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The Face of the Other and the Trace of God

by Jeffrey Bloechl

The Face of the Other and the Trace of God contain essays on the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas, and how his philosophy intersects with that of other philosophers, particularly Husserl, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Derrida. This collection is broadly divided into two parts: relations with the other, and the questions of God.

Manhattan: Letters from Prehistory

by Hélène Cixous Beverley Bie Brahic

Manhattan is the tale of a young French scholar who travels to the United States in 1965 on a Fulbright Fellowship to consult the manuscripts of beloved authors. In Yale University’s Beinecke Library, tantalized by the conversational and epistolary brilliance of a fellow researcher, she is lured into a picaresque and tragic adventure. Meanwhile, back in France, her children and no-nonsense mother await her return. A young European intellectual’s first contact with America and the city of New York are the background of this story. The experience of Manhattan haunts this labyrinth of a book as, over a period of thirty-five years, its narrator visits and revisits Central Park and a half-buried squirrel, the Statue of Liberty and a never again to be found hotel in the vicinity of Morningside Heights: a journey into memory in which everything is never the same. Traveling from library to library, France to the United States, Shakespeare to Kafka to Joyce, Manhattan deploys with gusto all the techniques for which Cixous’s fiction and essays are known: rapid juxtapositions of time and place, narrative and description, analysis and philosophical reflection. It investigates subjects Cixous has spent her life probing: reading, writing, and the “omnipotence-other” seductions of literature; a family’s flight from Nazi Germany and postcolonial Algeria; childhood, motherhood, and, not least, the strange experience of falling in love with, as Jacques Derrida writes, “a counterfeit genius.”

Truth and Consequences

by Sarah Madison

Sequel to Walk a MileThe Sixth Sense: Book ThreeWhen FBI agent Jerry Lee Parker wakes from a coma after a murderous attack on his life, he has no memory of his immediate past. In the blink of an eye, he has gone from having a nearly photographic memory to recalling nothing of the last six months of his life, including his partner and lover, John Flynn. While Lee tries to reboot his past and reconnect with John, there are events at play around him he doesn't understand. John is keeping secrets from him, secrets that could get them both killed. Matters come to a head when Lee is hounded to turn over a mysterious artifact, of which he has no knowledge. The two men wind up in a fight for their lives as they risk everything to keep the powerful relic out of the hands of a ruthless killer. In order to protect those he loves, however, John may be forced to make a deal with the devil.

Mental Language: from Plato to William of Ockham

by Claude Panaccio

The notion that human thought is structured like a language, with a precise syntax and semantics, has been pivotal in recent philosophy of mind. Yet it is not a new idea: it was systematically explored in the fourteenth century by William of Ockham and became central in late medieval philosophy. Mental Language examines the background of Ockham's innovation by tracing the history of the mental language theme in ancient and medieval thought. Panaccio identifies two important traditions: one philosophical, stemming from Plato and Aristotle, and the other theological, rooted in the Fathers of the Christian Church. The study then focuses on the merging of the two traditions in the Middle Ages, as they gave rise to detailed discussions over the structure of human thought and its relations with signs and language. Ultimately, Panaccio stresses the originality and significance of Ockham's doctrine of the oratio mentalis (mental discourse) and the strong impression it made upon his immediate successors.

The Weight of Love: Affect, Ecstasy, and Union in the Theology of Bonaventure

by Robert Glenn Davis

Supplementing theological interpretation with historical, literary, and philosophical perspectives, The Weight of Love analyzes the nature and role of affectivity in medieval Christian devotion through an original interpretation of the writings of the Franciscan theologian Bonaventure. Itintervenes in two crucial developments in medieval Christian thought and practice: the renewal of interest in the corpus of Dionysius the Areopagite in thirteenth-century Paris and the proliferation of new forms of affective meditation focused on the passion of Christ in the later Middle Ages. Through the exemplary life and death of Francis of Assisi, Robert Glenn Davis examines how Bonaventure traces a mystical itinerary culminating in the meditant's full participation in Christ's crucifixion. For Bonaventure, Davis asserts, this death represents the becoming-body of the soul, theconsummation and transformation of desire into the crucified body of Christ. In conversation with the contemporary historiography of emotions and critical theories of affect, The Weight of Love contributes to scholarship on medieval devotional literature by urging and offering a more sustained engagement with the theological and philosophical elaborations of affectus. Italso contributes to debates around the "affective turn" in the humanities by placing it within this important historical context, challenging modern categories of affect and emotion.

