we look back to the 1945-89 period to understand the political and cultural forces that shaped the modern world. The volume’s analysis of those forces and its focus on many of the ‘hot spots’ – Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea – that define the contemporary ‘war on terror’, make this an essential resources for those working in Postcolonial, American and English Literatures, as well as in History, Comparative Literature, European Studies and Cultural Studies. Global Cold War Literatures is a suitable companion volume to Hammond's Cold War Literature: Writing the Global Conflict, also available from Routledge.

Global Companies, Local Innovations: Why the Engineering Aspects of Innovation Making Require Co-location (Economic Geography Series)

by Yasuyuki Motoyama

Investigating the innovation activities of multinational corporations, this book uncovers and examines why the geography of innovation by multinationals is overwhelmingly local, in spite of their global operations in manufacturing and sales through case studies of produce development by three global players: Toyota, Sony, and Canon. The microdynamic approach of the book allows an in-depth investigation of the engineering and technical aspects of innovation making. The book unfolds the complex and constant process of trial and error in innovation and reveals three fundamental natures of innovation making: complexity, interdisciplinarity, and prototyping and testing. In order to manage these three natures of innovation, firms have to plan, ironically, for unplanned situations and to collocate knowledge, people, and resources.

Global Dickens (A Library of Essays on Charles Dickens)

by Nirshan Perera

This volume of essays provides a selection of leading contemporary scholarship which situates Dickens in a global perspective. The articles address four main areas: Dickens's reception outside Britain and North America; his intertextual relations with and influence upon writers from different parts of the world; Dickens as traveller; and the presence throughout his fiction and journalism of subjects, such as race and empire, that extend beyond the national contexts in which his work is usually considered. Written by leading researchers from diverse countries and cultures, this is an indispensable reference work in the field of Dickens studies.

Global Ecology and Unequal Exchange: Fetishism in a Zero-Sum World (Routledge Studies In Ecological Economics Ser. #14)

by Alf Hornborg

In modern society, we tend to have faith in technology. But is our concept of ‘technology’ itself a cultural illusion? This book challenges the idea that humanity as a whole is united in a common development toward increasingly efficient technologies. Instead it argues that modern technology implies a kind of global ‘zero-sum game’ involving uneven resource flows, which make it possible for wealthier parts of global society to save time and space at the expense of humans and environments in the poorer parts. We tend to think of the functioning of machines as if it was detached from the social relations of exchange which make machines economically and physically possible (in some areas). But even the steam engine that was the core of the Industrial Revolution in England was indissolubly linked to slave labour and soil erosion in distant cotton plantations. And even as seemingly benign a technology as railways have historically saved time (and accessed space) primarily for those who can afford them, but at the expense of labour time and natural space lost for other social groups with less purchasing power. The existence of technology, in other words, is not a cornucopia signifying general human progress, but the unevenly distributed result of unequal resource transfers that the science of economics is not equipped to perceive. Technology is not simply a relation between humans and their natural environment, but more fundamentally a way of organizing global human society. From the very start it has been a global phenomenon, which has intertwined political, economic and environmental histories in complex and inequitable ways. This book unravels these complex connections and rejects the widespread notion that technology will make the world sustainable. Instead it suggests a radical reform of money, which would be as useful for achieving sustainability as for avoiding financial breakdown. It brings together various perspectives from environmental and economic anthropology, ecological economics, political ecology, world-system analysis, fetishism theory, semiotics, environmental and economic history, and development theory. Its main contribution is a new understanding of technological development and concerns about global sustainability as questions of power and uneven distribution, ultimately deriving from the inherent logic of general-purpose money. It should be of interest to students and professionals with a background or current engagement in anthropology, sustainability studies, environmental history, economic history, or development studies.

The Global Economic Crisis in Latin America: Impacts and Responses (Routledge Studies In The Modern World Economy Ser.)

by Michael Cohen

When the 2008 housing market bubble burst in the United States, a financial crisis rippled from the epi-center in the United States across borders into economies both near and far, causing persistent social and economic detriment in many countries. The Global Economic Crisis in Latin America: Impacts and Responses is an examination of the impacts and responses in the diverse Latin American region through the lens of three countries: Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.

The Global Economics of Forestry

by William F. Hyde

This book traces the economic and biological pattern of forest development from initial settlement and harvest activity at the natural forest frontier to modern industrial forest plantations. It builds from diagrams describing three discrete stages of forest development, and then discusses the management and policy implications associated with each, supporting its observations with examples and data from six continents and from both developed and developing countries. It shows that characteristic distinctions between the three stages make forestry unusual in natural resource management and that effective policy requires different, even contrasting, decisions at each stage. William F. Hyde’s comprehensive discussion covers a wide range of issues, including the impacts of both specific forest policies and broader macroeconomic policies, the unique requirements of current issues such as global warming, biodiversity and tourism, and the complexities of the different forest products industries. Concluding chapters review the roles of the newer institutional landowners, of smaller private and farm landowners, and of public agencies. This highly-original volume reaches far beyond forest economics; it explains what forestry can do for regional development and environmental conservation and what policies designed for other sectors and the macro-economy can do for forestry.

