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A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle

by David Young Robert Rogers Russell Willier

With the rise of urban living and the digital age, many North American healers are recognizing that traditional medicinal knowledge must be recorded before being lost with its elders. A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle is a historic document, including nearly 200 color photos and maps, in that it is the first in which a native healer has agreed to open his medicine bundle to share in writing his repertoire of herbal medicines and where they are found. Providing information on and photos of medicinal plants and where to harvest them, anthropologist David E. Young and botanist Robert D. Rogers chronicle the life, beliefs, and healing practices of Medicine Man Russell Willier in his native Alberta, Canada. Despite being criticized for sharing his knowledge, Willier later found support in other healers as they began to realize the danger that much of their traditional practices could die out with them. With Young and Rogers, Willier offers his practices here for future generations. At once a study and a guide, A Cree Healer and His Medicine Bundle touches on how indigenous healing practices can be used to complement mainstream medicine, improve the treatment of chronic diseases, and lower the cost of healthcare. The authors discuss how mining, agriculture, and forestry are threatening the continued existence of valuable wild medicinal plants and the role of alternative healers in a modern health care system. Sure to be of interest to ethnobotanists, medicine hunters, naturopaths, complementary and alternative health practitioners, ethnologists, anthropologists, and academics, this book will also find an audience with those interested in indigenous cultures and traditions.

Ulysses Bores Me So

by Nola Tully

The publication of James Joyce's Ulysses was met with both hyperbolic praise and scorn: was Joyce's evocation of a day in the life of Leopold Bloom's Dublin a work of genius? Or was it drivel? Was it "an entirely new thing" (W. B. Yeats), or "a turgid welter of pornography" (Edith Wharton)? A "work of high genius" (Edmund Wilson) or something rather slighter: "Never did I read such tosh," Virginia Woolf wrote. In "Ulysses Bores Me So," a selection from the Bloomsday compendium yes I said yes I will Yes., the evidence is laid bare: the first reviews, letters, and reactions to the book that would change the course of literary history.

Zack

by Sawyer Bennett

New York Times bestselling author Sawyer Bennett goes for a hat trick with the latest romance in a sexy series about cool-as-ice hockey players and the women heating up their lives. Warning: The following contains spoilers from a cliffhanger in Garrett. Rising star Zack Grantham has been stuck in a downward spiral of grief that has put his career on hold. Back on the road with the Carolina Cold Fury, still crippled by emotional baggage, and now a single dad, he's in need of some serious help with his son. But while the nerdy new nanny wins his son's heart, Zack isn't sure he's ready for a woman's touch--even after getting a glimpse of the killer curves she's hiding under those baggy clothes. Kate Francis usually keeps men like Zack at a distance. Though his athlete's body is honed to perfection, he refuses to move on with his life--and besides, he's her boss. Still, the sparks between them are undeniable, tempting Kate to turn their professional relationship into a personal one. But before she makes a power play for Zack's wounded heart, Kate will have to open him up again and show him that love is worth the fight. Advance praise for Zack "Emotional, intense, funny, and sexy, Zack has it all. I didn't want this book to end."--#1 New York Times bestselling author Colleen Hoover Praise for Sawyer Bennett and the Carolina Cold Fury series "Sawyer Bennett never fails to deliver heroes I fall hard for and heroines I adore."--New York Times bestselling author Violet Duke "Wow. Just wow. Sawyer Bennett is my new favorite author."--Jami Davenport, USA Today bestselling author of Skating on Thin Ice "Garrett is a sizzling and emotional read with laughter and secrets thrown in for good measure. Sawyer Bennett had me at hello."--New York Times bestselling author Lexi Ryan "Sawyer Bennett has outdone herself with Garrett. If you like secrets, romance, hot sex, and an epically fantastic ending that leaves you totally satisfied, then this is your book."--New York Times bestselling author Lauren Blakely "Garrett took me on an emotional roller-coaster ride. It's sexy yet heartwarming, with a totally swoon-worthy hero."--New York Times bestselling author Melody Grace "Warm, witty, and fun, with sparkling dialogue and great characters including a bad boy hockey player, Cold Fury has it all! I'm eagerly awaiting the next in the series."--Katie Rose, award-winning author of Bring on the Heat "Sawyer Bennett has scored again with Alex, the perfect combination of sexy and emotional. I can't wait for the next Cold Fury story!"--Julie Cross, author of Third DegreeIncludes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.

