Browse Results

Showing 26 through 50 of 11,375 results

Margery Allingham Box Set 2: Flowers for the Judge, Death of a Ghost, and The Case of the Late Pig (The Albert Campion Mysteries)

by Margery Allingham

Three Albert Campion mysteries in one volume reveal why “Margery Allingham stands out like a shining light” (Agatha Christie). Flowers for the Judge Scandal hits the prestigious publishing house of Barnabas when one of the directors is found dead in a locked cellar. All eyes are on the other partners at the firm—cousins of the dead man with much to gain from his demise—and rumors hint at a connection to the long-ago disappearance of another director. Desperate to salvage their reputation, the cousins turn to Albert Campion—but will his investigations clear the Barnabas family name, or besmirch it forever? “One of her best . . . vivid and witty.” —The New York Times Death of a Ghost John Sebastian Lafcadio’s ambition to be known as the greatest painter since Rembrandt was not to be thwarted by a matter as trifling as his own death. A set of twelve sealed paintings is left in the hands of his widow, together with the instruction that she unveil one canvas each year before a carefully selected audience. Albert Campion is invited to join a cast of gadabouts, muses, and socialites to witness the eighth unveiling—but instead the lights go down and a young man is stabbed to death. Campion must get to work on the baffling case, with its long—suspiciously long—line-up of possible killers, and soon finds himself having to face his dearest enemy. “Wonderfully plotted . . . Allingham was a rare and precious talent.” —The Washington Post The Case of the Late Pig Private detective Albert Campion is summoned to the village of Kepesake to investigate a particularly distasteful death. The body turns out to be that of Pig Peters—freshly killed five months after his own funeral. Soon other corpses start to turn up, just as Peters’s body goes missing. It takes all of Campion’s coolly incisive powers of detection to unravel the crime. Mixing high drama and pitch-perfect black comedy, The Case of the Late Pig is, uniquely, narrated by Campion himself. “Allingham captures her quintessential quiet detective Albert Campion to perfection.”—Daily Express

Hangman's Holiday: Lord Peter Wimsey Book 9 (The\lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries Ser. #9)

by Dorothy L Sayers

Lord Peter Wimsey is the immortal amateur sleuth created by Dorothy L Sayers. Poisoned port . . . pet cats in peril . . . purloined pearls . . . Lord Peter Wimsey solves the mysteries of the man who was blown into the fourth dimension and the murder in fancy dress. He pursues miscreants across several countries and into unexpected hiding places. Dorothy L. Sayers' other detective, Montague Egg, encounters a fugitive murderer and uncovers a killer in an Oxford cloister. The travelling salesman extraordinaire solves puzzles with a unique combination of matter-of-fact practicality and brilliant deduction.

The Murder of my Aunt (British Library Crime Classics #0)

by Richard Hull

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY MARTIN EDWARDS Edward Powell lives with his Aunt Mildred in the Welsh town of Llwll. His aunt thinks Llwll an idyllic place to live, but Edward loathes the countryside - and thinks the company even worse. In fact, Edward has decided to murder his aunt. A darkly humorous depiction of fraught family ties, The Murder of My Aunt was first published in 1934.

Touch and Go: A Golden Age Mystery

by Patricia Wentworth

This mystery ratchets up the suspense as a governess tries to save her teenage charge from a deadly fate "No one can take a mother's place." But Sarah Trent is determined to try. She has just been engaged as governess to seventeen-year-old Lucilla Hildred, whose mother and stepfather were killed in a car accident. Lucilla's father died in the war, and his younger brother, Maurice, has been missing since 1918. Uncle Maurice's disappearance isn't the only mystery at the Red House. One night Sarah is awakened by a frightening noise. Something flings itself against her window and she hears the sounds of claws against glass. Then Holme Fallow, the estate where Lucilla was born--and where no one has lived since the war--is burgled. The only clue as to the culprit is a set of muddy footprints. Next someone tampers with the brakes on Lucilla's bicycle, and she stumbles over a baluster rail. It's soon clear to Sarah that someone is trying to kill the orphaned teenager, sole heir to Holme Fallow. Is it visiting American John Brown? Lucilla herself, playing a dangerous game? Or has someone else been patiently waiting for the perfect moment to strike? No matter the perpetrator, a ghost from the past could change everything. Patricia Wentworth, beloved creator of Miss Silver, crafts a puzzling mystery replete with twists, turns, and multiple suspects.

