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Best. Night. Ever.: A Story Told from Seven Points of View

by Stephanie Faris Ronni Arno Rachele Alpine Jen Malone Gail Nall Dee Romito Alison Cherry

Love Actually meets Adventures in Babysitting in this hilarious novel written by seven authors about seven classmates who are preparing for a crazy night at their middle school dance.Lynnfield Middle School is prepped and ready for a dance to remember, including an awesome performance from Heart Grenade, the all-girl band who recently won a Battle of the Bands contest. Seven classmates—Carmen, Genevieve, Tess, Ryan, Ellie, Ashlyn, and Jade—intend to make the most of the night…or at least the five of them who are able to attend do. The other two would sacrifice almost anything to be there. One thing’s for sure—this entire crew is in for one epic night! Gail Nall, Dee Romito, Rachele Alpine, Ronni Arno, Alison Cherry, Stephanie Faris, and Jen Malone have created a charming, hilarious, and relatable novel that’s perfect for anyone who can’t wait to dance the night away.

Jack the Ripper

by Michael Burgan

Get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of what it takes to be considered one of the worst figures in history, with this second book in a brand-new nonfiction series that focuses on the most nefarious historical figures.In 1888, London was terrorized by a mysterious man with a knife. Between the end of August and beginning of November, this man committed five known murders—possibly more. Then, just as suddenly as they started, the killings stopped. Dubbed “Jack the Ripper” by the press, he slipped through the dark, foggy streets of London’s Whitchapel district, targeting women and leaving no witnesses and no clues as to his identity. The police were stumped. The press went wild. But no one could find Jack the Ripper. Even today, Jack the Ripper continues to fascinate. Amateur detectives, known as “Ripperologists”, books, movies, and walking tours all focus on one question: who was Jack the Ripper? Get a little closer to finding out with this biography that takes a deeper look at Jack the Ripper…because while he may be one of history’s worst people, his legend lives on.

Adolf Hitler

by James Buckley Jr.

Get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of what it takes to be considered one of the worst figures in history, with this brand-new nonfiction series that focuses on the most nefarious historical figures.On a list of the worst people ever, Adolf Hitler is certainly at or near the top. Born the son of a low-ranking government official, no one would have predicted that the young Adolf would grow up and become the leader of millions of Germans as well as one of the most despised figures of the twentieth century. Hitler himself wanted to be an artist, but he couldn’t get into art school. The rejection was just one more thing in a long chain of events that made him angry. Angry at the world. Angry at specific groups of people. As his anger grew, so did his hatred until eventually there was very little else left. When Hitler entered politics, he found himself surrounded by people who agreed with him. Who would listen to his rants and would happily follow his every decree and cheer his every word. But why did people let him do that? Why did they follow him? What made his policies so attractive? And what made Adolf Hitler so popular? Find out with this biography that takes a deeper look at Hitler…because history isn’t just about the heroes.

Without Fear or Favor: A Novel

by Robert K. Tanenbaum

In the twenty-ninth novel in the New York Times bestselling Karp-Ciampi series featuring “the best fictional prosecuting attorney in literature” (Mark Lane, #1 New York Times bestselling author), Butch Karp and his wife Marlene Ciampi must stop a radical organization of armed militants bent on the cold-blooded murder of uniformed on-duty police officers.When a cop shoots down the son of a respected inner-city Baptist preacher, the community rises up in anger and demands to have the officer prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. But there’s something more than a call for justice at work here: a plot to bring down the city’s police force through a conspiracy so vast and malicious only Butch Karp and his band of truth-seekers can untangle it. Full of Tanenbaum’s signature page turning intense action and heart pounding suspense from “one hell of a writer” (New York Post), Without Fear or Favor will keep you guessing until the final scene.

