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The Dead Play On

by Heather Graham

Play a song for me... Musicians are being murdered in New Orleans. But Arnie Watson apparently died by his own hand. When Tyler Anderson plays the saxophone he inherited from Arnie, a soldier and musician who died soon after his return, he believes he sees visions of his friend's life-and death. He becomes convinced Arnie was murdered and that the instrument had something to do with whatever happened, and with whatever's happening all over the city... Tyler knows his theory sounds crazy to the police, so he approaches Danni Cafferty, hoping she and Michael Quinn will find out what the cops couldn't. Or wouldn't. After all, Cafferty and Quinn have become famous for solving unusual crimes. They're partners in their personal lives, too. Quinn's a private investigator and Danni works with him. When they look into the case, they discover a secret lover of Arnie's and a history of jealousies and old hatreds that leads them back to the band Arnie once played with-and Tyler plays with now. They discover that sometimes, for some people, the line between passion and obsession is hard to draw. Only in uncovering the truth can they hope to save others-and themselves-from the deadly hands of a killer.

Normal

by Graeme Cameron

"The truth is I hurt people. It's what I do. It's all I do. It's all I've ever done."He lives in your community, in a nice house with a well-tended garden. He shops in your grocery store, bumping shoulders with you and apologizing with a smile. He drives beside you on the highway, politely waving you into the lane ahead of him.What you don't know is that he has an elaborate cage built into a secret basement under his garage. And the food that he's carefully shopping for is to feed a young woman he's holding there against her will--one in a string of many, unaware of the fate that awaits her.This is how it's been for a long time. It's normal...and it works. Perfectly.Then he meets the checkout girl from the 24-hour grocery. And now the plan, the hunts, the room...the others--he doesn't need any of them anymore. He only needs her. But just as he decides to go straight, the police start to close in. He might be able to cover his tracks, except for one small problem--he still has someone trapped in his garage.Discovering his humanity couldn't have come at a worse time.

Sisters of Blood and Spirit

by Kady Cross

Wren Noble is dead-she was born that way. Vibrant, unlike other dead things, she craves those rare moments when her twin sister allows her to step inside her body and experience the world of the living. Lark Noble is alive but often feels she belongs in the muted Shadow Lands-the realm of the dead. Known as the crazy girl who talks to her dead sister, she doesn't exactly fit in with the living, though a recent suicide attempt and time in a psych ward have proved to her she's not ready to join her sister in the afterlife. Now the guy who saved Lark's life needs her to repay the favor. He and his friends have been marked for death by the malevolent spirit of a vicious and long-dead serial killer, and the twins-who should know better than to mess with the dead-may be their only hope of staying alive.

On and Off the Grill: Family Favorites from the Gourmet Dad

by Dean Mcdermott

Featuring fourteen easy-to-make favorite recipes from The Gourmet Dad family, each with tips and tricks to make them kid-friendlyDelicious summery meals for the grillRecipes that get the whole family cooking togetherIncludes a recipe for simple homemade pasta, an iron skillet breakfast, baked apples with mascarpone and more!Cooking up custom meals for everyone in your family practically every night of the week? Dean McDermott, The Gourmet Dad to five kids and host of Chopped Canada, will show you how to cook one meal the whole family will love so that you don't have to make different dinners for everyone. Written in Dean's signature friendly, straightforward style, these family-favorite recipes are easy to follow and so delicious that both the kids and the adults will be lining up for seconds.Dean McDermott is a father of five, reality TV star, gourmet cook, husband and a master of getting kids to eat veggies. Raised in Toronto with his three sisters and not a lot of money, Dean always helped his mom in the kitchen, even as a child. Today, whether cooking a special meal for his wife or getting creative in the kitchen with the kids, Dean loves to share his tricks for making the most memorable and delicious moments with family and friends. Dean and his wife, Tori Spelling, live in Los Angeles with their children.

Tap Out

by Sean Rodman

When Darwin's father went to prison for assault, his mom decided it was time to move him from his inner-city school to the elite Norfolk Academy. It was supposed to be a brand-new start for him. But old instincts die hard, and Dar is used to fighting for everything. Convinced by a new friend to take part in an illegal fight club, Dar starts competing in no-holds-barred matches between students. He quickly rises to become the best in the ring. When one match goes too far and a student is almost killed, Dar faces a choice. Everyone tells him he's a fighter, but he needs to decide for himself--who is he, and what is he fighting for?