Bound by Conflict

by Francis M. Deng

Since its independence on January 1, 1956, Sudan has been at war with itself. Through the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) of 2005, the North-South dimension of the conflict was seemingly resolved by the Independence of the South on July 9, 2011. However, as a result of issues that werenot resolved by the CPA, conflicts within the two countries have reignited conflict between them because of allegations of support for each other's rebels. In Bound by Conflict: Dilemmas of the Two Sudans, Francis M. Deng and Daniel J. Deng critique the tendency to see these conflicts as separate and to seek isolated solutions for them, when, in fact, they are closely intertwined. The policy implication is that resolving conflicts within the two Sudansis critical to the prospects of achieving peace, security, and stability between them, with the potential of moving them to some form of meaningful association.

City of Gods

by R. Scott Hanson

Religious Freedon, Immigration, and Pluralism in Flushing, Queens

Tricksters and Cosmopolitans

by Rei Magosaki

Tricksters and Cosmopolitans is the first sustained exploration into the history of cross-cultural collaborations between Asian American writers and their non-Asian American editors and publishers. The volume focuses on the literary production of the cosmopolitan subject, featuring the writers Sui Sin Far, Jessica Hagedorn, Karen Tei Yamashita, Monique Truong, and Min Jin Lee. The newly imagined cosmopolitan subject that emerges from their works dramatically reconfigured Asian American female subjectivity in metropolitan space with a kind of fluidity and ease never before seen. But as Rei Magosaki shows, these narratives also invariably expose the problematic side of this figure, which also serves to perpetuate exploitative structures of Western imperialism and its legacies in late capitalism. Arguing that the actual establishment of such a critical standpoint on imperialism and globalization required the expansive and internationalist vision of editors who supported, cultivated, and promoted these works, Tricksters and Cosmopolitans reveals the negotiations between these authors and their publishers and between the shared investment in both politics and aesthetics that influenced the narrative structure of key works in the Asian American literary canon.

The Wedding Feast of the Lamb

by Emmanuel Falque

Emmanuel Falque's The Wedding Feast of the Lamb represents a turning point in his thought. Here, Falque links philosophy and theology in an original fashion that allows us to see the full effect of theology's "backlash" against philosophy. By attending closely to the incarnation and the eucharist, Falque develops a new concept of the body and of love: By avoiding the common mistake of "angelism"--consciousness without body--Falque considers the depths to which our humanity reflects animality, or body without consciousness. He shows the continued relevance of the question "How can this man give us his flesh to eat?" (John 6:52), especially to philosophy. We need to question the meaning of "this is my body" in "a way that responds to the needs of our time" (Vatican II). Because of the ways that "Hoc est corpus meum" has shaped our culture and our modernity, this is a problem both for religious belief and for culture.

Crossing the Rubicon

by Emmanuel Falque

In France today, philosophy--phenomenology in particular--finds itself in a paradoxical relation to theology. Some debate a "theological turn. " Others disavow theological arguments as if such arguments would tarnish their philosophical integrity, while nevertheless carrying out theology in other venues. In Crossing the Rubicon, Emmanuel Falque seeks to end this face-off. Convinced that "the more one theologizes, the better one philosophizes," he proposes a counterblow by theology against phenomenology. Instead of another philosophy of "the threshold" or "the leap"--and through a retrospective and forward-looking examination of his own method--he argues that an encounter between the two disciplines will reveal their mutual fruitfulness and their true distinctive borders. Falque shows that he has made the crossing between philosophy and theology and back again with audacity and perhaps a little recklessness, knowing full well that no one thinks without exposing himself to risk.