Who Are You, Really?: The Surprising Puzzle of Personality

by Brian R. Little

Dr Brian Little challenges what we think we know about how our personality works and is shaped. It's time to think beyond the nature vs. nurture debate. It is our pursuit of our dreams and our personal passions that shape who we are. Previous praise for Dr Brian Little: 'Brian Little is one of the wisest, funniest, kindest, and most erudite people I have ever met' Susan Cain, bestselling author of Quiet 'With extraordinary wit and wisdom, distinguished psychologist Brian Little offers startling insights' Adam Grant, bestselling author of Give and Take and Originals Who Are You, Really? presents a distinctive view of how personality shapes our lives – and why this matters. Dr Brian Little makes the case for a third nature to the human condition – the pursuit of personal projects, crazy dreams and creative ventures that shape both people’s lives and their personalities. Stable traits of personality (now identified as the 'Big Five': openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism) have important links with well-being, both psychological and physical. But in contrast with these fixed traits of personality there are what Little identifies as 'free traits.' These are traits that run counter to one’s first nature. Why do we engage in free trait behaviour? We do so to advance core personal projects in our lives; we can act out of character because of the demands of professionalism or the imperatives of love. Like learning to walk, forcing ourselves out of balance as we step forward may be temporarily disconcerting. But it is the only way, literally, in which we can move forward. And it is the only way that human flourishing can be enhanced.Who Are You, Really? provides a deeply personal itinerary for exploring our personalities, our lives and the human condition.

Poetry Will Save Your Life: A Memoir

by Jill Bialosky

An unconventional and inventive coming-of-age memoir organized around forty-three remarkable poems by poets such as Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens and Sylvia Plath, from a critically acclaimed New York Times bestselling author and poet.For Jill Bialosky, certain poems stand out like signposts at pivotal moments in a life: the death of a father, adolescence, first love, leaving home, the suicide of a sister, marriage, the birth of a child, the day in New York City the Twin Towers fell. As Bialosky narrates these moments, she illuminates the ways in which particular poems offered insight, compassion, and connection, and shows how poetry can be a blueprint for living. In Poetry Will Save Your Life, Bialosky recalls when she encountered each formative poem, and how its importance and meaning evolved over time, allowing new insights and perceptions to emerge. While Bialosky’s personal stories animate each poem, they touch on many universal experiences, from the awkwardness of girlhood, to crises of faith and identity, from braving a new life in a foreign city to enduring the loss of a loved one, from becoming a parent to growing creatively as a poet and artist. In Poetry Will Save Your Life, Bialosky has crafted an engaging and entirely original examination of a life while celebrating the enduring value of poetry, not as a purely cerebral activity, but as a means of conveying personal experience and as a source of comfort and intimacy. In doing so she brilliantly illustrates the ways in which poetry can be an integral part of life itself and can, in fact, save your life.

Tell City

by Chris Cail

Founded in 1858, Tell City is located in the rolling hills of southern Indiana, along the Ohio River between Evansville, Indiana, and Louisville, Kentucky. Carefully planned by the Swiss Colonization Society of Cincinnati, Ohio, Tell City was originally named Helvetia. To proclaim their Swiss origin and honor their hero, William Tell, the founders chose to rename the area Tell City. Tell City is known for its famous Tell City Pretzels, a tradition that dates back to 1858, and the Tell City Chair Company, a well-known manufacturer of Early American–style furniture. After the closing of the Tell City Chair Company, the city changed from a furniture-manufacturing community to a more automotive-manufacturing community, with Waupaca and ATTC Manufacturing both employing a total of 1,500 people.

Southern Arkansas University

by James F. Willis Del Duke

Southern Arkansas University began as a residential agricultural high school, the Third District Agricultural School, in 1909. The school evolved into a junior college, popularly known as Magnolia A&M College, and later into a four-year institution, Southern State College. These four institutions served, primarily, young people of southwest Arkansas and provided extraordinary support to students, often the first in their families to seek degrees. The schools’ educational value has been exceptional, as measured in graduates’ achievements. Distinguished graduates have included, among many others, Gen. Horace Wade, ’36, vice chief of staff, US Air Force; Leland Tollett, ’56, president of Tyson Foods; Harry Thomason, ’62, Hollywood producer and director; Cinda Hallman, ’66, CEO, Spherion Corporation; Joyce Elliot, ’73, Arkansas state senator and educational reformer; Joan Dempsey, ’81, deputy director, US Central Intelligence Agency; and Fernando Barbosa, ’92, managing director, Walt Disney Television International.