Beethoven's Tenth

by Brian Harvey

Piano tuner Frank Ryan is paid in kind by an aging music teacher with an old manuscript that turns out to be Beethoven's Tenth Symphony. Launched into a world of intrigue and violence, Ryan, an unlikely sleuth, realizes he must use his wits to conquer his enemies and solve the mystery of the manuscript. In the process Ryan discovers whom he can trust and what he is made of. The first in a series featuring Frank Ryan, Beethoven's Tenth is a smart page-turner.

Night Thief, The

by Barbara Fradkin

Simple country handyman Cedric O'Toole relies on his organic vegetable garden to supplement his meager income, so he's upset when vegetables begin disappearing. After several futile attempts to protect the garden, he stakes it out one night with his shotgun and spots a shadowy figure running into the woods. Cedric follows and finds a young boy living rough on his land. The boy has never been taught to read or write, and no one has reported him missing. No stranger to childhood neglect himself, Cedric takes the boy under his wing and tries to find answers. Who is the mystery boy, and why is he hiding in the woods? The Night Thief is the third novel in a series featuring reluctant sleuth Cedric O'Toole.

Punch Like a Girl

by Karen Krossing

Nobody understands why Tori has suddenly become so moody and violent. When she attacks a stranger in a store, she ends up doing community service at a shelter for victims of domestic violence. She bonds with a little girl named Casey, but when Casey is abducted while in Tori's care, Tori is racked with guilt, certain that she should have been able to prevent the abduction. During the search for Casey, Tori comes face to face with an ex-boyfriend who sexually assaulted her at a party. Only when she speaks out about the assault is she able to begin to heal.

Blank

by Trina St. Jean

When Jessica wakes up from a coma, she has no memories of her life before the accident at her family's bison ranch. As she struggles to reconnect with her family and friends, she experiences all the signs of traumatic brain injury: confusion, sadness, fear and rage. Returning to school is a nightmare, especially when she overhears someone say he thinks she is faking her amnesia. When a new friend presents an alternative to staying in her old life, Jessica must confront the reality of what it means to leave her past behind.

Lost in the Backyard

by Alison Hughes

Flynn hates the outdoors. Always has. He barely pays attention in his Outdoor Ed class. He has no interest in doing a book report on Lost in the Barrens. He doesn't understand why anybody would want to go hiking or camping. But when he gets lost in the wilderness behind his parents' friends' house, it's surprising what he remembers--insulate your clothes with leaves, eat snow to stay hydrated, build a shelter, eat lichen--and how hopelessly inept he is at survival techniques.

Button Hill

by Michael Bradford

Dekker isn't happy that he and his little sister, Riley, are stuck in Button Hill with their weird old great-aunt Primrose. When he discovers an old clock in the cellar, made entirely of bones and with a skull for a face, he doesn't think much about it. But when Riley goes missing, a strange boy named Cobb appears in Button Hill. He tells Dekker that Button Hill sits on the border between Nightside and Dayside--and that Riley is in Nightside and may never return. In order to save her, Dekker must follow her into the darkness and sacrifice something he thought he couldn't live without.

There Is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ

by Michael Gaddis

"There is no crime for those who have Christ," claimed a fifth-century zealot, neatly expressing the belief of religious extremists that righteous zeal for God trumps worldly law. This book provides an in-depth and penetrating look at religious violence and the attitudes that drove it in the Christian Roman Empire of the fourth and fifth centuries, a unique period shaped by the marriage of Christian ideology and Roman imperial power. Drawing together materials spanning a wide chronological and geographical range, Gaddis asks what religious conflict meant to those involved, both perpetrators and victims, and how violence was experienced, represented, justified, or contested. His innovative analysis reveals how various groups employed the language of religious violence to construct their own identities, to undermine the legitimacy of their rivals, and to advance themselves in the competitive and high-stakes process of Christianizing the Roman Empire.Gaddis pursues case studies and themes including martyrdom and persecution, the Donatist controversy and other sectarian conflicts, zealous monks' assaults on pagan temples, the tyrannical behavior of powerful bishops, and the intrigues of church councils. In addition to illuminating a core issue of late antiquity, this book also sheds light on thematic and comparative dimensions of religious violence in other times, including our own.