Anglicanism: The Thought and Practice of the Church of England

by Frank Leslie Cross Paul Elmer More

The Anglican Faith, The Church, Separated Churches,The Bible, Standards of Faith, Natural Theology, Revealed Theology, Soteriology, Eschatology, The Christian Ministry, The Sacraments, Baptism and Confirmation, The Eucharist Other Religious Practices, Prayer, Ethics, King and State, Visitations, Caroline Piety.

The Lake District Murder: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics #0)

by John Bude

Luke flung the light of his torch full onto the face of the immobile figure. Then he had the shock of his life. The man had no face! Where his face should have been was a sort of inhuman, uniform blank! When a body is found at an isolated garage, Inspector Meredith is drawn into a complex investigation where every clue leads to another puzzle: was this a suicide, or something more sinister? Why was the dead man planning to flee the country? And how is this connected to the shady business dealings of the garage? This classic mystery novel is set amidst the stunning scenery of a small village in the Lake District. It is now republished for the first time since the 1930s with an introduction by the award-winning crime writer Martin Edwards.

Sometimes a Great Notion

by Ken Kesey

The magnificent second novel from the legendary author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and Sailor Song is a wild-spirited and hugely powerful tale of an Oregon logging clan. A bitter strike is raging in a small lumber town along the Oregon coast. Bucking that strike out of sheer cussedness are the Stampers: Henry, the fiercely vital and overpowering patriarch; Hank, the son who has spent his life trying to live up to his father; and Viv, who fell in love with Hank's exuberant machismo but now finds it wearing thin. And then there is Leland, Henry's bookish younger son, who returns to his family on a mission of vengeance - and finds himself fulfilling it in ways he never imagined. Out of the Stamper family's rivalries and betrayals Ken Kesey has crafted a novel with the mythic impact of Greek tragedy. .

Death Goes to School

by Q. Patrick

The Edgar Award–winning author of the Peter Duluth Mysteries (as Patrick Quentin) “keeps the reader guessing” in a mystery set at a British boys’ school (The New York Times). <P><P>Patrick Quentin, best known for the Peter Duluth puzzle mysteries, also penned outstanding detective novels from the 1930s through the 1960s under other pseudonyms, including Q. Patrick and Jonathan Stagge. <P><P>Anthony Boucher wrote: “Quentin is particularly noted for the enviable polish and grace which make him one of the leading American fabricants of the murderous comedy of manners; but this surface smoothness conceals intricate and meticulous plot construction as faultless as that of Agatha Christie.” <P><P>The lads at Craiglea, a preparatory school on the Bristol Channel, are unimpeachable young men. The faculty? Unflappable. Until a student is found smothered in a linen closet. The son of a controversial American judge, Eric Moss, along with his brother, had already been a victim of a botched kidnapping back in the States. Ironically, they’d been enrolled at Craiglea for their own safety. But if it was an inside job, who did it? The suspects number a staff of sixteen and sixty-eight boys. But one precocious student might know more than he’s letting on . . .