Responding to Loss

by Robert Mugerauer

Much recent philosophical work proposes to illuminate dilemmas of human existence with reference to the arts and culture, often to the point of submitting particular works to preconceived formulations. In this examination of three texts that respond to loss, Robert Mugerauer responds withclose, detailed readings that seek to clarify the particularity of the intense force such works bring forth. Mugerauer shows how, in the face of what is irrevocably taken away as well as of what continues to be given, the unavoidable task of interpretation is ours alone. Mugerauer examines works in three different forms that powerfully call on us to respond to loss: Cormac McCarthy's The Crossing, Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum Berlin, and Wim Wenders's film Wings of Desire. Explicating these difficult but rich works with reference to the thought of MartinHeidegger, Jean-Luc Marion, Hannah Arendt, and Emmanuel Levinas, the author helps us to experience the multiple and diverse ways in which all of us are opened to the saturated phenomena of loss, violence, witnessing, and responsibility.

Walking New York

by Stephen Miller

THE NEW YORK OBSERVER: ONE OF THE TOP 10 BOOKS FOR FALL It's no wonder that New York has always been a magnet city for writers. Manhattan is one of the most walkable cities in the world. While many novelists, poets, and essayists have enjoyed long walks in New York, not all of them have had favorable impressions. Addressing an endlessly appealing subject, Walking New York is a study of twelve American writers and several British writers who walked the streets of New York and wrote about their impressions of the city in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Seen through the eyes of Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, William Dean Howells, Jacob Riis, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Theodore Dreiser, James Weldon Johnson, Alfred Kazin, Elizabeth Hardwick, Colson Whitehead, and Teju Cole, almost all the works in Walking New York are about Manhattan, with only Whitman and Kazin writing about Brooklyn. Though the writers were often irritated, disturbed, and occasionally shocked by what they saw on their walks, they were still fascinated by the city William Dean Howells called "splendidly and sordidly commercial" and Cynthia Ozick called "faithfully inconstant, magnetic, man-made, unnatural--the synthetic sublime. " In this idiosyncratic guidebook to New York, celebrated writers ruminate on questions that are still hotly debated to this day: the pros and cons of capitalism and the impact of immigration. Many imply that New York is a bewildering text that is hard to make sense of. Returning to New York after an absence of two decades, Henry James loathed many things about "bristling" New York, while native New Yorker Walt Whitman both celebrated and criticized "Mannahatta" in his writings. Combining literary scholarship with urban studies, Walking New York reveals how this crowded, dirty, noisy, and sometimes ugly city gave these "restless analysts" plenty of fodder for their craft.

The Athlete Apperception Technique: Manual and Materials for Sport and Clinical Psychologists

by Petah M. Gibbs Mark B. Andersen Daryl B. Marchant

As the field of sport psychology has matured, so a greater appreciation for a diversity of training models, research methodologies, and therapeutic approaches, opposed to the dominant models of objective testing, has developed. The Athlete Apperception Technique (AAT) sets out a sport-specific projective test for practitioners working in sport and exercise service delivery or counselling work with athletes and coaches. This innovative book includes a basic primer on projective methods and the psychoanalytic theory behind them; a history of projective, storytelling instruments in clinical psychology; the development of the image set for the AAT; some examples of interpreting AAT image stories; instructions for the administration of the AAT; a scoring guide for the stories produced; and in-depth descriptions of the stimulus properties of each image in the AAT, along with all images presented as full-page illustrations. The AAT will help sport practitioners identify and assess personality features, relationships, anxieties, achievement, motivation, and perfectionism, and augment the recent shift in orientation for service delivery to athletes and provide a more in-depth understanding of athletes’ characters. The AAT is useful supplementary reading for students of sport psychology and a novel tool for any practicing sport psychologist.