Confessions

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Rousseau's ideas have influenced almost every major political development of the last two hundred years, and are crucial to an understanding of phenomena as diverse as the French Revolution, modern educational theory, and the contemporary environmental movement. This is reason enough to draw attention to his startlingly alive autobiography. But the Confessions is also among the greatest self-portraits in world literature -which suggests, even more than the impact of Rousseau's thought, the extent to which the very high opinion he had of himself was ultimately justified.(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)

Letters

by Mary Wortley Montagu

Immensely learned, self-educated in an era when formal schooling was denied to women, Mary Wortley Montagu was an admired poet, a consistently scandalous doyenne of eighteenth-century London society, and, in a period when letter-writing had been elevated to an art form, one of the greatest letter writers in the English language. Her epistles, meant for both public and private consumption, are the product of a mind distinguished by its adventurousness, its indifference to convention, and its eagerness not only to acquire knowledge but to convey it with unmitigated style and grace.(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)

The Politics of Conflict

by Monica Ingber

By looking at the problem of complicity in political violence from a social versus a legal perspective, The Politics of Conflict offers readers new insight into the ways in which violence operates. To do this, Monica Ingber applies Gilles Deleuze's analysis of the novellas of Leopold Sacher-Masoch, particularly Venus in Furs, to the politics of violence in Iraq. Specifically, Ingber develops the concept of transubstantiatory violence, to think through the relationship between social complicity and political violence. By assessing politics in Iraq through the lens of transubstantiatory violence, it becomes possible to see how social complicity validates what would be otherwise viewed as illegitimate forms of violence. This legitimization of violence is addressed through the problematization of the modern correlation of security, law, and the social contract by exploring three key areas of socio-politics: state-making and nation-building, political movements, and the popular militia. A serious study that makes important contributions to political science, political philosophy, and conflict studies, The Politics of Conflict demonstrates an alternative view of violence that is provocative in its ability to destabilize dominant understandings of regime violence and the counter-reactions of opposition movements.

Fatal Glamour

by Paul Delany

Rupert Brooke (b. 1887) died on April 23, 1915, two days before the start of the Battle of Gallipoli, and three weeks after his poem "The Soldier" was read from the pulpit of St Paul's Cathedral on Easter Sunday. Thus began the myth of a man whose poetry crystallizes the sentiments that drove so many to enlist and assured those who remained in England that their beloved sons had been absolved of their sins and made perfect by going to war. In Fatal Glamour, Paul Delany details the person behind the myth to show that Brooke was a conflicted, but magnetic figure. Strikingly beautiful and able to fascinate almost everyone who saw him - from Winston Churchill to Henry James - Brooke was sexually ambivalent and emotionally erratic. He had a series of turbulent affairs with women, but also a hidden gay life. He was attracted by the Fabian Society's socialist idealism and Neo-Pagan innocence, but could be by turns nasty, misogynistic, and anti-Semitic. Brooke's emotional troubles were acutely personal and also acutely typical of Edwardian young men formed by the public school system. Delany finds a thread of consistency in the character of someone who was so well able to move others, but so unable to know or to accept himself. A revealing biography of a singular personality, Fatal Glamour also uses Brooke's life to shed light on why the First World War began and how it unfolded.

Frank Underhill and the Politics of Ideas

by Bob Rae Kenneth C. Dewar

Frank Underhill (1889-1971) practically invented the role of public intellectual in English Canada through his journalism, essays, teaching, and political activity. He became one of the country's most controversial figures in the middle of the twentieth century by confronting the central political issues of his time and by actively working to reform the Canadian political landscape. His propagation of socialist ideas during the Great Depression and his criticism of the British Empire and British foreign policy almost cost him his job at the University of Toronto. In Frank Underhill and the Politics of Ideas, Kenneth Dewar demonstrates how Underhill's thought evolved from his days as a student at Toronto and Oxford, to his drafting of the Regina Manifesto - the founding platform of the leftist Co-operative Commonwealth Federation - to his support of his long-time friend Lester Pearson's Liberals in the 1960s. Not willing to be bound by partisan loyalties, his later shift toward the political centre dismayed many of his former allies. The various issues Underhill confronted, Dewar argues, were connected by the pioneering role he played as an intellectual and by his social democratic vision of politics. Dewar also reassesses Underhill's historical work, focusing on how it differed from the new professional history practised his younger colleagues. Intelligently written and thoroughly researched, Frank Underhill and the Politics of Ideas delivers important insights into twentieth-century political life and innumerable lessons for twenty-first century Canada.

