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SOA Cookbook

by Michael Havey

As a cookbook, this book can be regarded as a set of gourmet recipes for SOA. Each of the eight chapters that follow the introductory chapter covers an important concept in process-based SOA and teaches techniques to build solutions based on the concept. Working examples are developed in BPEL, TIBCO's BusinessWorks and BEA's Weblogic Integration. The book is intended for hands-on SOA architects, designers, and developers who want to learn techniques in process orchestration. Many of these readers use, or will soon start using, languages such as BPEL, TIBCO's BusinessWorks, or BEA's Weblogic Integration in their projects. This intermediate-level book assumes that the reader is comfortable reading XML and knows the basic concepts of web services. The book presents several BPEL and BPMN examples, but it explains specific language constructs on the fly; the reader need not have background in these languages.

The Age of the Democratic Revolution

by R. R. Palmer David Armitage

For the Western world, the period from 1760 to 1800 was the great revolutionary era in which the outlines of the modern democratic state came into being. Here for the first time in one volume is R. R. Palmer's magisterial account of this incendiary age. Palmer argues that the American, French, and Polish revolutions--and the movements for political change in Britain, Ireland, Holland, and elsewhere--were manifestations of similar political ideas, needs, and conflicts. Palmer traces the clash between an older form of society, marked by legalized social rank and hereditary or self-perpetuating elites, and a new form of society that placed a greater value on social mobility and legal equality.Featuring a new foreword by David Armitage, this Princeton Classics edition of The Age of the Democratic Revolution introduces a new generation of readers to this enduring work of political history.

A Sparrowhawk's Lament

by Bruce Pearson Chris Packham David Cobham

Britain is home to fifteen species of breeding birds of prey, from the hedgerow-hopping Sparrowhawk to the breathtaking White-tailed Eagle. In this handsomely illustrated book, acclaimed British filmmaker and naturalist David Cobham offers unique and deeply personal insights into Britain's birds of prey and how they are faring today. He delves into the history of these marvelous birds and talks in depth with the scientists and conservationists who are striving to safeguard them. In doing so, he profiles the writers, poets, and filmmakers who have done so much to change the public's perception of birds of prey. Thanks to popular television programs, the Victorian myth that any bird with a hooked beak is evil has been dispelled. However, although there are success stories--five birds of prey that were extinct have become reestablished with viable populations--persecution is still rife: so much so that one bird of prey, the Hen Harrier, became extinct in England as a breeding bird in 2013.Featuring drawings by famed wildlife artist Bruce Pearson, this book reveals why we must cherish and celebrate our birds of prey, and why we neglect them at our peril. In A Sparrowhawk's Lament, you will learn how the perfection of the double-barreled shotgun sounded a death knell for British birds of prey in the nineteenth century, how the conscription of gamekeepers during two world wars gave them a temporary reprieve, how their fortunes changed yet again with the introduction of agricultural pesticides in the 1950s, why birds of prey are vital to Britain's ecosystems and cultural heritage - and much more.

The Butterfly Defect

by Ian Goldin Mike Mariathasan

Global hyperconnectivity and increased system integration have led to vast benefits, including worldwide growth in incomes, education, innovation, and technology. But rapid globalization has also created concerns because the repercussions of local events now cascade over national borders and the fallout of financial meltdowns and environmental disasters affects everyone. The Butterfly Defect addresses the widening gap between systemic risks and their effective management. It shows how the new dynamics of turbo-charged globalization has the potential and power to destabilize our societies. Drawing on the latest insights from a wide variety of disciplines, Ian Goldin and Mike Mariathasan provide practical guidance for how governments, businesses, and individuals can better manage risk in our contemporary world. Goldin and Mariathasan assert that the current complexities of globalization will not be sustainable as surprises become more frequent and have widespread impacts. The recent financial crisis exemplifies the new form of systemic risk that will characterize the coming decades, and the authors provide the first framework for understanding how such risk will function in the twenty-first century. Goldin and Mariathasan demonstrate that systemic risk issues are now endemic everywhere--in supply chains, pandemics, infrastructure, ecology and climate change, economics, and politics. Unless we are better able to address these concerns, they will lead to greater protectionism, xenophobia, nationalism, and, inevitably, deglobalization, rising conflict, and slower growth. The Butterfly Defect shows that mitigating uncertainty and systemic risk in an interconnected world is an essential task for our future.