The Goddess Pose

by Michelle Goldberg

When the woman who would become Indra Devi was born in Russia in 1899, yoga was virtually unknown outside of India. By the time of her death, in 2002, it was being practiced everywhere, from Brooklyn to Berlin to Ulaanbaatar. In The Goddess Pose, New York Times best-selling author Michelle Goldberg traces the life of the incredible woman who brought yoga to the West--and in so doing paints a sweeping picture of the twentieth century. Born into the minor aristocracy (as Eugenia Peterson), Devi grew up in the midst of one of the most turbulent times in human history. Forced to flee the Russian Revolution as a teenager, she joined a famous Berlin cabaret troupe, dove into the vibrant prewar spiritualist movement, and, at a time when it was nearly unthinkable for a young European woman to travel alone, followed the charismatic Theosophical leader Jiddu Krishnamurti to India. Once on the subcontinent, she performed in Indian silent cinema and hobnobbed with the leaders of the independence movement. But her greatest coup was convincing a recalcitrant master yogi to train her in the secrets of his art. Devi would go on to share what she learned with people around the world, teaching in Shanghai during World War II, then in Hollywood, where her students included Gloria Swanson and Greta Garbo. She ran a yoga school in Mexico during the height of the counterculture, served as spiritual adviser to the colonel who tried to overthrow Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega, and, in her eighties, moved to Buenos Aires at the invitation of a besotted rock star. Everywhere she went, Indra Devi evangelized for yoga, ushering in a global craze that continues unabated. Written with vivid clarity, The Goddess Pose brings her remarkable story--as an actress, yogi, and globetrotting adventuress--to life.From the Hardcover edition.

SignWave

by Andrew Vachss

Once a mercenary, later an assassin, and now living a different life, Dell has bone-marrow-deep loyalty and protective instincts that know no bounds when it comes to his wife, Dolly, a former battle-field nurse, and their close-knit group of Dolly's friends and Dell's allies. When Dolly receives a thinly veiled threat, Dell reverts to his old ways to untangle the background of a prominent local figure, George Byron Benton, whose actions have awakened Dell's obsessive need for security. This target combines the deadly patience of a gila monster and a complex agenda--including a public life that's all elaborate disguise. To penetrate Benton's dense facade, Dell methodically works his way through the only reliable source of news in the area--a blog called Undercurrents. If he manages to track Benton down, Dell will have to decide how far he is willing to go to recapture the sense of safety that Benton has stolen. With Andrew Vachss's trademark razor-sharp dialogue and inimitable prose style, SignWave--the third entry in the Aftershock series--is guaranteed to reverberate powerfully long after it has been read.From the Hardcover edition.

The Household Spirit

by Tod Wodicka

In this remarkable novel, Tod Wodicka, author of All Shall Be Well; and All Shall Be Well; and All Manner of Things Shall Be Well, has crafted a luminous story of a most curious friendship. There's something wrong next door. At least that's what neighbors Howie Jeffries and Emily Phane both think. Since his daughter and wife moved out, Howie has been alone, an accidental recluse content with his fishing and his dreams of someday sailing away from himself on a boat. Emily couldn't be more different: she's irreverent, outgoing, and seemingly well adjusted. But when she returns from college to care for her dying grandfather, Howie can't help but notice her increasingly erratic behavior--not to mention her newfound love of nocturnal gardening. The thing is, although they've lived side by side in the only two houses on Route 29 in rural upstate New York since Emily was born, Howie and Emily have never so much as spoken to each other. Both have their reasons: Howie is debilitatingly shy, and Emily has been hiding the fact that she suffers from a nighttime affliction that makes her terrified to go to sleep and makes her question the very reality of her waking life. It is only when tragedy strikes that their worlds finally intersect in ways neither of them could have ever imagined. A poignant, big-hearted, and often humorous novel about two unique individuals unceremoniously thrown together, The Household Spirit is a story about how little we know the people we see every day--and the unexpected capabilities of the human heart.From the Hardcover edition.