Death for Dear Clara (The Lieutenant Trant Mysteries #1)

by Q. Patrick

A dapper detective tracks a high-society killer in Manhattan—from the Edgar Award–winning author who wrote the Peter Duluth Mysteries as Patrick Quentin. Patrick Quentin, best known for the Peter Duluth puzzle mysteries, also penned outstanding detective novels from the 1930s through the 1960s under other pseudonyms, including Q. Patrick and Jonathan Stagge. Anthony Boucher wrote: “Quentin is particularly noted for the enviable polish and grace which make him one of the leading American fabricants of the murderous comedy of manners; but this surface smoothness conceals intricate and meticulous plot construction as faultless as that of Agatha Christie.” After tumbling from the Park Avenue set to penurious widowhood, the resilient Clara Van Heuten has started her own business offering counsel to aspiring writers. When it comes to advice, she’s full of it. Maybe that’s why she ends up with a knife in her back. Timothy Trant, once the pride of Princeton, now one of New York’s finest, uses his IQ to figure out a killer’s MO. This time all the lieutenant has to work with is a stack of unpublishable manuscripts and the hoity-toity guest list of Van Heuten’s last get-together—until he discovers that the widow had reason to believe she was going to be murdered . . .

Murder in Mesopotamia: A Hercule Poirot Mystery (Hercule Poirot Mysteries #14)

by Agatha Christie

Nurse Amy Leatheran had never felt the lure of the 'mysterious East,' but she nonetheless accepts an assignment at Hassanieh, an ancient site deep in the Iraqi desert, to care for the wife of a celebrated archaeologist. Mrs Leidner is suffering bizarre visions and nervous terror. 'I'm afraid of being killed!' she admits to her nurse. Her terror, unfortunately, is anything but unfounded, and Nurse Leatheran is soon enough without a patient. The world's greatest detective happens to be in the vicinity, however: having concluded an assignment in Syria, and curious about the dig at Hassanieh, Hercule Poirot arrives in time to lead a murder investigation that will tax even his remarkable powers -- and in a part of the world that has seen more than its share of misadventure and foul play.

Arms and the Covenant

by Winston S. Churchill

This inspiring collection of campaign speeches from the British Prime Minister bring his oratory brilliance and powers of persuasion to life. <P><P> Legendary politician and military strategist Sir Winston Churchill was a master not only of the battlefield, but of the page and the podium. Over the course of forty books and countless speeches, broadcasts, news items and more, he addressed a country at war and at peace, thrilling with victory but uneasy with its shifting role on the global stage. <P><P> In 1953, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature for “his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values.” During his lifetime, he enthralled readers and brought crowds roaring to their feet; in the years since his death, his masterful writing has inspired generations of eager history buffs. <P><P> Well before Britain entered World War II, Winston Churchill warned his government about the growing Nazi threat, even as many European leaders were still urging caution and diplomacy. In this collection of forty-one speeches from 1928 to 1938, the great politician’s prescience and political skill—vital to Britain’s role as the first country to stand against Hitler—are clearly on display. This collection, which includes the famous “Disarmament Fable” speech, presents a fascinating look at Churchill’s campaign to mobilize Britian against the rising Nazi threat, and showcases his versatility and genius as one of the best orators of the twentieth century.

Excellent Intentions (British Library Crime Classics #0)

by Richard Hull

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY MARTIN EDWARDS 'From the point of view of the nation, it's a good thing that he died.' Great Barwick's least popular man is murdered on a train. Twelve jurors sit in court. Four suspects are identified - but which of them is on trial? This novel has all the makings of a classic murder mystery, but with a twist: as Attorney-General Anstruther Blayton leads the court through prosecution and defence, Inspector Fenby carries out his investigation. All this occurs while the identity of the figure in the dock is kept tantalisingly out of reach. Excellent Intentions is a classic crime novel laced with irreverent wit, first published in 1938.