Sioux Falls

by Dr Rick Odland

The 1950s and 1960s were a time of historic growth, when over 20,000 new residents chose to make Sioux Falls their home. In 1981, Citibank came to Sioux Falls, bringing many more people to the city. Since the start of the 21st century, health care has been the job sector employing the most people in Sioux Falls, creating jobs and bringing many new medical specialties to the area. New entertainment, restaurants, parks, and shopping have improved the quality of life for locals. As the population has increased, Sioux Falls has proven it can keep up with demand.

Lost Coal Country of Northeastern Pennsylvania

by Lorena Beniquez

Lost Coal Country of Northeastern Pennsylvania documents the region’s disappearing anthracite history, which shaped the legacy of the United States of America and the industrial revolution. The coal mines, breakers, coal miners’ homes, and railroads have all steadily disappeared. With only one coal breaker left in the entire state, it was time to record what would soon be lost. Unfortunately, one piece of history that persists is underground fires that ravage communities like Centralia. Blazing for over 50 years, the flames of Centralia will not be doused anytime soon. Images featured in the book include the St. Nicholas coal breaker, Huber coal breaker, Steamtown National Historic Site, Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour, Eckley Miners’ Village, Centralia, and the Knox Mine disaster. A hybrid history book and travel guide, Lost Coal Country of Northeastern Pennsylvania is one final recounting of what is gone and what still remains.

Laurel Hill Cemetery

by Rachel Wolgemuth Carol Yaster

Established in 1836, Philadelphia’s Laurel Hill Cemetery was one of the earliest rural cemeteries in America. The picturesque views and outstanding horticulture, along with sculptures and monuments designed by notable artists and architects—like Alexander Milne Calder, Alexander Stirling Calder, Harriet Frishmuth, John Notman, and Thomas Ustick Walter—attracted thousands of visitors. Laurel Hill became the desired place of burial for Philadelphia’s elite and the final resting place for those with last names like Widener, Wharton, Meade, and Elkins. The cemetery’s design was much admired and widely imitated, both locally and nationally. While the 20th century ushered in a steep decline for Laurel Hill, the establishment of a friends group in 1978 and the cemetery’s designation as a National Historic Landmark in 1998 signaled a transformation for the cemetery. Laurel Hill entered a new century as a revitalized and relevant institution. Once again, the cemetery is regarded as an important part of the community, a worthy destination for visitors, and a place to share in the stories of the men and women whose lives shaped both Philadelphia and the nation.

Historic Oakwood Cemetery

by Robin Simonton Bruce Miller

Oakwood Cemetery evolved from a final resting place for Confederate soldiers to a modern “cemetery full of life,” reflecting over 150 years of the remarkable history of Raleigh, North Carolina. Many of the men and women who lived that history and developed this Southern capital—from soldiers and politicians to educators and clergy, from merchants and craftsmen to social activists and laborers—now rest in Oakwood, memorialized in the monuments that grace this lovely garden cemetery. Their stories, illustrated by archival and modern photographs, are told within this volume.

East Windsor

by Jessica Bottomley East Windsor Historical Society Ceil Donahue

The town of East Windsor, incorporated in 1768, is situated in the center of northern Connecticut, with the Connecticut River as its western border. In the early 1600s, a few settlers crossed the “great river” to establish farms. East Windsor’s rich and productive farmland served them well. Five distinct villages, each historically different, highlight the rich and diverse heritage of the town. Warehouse Point, with its proximity to the river, was a vital shipping and transportation hub. Scantic was started by a strong religious community devoted to God and families. Broad Brook had access to the millpond, which spurred the prosperous Broad Brook Company woolen mill. Melrose, established by farming families, is rooted in its agrarian past. Windsorville’s location on the banks of Ketch Brook triggered villagers to build a dam and erect mills. Through it all ran the trolley line, which linked the villages and town with the surrounding area.