Dismantling Canada

by Brooke Jeffrey

Stephen Harper is the first prime minister to represent the new Conservative Party, and the first to declare that his goals include nothing less than changing Canada by entrenching conservative values and replacing the Liberals as the country's natural governing party. After nine years of a closed-door governing style, his agenda is no longer hidden. As Brooke Jeffrey outlines in compelling detail in Dismantling Canada, Harper's agenda is driven by a desire to impose order and tradition at home, and to take firm stands on emerging issues abroad. With only thirty-nine per cent of the popular vote in 2011, his government appears to have gone a surprisingly long way towards achieving those objectives, with little or no concerted public opposition. Illuminating the importance and influence of British and especially American right-wing conservatives on Harper's strategies, the book explains how he has achieved so much through a combination of stealth, pragmatism, and ruthless determination. Providing fascinating insight into the origins of a new conservative vision for the economy, federalism, and domestic and foreign policies, Dismantling Canada explores Harper's successes and failures, and evaluates the likely outcome of his long-term agenda to change Canada into a country most Canadians would not recognize.

Missing Link

by Jeffery Donaldson

We look for missing links in the sciences and humanities, but the essential missing link - metaphor - is always in front of us. In Missing Link, Jeffery Donaldson unites literary criticism and evolutionary and cognitive science to show how metaphor has been with us since the beginning of time as a seed in the nature of things. With examples from centuries of poets, critics, philosophers, and scientists, he details how metaphor is a chemistry, an exchange of energies forming and dissolving, and an openness in the spaces between things. He considers the ways in which DNA learns how to liken things that have been, how mutation makes errors and then tries them on, and how evolution is hypothesis - nature's way of "thinking more." The mind is a matrix of relations: neural synapses cascade into ever-changing pathways and patterns. Metaphor is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. It is the unbroken thread between matter and spirit. Whether offering analysis of a turn of phrase or chemical reaction, Missing Link presents a vision of literature that is also a vision of the cosmos, and vice versa. It enters the debate between evolution and religion, and challenges scientists, literary theorists, and religious advocates to rethink the relations between their disciplines.

Hurrah Revolutionaries

by Patryk Polec

Polish Canadians typically identify themselves as stringent anti-Communists, a label solidified by the legacies of the 1980s Solidarity movement, its founder Lech Walęsa, and the widespread anti-Communist riots that helped topple the Communist regime in 1989. Hurrah Revolutionaries challenges this common perception by examining the Polish immigrant community in Canada and the development of radical and traditionally "deviant" ideologies during the interwar period until the end of the Second World War. Patryk Polec unveils a versatile, well-funded, and influential Polish pro-Communist movement with a talented leadership that worked tirelessly to persuade traditionally conservative and religious immigrants to adopt an ideology that was anti-nationalist and atheist. He traces the roots of socialist support in Poland, its transplantation to Canada where the movement enjoyed its greatest support, the challenges the movement faced within an ethnic community influenced by Catholicism, and the complications caused by its links to the Communist International. Polec offers a deeper understanding of the ways in which the Communist Party was able to appeal to certain ethnic groups through cultural outreach as well as its complicated and often counter-productive relationship with the Soviet Union. Grounded in recently declassified Polish consular documents and RCMP surveillance reports, Hurrah Revolutionaries is the first full-length study of Polish Communists in Canada, a group that constituted a substantial portion of the country's socialist left in the twentieth century.

The Canny Scot

by Peter Ludlow

A paradoxical prelate to many, Archbishop James Morrison was the spiritual head of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Antigonish, Nova Scotia, from 1912 to 1950. Traditional, frugal, and aloof, he was also the ecclesiastical leader of a progressive program of Catholic social action that became known as the "Antigonish Movement." Elevated to bishop after a successful clerical career in Prince Edward Island, Morrison guided Catholics in eastern Nova Scotia through difficult periods of economic decline, out-migration, and war. He was unprepared for the challenges of twentieth-century Canadian society, and initially struggled to cope with a dwindling Maritime economy, labour unrest, and rural depopulation. Determined to maintain the stature of his diocese, Morrison cautiously supported the clergy reformers who wanted a program of adult education and economic reform. Peter Ludlow unravels the mystery of this figure to show that although Morrison was one of the last powerful and austere Canadian Roman Catholic prelates, he was also one of the first to recognize that the Church could offer its adherents more than spiritual guidance. A revisionist account of the foundation and application of the Antigonish Movement, The Canny Scot illustrates the important role of the Catholic Church in Nova Scotia.