The Truth According to Us

by Annie Barrows

From the co-author of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society comes a wise, witty, and exuberant novel, perfect for fans of Lee Smith, that illuminates the power of loyalty and forgiveness, memory and truth, and the courage it takes to do what's right. Annie Barrows once again evokes the charm and eccentricity of a small town filled with extraordinary characters. Her new novel, The Truth According to Us, brings to life an inquisitive young girl, her beloved aunt, and the alluring visitor who changes the course of their destiny forever. In the summer of 1938, Layla Beck's father, a United States senator, cuts off her allowance and demands that she find employment on the Federal Writers' Project, a New Deal jobs program. Within days, Layla finds herself far from her accustomed social whirl, assigned to cover the history of the remote mill town of Macedonia, West Virginia, and destined, in her opinion, to go completely mad with boredom. But once she secures a room in the home of the unconventional Romeyn family, she is drawn into their complex world and soon discovers that the truth of the town is entangled in the thorny past of the Romeyn dynasty. At the Romeyn house, twelve-year-old Willa is desperate to learn everything in her quest to acquire her favorite virtues of ferocity and devotion--a search that leads her into a thicket of mysteries, including the questionable business that occupies her charismatic father and the reason her adored aunt Jottie remains unmarried. Layla's arrival strikes a match to the family veneer, bringing to light buried secrets that will tell a new tale about the Romeyns. As Willa peels back the layers of her family's past, and Layla delves deeper into town legend, everyone involved is transformed--and their personal histories completely rewritten.Advance praise for The Truth According to Us "In The Truth According to Us, Annie Barrows leaves no doubt that she is a storyteller of rare caliber, with wisdom and insight to spare. As she subtly unpacks the emotional intricacies of the Romeyn family and their small West Virginia town in the wake of the Great Depression, we're struck by the slipperiness of history--how the stories we tell each other and ourselves often demand to be interrogated; how the things we're driven know about our families, our towns, our closest intimates, will always change us, sometimes over and over. Barrows is at her best here. Every page rings like a bell."--Paula McLain, author of The Paris Wife"The Truth According to Us is an irresistible novel, a sly charmer of a story about a small town in Depression-era West Virginia whose history is rewritten by a debutante on the run. Family histories, too, are unraveled, but mended by the fierce, strong women who dominate this delightful page-turner, a tribute to the power of love and forgiveness to heal even the most heartbreaking betrayals."--Melanie Benjamin, author of The Aviator's Wife Praise for The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society "A jewel . . . poignant and keenly observed . . . a small masterpiece about love, war, and the immeasurable sustenance to be found in good books and good friends."--People "Affirms the power of books to nourish people enduring hard times."--The Washington Post "Smart and delightful . . . Treat yourself to this book, please--I can't recommend it highly enough."--Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love and The Signature of All ThingsFrom the Hardcover edition.

Risk/Reward

by Anne Kreamer

A persuasive and eye-opening look at the importance of embracing risk in our working lives--and how to use it to achieve lifelong career success Some of us relish the chance to fly without a net, others . . . not so much. But no matter how adventurous we might be in our personal lives, most of us are wary of allowing risk into our careers. With an economy in constant flux and a job market in which uncertainty is the only constant, stepping outside one's comfort zone can feel dangerous. But as the findings of this eye-opening and urgent book attest, the avoidance of risk might pose the greatest danger of all to our career prospects. In Risk/Reward, trend-spotter and career guru Anne Kreamer makes the compelling case that embracing risk is essential to managing a twenty-first-century career. Risk-taking isn't just for entrepreneurs, nor does it require working on a figurative tightrope. Rather, Kreamer says, conscious, consistent, and modest risk-taking can help us become more able to recognize opportunity when it appears, and more likely to seize the chance to make the right change at the right moment. Risk/Reward presents a framework for making the most of today's ever-evolving workplace and turning risk-taking into a daily practice. Using proprietary data from three national studies about the American worker, Kreamer explores the importance of career risk-taking through profiles of four Risk/Reward personality types: Pioneers, Thinkers, Defenders, and Drifters. She presents a Risk/Reward Matrix that anyone can use to identify his or her own innate risk threshold, and she identifies constructive ways to implement risk in everyday situations--from initiating an uncomfortable conversation with a boss to sharing out-of-the-box ideas with colleagues or constructively challenging long-held practices in an organization. Peppered throughout Risk/Reward are insights and hard-won wisdom from notable achievers such as bestselling author Anna Quindlen, journalist Jane Pauley, CNBC financial maven Jim Cramer, thought leader Po Bronson, and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. Timely and insightful, Risk/Reward is a unique blend of practical and inspirational wisdom that even the most risk-averse person can harness on the path toward success and fulfillment. Praise for Anne Kreamer's It's Always Personal: Navigating Emotion in the New Workplace "A stimulating read bolstered by . . . some of the best recent work on emotional intelligence and the science of happiness."--The Wall Street Journal "So what should be the rules and boundaries for showing how you feel while you work? That's a question asked and answered in Anne Kreamer's fascinating . . . look at an issue that rarely gets discussed."--The Washington Post "Finally, someone is willing to unpack the morass of anger, anxiety, sadness, and joy that drives the workday. . . . [Kreamer] has hit the 'It's about time!' button."--Elle "[A] lively, well-researched exploration of emotions on the job."--Oprah.com "Explores how to be true to your 'emotional flashpoints--anger, fear, anxiety, empathy, happiness and crying'--without sabotaging your career."--The New York Times Book ReviewFrom the Hardcover edition.