Depression-Era Sculpture of the Bay Area

by Nicholas A. Veronico Betty S. Veronico

The Great Depression was a terrible blow for the Bay Area’s thriving art community. A few private art projects kept a small number of sculptors working, but for the majority, prospects of finding new commissions were grim. By the mid-1930s, Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal program had gathered steam, and assistance was provided to the nation’s art community. Salvation came from the Works Progress Administration (WPA), which employed thousands of artists to produce sculpture for public venues. The Bay Area art community subsequently benefitted from the need to fill the then-forthcoming Golden Gate International Exposition (GGIE) with sculpture of all shapes and sizes. As bad as the Depression was, its legacy more than 80 years on is one of beauty. The Bay Area is dotted with sculpture from this era, the majority of it on public display. Depression-Era Sculpture of the Bay Area is a visual tour of this artistic bounty.

Chippewa Lake

by Sharon Karhan Gayle Foster Amber Dalakas

Formed by glaciers, Chippewa Lake has been drawing visitors since early Indian tribes came to hunt and fish; settlers first laid down roots in the area during the War of 1812. Soon, visitors hoping to escape the heat of the city discovered the cooling waters of Chippewa. Eventually, a pleasure resort was developed, and the area expanded. Churches, a school, a brickyard, a grain elevator, general stores, a post office, and a meat market were established. Passenger trains delivered families laden with picnic baskets to Chippewa Lake Park, an amusement park that featured water activities, a carousel, a roller coaster, and a ballroom. Dignitaries, politicians, and entertainers frequented the park. A cottage community developed along the shoreline in neighborhoods like Gloria Glens, Briarwood Beach, and Chippewa-on-the-Lake. Before refrigeration, ice was harvested from the lake in the winter and shipped as far away as Philadelphia. After 100 years in operation, Chippewa Lake Park closed in 1978. The lake is currently owned by the Medina County Park District and still offers spectacular sunsets and public fishing and boating.

Bothell

by Margaret Turcott

The river community of Bothell began with the arrival of Columbus Greenleaf and George Wilson in 1870. They staked claims along the Sammamish River after navigating from Seattle across Lake Washington and then east along the meandering Sammamish. Bothell was first a logging community, with several mills producing boards and shingles. After the forests were harvested, it became a farming community, connected to other settlements by the river and, after 1887, the railroad. In 1909, Bothell incorporated as a city after a contentious campaign. The vote was 79 to 70 in favor of becoming a city. The population of Bothell in 1910 was 599, but many lived outside the two-thirds square mile original city limits. This book tells the story of Bothell as a central hub, with distinct neighborhoods having their own personalities. Bothell’s population today is almost 43,000, divided between two counties: King and Snohomish.

The Daughters of Ireland

by Santa Montefiore

Ireland. 1925. The war is over. But life will never be the same..."Everything Santa Montefiore writes, she writes from the heart,” says JOJO MOYES. See why in this unforgettable story of love, loss, and life, perfect for fans of DOWNTON ABBEY and KATE MORTON.In the green hills of West Cork, Ireland, Castle Deverill has burned to the ground. But young Celia Deverill is determined to see her ruined ancestral home restored to its former glory — to the years when Celia ran through its vast halls with her cousin Kitty and their childhood friend Bridie Doyle.Kitty herself is raising a young family, but she longs for Jack O’Leary — the long-ago sweetheart she cannot have. And soon Kitty must make a heartbreaking decision, one that could destroy everything she holds dear.Bridie, once a cook's daugher in Castle Deverill, is now a well-heeled New York City socialite. Yet her celebrity can't erase a past act that haunts her still. Nor can it keep her from seeking revenge upon the woman who wronged her all those years ago.As these three daughters of Ireland seek to make their way in a world once again beset by dark forces, Santa Montefiore shows us once more why she is one of the best-loved storytellers at work today.