The Grandmothers' Movement

by May Chazan

At the height of the African AIDS crisis older women mobilized across two continents and an ocean of difference to change the lives of innumerable African women confronting insecurity, violence, grief, and illness. In 2006 the Stephen Lewis Foundation launched its Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign, seeking to organize Canadians in solidarity with "Africa's grandmothers" - older caregivers who had lost their children to AIDS and were left to raise their grandchildren. Four years later, some 10,000 Canadians had joined the campaign. May Chazan's The Grandmothers' Movement explores the encounters, ideas, and circumstances that shaped this remarkable story of solidarity and struggle. Based on interviews, family trees, personal journals, and archival materials, Chazan provides the first analysis of the movement. Through personal reflections and powerful vignettes from nearly a decade of participation in grandmothers' lives in South Africa and Canada, she presents untold narratives and brings new humanity to the AIDS crisis in Africa. The Grandmothers' Movement tells a story of hope while challenging conventional understandings of the global AIDS response, solidarity, and old age. It is about the power of older women to alter their own lives through collective action and about the influence of transnational cooperation to effect positive global change.

Invisible Chains

by Lisa Aronson Fontes

When a man showers all of his attention on a woman, it can feel incredibly romantic, and can blind her to hints of problems ahead. But what happens when that attentiveness becomes domination? In some relationships, the desire to control leads to jealousy, threats, micromanaging--even physical violence. If you or someone you care about are trapped in a web of coercive control, this book provides answers, hope, and a way out. Lisa Aronson Fontes draws on both professional expertise and personal experience to help you:*Recognize controlling behaviors of all kinds.*Understand why this destructive pattern occurs.*Determine whether you are in danger and if your partner can change.*Protect yourself and your kids.*Find the support and resources you need.*Take action to improve or end your relationship.*Regain your freedom and independence.

Wild Wood

by Posie Graeme-Evans

A new novel from Australia's most beloved storyteller Jesse Marley calls herself a realist; she's all about the here and now. But in the month before Prince Charles and Lady Diana's wedding in 1981, all her certainties are blown aside by events she cannot control. First she finds out she's adopted. Then she's run down by a motorbike. In a London hospital, temporarily unable to speak, she uses her left hand to write. But Jesse's right-handed. And as if her fingers have a will of their own, she begins to draw places she's never seen, people from another time--a castle, a man in medieval armour. And a woman's face. Rory Brandon, Jesse's neurologist, is intrigued. Maybe his patient's head trauma has brought out latent abilities. But wait. He knows the castle. He's been there. So begins an extraordinary journey across borders and beyond time, one that takes Jesse to Hundredfield, a stronghold built a thousand years ago by a brutal Norman warlord and passed down to the noble Dieudonné family, a clan honored and burdened with the task of protecting England's dangerous northern border in the fourteenth century. Jesse holds the key to the castle's many secrets and its connection to the mystical legend of the Lady of the Forest. Somehow Hundredfield, with its history of darkness and light, of bloody battles won and lost, will help Jesse find her true lineage. In a world where the tales of old are just a heartbeat away, there are no accidents. There is only fate.

The Vince Flynn Encyclopedia

by Emily Bestler Books

Everything you need to know about Vince Flynn's #1 New York Times bestselling Mitch Rapp series!Hailed as "the king of high-concept political intrigue" (Dan Brown, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Da Vinci Code), Vince Flynn's covert agent Mitch Rapp took the world by storm in his bestselling series, fighting terrorism and treason both at home and abroad, and captivating the minds of readers all across the world. This comprehensive compilation of characters is the ultimate guidebook to the thrilling and dangerous world of Mitch Rapp. Featuring summaries, memorable quotes, and other fascinating trivia, The Vince Flynn Encyclopedia will tell you everything you need to know about all the characters you love, and the ones you love to hate.

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