Book of Numbers

by Joshua Cohen

A monumental, uproarious, and exuberant novel about the search--for love, truth, and the meaning of Life With The Internet. The enigmatic billionaire founder of Tetration, the world's most powerful tech company, hires a failed novelist, Josh Cohen, to ghostwrite his memoirs. The mogul, known as Principal, brings Josh behind the digital veil, tracing the rise of Tetration, which started in the earliest days of the Internet by revolutionizing the search engine before venturing into smartphones, computers, and the surveillance of American citizens. Principal takes Josh on a mind-bending world tour from Palo Alto to Dubai and beyond, initiating him into the secret pretext of the autobiography project and the life-or-death stakes that surround its publication. Insider tech exposé, leaked memoir-in-progress, international thriller, family drama, sex comedy, and biblical allegory, Book of Numbers renders the full range of modern experience both online and off. Embodying the Internet in its language, it finds the humanity underlying the virtual. Featuring one of the most unforgettable characters in contemporary fiction, Book of Numbers is an epic of the digital age, a triumph of a new generation of writers, and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do. Please note that Book of Numbers uses a special pagination system inspired by binary notation: the part number precedes the page number, and is separated from it by a decimal point. Praise for Book of Numbers "Joshua Cohen is the Great American Novelist. . . . Like Pynchon and Wallace, Cohen can write with tireless virtuosity about absolutely everything. . . . Cohen has turned the tables on the Internet: Instead of being reduced by its omniscience, he forces it to serve his imaginative purposes. . . . If John Henry is going to compete with the steam engine, he needs an almost superhuman energy and intelligence of his own--and if any writer has it, it is Joshua Cohen."--Adam Kirsch, Tablet "The next candidate for the Great American Novel . . . David Foster Wallace-level audacious."--Details "[A] monstrous talent and restive, roiling intellect . . . Other recent literary novels have treated the dot-com-mania reboot, its flagship companies, and their 'disruptive' technologies--Pynchon's Bleeding Edge, Dave Eggers's The Circle--but Cohen's is the best."--Bookforum "Cohen returns with a new novel questioning what life is in the digital age. The prolific writer . . . has given us a smart thriller to kick off the season. . . . Inspiring in a way that requires readers to pay attention not just to the words but the book as a form."--Vanity Fair "Reading Cohen's magnum opus is a lot like falling down an Internet wormhole. In Numbers, you'll find an international mystery, a fake memoir, a modern retelling of the biblical Book of Numbers, a sex romp, and a bunch of leaked documents. Think David Foster Wallace meets David Mitchell meets the search history that you just cleared. Beast."--Esquire"An ambitious and inspired attempt at the Great American Internet Novel . . . Cohen's encyclopedic epic is about many things--language, art, divinity, narrative, desire, global politics, surveillance, consumerism, genealogy--but it is above all a standout novel about the Internet."--Publishers Weekly (starred review)From the Hardcover edition.

Men of War

by Alexander Rose

In the grand tradition of John Keegan's enduring classic The Face of Battle comes a searing, unforgettable chronicle of war through the eyes of the American soldiers who fought in three of our most iconic battles: Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima. This is not a book about how great generals won their battles, nor is it a study in grand strategy. Men of War is instead a riveting, visceral, and astonishingly original look at ordinary soldiers under fire. Drawing on an immense range of firsthand sources from the battlefield, Rose begins by re-creating the lost and alien world of eighteenth-century warfare at Bunker Hill, the bloodiest clash of the War of Independence--and reveals why the American militiamen were so lethally effective against the oncoming waves of British troops. Then, focusing on Gettysburg, Rose describes a typical Civil War infantry action, vividly explaining what Union and Confederate soldiers experienced before, during, and after combat. Finally, he shows how in 1945 the Marine Corps hurled itself with the greatest possible violence at the island of Iwo Jima, where nearly a third of all Marines killed in World War II would die. As Rose demonstrates, the most important factor in any battle is the human one: At Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima, the American soldier, as much as any general, proved decisive. To an unprecedented degree, Men of War brings home the reality of combat and, just as important, its aftermath in the form of the psychological and medical effects on veterans. As such, the book makes a critical contribution to military history by narrowing the colossal gulf between the popular understanding of wars and the experiences of the soldiers who fight them.Advance praise for Men of War "A brilliant, riveting, unique book, Men of War does for the American soldier what John Keegan's The Face of Battle did for the British soldier. Using three epochal battles--Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima--Alexander Rose takes us into the ranks and helps us understand the experiences of those fighting on the ground. He captures vividly the emotions and conditions of combat--the terror and the boredom, the barbarity and the magnanimity--helping readers understand the realities known to those who have earned membership in that most treasured of fraternities, the brotherhood of the close fight. Men of War will be a classic."--General David H. Petraeus, U.S. Army (Retired) "On the model of The Face of Battle, Alexander Rose has applied the same technique of description and analysis to three landmark battles in American history. The overwhelming experience of combat for front-line soldiers who lived to write about it, and through their eyes those who did not, comes through with stark realism. If you want to know the meaning of war at the sharp end, this is the book to read."--James McPherson, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The War That Forged a Nation "Alexander Rose tells us about war from the perspective of those who fought it, capturing myriad combat details to weave a gripping tapestry of three of the most iconic battles in U.S. history--Bunker Hill, Gettysburg, and Iwo Jima."--Robert L. O'Connell, author of Fierce Patriot "A highly recommended addition to the literature of military history . . . Rose builds up a detailed picture of each of these battles, sparing few gritty details and romanticizing almost nothing. He writes vividly and memorably, with a good eye for the telling detail or anecdote as well as big-picture perspectives."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)From the Hardcover edition.