There Goes the Gayborhood?

by Amin Ghaziani

Gay neighborhoods, like the legendary Castro District in San Francisco and New York's Greenwich Village, have long provided sexual minorities with safe havens in an often unsafe world. But as our society increasingly accepts gays and lesbians into the mainstream, are "gayborhoods" destined to disappear? Amin Ghaziani provides an incisive look at the origins of these unique cultural enclaves, the reasons why they are changing today, and their prospects for the future.<P> Drawing on a wealth of evidence--including census data, opinion polls, hundreds of newspaper reports from across the United States, and more than one hundred original interviews with residents in Chicago, one of the most paradigmatic cities in America--There Goes the Gayborhood? argues that political gains and societal acceptance are allowing gays and lesbians to imagine expansive possibilities for a life beyond the gayborhood. The dawn of a new post-gay era is altering the character and composition of existing enclaves across the country, but the spirit of integration can coexist alongside the celebration of differences in subtle and sometimes surprising ways.<P> Exploring the intimate relationship between sexuality and the city, this cutting-edge book reveals how gayborhoods, like the cities that surround them, are organic and continually evolving places. Gayborhoods have nurtured sexual minorities throughout the twentieth century and, despite the unstoppable forces of flux, will remain resonant and revelatory features of urban life.

Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age

by Jacqueline Bhabha

Why, despite massive public concern, is child trafficking on the rise? Why are unaccompanied migrant children living on the streets and routinely threatened with deportation to their countries of origin? Why do so many young refugees of war-ravaged and failed states end up warehoused in camps, victimized by the sex trade, or enlisted as child soldiers? This book provides the first comprehensive account of the widespread but neglected global phenomenon of child migration, exploring the complex challenges facing children and adolescents who move to join their families, those who are moved to be exploited, and those who move simply to survive.Spanning several continents and drawing on the actual stories of young migrants, the book shows how difficult it is for children to reunite with parents who left them behind to seek work abroad. It looks at the often-insurmountable obstacles we place in the paths of adolescents fleeing war, exploitation, or destitution; the contradictory elements in our approach to international adoption; and the limited support we give to young people brutalized as child soldiers. Part history, part in-depth legal and political analysis, this powerful book challenges the prevailing wisdom that widespread protection failures are caused by our lack of awareness of the problems these children face, arguing instead that our societies have a deep-seated ambivalence to migrant children--one we need to address head-on.Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age offers a road map for doing just that, and makes a compelling and courageous case for an international ethics of children's human rights.

A Child Sees God: Children Talk About Bible Stories

by Howard Worsley John Hull

In A Child Sees God, Howard Worsley explores how we can all learn from a child's perspective of the world and shows how a child's eye view of the Bible reveals many interesting ideas about ethics and morality, and provides new ways of understanding these ancient stories. By asking families to read Bible stories to their children and discuss these stories with them, recording the ensuing conversations, Howard Worsley offers not only fresh insights into the meaning and significance of these stories but also reflections on how adults can use the Biblical text in the company of children at different stages of development. Following the theory that all stories ever written fall into one of seven categories, this book shows that the themes of the Bible are no different, dividing stories into sections containing texts of wonder, adventure and leadership, terror, justice and judgement, comfort and hope, comedy, and mercy and forgiveness. This fresh look at the Bible through the eyes of children will be a fascinating read for parents, teachers, ministers, and anyone with an interest in child spirituality or ethics.