The Lanny Budd Novels: World's End, Between Two Worlds, and Dragon's Teeth (The Lanny Budd Novels #2)

by Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair's Pulitzer Prize-winning series of historical novels brings the first half of the twentieth century dramatically to life. In World's End, the gathering storm clouds of World War I burst over Europe, forcing Lanning "Lanny" Budd, the young son of an American arms dealer, to put the innocence of youth behind him; his language skills and talent for decoding messages are in high demand. At his father's side, Lanny meets many important political and military figures, learns about the myriad causes of the conflict, and closely follows the war's progress. When the bloody hostilities conclude, Lanny joins the Paris Peace Conference as the assistant to a geographer asked by President Woodrow Wilson to redraw the map of Europe. From the rise of Fascism in Europe to the stock market crash on Wall Street, Between Two Worlds captures the drama, intrigue, and excitement of the Roaring Twenties. At the start of his career as an international art dealer, Lanny travels to Italy and witnesses the brutal charisma of Benito Mussolini. Meanwhile, in Germany, the failed Beer Hall Putsch led by Adolf Hitler's Nazi Party strikes an ominous note, foreshadowing the devastation to come. After two star-crossed love affairs, Lanny marries a wealthy heiress and chooses the United States with its booming economy as their home. But neither he nor those he loves can predict the financial disaster that will bring a decade of prosperity to an abrupt close. Winner of the 1943 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, Dragon's Teeth brilliantly captures the nightmarish march toward the Second World War. In Germany to visit relatives, Lanny encounters a disturbing atmosphere of hatred and jingoism stoked by the Nazi Party and meets the group's fanatical leader, Adolf Hitler. But Lanny's gravest fear is the threat to his Jewish friends and family--a threat that impels him to risk his wealth, his future, and even his life in a courageous attempt to rescue his loved ones from a terrible fate. An astonishing mix of history, adventure, and romance, the Lanny Budd Novels are a testament to the breathtaking scope of Upton Sinclair's vision and his singular talents as a storyteller.

Sergeant Lamb’s America

by Robert Graves

The first in a two-book series, Sergeant Lamb’s America tells the story of Sgt. Roger Lamb, an Irish soldier who served on the British side during the American War of Independence. Based on real historical events and people, Sergeant Lamb recounts the British defeat and the capture of his unit at the Battle of Saratoga in a voice that’s both funny, insightful, and wise. <P><P> This fictionalized account is based on the journals of the historical Sergeant Roger Lamb, and is largely faithful to the true eyewitness account of the American Revolution told from the loser’s perspective. With his engaging, personable voice and basic decency of character, Sergeant Lamb reminds us that regardless of how history casts the British side, there were good men on both sides of this important conflict.

World's End (The Lanny Budd Novels #1)

by Upton Sinclair

A sophisticated American teenager comes of age during World War I in the first volume of the Pulitzer Prize-winning series of historical novels from the author of The Jungle The son of an American arms dealer and his mistress, Lanning "Lanny" Budd spends his first thirteen years in Europe, living at the center of his mother's glamourous circle of friends on the French Riviera. In 1913, he enters a prestigious Swiss boarding school and befriends Rick, an English boy, and Kurt, a German. The three schoolmates are privileged, happy, and precocious--but their world is about to come to an abrupt and violent end. When the gathering storm clouds of war finally burst, raining chaos and death over the continent, Lanny must put the innocence of youth behind him; his language skills and talent for decoding messages are in high demand. At his father's side, he meets many important political and military figures, learns about the myriad causes of the conflict, and closely follows the First World War's progress. When the bloody hostilities eventually conclude, Lanny joins the Paris Peace Conference as the assistant to a geographer asked by President Woodrow Wilson to redraw the map of Europe. World's End is the magnificent opening chapter of a monumental series that brings the first half of the twentieth century to vivid life. A thrilling mix of history, adventure, and romance, the Lanny Budd Novels are a testament to the breathtaking scope of Upton Sinclair's vision and his singular talents as a storyteller.

Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent, 1934-1941

by William L. Shirer

A radio broadcaster and journalist for Edward R. Murrow at CBS, William Shirer was new to the world of broadcast journalism when he began keeping a diary while in Europe during the 1930s. It was in 1940, still a virtual unknown, that Shirer wondered whether his reminiscences of the collapse of the world around Nazi Germany could be of any interest or value as a book. Shirer's Berlin Diary, which is considered the first full record of what was happening in Germany during the rise of the Third Reich, first appeared in 1941. The book was an instant success. But how did Shirer get such a valuable firsthand account? He had anonymous sources willing to speak with him, provided their identity remained protected and disguised so as to avoid retaliation from the Gestapo. Shirer recorded his and others' eyewitness views to the horror that Hitler was inflicting on his people in his effort to conquer Europe. Shirer continued his job as a foreign correspondent and radio reporter for CBS until Nazi press censors made it virtually impossible for him to do his job with any real accuracy. He left Europe, taking with him the invaluable, unforgettable (and horrific) contents of his Berlin Diary. Berlin Diary brings the reader as close as any reporter has ever been to Hitler and the rise of the Third Reich. Shirer's honest, lucid and passionate reporting of the brutality with which Hitler came to power and the immediate reactions of those who witnessed these events is for all time. ABOUT THE AUTHOR William Shirer (1904-1993) was originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and was the first journalist hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a team of journalists for CBS radio. Shirer distinguished himself and quickly became known for his broadcasts from Berlin during the rise of the Nazi dictatorship through the first year of World War II. Shirer was the first of "Edward R. Murrow's Boys" - broadcast journalists - who provided news coverage during World War II and afterward. It was Shirer who broadcast the first uncensored eyewitness account of the annexation of Austria. Shirer is best known for his books The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich which won the National Book Award and Berlin Diary.

Forty Dead Men (Alafair Tucker Mysteries #10)

by Donis Casey

Some people who have experienced a shocking, dangerous, or terrifying event develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It is recognized today as a debilitating but potentially treatable mental health condition. Military veterans are a vulnerable group. But PTSD can deliver a knockout blow to anyone, as the remarkable unfolding of the tenth Alafair Tucker Mystery, Forty Dead Men, shows. World War I is over. Alafair is overjoyed that her elder son, George Washington Tucker, has finally returned home from the battlefields of France. Yet she is the only one in the family who senses that he has somehow changed. Gee Dub moves back into his old bunkhouse quarters, but he's restless and spends his days roaming. One rainy day while out riding he spies a woman trudging along the country road. She's thoroughly skittish and rejects his help. So Gee Dub cannily rides for home to enlist his mother in offering the exhausted traveler shelter. Once made comfortable at the Tucker farm, Holly Johnson reveals she's forged her way from Maine to Oklahoma in hopes of finding the soldier she married before he shipped to France. At the war's end, Daniel Johnson disappeared without a trace. It's been months. Is he alive? Is she a widow? Holly is following her only lead - that Dan has connected with his parents who live yonder in Okmulgee. Gee Dub, desperate for some kind of mission, resolves to shepherd Holly through her quest although the prickly young woman spurns any aid. Meanwhile, Alafair has discovered that Gee Dub sleeps with two cartridge boxes under his pillow - boxes containing twenty "dead men" each. The boxes are empty, save for one bullet. She recognizes in Gee Dub and Holly that not all war wounds are physical. Then Holly's missing husband turns up, shot dead. Gee Dub is arrested on suspicion of murder, and the entire extended Tucker family rallies to his defense. He says he had no reason to do it, but the solitary bullet under Gee Dub's pillow is gone. Regardless, be he guilty or innocent, his mother will travel any distance and go to any lengths to keep him out of prison.

Death Paints the Picture (The Homer Bull & Hank MacAndrews Mysteri #1)

by Lawrence Lariar

Frist in a series: A comic book artist is drawn into an elaborate game of murder when he visits an isolated country estate in Woodstock. Lawrence Lariar was one the most popular cartoonists of the twentieth century. But from the 1940s through the 1960s, he also crafted a line of lean and mean detective and mystery novels under his own name as well as the pseudonyms Michael Stark, Adam Knight, Michael Lawrence, and Marston La France. Lariar now gets his due as a leading artist in hardboiled crime fiction. A graphic artist and true crime buff, Homer Bull is always looking for a good murder for his syndicated comic strip. He just never expects to be invited to one—courtesy of his old pal Hugo Shipley, a wealthy illustrator who’s notorious for his practical jokes. But when Shipley himself drops dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, it’s no laughing matter. Not that the other guests have a sense of humor. Among them, a dry tobacco magnate, a dull-witted gangster, a libelous newspaper reporter, and Homer’s ex-wife, a shallow doll who dumped him for a career in modeling. All but Homer are quick to accept the suicide bunk. Maybe that’s because all but Homer have their own sordid secrets and motives. And not one of them is leaving Shipley’s isolated estate before Homer finds his friend’s killer. Death Paints the Picture is the 1st book in the Homer Bull & Hank MacAndrews Mysteries, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.