Who Walk in Darkness

by Chandler Brossard

Considered by many to be the first Beat novel, this underground classic follows a clique of young bohemians from dive bar to dance hall in 1940s New York Recently fired from his job and not yet ready to find a new one, aspiring author Blake Williams begins his evenings at the Sporting Club Bar in Greenwich Village, where he knows he will find Henry Porter. An ambitious and manipulative writer rumored to be "passing" for white, Henry has a cold-hearted charisma that is both irresistible and infuriating to his friends. While sipping beers delivered by the bar's surly Italian waiter, Henry and Blake discuss their plans for the night: a trip uptown to dance to the strains of a Puerto Rican orchestra, perhaps, or a prize fight at Madison Square Garden, or maybe a party in a dim and crowded apartment on Prince Street, reefer smoke clouding the air. The possibilities are endless--until the money runs out. Originally published in 1952, Who Walk in Darkness was one of the most controversial novels of midcentury America. Its cast of hip young men and women--from the unforgettable antihero Henry Porter to Harry Lee, a talented but heavy-drinking novelist going through a period of grave self-doubt--were based on well-known figures of the era. Their existential crises are portrayed with an honesty that shocked the publishing establishment and helped give rise to one of the most significant literary movements in American history. As relevant today as it was more than half a century ago, Who Walk in Darkness is the masterwork of an author far ahead of his time and a captivating character study whose influence can be felt in novels as wide-ranging as Jack Kerouac's On the Road and Philip Roth's The Human Stain.

The Avion My Uncle Flew

by Cyrus Fisher Richard Floethe

Spending the summer in a dull French village is not what Johnny had in mind . . . but soon he's hot on the trail of a Nazi spy!<P><P> When twelve-and-a-half-year-old Johnny Littlehorn's dad returns from the front lines and announces they're spending the summer in France, Johnny is appalled. He doesn't understand why they're going to France when they could stay home at their Wyoming ranch instead. But that's before he discovers an old German pistol hidden in a loaf of bread.<P> When Johnny arrives, he finds the village of Saint-Chamant anything but boring. With the help of his new friends Suzanne and Charles, Johnny follows a winding trail that leads to a fugitive spy and a stolen fortune. Before long, he's learning French, helping his oncle Paul build a real airplane, and unraveling an evil Nazi plot!<P> A Newbery Honor Book

Turn Signal

by Howard Owen

No one thought Jack Stone of Speakeasy, Virginia, was the kind of man who would try to solve his problems with a .38. But here he is, on a train to New York, armed and dangerously determined that somebody is going to read his damn novel. Jack once had dreams of bigger things, but here he is, a long-distance trucker with a shaky home life and one last chance to be special. All that the New York editor needs is a little persuasion.