Nuclear Multilateralism and Iran: Inside EU Negotiations

by Tarja Cronberg

Drawing on the author’s personal experience, this book presents an insider’s chronology and policy analysis of the EU’s role in the nuclear negotiations with Iran. The European Union strives to be a global player, a “soft power” leader that can influence international politics and state behavior. Yet critics argue that the EU’s Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) remains largely ineffective and incoherent. The EU’s early and continuous involvement in the effort to dissuade Iran from developing nuclear weapons can be viewed as a test case for the EU as a global actor. As Chair of the European Parliament’s delegation for relations with Iran, Tarja Cronberg had a ringside seat in the negotiations to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. Drawing on her experiences leading a parliamentary delegation to Iran and interviews with officials, legislators and opposition leaders in nearly every country participating in the negotiations, as well as reports by the International Atomic Energy Agency, parliaments and independent experts, the author illustrates an insider’s strategic understanding of the negotiations. Intersecting history, politics, economics, culture and the broader security context, this book not only delivers a unique analysis of this historic deal and the twelve-year multilateral pursuit of it, but draws from it pertinent lessons for European policy makers for the future. This book will be of much interest to students of nuclear proliferation, EU policy, diplomacy and international relations in general.

Sexuality in World History

by Peter N. Stearns

This book examines sexuality in the past, and explores how it helps explain sexuality in the present. The subject of sexuality is often a controversial one, and exploring it through a world history perspective emphasizes the extent to which societies, including our own, are still reacting to historical change through contemporary sexual behaviors, values, and debates. The study uses a clear chronological structure to focus on major patterns and changes in sexuality—both sexual culture and sexual behaviors—in the main periods of world history, covering topics including: • The sexual implications of the transition from hunting and gathering economies to agricultural economies; • Sexuality in classical societies; • The postclassical period and the spread of the world religions; • Sex in an age of trade and colonies; • Changes in sexual behaviors and sexual attitudes between 1750 and 1950; • Sex in contemporary world history. This new edition examines these issues on a global scale, with attention to anthropological insights on sexuality and their relationship to history, the dynamics between sexuality and imperialism, sexuality in industrial society, and trends and conflicts surrounding views of sex and sexuality in the contemporary world.

A Systemic Functional Grammar of French

by David Banks

A Systemic Functional Grammar of French provides an accessible introduction to systemic functional linguistics through French. This concise introduction to the systemic functional grammar (SFG) framework provides illustrations throughout that highlight how the framework can be used to analyse authentic language texts. This will be of interest to students in alternative linguistic frameworks who wish to acquire a basic understanding of SFG as well as academics in related areas, such as literary and cultural studies, interested in seeing how SFG can be applied to their fields.

Motor Learning and Control for Practitioners

by Cheryl A. Coker

Motor Learning & Control for Practitioners, with Online Labs, Third Edition, is a reader-friendly text that balances theoretical concepts and their applications. Its practical approach and wide range of examples and teaching tools help readers build a solid foundation for assessing performance; providing effective instruction; and designing practice, rehabilitation, and training experiences. Whether readers plan to work in physical education, kinesiology, exercise science, coaching, athletic training, physical therapy, or dance, this text defines current thinking and trends, blending practical information with supporting research.Cerebral Challenges, Exploration Activities, and Research Notes will help students review and extend their learning and inform them about developments in the field. Marginal website references direct readers to online resources, including videos, web-based activities, and relevant apps.Sixteen online lab experiences allow readers to apply what they've learned; many include videos demonstrating procedural aspects.

Exercise and Sport Pharmacology

by Mark D. Mamrack

Exercise and Sport Pharmacology is an accessible book that will be useful for teaching upper-level undergraduates or entry-level graduate students about how drugs can affect exercise and as well as how exercise can affect the action of drugs. It leads students through the science-including the related pathology, exercise physiology, and drug action-to gain an understanding of these interactions. The book is divided into four parts. Part I provides the basics of exercise pharmacology, exercise physiology, and autonomic pharmacology; Part II presents chapters on the major cardiovascular and respiratory drug classes; Part III describes the frequently prescribed medications for such common conditions as diabetes, depression, pain, fever, inflammation, and obesity; and Part IV includes discussions of supplements and commonly used drugs such as caffeine, nicotine, cannabis, and performance-enhancing drugs. In Parts II through IV, the chapters include an overview of the pathology the drugs are designed to treat, how the drug works in the human body, the effect of exercise on how the body responds to a drug, and how exercise changes the fate of the drug in the body. Chapters also include information on the drug's possible health risks and whether taking the drug comes under scrutiny of sport-regulating agencies.Throughout, figures and tables help to illustrate and summarize content. Most chapters open with an on-going case example to apply and preview chapter content. In the text, boldface terms indicate for students which concepts can be found in the book's Glossary, for easy reference. Chapters conclude with a Key Concepts Review and Review Questions.