Earth's Last Citadel

by C. L. Moore Henry Kuttner

Four WWII combatants travel to a distant and dangerous future in this novel by “two of the most revered names from [science fiction’s] Golden Age” (SFReviews.net). During World War II, four bitter enemies are pulled forward a billion years in time by a master being from an alien galaxy. They arrive on a dying Earth—to Carcasilla, Earth’s last citadel—where the mutated remnants of humanity are making their final stand against the monstrous creations of a fading world. Thrust in the middle of this desperate struggle for survival, the last humans must put aside their differences and stop the looming Armageddon. Praise for Henry Kuttner “One of the all-time major names in science fiction.” —The New York Times “A neglected master.” —Ray Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451 “Kuttner is magic.” —Joe R. Lansdale, author of The Thicket

He Died Laughing (The Homer Bull & Hank MacAndrews Mysteri #2)

by Lawrence Lariar

The sudden death of one of Hollywood’s most famous producers looks pretty sketchy to a comic book artist turned amateur sleuth. Lawrence Lariar was one the most popular cartoonists of the twentieth century. But from the 1940s through the 1960s, he also crafted a line of lean and mean detective and mystery novels under his own name as well as the pseudonyms Michael Stark, Adam Knight, Michael Lawrence, and Marston La France. Lariar now gets his due as a leading artist in hardboiled crime fiction. Illustrators Homer Bull and his partner, Hank MacAndrews, have hit the big time. As new employees of Dick Piper, the head of the greatest animation studio in the world, their future looks colorful. But no sooner do the backlot newbies settle in than they discover that a career at the giggle factory isn’t exactly family friendly. Someone’s been amassing dirty secrets—professional and personal—to leak to the scandal-mongering press. Even worse, contract negotiations are just around the corner. As every gagman, story editor, and animator knows, it’s time for the great purge. And it begins with an exec found shot to death in the projection room. Homer and Hank are betting it won’t end there. But in a land of illusion, it’s not going to be easy to recognize the killer, or even guess the next victim—or real motive. He Died Laughing is the 2nd book in the Homer Bull & Hank MacAndrews Mysteries, but you may enjoy reading the series in any order.

El siciliano: Salvatore Giuliano (Grandes Exitos Ser.)

by Mario Puzo

El siciliano es una biografía novelada de Giuliano y una incisiva descripción de la vida, las tradiciones y las complejas relaciones de poder en Sicilia. Corre el año 1950. El exilio de Michael Corleone en Palermo está a punto de acabar, y su padre, Don Vito, le ha encomendado una misión: debe volver a América con un hombre que se ha convertido en un mito popular, un forajido acosado por el Gobierno, las clases altas y la Mafia. Su nombre es Salvatore Giuliano, un moderno Robin Hood que, tras enfrentarse en su juventud a una patrulla de carabineri, se vio forzado a refugiarse en las montañas. Desde allí lucha por su patria y su gente, oprimida por la Cosa Nostra y la corrupción del Gobierno de Roma. Ahora, en esta neblinosa tierra de montañas y ruinas antiguas, el destino de Michael Corleone se verá hermanado con la leyenda de Salvatore Giuliano.