Can the World Afford Autistic Spectrum Disorder?: Nonverbal Communication, Asperger Syndrome and the Interbrain

by Digby Tantam

The world affords to most of us a web of subliminal nonverbal communication that regulates our minds, indicates whether our beliefs have, or have not, social approval, and generally guides us. People with autism do not seem to be influenced by these subliminal signals as much as others, and this results in the difficulties in social interaction that are so characteristic of all the autistic spectrum disorders. How is such nonverbal communication carried out, and why do people on the autism spectrum find it so difficult? What are the consequences of this for them, and how do these consequences affect their personality, self-awareness, and sense of place in the world? Digby Tantam explores current theories on nonverbal communication and how it shapes social behaviour, and the evidence for it being impaired in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). He shows how knowledge of this difference can be used to overcome some of the impairments in nonverbal communication in people with ASD, but also how acknowledging them can result in more positive development elsewhere. This groundbreaking book will be fascinating reading for anyone interested in communication, as well as people who have ASD themselves, their families, and all professionals working with people on the autism spectrum.

Reflecting On and Developing Your Practice: A Workbook for Social Care Workers

by Suzan Collins

Working in residential or domiciliary settings involves a continuing process of learning. Every day, social care workers face challenges that force them to think about what they do and how they do it â?? whether it be an ethical dilemma, the introduction of a new policy or procedure or training on a specific subject. Reflecting On and Developing Your Practice is an accessible, interactive workbook providing social care workers with guidance on how to improve your knowledge through training and development. It advises how to keep up to date with the latest developments, but also how to reflect and improve upon your own practice. It also provides information about different approaches to learning and how to draw on your experience when working in new and unfamiliar situations. Designed to meet the requirements of Health and Social Care (Adults) NVQ Level 3, Unit 33, this workbook is also a valuable source of guidance for any social care worker wanting and needing to develop their work.

Safeguarding Adults: A Workbook for Social Care Workers

by Suzan Collins

Working in residential or domiciliary settings involves a responsibility to safeguard adults from harm and abuse. This workbook will provide staff and relatives with the ability to make sensible choices concerning prevention and protection, as well as responding to and reporting concerns. Safeguarding Adults examines the different forms of abuse, where abuse can take place and how and where to report the suspected abuse. The workbook meets the requirements of care standards and promotes best practice by enabling staff to feel confident contributing to keeping the people they support safe from harm and abuse. Designed to meet the requirements of Health and Social Care (Adults) NVQ Level 3, Unit 35, this workbook is also a valuable source of guidance for any social care worker wanting or needing to improve their practice in relation to safeguarding adults from harm and abuse.

Effective Communication: A Workbook for Social Care Workers

by Suzan Collins

Social care workers in residential or domiciliary settings need to be able to communicate effectively in order to carry out their work. Supporting people with a variety of difficulties including hearing loss, impaired speech, visual impairment, dementia and physical and learning disabilities requires a range of communication skills, such as listening, sign language, writing notes, and using body language, touch and stimulation. This workbook will provide workers with the ability to enable adults with limited or no verbal communication skills to make decisions, and to express their views in their preferred method of communication. Effective Communication includes practical guidance on using communication tools, such as computers, staff photo rota boards and pictorial menu boards, and use of photographs as visual reminders. The workbook meets the requirements of care standards and also refers to the importance of recording and reporting, and dealing with sensitive and complex issues, such as breaking the news of a family bereavement, or communicating with a person who has been abused. Designed to meet the requirements of Health and Social Care (Adults) NVQ Level 3, Unit 31, this workbook is also a valuable source of guidance for any social care worker wanting to improve communication with the people they support.