Call of Fire

by Beth Cato

A resourceful young heroine must protect the world from her enemies—and her own power—in this thrilling sequel to the acclaimed Breath of Earth, an imaginative blend of alternative history, fantasy, science, magic, and adventure.When an earthquake devastates San Francisco in an alternate 1906, the influx of geomantic energy nearly consumes Ingrid Carmichael. Bruised but alive, the young geomancer flees the city with her friends, Cy, Lee, and Fenris. She is desperate to escape Ambassador Blum, the cunning and dangerous bureaucrat who wants to use Ingrid’s formidable powers to help the Unified Pacific—the confederation of the United States and Japan—achieve world domination. To stop them, Ingrid must learn more about the god-like magic she inherited from her estranged father—the man who set off the quake that obliterated San Francisco. When Lee and Fenris are kidnapped in Portland, Ingrid and Cy are forced to ally themselves with another ambassador from the Unified Pacific: the powerful and mysterious Theodore Roosevelt. But even TR’s influence may not be enough to save them when they reach Seattle, where the magnificent peak of Mount Rainier looms. Discovering more about herself and her abilities, Ingrid is all too aware that she may prove to be the fuse to light the long-dormant volcano . . . and a war that will sweep the world.

The Girl with Kaleidoscope Eyes: A Stewart Hoag Mystery

by David Handler

HARLAN COBEN calls it "One of my all-time favorite series! ...David Handler is so good at writing one smart, funny page-turner after another that he makes it look easy." Fans of JANET EVANOVICH and CARL HIAASEN, get ready. If you haven't yet discovered wisecracking sleuth Stewart "Hoagy" Hoag and his faithful basset hound Lulu, you're in for a sharp, hilarious treat.Once upon a time, Hoagy had it all: a hugely successful debut novel, a gorgeous celebrity wife, the glamorous world of New York City at his feet. These days, he scrapes by as a celebrity ghostwriter. A celebrity ghostwriter who finds himself investigating murders more often than he'd like.And once upon a time, Richard Aintree was the most famous writer in America -- high school students across the country read his one and only novel, a modern classic on par with The Catcher in the Rye. But after his wife's death, Richard went into mourning... and then into hiding. No one has heard from him in twenty years.Until now. Richard Aintree — or someone pretending to be Richard Aintree — has at last reached out to his two estranged daughters. Monette is a lifestyle queen à la Martha Stewart whose empire is crumbling; and once upon a time, Reggie was the love of Hoagy's life. Both sisters have received mysterious typewritten letters from their father. Hoagy is already on the case, having been hired to ghostwrite a tell-all book about the troubled Aintree family. But no sooner does he set up shop in the pool house of Monette's Los Angeles mansion than murder strikes. With Lulu at his side — or more often cowering in his shadow — it's up to Hoagy to unravel the mystery, catch the killer, and pour himself that perfect single-malt Scotch... before it's too late.

Crystal Blade

by Kathryn Purdie

Fans of Three Dark Crowns and Red Queen will devour book two in the #1 New York Times bestselling Burning Glass trilogy, about a teen empath and the secret dangers of her expanding power.Sonya and Anton may have brought about a revolution, but can they protect their homeland—and their love—with so many forces threatening to tear them apart?The empire has fallen, Valko faces trial, and Sonya is finally free from her fate as Sovereign Auraseer. But Sonya’s expanding abilities are just as unstable as the new government of Riaznin. Not only can she feel the emotions of others but, unlike most Auraseers, she’s learned to make others feel what she’s feeling as well. And with her relationship falling apart, Sonya isn’t immune to her power’s sinister temptations.Now, as Sonya fights to contain her own darkness, she senses a new evil lurking in the shadows of the palace. Someone from Sonya’s past has returned seeking revenge—and she won’t be satisfied until Sonya has suffered for her mistakes.

Sleeping in the Ground: An Inspector Banks Novel

by Peter Robinson

MICHAEL CONNELLY calls Peter Robinson "an author with amazing empathy, a snare-trap ear for dialogue, and a clear eye for the telling detail."See why in Sleeping in the Ground, the gripping new novel starring Alan Banks — featuring an opening scene you'll never forget, and a finale you won't see coming.At the doors of a charming country church, an unspeakable act destroys a wedding party. A huge manhunt ensues. The culprit is captured. The story is over.Except it isn't. For Alan Banks, still struggling with a tragic loss of his own, there's something wrong about this case — something unresolved. Reteaming with profiler Jenny Fuller, the relentless detective deeper into the crime... deep enough to unearth long-buried secrets that reshape everything Banks thought he knew about the events outside that chapel. And when at last the shocking truth becomes clear, it's almost too late.Packed with twists and turns, heart and soul, this is another triumph from an author "at the top of his game" (LOUISE PENNY).