Global Education Inc.: New Policy Networks and the Neoliberal Imaginary

by Stephen J. Ball

Do private and philanthropic solutions to the problems of education signal the end of state education in itswelfare form?Education policy is being reformed and re-worked on a global scale. Policies are flowing and converging to produce a singular vision ofbest practice based on the methods and tenets of theneo-liberal imaginary. Philanthro

Global Environment of Policing (International Police Executive Symposium Co-publications)

by Dilip K. Das Darren Palmer Michael M. Berlin

Police organizations across the globe are experiencing major changes. Many nations cope with funding constraints as pressures within their societies, terrorism and transnational crime, and social and political transformations necessitate a more democratic form of policing. Drawn from the proceedings at the International Police Executive Symposium i

Global Finance (Shortcuts)

by Robert J. Holton

Written under the shadow of the global financial crisis, this book charts the current shape of global finance and tries to explain why the crisis arose – and what can be done about it. Economics alone cannot fully explain how global finance operates, and why it is so crisis prone. Global Finance offers a wider approach in three key ways, by: setting markets and financial market failure in a historical context bringing politics and culture back into the analysis of global finance drawing on the latest thinking by sociologists of economic life. With a convincing argument for better regulation of markets, Robert Holton provides a fascinating insight into the volatile and often misunderstood world of global finance. This is a key text for undergraduate students of sociology, economics, business, and politics, as well as being an incisive, informative read for anyone with an interest in this topical issue.

The Global Financial Crisis: Triggers, Responses and Aftermath

by Tony Ciro

This book offers commentary and analysis on the catastrophic events which have recently confronted the international economy in the modern era and contrasts the current situation with other financial crises. It includes case studies on Lehman Brothers in the US, Babcock & Brown in Australia, and Northern Rock in the UK. Asking many pertinent questions about the causes of the crisis and its effects, the book explores fundamental themes such as: asset bubbles and speculation in the financial and non-financial markets, systemic risks and the role of regulation, and regulators. It also reviews the response of international institutions such as the IMF, the World Bank, the US Federal Reserve, the EU Central Bank and the G20. The book assesses the triggers of the crisis and evaluates rescue packages and policy responses as well as suggesting reform of regulatory and supervisory frameworks to maintain banking and modern financial systems in the future.

Global HR: Challenges Facing the Function

by Tony Williams Peter Reilly

The HR function is having to adjust itself to the implications of the globalisation of business activity. This has meant adjusting its philosophy, policies and practices to fit new organisational imperatives, as well as creating its own refashioned service delivery model. Peter Reilly and Tony Williams's Global HR explores the key issues of building an international brand, culture and talent pool, whilst contributing to business and functional transformation, drawing on examples from multinationals in telecoms, fast-moving consumer goods, manufacturing, software, services and commodities. In doing so, they offer insights into managing people and businesses that no organization can ignore.

Global Indonesia (Routledge Contemporary Southeast Asia Series)

by Jean Gelman Taylor

In the 19th century, colonial rule brought the modern world closer to the Indonesian peoples, introducing mechanized transport, all-weather roads, postal and telegraph communications, and steamship networks that linked Indonesia’s islands to each other, to Europe and the Middle East. This book looks at Indonesia’s global importance, and traces the entwining of its peoples and economies with the wider world. The book discusses how products unique to Indonesia first slipped into regional trade networks and exposed scattered communities to the dynamic influence of far-off civilizations. It focuses on economic and cultural changes that resulted in the emergence of political units organized as oligarchies or monarchies, and goes on to look in detail at Indonesia’s relationship with Holland’s East Indies Company. The book analyses the attempts by politicians to negotiate ways of being modern but uniquely Indonesian, and considers the oscillations in Indonesia between movements for theocracy and democracy. It is a useful contribution for students and scholars of World History and Southeast Asian Studies.

Global Islamophobia: Muslims and Moral Panic in the West (Global Connections)

by George Morgan

The decade since 9/11 has seen a decline in liberal tolerance in the West as Muslims have endured increasing levels of repression. This book presents a series of case studies from Western Europe, Australia and North America demonstrating the transnational character of Islamophobia. The authors explore contemporary intercultural conflicts using the concept of moral panic, revitalised for the era of globalisation. Exploring various sites of conflict, Global Islamophobia considers the role played by 'moral entrepreneurs' in orchestrating popular xenophobia and in agitating for greater surveillance, policing and cultural regulation of those deemed a threat to the nation's security or imagined community. This timely collection examines the interpenetration of the global and the local in the West's cultural politics towards Islam, highlighting parallels in the responses of governments and in the worrying reversion to a politics of coercion and assimilation. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology and politics with interests in race and ethnicity; citizenship and assimilation; political communication, securitisation and The War on Terror; and moral panics.