Traveling Tennessee

by Cathy Summerlin

A complete tour guide to the Volunteer State from the highlands of the Smoky Mountains to the banks of the Mississippi River.Tennessee is a state of endless diversity. It boasts breath-taking scenery, the homes of three presidents, and the birthplace of legendary frontiersman Davy Crockett. It is the birthplace of the blues and the home of the King of rock 'n' roll. It offers a wealth of opportunities for hiking, canoeing, fishing, and wildlife viewing in state and national parks, recreation areas, and forests. From mountain highroads to delta lands, this comprehensive guide invites you to the best of Tennessee's bed and breakfasts, museums, historic sites, restaurants, antique shops, and such attractions as:The Great Smoky Mountains National ParkThe National Storytelling Festival in JonesboroughThe South's favorite outlet shopping in Pigeon ForgeCoker Creek, the site of Tennessee's gold rushWorld-class whitewater rafting on the Obed and Ocoee RiversThe Big South Fork National River and Recreation AreaThe Chattanooga Choo Choo and the Tennessee State AquariumCivil War battlefields like Stones River and ShilohThe Jack Daniel Distillery in LynchburgThe Natchez Trace ParkwayMusical venues from the Grand Ole Opry to Beale StreetThe largest Middle Woodland Indian Mound in the southeastA half-mile-long reprodction of the Mississippi RiverTraveling Tennessee does more than get you where you want to go. It also educates you about the state's heritage, excites you about its vacation possibilities, and entertains you with accounts of the authors' own experiences.

Traveling the Trace

by Cathy Summerlin

Only three national parks have more visitors each year than the Natchez Trace Parkway, a national park of great natural beauty and historical significance that follows a 450-mile course from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi. First used as a vital transportation link by Native Americans and later by "kaintucks" and frontiersmen, today the Trace is experienced by more than 13 million visitors a year.Traveling the Trace explores the parkway and sights within 30 miles of either side of the Natchez Trace. In addition to the well-known stops, the authors visit side roads most tourists ignore or don't know exist. It is a guide to:25 Civil War sites73 antebellum homes65 museums and art galleries78 antique shops and malls72 bed and breakfasts56 campgrounds175 restaurants49 spots for water sports and a whole lot more"One of the ten most outstanding scenic byways in America." -Scenic Byways Bulletin"Distances on the Natchez Trace are measured as much in places, people, and history as in miles." -Southern Living

Best Friends

by Thomas Kinkade

Travel inside the paintings of Thomas Kinkade in this delightful collection of eight heart-warming stories of friendship-some adaptations of beloved classics, some original stories of extraordinary lives. Any girl who has ever had a best friend will treasure the adaptations of favorite scenes from Anne of Green Gables, The Secret Garden, Heidi and Little Women. They'll also be inspired by real-life heroines like Harriet Tubman, the former slave who forged a trail to freedom via the Underground Railroad-and Helen Keller, who shared an enduring friendship with her teacher, Anne Sullivan. The friends featured in this volume withstand conflict, separation and the challenges of growing up, emerging as strong models of dedication and devotion for today's young readers. Beautiful spot art and border design by Kevin Burke bring the stories to life and add a child-like touch to the book.

Snuffy Goes to School

by Porchlight Entertainment

Tomorrow's the first day of school and everyone's excited-except for Jay Jay's younger pal Snuffy. While all the other planes think school is fun, Snuffy's wings start to shake as he wonders whether the new teacher will like him or if he'll know anyone in his class. So when Snuffy suddenly disappears from his hangar, Jay Jay and his friends decide to take to the air to find their scared buddy. And when Old Oscar pitches in, Snuffy is in for a big surprise. This high-flying adventure will help kids see how God is always with them, even in the scary times like the first day of school!

I Miss You a Whole Lot (Jay Jay the Jet Plane #4)

by Porchlight Entertainment

Life is "plane lonely" when best friends are apart! When Big Jake tells Snuffy and Jay Jay that he's taking a trip far, far away, the little planes know they'll miss their buddy. But they have no idea how MUCH until after Big Jake soars off into the clouds. That's when they realize just how looong the days can seem when a best friend is miles away. So just how do young planes cool their jets when all they can think about is missing someone? With a wing and a prayer-and a little help from God-Jay Jay and Snuffy discover how true friends can feel close even when they're apart. A high-flying adventure shows the unbreakable bond between friends while also providing a fun countdown activity that kids can actually use while waiting for someone special to return.

Java EE 5 Development with NetBeans 6

by David R. Heffelfinger

This book takes you through the important parts of Java EE development and, with clear, careful instructions and screenshots, shows you the relevant features of the NetBeans IDE. The book is aimed at Java developers who wish to develop Java EE applications while taking advantage of NetBeans functionality to automate repetitive tasks and to ease their software development efforts. Familiarity with Java EE is not assumed.