The Rail

by Howard Owen

Before he let his life fall apart, James "Neil" Beauchamp was special. He lived and flourished in the world of privilege, adored and accommodated. Then, before he truly learned to appreciate it, the one talent that lifted him from a small life in a small town was gone. The only thing worse than spending your life earthbound, Neil would learn, is landing hard and knowing you'll never fly again. Born in Penns Castle, in the castle itself, he was a prince of sorts. But when his mother left the castle with him in tow, he lost everything, even his name. He seemed destined for a life as a shopkeeper's barely tolerated stepson. That's when baseball presented itself and saved him. For what Neil could do was hit. Through some combination of reflexes, vision, and coordination, the lean and supple Virginia Rail turned the game of his childhood into the driving force of his life. Before he was through, he would win batting championships and be elected to the Hall of Fame. Yet before his talent failed, he already was failing those closest to him. His wife and son suffered from being outside his field of vision too much of the time. Then, with his career over well before his 40th birthday, everything collapsed. The final crash, with his half-sister Blanchard beside him in the car, the crash that sent him to prison, was seen by most who knew him as the inevitable landing at the end of a very long fall. On the day he was paroled, he was met at the prison gates by his son David, the last person Neil expected to see, and returned to the castle from which he was banished as a child and to Blanchard, a woman of tenuous mental balance. Neil is looking for some way to make amends. And his son, who will learn things about Neil he never would have guessed, still wants to salvage something out of their mutual wreckage.

Harry & Ruth

by Howard Owen

Don't torture yourself, Ruth Crowder Flood has always told Harry Stein. Don't let your life be ruined by what might have been. But he can't help it. And, in truth, neither can she. In the one short moment that was theirs, Ruth had too much pride and Harry didn't have enough courage. In the instant that defined the rest of their lives, they both hesitated and were lost, condemned to wander in a wilderness of their own making. In Harry & Ruth, Howard Owen's fifth novel, two unlikely lovers learn just how much their lives can be defined by one bad decision. They will be seasoned by wars both foreign and domestic, by Washington and state politics, by an Olympic swimmer they've both failed in different ways, by business and financial success--and by two haunted and disastrous marriages. Through it all, Harry and Ruth endure--on paper. They begin writing in the fall of 1942 and never stop. Now it's the fall of 1995, hurricane season again. Ruth Crowder Flood is 70 years old, the matriarch of a damaged, secret-hoarding family. Harry Stein is dying, and he wants to tie up a plenitude of loose ends. All that remains is for some of the famous Crowder family reserve to melt away, so that a disaffected daughter might understand everything, even the mystery of what happened to Henry Flood.

Fat Lightning

by Howard Owen

A visionary who dreams about eating kindling wood called "fat lightning" and sees Christ on the Cross in his barn forms an unlikely league with his nephew's frustrated wife in a small Southern town.

Rock of Ages

by Howard Owen

In Rock of Ages, Howard Owen returns to the terrain of Scots County, North Carolina, site of his best-selling novel Littlejohn. Littlejohn McCain has been dead 11 years. In that time, his daughter has divorced one husband and buried another. Georgia has reclaimed her original name and believes she is starting to settle comfortably into the last and quietest third of her life. But then she starts seeing her dead father--not just in dreams, but also in her Montclair University classroom. Her son Justin is already down in North Carolina with his pregnant girlfriend, helping prepare what's left of Littlejohn's farm for sale. On the verge of a breakdown, Georgia joins them. As a girl, Georgia couldn't wait to get away from the farm and her moribund hometown. She's back now, but only long enough to sell the former and bid a final, less-than-fond farewell to the latter. Or so she thinks. When her cousin Jenny dies neglected and under mysterious circumstances, Georgia is forced to deal with a major dose of baby-boomer guilt. She's always told herself that she could live with the knowledge that she would never truly "do right" by her older relatives, but now she's not so sure. The "peace that passes understanding" about which the members of her father's old church sing seems far beyond her reach. Georgia, with grandmotherhood and a ghost hovering, tries to discover what really happened to Jenny and partially redeem herself. In the process, she will find two things she never expected in the middle of the dead-calm boredom of East Geddie--requited, taboo-flouting lust and a murder mystery.

Walking Dunes

by Sandra Scofield

The sandhills stretch across the West Texas plains for 60 miles. As much as ten miles wide in places, they are a gleaming, sugary whiteness. The winds keep a trickle of sand moving on their peaks; in high winds the sand shifts so fast they say the dunes walk. So, too, can a handsome young man's intellect and sensibility belie his unreliable character; so, too, can his sense of identity shift as he is buffeted by the storm of circumstance a single fateful year brings. Eighteen year old David Puckett is torn between his desire for and his fear of intimacy--between his yearning for two very different definitions of success. Artistry and passion are embodied in one girl, the avoidance of intimacy and the path to power in another. His story is set in the late 1950s, an era that has become mythologized as an age of carefree innocence and conservative consensus. Walking Dunes gives us another glimpse of life as it lay on the lip of the '60s, life as beset by poverty, violence, and misery as it was buoyed by rock and roll, television, and the explosion of the suburbs. There is, too, in David's story the poignancy of a failed family, the sweet awkwardness of young love, the fierceness of early ambition, the bitterness of loss. The lives of teenagers, so often perceived as trivial and commonplace, surprise and ultimately shock the reader, as a boy sets the course on which he will become a man.