Why Poetry

by Matthew Zapruder

An impassioned call for a return to reading poetry and an incisive argument for poetry’s accessibility to all readers, by critically acclaimed poet Matthew ZapruderIn Why Poetry, award-winning poet Matthew Zapruder takes on what it is that poetry—and poetry alone—can do. Zapruder argues that the way we have been taught to read poetry is the very thing that prevents us from enjoying it. In lively, lilting prose, he shows us how that misunderstanding interferes with our direct experience of poetry and creates the sense of confusion or inadequacy that many of us feel when faced with it. Zapruder explores what poems are, and how we can read them, so that we can, as Whitman wrote, “possess the origin of all poems,” without the aid of any teacher or expert. Most important, he asks how reading poetry can help us to lead our lives with greater meaning and purpose. Anchored in poetic analysis and steered through Zapruder’s personal experience of coming to the form, Why Poetry is engaging and conversational, even as it makes a passionate argument for the necessity of poetry in an age when information is constantly being mistaken for knowledge. While he provides a simple reading method for approaching poems and illuminates concepts like associative movement, metaphor, and negative capability, Zapruder explicitly confronts the obstacles that readers face when they encounter poetry to show us that poetry can be read, and enjoyed, by anyone.

The Art of Feeling

by Laura Tims

For fans of Jennifer Niven’s All the Bright Places and Meg Wolitzer’s Belzhar comes an emotionally thrilling tale of a friendship between a girl who feels too much and a boy who feels too little, as they discover that maybe pain can bring people together and not just tear them apart.Samantha Herring has been in constant pain ever since the car accident that injured her leg and killed her mother. After pushing her friends away, Sam has receded into a fog of depression until she meets Eliot, a carefree, impulsive loner who, is unable to feel any pain at all. At first, Sam is jealous. She would give anything to not feel the pain she’s felt for the past year. But the more she learns about Eliot’s medical condition, the more she notices his self-destructive tendencies.In fact, Eliot doesn’t seem to care about anything—except Sam. And as they grow closer, they begin to confront Sam’s painful memories of the accident, memories that hold a startling truth about what really happened that day.

How to Disappear

by Sharon Huss Roat

From the author of Between the Notes comes a story that shines a light on our love of social media and how sometimes being the person you think you want to be isn’t as great as being the person you truly are. Perfect for fans of Vivi Greene’s Sing and Susane Colasanti’s Now and Forever.Vicky Decker’s social anxiety has helped her to master the art of hiding in plain sight, appearing only to her best friend, Jenna. But when Jenna moves away, Vicky’s isolation becomes unbearable. So she decides to invent a social life by Photoshopping herself into other people’s photos and posting them on Instagram under the screen name Vicurious.Instantly, she begins to get followers, and soon, Vicky has made a whole new life for herself without ever leaving her bedroom. But the more followers she amasses online, the clearer it becomes that there are a lot of people out there who feel like her—#alone and #ignored in real life. To help them, and herself, she must stop living vicariously and start bringing the magic of Vicurious back to life.

It's Not About the Bra: Play Hard, Play Fair, and Put the Fun Back Into Competitive Sports

by Brandi Chastain

Youth sports aren't just about fun and games anymore. What should be a pleasurable experience is often marred by poor sportsmanship, trash talking, win-at-all-cost attitudes, and, in the worst cases, violence. But World Cup soccer champion and Olympic gold medalist Brandi Chastain has a solution. In It's Not About the Bra, Chastain draws on lessons learned in her phenomenal career and in her experience as a parent to illuminate "the beautiful game" and provide creative answers to the challenges that face young athletes and their parents.Chastain emphasizes the importance of developing leadership skills, finding (and becoming) role models, and giving back to one's team and community. She offers a blueprint for kids and parents alike on how to play fair, win (and lose) with grace, and, above all, have a good time doing it.

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