Spring Web Flow 2 Web Development

by Sven Lüppken Markus Stäuble

This book is a tutorial, with plenty of step-by-step instructions beginning with "getting started" material, followed by advanced coverage of this technology. The book has a practical approach towards the Spring MVC framework and is packed with practical examples and code. This book is targeted at Java web application developers who want to work on Spring Web Flow. This book is a must-read for those who desire to bridge the gap between the popular web framework and the popular application framework. It requires prior knowledge of the Spring framework, but no prior knowledge of Spring Web Flow.

Flex 3 with Java

by Satish Kore

The author's experience in creating applications using Flex enables him to share insights on using it effectively in a clear, simple, and concise manner. His approach will help you gain hands-on programming experience in Flex 3 and ActionScript 3.0. The book focuses on important features of Flex 3 and ActionScript 3.0 and gives clear instructions and precise code examples to explain features and ensure that you actually learn as you read. This book is a good starting point for any developer with a little experience in Java programming to get going with Adobe Flex 3 and ActionScript 3.0 development. You may be a software developer/professional who wishes to learn and understand Flex 3 technology for developing Rich Internet Applications. If you are a system analyst who wants to explore and understand Flex 3 then this is an ideal book for you.

WordPress for Business Bloggers

by Paul Thewlis

This is a practical, hands-on book based around a fictitious case study blog, which you will build on a development server using WordPress. The case study grows chapter by chapter, from installing your local development server, right up to the finished blog. The book starts by looking at the important features that make a successful business blog: adding value to your products and services, providing proper customer service and support, driving traffic to your website, and so on. It then shows how to implement these features in WordPress. It provides clear instructions and detailed screenshots, so you can see exactly what to do at each step of the build. You will install and configure a selection of WordPress plug-ins to improve the functionality of the case-study blog. When you have completed the case study, you will have the knowledge and confidence to apply all the techniques you have learned to your own WordPress business blog. This book is for anybody running or starting a business blog using WordPress. Whether you plan to use your blog for PR and marketing, or want to profit directly from blogging, this book offers you everything you need. As we want to get into the specifics of business blogging as quickly as possible, we don cover the WordPress basics. So its best to have some experience with WordPress before you start with this book. The book mainly focuses on a self-hosted WordPress installation, but most of the advice also applies to blogs hosted on WordPress.com.

Building Websites with Joomla! v1.0

by Hagen Graf

This book focuses on taking you through the essential tasks to create a Joomla! site as fast as possible. These essential tasks are explained clearly, with well structured step-by-step instructions. The book does not aim to cover every feature of Joomla! nor is it a comprehensive guide to extending Joomla!. Almost everything in the book is accomplished without recourse to the underlying PHP code in which Joomla! is written. The book is very readable and the author has a particularly chatty and engaging writing style. This book is suitable for web developers, designers, webmasters, content editors and marketing professionals who want develop a fully featured web presence in a simple and straightforward process. It does not require any detailed knowledge of programming or web development, and any IT confident individual will be able to use the book to produce an impressive web site.

Philology

by James Turner

Many today do not recognize the word, but "philology" was for centuries nearly synonymous with humanistic intellectual life, encompassing not only the study of Greek and Roman literature and the Bible but also all other studies of language and literature, as well as religion, history, culture, art, archaeology, and more. In short, philology was the queen of the human sciences. How did it become little more than an archaic word? In Philology, the first history of Western humanistic learning as a connected whole ever published in English, James Turner tells the fascinating, forgotten story of how the study of languages and texts led to the modern humanities and the modern university. This compelling narrative traces the development of humanistic learning from its beginning among ancient Greek scholars and rhetoricians, through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Enlightenment, to the English-speaking world of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Turner shows how evolving researches into the texts, languages, and physical artifacts of the past led, over many centuries, to sophisticated comparative methods and a deep historical awareness of the uniqueness of earlier ages. But around 1800, he explains, these interlinked philological and antiquarian studies began to fragment into distinct academic fields. These fissures resulted, within a century or so, in the new, independent "disciplines" that we now call the humanities. Yet the separation of these disciplines only obscured, rather than erased, their common features.The humanities today face a crisis of relevance, if not of meaning and purpose. Understanding their common origins--and what they still share--has never been more urgent.