More Than Allies

by Sandra Scofield

Maggie came to scenic little Lupine, Oregon, to live as a foster child in the Jarrett home. Thirteen years later, she's a legitimate member of the family, living in the back yard cottage with two children. Her husband, Mo, has moved on to Texas in search of opportunity. He wants Maggie and their children to follow, but she is mired in indecision. Her baby's a handful and her 9-year-old son, Jay-Jay, is in such trouble at school they want to put him in the "anger group." She seeks comfort and advice from her friends, but her problems and theirs don't seem to be occurring in the same universe. Even Polly, then foster-mother, now mother-in-law, seems to be slipping away. She's talking about taking in an infant with special needs. Where does that leave Maggie and her kids? Nearby, Dulce Quirarte lives a separate life, the last person with whom Maggie would think she has anything in common. Dulce cleans houses, makes beds in a motel, and dreams. Cut off in all ways from her family and her culture, she gives in to the magic of Spanish only in her sleep. Her real life is a matter of survival. Her son Gus--a classmate of Jay's--is fast becoming a complicated person all his own. He wants to know why he's a Mexican who doesn't speak Spanish and never sees any family but his mother. Besides, his father Gustavo has been paroled to his parents' dairy farm in Texas, and he wants a family, or at least his son. Querida, he writes: I ask you with humility and love, be open. Doesn't he know how closed she's had to be to live an independent life? But then, isn't her most vivid dream of him? As spring unfolds into summer, marriage, motherhood, and friendship are all reconsidered. Below the surface of a quaint, hip town, real lives are led, and two women transcend the boundaries of class and culture to forge an alliance that will enrich both their lives.

Beyond Deserving

by Sandra Scofield

Gully Fisher's twin sons will soon be 45, and are the push and pull of their clan. Michael is almost too good; immune to consternation, he is the family rock, while Fish is the family maverick, acting out what the others cannot bring themselves to do. Michael's wife, Ursula, spends her days rearranging the lives of failed families, and craves a deeper intimacy with her taciturn husband and her two children. Katie, still seduced by Fish's tales of Vietnam and jail, has a new job and a boyfriend, and thinks of breaking away. The elder Fishers, celebrating 50 years of marriage, teeter on the line between suppressed anger and fierce loyalty. When Katie and Fish's 9-year-old daughter, Rebecca, appears from Texas (where she is being raised by Katie's mother), she lurches across this landscape and the entire family is beset by a summer of little squalls. By the fall, a few secrets are out, and they're all better for it. This is a novel full of the telling: poignant details that illustrate the fabric of domestic life, allowing the reader a shock of recognition. It is often funny, sometimes sad, always wise. All the Fishers are emotionally complex characters who reveal fresh insights into human nature and relationships. At a time when groups are springing up all over the country in order to provide instant intimacy and support for people lost in their selfhood and history, this is a novel demonstrating that love can be messy, silly, painful, and utterly idiosyncratic--that marriage and family can be uniquely defined. The Fishers are such a family, loving because they are bound, because they have the habit, and because the larger world can't understand them. They love more than they know how to say, and they love beyond deserving.

The Chesapeake Diaries Series 5-Book Bundle

by Mariah Stewart

In the tradition of Robyn Carr, Susan Mallery, and Barbara Freethy, the stories in the Chesapeake Diaries series combine captivating contemporary romance with the heartwarming power of healing and redemption. Once you settle into the charming small-town rhythms of St. Dennis, Maryland, you'll never want to leave. And now, you won't have to, with the first five novels in this beloved series from New York Times bestselling author Mariah Stewart collected in one eBook bundle: COMING HOME HOME AGAIN ALMOST HOME HOMETOWN GIRL HOME FOR THE SUMMER Along the way, you'll meet Steffie Wyler, the proud owner of the One Scoop or Two ice cream parlor who is still searching for her happily ever after, Brooke Madison Bowers, the local pageant star who falls to pieces when her husband is killed while serving in Iraq, and Dallas MacGregor, the award-winning actress who seeks refuge in St. Dennis after her Hollywood dream turns into a tabloid nightmare. The Chesapeake Diaries series brings together these unforgettable characters, and many more, in Mariah Stewart's enchanting tales of love, compassion, and second chances. Praise for The Chesapeake Diaries "An engrossing story with poignant, relatable themes like grief, forgiveness, friendship, and rebirth . . . a heartwarming read."--USA Today, on Hometown Girl "Delightfully warm and touching . . . The town and townspeople of St. Dennis, Maryland, come vividly to life under Stewart's skillful hands."--RT Book Reviews, on Home Again "Sweet, tender, and overflowing with small-town flavor."--Library Journal, on Almost Home