Wide Is the Gate: Wide Is The Gate, Presidential Agent, And Dragon Harvest (The Lanny Budd Novels #4)

by Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair's Pulitzer Prize-winning saga continues as Lanny Budd faces the horrors of Nazi Germany and steps into the fire of the Spanish Civil War Lanny Budd's dedication to social justice and political action has placed a serious strain on his marriage to his heiress wife, Irma, but as he moves through the 1930s, the international art dealer is unable to turn a blind eye to what is happening in Europe. As the Nazi Party solidifies its power in Germany, Lanny recognizes a golden opportunity to make a difference when his arms dealer father strikes a business agreement with Hermann Göring, Adolf Hitler's second-in-command. Robbie Budd's alliance with the Luftwaffe commander and Lanny's art world reputation enable the younger Budd to move easily among the Nazi high command and gather valuable information he can transmit back to those who are dedicated to the destruction of Nazism and Fascism. It is a dangerous--albeit necessary--game that Lanny is playing, and it will carry him from Germany to Spain on a life-and-death mission on the eve of the Spanish Civil War. The fourth installment of an eleven-book series, Wide Is the Gate continues Upton Sinclair's literary journey through the tumult of the twentieth century. An astonishing mix of history, adventure, and romance, the Lanny Budd Novels are a testament to the breathtaking scope of the author's vision and his singular talents as a storyteller.

Forever Amber (Rediscovered Classics Ser.)

by Barbara Taylor Bradford Kathleen Winsor

Abandoned pregnant and penniless on the teeming streets of London, 16-year-old Amber St. Clare manages, by using her wits, beauty, and courage, to climb to the highest position a woman could achieve in Restoration England--that of favorite mistress of the Merry Monarch, Charles II. From whores and highwaymen to courtiers and noblemen, from events such as the Great Plague and the Fire of London to the intimate passions of ordinary--and extraordinary--men and women, Amber experiences it all. But throughout her trials and escapades, she remains, in her heart, true to the one man she really loves, the one man she can never have. Frequently compared to Gone with the Wind, Forever Amber is the other great historical romance, outselling every other American novel of the 1940s--despite being banned in Boston for its sheer sexiness. A book to read and reread, this edition brings back to print an unforgettable romance and a timeless masterpiece.

Hercules, My Shipmate

by Robert Graves

An inventive reimagining of the story of Jason and the Argonauts, this novel by renowned poet and classicist Robert Graves brings heroic figures of Hellenistic myth to life. Graves’s Jason is belligerent, energetic, and full of life, and the society Graves builds for him is outlandish and deeply invested in ancient cults. <P><P> Against this primitive, religious backdrop, the charismatic Jason assembles a crew and sets out to retrieve the sacred gold-trimmed fleece that is sacred to Zeus, and that has been stolen by worshippers of the Triple Goddess. Accompanying him is Hercules, a brave warrior known more for his brawn, and his astonishingly good luck, than his brains. Robert Graves builds a compelling world that sets Hellenistic magic and mystery in a surprisingly gritty, realistic setting, a fascinating read for fans of Greek mythology.

The 42nd Parallel: U. S. A. - The 42nd Parallel; 1919; The Big Money (U.S.A. Trilogy #1)

by John Dos Passos

With his U.S.A. trilogy, comprising THE 42nd PARALLEL, 1919, and THE BIG MONEY, John Dos Passos is said by many to have written the great American novel. While Fitzgerald and Hemingway were cultivating what Edmund Wilson once called their "own little corners," John Dos Passos was taking on the world. Counted as one of the best novels of the twentieth century by the Modern Library and by some of the finest writers working today, U.S.A. is a grand, kaleidoscopic portrait of a nation, buzzing with history and life on every page.The trilogy opens with THE 42nd PARALLEL, where we find a young country at the dawn of the twentieth century. Slowly, in stories artfully spliced together, the lives and fortunes of five characters unfold. Mac, Janey, Eleanor, Ward, and Charley are caught on the storm track of this parallel and blown New Yorkward. As their lives cross and double back again, the likes of Eugene Debs, Thomas Edison, and Andrew Carnegie make cameo appearances.

Refine Search

Showing 26 through 50 of 11,375 results