Investigative Reporting from Premise to Publication

by Marcy Burstiner

This book gives readers the confidence they need to handle any investigative reporting assignment and to produce demonstrated results. Its step-by-step progression covering the entire investigative process will help them stay on track to complete stories of any size. The book answers relevant questions such as "Where can I find a story?" "What do I do when a source won't talk?" "How can I find the right documents to support my story?" "How can I present this story online?" and "How can a spreadsheet keep it all from falling apart?" Investigative Reporting contains full stories and timely examples from both professional and student reporters. Each chapter concludes with sequential "Big Story" assignments to help readers research, write and publish their own investigative stories. Web links to online resources (including public records information, computer-assisted reporting techniques and interactive investigative story examples) will help readers move smoothly and successfully through an investigative story or team reporting project, whether for print, broadcast or the Web.

Fluid Space and Transformational Learning

by Kyriaki Tsoukala

Fluid Space and Transformational Learning presents a critique of the interlocking questions of ‘school architecture’ and education and attempts to establish a field of questioning that aspectualises and intersects concepts, theories and practices connected with the contemporary school building and the deschooling of learning and of the space within and through which it takes place. Tying together the historicity of architectural theory, criticism and practice and the plural dynamic of social fields and sciences, this book outlines the qualities and modalities of experiential fields of transformational learning. The three qualities of space that are highlighted along the way – activated, polyphonic and playful space – as they emerge (without being instrumentalised) through architecturalised spatial modalities – flexibility, variability, interactivity, taut fluid polyphony, multiplicity, transcendence of boundaries – tend to construct and establish a school environment rich in heretical socio-spatial codes. Meshing cooperative, participatory, intrapsychic and interpsychic dimensions, they invite the factors of learning to a creative, imponderable, transformational disorder and deconstruct dominant conditioned reflexes of a disciplinary, methodical and productive order.

Artists’ SoHo

by Richard Kostelanetz

How a little-known industrial neighborhood in New York unintentionally became a nexus of creative activity for a brief burst of time. During the 1960s and 1970s in New York City, young artists exploited an industrial wasteland to create spacious studios where they lived and worked, redefining the Manhattan area just south of Houston Street. Its use fueled not by city planning schemes but by word-of-mouth recommendations, the areasoon grew to become a world-class center for artistic creation indeed, the largest urban artists' colony ever in America - let alone the world. Richard Kostelanetz's Artists' SoHo not only examines why the artists came and how they accomplished what they did but also delves into the lives and works of some of the most creative personalities who lived there during that period, including Nam June Paik, Robert Wilson, Meredith Monk, RichardForeman, Hannah Wilke, George Macuinas, and Alan Suicide. Gallerists followed the artists in fashioning themselves, their homes, their buildings, and even their streets into transiently prominent exhibition and performance spaces. SoHo pioneer Richard Kostelanetz's extensively researched intimate history is framed within a personal memoir that unearths myriad perspectives: social and cultural history, the changing rules for residency and ownership, the ethos of the community, the physical layouts of the lofts, the types ofart produced, venues that opened and closed, the daily rhythm, and the gradual invasion of "new people. " Artists' SoHo also explores how and why this fertile bohemia couldn't last forever. As wealthier people paid higher prices, galleries left, younger artists settled elsewhere, and the neighborhoodbecame a "SoHo Mall" of trendy stores and restaurants. Compelling and often humorous, Artists' SoHo provides an analysis of a remarkable neighborhood that transformed the art and culture of New York City over the past five decades.

