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Literature�s Sensuous Geographies

by Sten Pultz Moslund

Using place studies within a postcolonial context, this study explores the sense-aesthetic dimensions in literature such as smell, sound, etc. that often challenge the rationalizing logic of modernity. Through close readings of writers such as Conrad and Coetzee, Moslund invites scholars to shift focus from discourse analysis to aesthetic analysis.

Living with London’s Olympics

by Iain Lindsay

The quadrennial summer Olympic Games are renowned for producing the world's biggest single-city cultural event. This mega-event attracts a live audience of millions, a television audience of billions, and generates incredible scrutiny before, during, and after each installment. This is due to the fact that underpinning the 17 days of spectacular sporting events is approximately a decade worth of planning, preparing, and politicking. It is during this decade that prospective host cities must plan and win their bids before embarking upon seven years of urban upheaval and social transformation in order to stage the world's premier sporting event. This book draws on seven years of ethnographic inquiry around the London 2012 Olympics and contrasts the rhetoric and reality of mega-event delivery. Lindsay argues that in its current iteration the twin notions of beneficial Olympic legacies and Olympic delivery benefits for hosting communities are largely incompatible.

Identities and Foreign Policies in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus

by Valentina Feklyunina Stephen White

This book maps changing definitions of statehood in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus as a result of their exclusion from an expanding Europe. The authors examine the perceptions of the place of each state in the international political system and its foreign policy choices, and draw comparisons across the region.

Building a New World

by Michael Marder Luce Irigaray

In this book young researchers endeavour to build a new world. They neither confine themselves to criticism, resentment and disenchantment nor submit to traditional conceptions of truth, past moral imperatives and suprasensitive ideals alone. Here, young researchers invent another way of thinking, believing, making art, or being political players. They inaugurate an epoch when the cultivation of nature as an environment encompassing natural belonging allows for a world-wide coexistence respectful of differences between sexes, generations, cultures and traditions. The seminar that Luce Irigaray has been holding for 12 years for researchers doing their PhDs on her thought is the place where they gathered and began constructing a culture based on the growing and sharing of life, but also on desire and love in mutual respect. Their contributions are accompanied by three texts of Luce Irigaray and an Afterword by Michael Marder, underlining some conditions for a cultivation of nature.

Microcredit Guarantee Funds In The Mediterranean

by Pasqualina Porretta Paola Leone

Microfinance/microcredit today is facing two challenges. Firstly, it needs be more economically and financially sustainable. Secondly, it needs to increase its outreach in order to have a more significant impact on poorer areas of the world. Access to credit for the poorest people is a trade-off between economic and financial sustainability and the spread of activity. Greater innovation in processes and products is required in order to reduce transactional costs and informational asymmetries, extend the term structure of contracts and provide suitable assessment and risk management in the microfinance sector. This book offers a comprehensive comparative analysis of the most significant models of microcredit guarantee funds adopted in three South European countries (Italy, France, Spain) and in three North African countries (Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt). It provides a clear picture of microcredit guarantee funds in each country, focusing on three keys areas: analysis of the regulatory framework, mapping of microcredit institutions and analysis of the main features of guarantee funds. The authors highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the microcredit guarantee system and provide regulatory or operative solutions which may improve the economic sustainability of microcredit institutions and, ultimately, contribute to facilitating access to credit for microenterprises and the microborrower. The book will be a valuable resource for supervisors, microcredit institutions, guarantee intermediaries and financial intermediaries.

Inferentialism

by Jaroslav Peregrin

The term 'inferentialism', coined by Robert Brandom, has become a trademark of a certain position in the philosophy of language which claims that meanings identify with inferential roles a radical departure from more traditional semantic approaches. Independently of this, the term is now cropping up in logic, in connection with positions prioritizing proof-theory over model theory and approaching meaning in logical, especially proof-theoretical, terms. The book brings these two strands together: it reviews and critically assesses the foundations of Brandomian inferentialism; it proposes upgrades; and it clarifies its relationship to inferentialism in logic. Emphasis is laid on clearly articulating the general assumptions on which inferentialism rests, thus elucidating its foundations, followed by discussing the consequences of this standpoint, and then dealing with the most intensive objections raised against the standpoint. "

Women Dramatists, Humor, and the French Stage

by Joyce Johnston

Filling a critical void, this book examines French women dramatists of the nineteenth century who managed to have their works staged prior to the lifting of censorship laws in 1864. Sophie de Bawr (1773 1860), Sophie Gay (1776 1852), Virginie Ancelot (1792 1875), and Delphine Gay de Girardin (1804 1855) all staged successful plays at Paris's top venues (Theatre Francais and Odeon) or at other selective theatres (Ambigu-Comique, Vaudeville, Gymnase) during this period without the aid or protection of a male coauthor. Between 1802 and 1855, all four of these dramatists were heavily involved in the literary scene of their day and hosted their own salons, venues essential for any male author wishing to see his works published and accepted among the public. While not always directly engaged in the politics of the day in their theater, these dramatists were aware of and influenced by the public sphere. Though none staged what today's critics would refer to as overtly feminist drama, through their use of humor, Bawr, Gay, Ancelot, and Girardin all cast aspersion upon patriarchal dominance and reconstructed ideals of womanhood that rejected traditional submissive roles. "

Rose Elizabeth Cleveland: First Lady and Literary Scholar

by Sirpa Salenius

Rose Elizabeth Cleveland was the First Lady of the United States when she assisted her brother, Grover Cleveland. She was also a literary scholar, novelist, and a poet who published work that empowered women. This book positions Cleveland in the historical context of the early twentieth century, when she helped shape female subjectivity and agency.