Project Fatherhood

by Jorja Leap

A group of former gang members come together to help one another answer the question "How can I be a good father when I've never had one?" In 2010, former gang leader turned community activist Big Mike Cummings asked UCLA gang expert Jorja Leap to co-lead a group of men struggling to be better fathers in Watts, South Los Angeles. These men, black and brown, from late adolescence to middle-age, most formerly incarcerated, work to build their identities as fathers, connect with their children, and heal their community. Project Fatherhood follows the lives of the men, who meet each week as they struggle with the pain of their own losses, the chronic pressures of poverty and unemployment, and the unquenchable desire to do better and provide more for the next generation. Through immersion into the lived experiences of those working to overcome their circumstances, Leap provides not only dramatic stories of fathers trying to do the right thing but a larger sociological portrait of how institutional injustices become manifest in the lives of ordinary people. The group's development over time demonstrates real-life movement toward solutions as the men find support in each other and in their shared goal of healing their families and keeping their children out of the "cradle-to-prison pipeline."

Saving the Original Sinner

by Karl W. Giberson

A scientist and former evangelical argues that holding onto a belief in a literal, historical Adam has forced many Christians to reject science and become intellectually isolated from the modern world. Beginning in the seventeenth century, discoveries in anthropology, geology, paleontology, biblical studies, and linguistics cast doubt on the familiar account of the biblical Adam and his fall into sin, the central component in the West's understanding of its origins. Christians responded by creatively reconstructing the creation story, letting Adam "evolve" to accommodate his changing context. But further advances both in science and biblical studies eventually made it all but impossible to reconcile a first couple with a modern, scientific understanding of the past or with an informed reading of ancient biblical texts. Many Christians rejected the offensive scholarship, veering onto a path that would place them increasingly at odds with contemporary scholarship in many fields. In Saving the Original Sinner, Giberson tells the story of the evolution of the idea of Adam and explores how, over the centuries, we have created Adam in our own image to explain and justify our behavior. Giberson shows how the narrative of the Fall has influenced Western ideas about sexuality, gender, and race, and he argues that ongoing attempts to preserve the biblical story of creation in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary is contributing to the intellectual isolation of many Christians, particularly evangelicals--even as they continue to wield significant political power in the United States.

The Story of Us

by Dani Atkins

For fans of David Nicholls's One Day and Liane Moriarty's What Alice Forgot, here's a page-turning novel about a young woman who is torn between two men, and who must determine where--and with whom--her future lies. Emma is just days from marrying her childhood sweetheart, Richard. But what should be the happiest time of Emma's life takes a turn for the worse when, on the night of her bachelorette party, tragedy strikes. Thanks to some quick thinking from a stranger, Emma is pulled free from a totaled car before it goes up in flames. But another passenger is not so lucky. The wedding is postponed as family and friends deal with their shock and grief. But soon, secrets come to light that have Emma questioning her relationships--and her engagement. Making matters more complicated is the emotional connection she feels with Jack, the mysterious man who saved her life. It's a crisis no bridal magazine has ever covered: What do you do when, on the eve of your wedding, you find yourself in love with two men? Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader's Circle for author chats and more.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Darwin's Watch

by Terry Pratchett Ian Stewart Jack Cohen

When Charles Darwin writes the wrong book and reverses the progress of science, Unseen University's wizards must once again save Roundworld (Earth, that is) from an apocalyptic end. Ever since a wizardly experiment inadvertently brought about the creation of Roundworld, the wizard scholars of Unseen University have done their best to put things on the right course. In Darwin's Watch they may face their greatest challenge yet: A man called Darwin has written a bestselling book called The Theology of the Species, and his theory of scientific design has been witlessly embraced by Victorian society. As a result, scientific progress has slowed to a crawl, and the wizards must find a way to change history back to the way it should have been. DARWIN'S WATCH EXPLORES THE REVERBERATIONS of major scientific advances on our planet and our culture, the dangers of obscurantism, and the theory of evolution as you have never seen it before. This brilliant addition to Pratchett's beloved Discworld series illustrates with great wit and wisdom how the laws of our universe truly are stranger than fiction.

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