The Historical Uncanny

by Susanne C. Knittel

The Historical Uncanny explores how certain memories become inscribed into the heritage of a country or region while others are suppressed or forgotten. In response to the erasure of historical memories that discomfit a public's self-understanding, this book proposes the historical uncanny asthat which resists reification precisely because it cannot be assimilated to dominant discourses of commemoration. Focusing on the problems of representation and reception, the book explores memorials for two marginalized aspects of Holocaust: the Nazi euthanasia program directed against the mentally ill and disabled and the Fascist persecution of Slovenes, Croats, and Jews in and around Trieste. Reading thesememorials together with literary and artistic texts, Knittel redefines "sites of memory" as assemblages of cultural artifacts and discourses that accumulate over time; they emerge as a physical and a cultural space that is continually redefined, rewritten, and re-presented. In bringing perspectives from disability studies and postcolonialism to the question of memory, Knittel unsettles our understanding of the Holocaust and its place in the culture of contemporary Europe.

Reading Publics: New York City’s Public Libraries, 1754–1911

by Tom Glynn

This lively, nuanced history of New York City's early public libraries traces their evolution within the political, social, and cultural worlds that supported them. On May 11, 1911, the New York Public Library opened its "marble palace for book lovers" on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. This was the city's first public library in the modern sense, a tax-supported, circulating collection free to every citizen. Since before the Revolution, however, New York'sreading publics had access to a range of "public libraries" as the term was understood by contemporaries. In its most basic sense a public library in the eighteenth and most of the nineteenth centuries simply meant a shared collection of books that was available to the general public and promotedthe public good. From the founding in 1754 of the New York Society Library up to 1911, public libraries took a variety of forms. Some of them were free, charitable institutions, while others required a membership or an annual subscription. Some, such as the Biblical Library of the American BibleSociety, were highly specialized; others, like the Astor Library, developed extensive, inclusive collections. What all the public libraries of this period had in common, at least ostensibly, was the conviction that good books helped ensure a productive, virtuous, orderly republic-that good readingpromoted the public good. Tom Glynn's vivid, deeply researched history of New York City's public libraries over the course of more than a century and a half illuminates how the public and private functions of reading changed over time and how shared collections of books could serve both public and private ends. ReadingPublics examines how books and reading helped construct social identities and how print functioned within and across groups, including but not limited to socioeconomic classes. The author offers an accessible while scholarly exploration of how republican and liberal values, shifting understandingsof "public" and "private," and the debate over fiction influenced the development and character of New York City's public libraries in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Reading Publics is an important contribution to the social and cultural history of New York City that firmly places the city's early public libraries within the history of reading and print culture in the United States.

Portrait Stories

by Michal Peled Ginsburg

What makes stories about portraits so gripping and unsettling? Portrait Stories argues that it is the ways they problematize the relation between subjectivity and representation. Through close readings of short stories and novellas by Poe, James, Hoffmann, Gautier, Nerval, Balzac, Kleist, Hardy, Wilde, Storm, Sand, and Gogol, the author shows how the subjectivities of sitter, painter, and viewer are produced in relation to representations shaped by particular interests and power relations, often determined by gender as well as by class. She focuses on the power that can accrue to the painter from the act of representation (often at the expense of the portrait's subject), while also exploring how and why this act may threaten the portrait painter's sense of self. Analyzing the viewer's relation to the portrait, she demonstrates how portrait stories problematize the very act of seeing and with it the way subjectivity is constructed in the field of vision.

God’s Mirror

by Toby Garfitt Katherine Davies

Gathering in one place a cohesive selection of articles that deepen our sense of the vitality and controversy within the Catholic renewal of the mid-twentieth century, God's Mirror offers historical analysis of French Catholic intellectuals. This volume highlights the work of writers, thinkersand creative artists who have not always drawn the attention given to such luminaries as Maritain, Mounier, and Marcel. Organized around the typologies of renewal and engagement, editors Katherine Davies and Toby Garfitt provide a revisionist and interdisciplinary reading of the narrative of twentieth-century French Catholicism. Renewal and engagement are both manifestations of how the Catholic intellectual reflectsand takes position on the relationship between the Church, personal faith and the world, and on the increasingly problematic relationship between intellectuals and the Magisterium. A majority of the writings are based on extensive research into published texts, with some occasional archivalreferences, and they give critical insights into the tensions that characterized the theological and political concerns of their subjects.

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