Do Less Better

by John R. Bell

Do Less Better teaches leaders how to recognize the complexity and inefficiencies within their businesses and reveals how they can simplify and streamline through specialization and sacrifice. According to Bell, a company's willingness to focus on a particular vision or identity ensures viability and strengthens its competitive edge.

Cyprus and the Financial Crisis

by Jonathan Theodore John Theodore

The 2012-2013 economic crisis in the Republic of Cyprus is commonly attributed to a number of factors, including the exposure of Cypriot banks to over leveraged local property companies; the knock-on effect of the Greek government debt crisis; and international credit rating agencies downgrading the Cypriot government's bond credit status. What followed was unexpected and controversial: a bailout on condition of a one-time bank deposit levy on all uninsured deposits in the country's second-largest bank, the Cyprus Popular Bank; and on the uninsured deposits of large proportion of the island's largest commercial bank, the Bank of Cyprus. Many have questioned the implications of Cyprus' ties with the Russian financial system, as well as the draconian and unprecedented bailout terms imposed on the Cypriot population by the Eurozone. There has been little written from the Cypriot perspective on these events. This book presents a study of the events surrounding the recent Cypriot Financial Crisis and its impact on the Eurozone. It incorporates insights from leading protagonists in the Cypriot government and banking sectors and focuses on qualitative research to assess the events that formed the backdrop of the crisis. The book analyzes the policies of many public and private institutions and presents the crisis alongside other Eurozone bailouts to compare and contextualize the ongoing issues. Cyprus and the Financial Crisis also explains the political and historical backdrop of the events, including the wider Cypriot experience since the 1974 invasion, and the unravelling financial relationship between Cyprus, Greece and Russia. It incorporates the views of Cypriots from a wide and diverse spectrum, and presents the resilience of the island in fighting back to beat forecasts for recovery, helped by the Eldorado of gas finds off its southern shores.

On Face Transplantation: Life and Ethics in Experimental Biomedicine

by Samuel Taylor-Alexander

Drawing together interview material, medical publications, and first-hand accounts, this book shows that what is being remade in the burgeoning medical field of face transplantation is not only the lives of patients, but also the very ways that state institutions, surgeons, and families make sense of rights, claims for inclusion, and life itself. This sophisticated account traces the work done by medical and bureaucratic elites to make the life threatening operation a clinical reality. Working within the context of increasing ethical scrutiny, their endeavour has resulted in the delineation of the 'ideal patient' of face transplantation: a person whose particular state of health and suffering allows the operation to be performed given current technical constraints. The operation has introduced into the lives of face transplant recipients a profoundly new sense of personhood in which they continue to negotiate questions of how to relate to their new biology and to those around them.

Policy, Politics and Poverty in South Africa

by Nicoli Nattrass Jeremy Seekings

When South Africa finally held its first democratic elections in 1994, the country had a much higher poverty rate than in other countries at a similar level of development. This was the legacy of apartheid. Twenty years later, poverty was still widespread. Seekings and Nattrass explain why poverty has persisted in South Africa since 1994. They demonstrate who has and who has not remained poor, how public policies both mitigated and reproduced poverty, and how and why these policies were adopted. Their analysis of the South African welfare state, labour market policies and the growth path of the South African economy challenge conventional accounts that focus only on 'neoliberalism'. They argue, instead, that policies were, in important respects, social democratic. They show how social democratic policies both mitigate and reproduce poverty in contexts such as South Africa, reflecting the contradictory nature of social democracy in the global South.

The Influence of Islamic Values on Management Practice

by Gillian Forster

The Influence of Islamic Values on Management Practice is a cultural study examining how Islamic values influence management practice. Using Morocco as a case study, and with academic research and actual business managers working in this context, the book explores and explains how national characteristics, including Islam, shape management practice