The Global Journalist in the 21st Century (Routledge Communication Ser.)

by Lars Willnat David H. Weaver

The Global Journalist in the 21st Century systematically assesses the demographics, education, socialization, professional attitudes and working conditions of journalists in various countries around the world. This book updates the original Global Journalist (1998) volume with new data, adding more than a dozen countries, and provides material on comparative research about journalists that will be useful to those interested in doing their own studies. The editors put together this collection working under the assumption that journalists’ backgrounds, working conditions and ideas are related to what is reported (and how it is covered) in the various news media round the world, in spite of societal and organizational constraints, and that this news coverage matters in terms of world public opinion and policies. Outstanding features include: Coverage of 33 nations located around the globe, based on recent surveys conducted among representative samples of local journalists Comprehensive analyses by well-known media scholars from each country A section on comparative studies of journalists An appendix with a collection of survey questions used in various nations to question journalists As the most comprehensive and reliable source on journalists around the world, The Global Journalist will serve as the primary source for evaluating the state of journalism. As such, it promises to become a standard reference among journalism, media, and communication students and researchers around the world.

Global Justice (The Library of Essays on Justice)

by Holly Lawford-Smith

This volume brings together a range of influential essays by distinguished philosophers and political theorists on the issue of global justice. Global justice concerns the search for ethical norms that should govern interactions between people, states, corporations and other agents acting in the global arena, as well as the design of social institutions that link them together. This volume includes articles that engage with major theoretical questions such as the applicability of the ideals of social and economic equality to the global sphere, the degree of justified partiality to compatriots, and the nature and extent of the responsibilities of the affluent to address global poverty and other hardships abroad. It also features articles that bring the theoretical insights of global justice thinkers to bear on matters of practical concern to contemporary societies, such as policies associated with immigration, international trade and climate change.

Global Justice Activism and Policy Reform in Europe: Understanding When Change Happens (Routledge Advances in Sociology #90)

by Peter Utting Mario Pianta Anne Ellersiek

Civil society activism around issues of global justice has proliferated in Europe during the past two decades. Has such contestation and advocacy made a difference? This book examines whether and how the organizations, networks and campaigns involved have attained their policy objectives in the areas of debt relief, international trade, international taxation and corporate accountability. The analysis also considers the relationship between national and transnational activism. By comparing variations in the "activism-policy nexus" in France, Italy and the United Kingdom, it seeks to understand how such interaction and policy outcomes vary in different institutional and political contexts.

Global Minority Rights (The International Library of Essays on Rights)

by Joshua Castellino

This important volume brings together a range of material in different areas of law and the social sciences that address questions concerning the rights of minorities. The discipline is arguably one of the oldest branches of public international law, and owes its heritage to those who struggled to create standards to protect the numerically inferior and non-dominant communities from the excesses of the majority. While reflecting this rich heritage, the works contained in this volume show the extent to which policy constructs (especially in law) have begun to pay heed to the need to include minorities in different domestic settings across the globe. To provide readers with a structured approach to understanding global minority rights law the editor divides the issues into six main headings, namely: Historical Development; Conceptual Development; Contemporary Challenges; Fundamental Norms of Minority Protection; Specific Rights of Minorities; Human Rights and Minority Rights.

Global Modernity, Development, and Contemporary Civilization: Towards a Renewal of Critical Theory (Routledge Studies in Emerging Societies)

by José Maurício Domingues

This book investigates modern global civilization, offering an alternative to post-colonial theories and the "multiple modernities" approach (as well as the civilizational theory linked to it). It argues that modernity has become a global civilization that is heterogeneous and intertwined with other civilizations, and also aims at a renewal of critical theory that is not US-centric and Eurocentric, focusing instead on China, South Asia (India) and Latin America (Brazil). Dealing with the themes of centre-periphery relations, complexity (including culture and religion), democracy and emancipatory possibilities, this book is based on general theoretical ideas such as collective subjectivity, the interplay of memory and creativity, and the concept of "modernizing moves," so as to deal with historical contingency.

Global perspectives on higher education and lifelong learners

by Hans G. Schuetze Maria Slowey

The global expansion of participation rates in higher education continue more or less unabated. However, while the concept of lifelong learning has figured prominently in national and international educational policy discourse for more than three decades, its implications for the field of higher education has remained relatively underdeveloped. This book focuses on a particular dimension of the lifelong learning: higher education for those who have not progressed directly from school to higher education. Some will embark on undergraduate programmes as mature students, part-time and/or distance students; others wish to return to higher education after having completed (or not completed) a previous academic programme, while increasing numbers participate in postgraduate and continuing studies for a complex mix of professional and personal reasons. Adopting a comparative and international longitudinal perspective which goes beyond a snapshot view by building on the cases of a core group of ten OECD countries, this timely book investigates the ways in which important new developments impacting on higher education crystallise around the lifelong learning agenda: new technology and open source resources; the changing role of the state and market in higher education; the blurring of public and private boundaries; issues of equity and access in a time of global economic turmoil; the increased emphasis on research and international league tables; the changing nature of the education; and, the complex interaction of international, national and regional expectations which governments and other stakeholders have of universities and other public and private institutions of higher education. While focusing on the situation in Canada, USA, Japan, Australia, New Zealand and a wide variety of European countries, the book also assesses the issues from the perspective of developing countries. Launched by the Irish Minister of Education, this timely book is a must read. Find out more here: http://www4.dcu.ie/ovpli/herc/book_launch

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