Falling Behind?

by Michael S. Teitelbaum

Is the United States falling behind in the global race for scientific and engineering talent? Are U.S. employers facing shortages of the skilled workers that they need to compete in a globalized world? Such claims from some employers and educators have been widely embraced by mainstream media and political leaders, and have figured prominently in recent policy debates about education, federal expenditures, tax policy, and immigration. Falling Behind? offers careful examinations of the existing evidence and of its use by those involved in these debates.These concerns are by no means a recent phenomenon. Examining historical precedent, Michael Teitelbaum highlights five episodes of alarm about "falling behind" that go back nearly seventy years to the end of World War II. In each of these episodes the political system responded by rapidly expanding the supply of scientists and engineers, but only a few years later political enthusiasm or economic demand waned. Booms turned to busts, leaving many of those who had been encouraged to pursue science and engineering careers facing disheartening career prospects. Their experiences deterred younger and equally talented students from following in their footsteps--thereby sowing the seeds of the next cycle of alarm, boom, and bust. Falling Behind? examines these repeated cycles up to the present, shedding new light on the adequacy of the science and engineering workforce for the current and future needs of the United States.

Complexity and the Art of Public Policy

by David Colander Roland Kupers

Complexity science--made possible by modern analytical and computational advances--is changing the way we think about social systems and social theory. Unfortunately, economists' policy models have not kept up and are stuck in either a market fundamentalist or government control narrative. While these standard narratives are useful in some cases, they are damaging in others, directing thinking away from creative, innovative policy solutions. Complexity and the Art of Public Policy outlines a new, more flexible policy narrative, which envisions society as a complex evolving system that is uncontrollable but can be influenced. David Colander and Roland Kupers describe how economists and society became locked into the current policy framework, and lay out fresh alternatives for framing policy questions. Offering original solutions to stubborn problems, the complexity narrative builds on broader philosophical traditions, such as those in the work of John Stuart Mill, to suggest initiatives that the authors call "activist laissez-faire" policies. Colander and Kupers develop innovative bottom-up solutions that, through new institutional structures such as for-benefit corporations, channel individuals' social instincts into solving societal problems, making profits a tool for change rather than a goal. They argue that a central role for government in this complexity framework is to foster an ecostructure within which diverse forms of social entrepreneurship can emerge and blossom.

Finding Equilibrium

by Till Düppe E. Roy Weintraub

Finding Equilibrium explores the post-World War II transformation of economics by constructing a history of the proof of its central dogma--that a competitive market economy may possess a set of equilibrium prices. The model economy for which the theorem could be proved was mapped out in 1954 by Kenneth Arrow and Gerard Debreu collaboratively, and by Lionel McKenzie separately, and would become widely known as the "Arrow-Debreu Model." While Arrow and Debreu would later go on to win separate Nobel prizes in economics, McKenzie would never receive it. Till Düppe and E. Roy Weintraub explore the lives and work of these economists and the issues of scientific credit against the extraordinary backdrop of overlapping research communities and an economics discipline that was shifting dramatically to mathematical modes of expression.Based on recently opened archives, Finding Equilibrium shows the complex interplay between each man's personal life and work, and examines compelling ideas about scientific credit, publication, regard for different research institutions, and the awarding of Nobel prizes. Instead of asking whether recognition was rightly or wrongly given, and who were the heroes or villains, the book considers attitudes toward intellectual credit and strategies to gain it vis-à-vis the communities that grant it.Telling the story behind the proof of the central theorem in economics, Finding Equilibrium sheds light on the changing nature of the scientific community and the critical connections between the personal and public rewards of scientific work.

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