Hayek: A Collaborative Biography

by Robert Leeson

In 1984, F. A. Hayek, the co-leader of the Austrian free market neo-classical school, embraced the transparently fraudulent assertion made by Donald McCormick, aka Richard Deacon, in The British Connection (1979) which accused A. C. Pigou, the co-leader of the Cambridge market failure neo-classical school, of being a Soviet spy. Over lunch at the Reform Club with 'Deacon' McCormick, the former Sunday Times Foreign Manager, Hayek authenticated the fraudulent signature contained in a 1905 diary the essence of the case against Pigou. In this third volume of Hayek: A Collaborative Biography, a distinguished collection of academics and specialists examine 'Deacon' McCormick's fraudulent career: summarizing the large volume of incriminating evidence that was available to Hayek in 1984. Hayek's 1931 unsubstantiated assertion about having predicted the Great Depression was obviously matched by other equally unreliable assertions. That Hayek's assertions have been uncritically repeated by his disciples illuminates dynamics of that school. Austrian School economists who promote financial sector deregulation and climate change denial appear to resemble a free market religion rather than the scientific communities examined in other volumes in this series. "

Justice and Foreign Rule: On International Transitional Administration

by Daniel Jacob

Can foreign rule be morally justified? Since the end of the First World War, international transitional administrations have replaced dysfunctional states to create the conditions for lasting peace and democracy. In response to extreme state failure, the author argues, this form of foreign rule is not only justified, but a requirement of justice.

Mixed Methods Research in Poverty and Vulnerability

by Laura Camfield Keetie Roelen

The added value of mixed methods research in poverty and vulnerability is now widely recognized. However, despite the expanding volume of literature on the use of mixed methods, gaps and challenges still remain. This edited volume focuses on issues of credibility, usability and complexity, considering how mixed methods approaches can better respond to these issues so as to make research more credible, usable and responsive to complexity. The contributors share experiences and lessons learned from research in developed and developing country contexts in respect of mixed methods in poverty measurement, evaluation research and the translation from research to policy.

Demystifying the Meese–Rogoff Puzzle

by Kelly Burns Imad A. Moosa

The authors present compelling evidence, supported by their own measure: the 'adjusted root mean square error', to finally solve the Meese-Rogoff puzzle and provide a new alternative.

The Peripheral Child in Nineteenth Century Literature and its Criticism

by Neil Cocks

Established accounts of the child in nineteenth century literature tend to focus on those who occupy a central position within narratives. This book is concerned with children who are not so easily recognized or remembered, the peripheral or overlooked children to be read in works by Dickens, Bront#65533;, Austen and Rossetti.

Hayek: A Collaborative Biography

by Robert Leeson

In 1984, F. A. Hayek, the co-leader of the Austrian free market neo-classical school, embraced the transparently fraudulent assertion made by Donald McCormick, aka Richard Deacon, in The British Connection (1979) which accused A. C. Pigou, the co-leader of the Cambridge market failure neo-classical school, of being a Soviet spy. Over lunch at the Reform Club with 'Deacon' McCormick, the former Sunday Times Foreign Manager, Hayek authenticated the fraudulent signature contained in a 1905 diary the essence of the case against Pigou. In this third volume of Hayek: A Collaborative Biography, a distinguished collection of academics and specialists examine 'Deacon' McCormick's fraudulent career: summarizing the large volume of incriminating evidence that was available to Hayek in 1984. Hayek's 1931 unsubstantiated assertion about having predicted the Great Depression was obviously matched by other equally unreliable assertions. That Hayek's assertions have been uncritically repeated by his disciples illuminates dynamics of that school. Austrian School economists who promote financial sector deregulation and climate change denial appear to resemble a free market religion rather than the scientific communities examined in other volumes in this series. "

A Conrad Chronology

by Owen Knowles

This chronology is designed to provide a digest of Conrad's life as it develops from year to year. It is written as a series of diary or chronicle entries and thus caters for the reader who may wish to check a single fact. The main contents are supplemented by a Who's Who and indexes which provide easy access to a wider range of information.

Indigenous Communities and Settler Colonialism

by Alan Lester Zoë Laidlaw

The new world created through Anglophone emigration in the 19th century has been much studied. But there have been few accounts of what this meant for the Indigenous populations. This book shows that Indigenous communities tenaciously held land in the midst of dispossession, whilst becoming interconnected through their struggles to do so.

Women and Death in Film, Television, and News

by Joanne Clarke Dillman

Dead women litter the visual landscape of the 2000s. In this book, Clarke Dillman explains the contextual environment from which these images have arisen, how the images relate to (and sometimes contradict) the narratives they help to constitute, and the cultural work that dead women perform in visual texts.

Poland And Eu Enlargement

by Joanna Kaminska

This book analyzes changes in Polish foreign policy in the context of the EU membership, exploring Poland's transition from a policy taker to policy-maker. It focuses on how Poland shapes EU policy towards the Eastern neighbors.

Corporate Governance in the United Kingdom: Past, Present and Future

by Lynn Hodgkinson William Forbes

This book provides an overview of the development of corporate governance with a focus on literature concerning the UK.

Realism, Form and the Postcolonial Novel

by Nicholas Robinette

Confronted with apartheid, dictatorship or the sheer scale of global economics, realism can no longer function with the certainties of the nineteenth century. Free Realist Style considers how the style of the realist novel changes as its epistemological horizons narrow.

Showing 4,101 through 4,125 of 20,057 results

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